I Am Yours
It is time. It is time to free our voice.To speak is a revolution.For too long, through the most intimate acts of erasure, women have been silenced. Now, women everywhere are breaking through the limits placed on us by family, society, and tradition. To find our voices. To make space for ourselves in this world. Now is the moment to reclaim what was once lost, stolen, forsaken, or abandoned. I Am Yours is about my fight to protect and free my voice from those who have sought to silence me, for the sake of creating a world where all voices are welcome and respected. Because the voice, without intimacy, will atrophy. We’re in this together. You are mine, and I am yours.

I Am Yours Details

TitleI Am Yours
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 5th, 2019
PublisherAmberjack Publishing
ISBN-139781948705110
Rating
GenreAutobiography, Memoir, Nonfiction

I Am Yours Review

  • Tess
    January 1, 1970
    I am a bit baffled by the description of this book versus the content. It is clearly a memoir, as it depicts the author's life from her literal birth up until the decision to write said book. It seems to be a lot of platitudes from someone who has a very privileged background. I feel for the author's trauma and struggles, but I do not understand how this is translated into the description of a women's revolution and freeing our voices. I was also taken aback by the fat-shaming, and discussions o I am a bit baffled by the description of this book versus the content. It is clearly a memoir, as it depicts the author's life from her literal birth up until the decision to write said book. It seems to be a lot of platitudes from someone who has a very privileged background. I feel for the author's trauma and struggles, but I do not understand how this is translated into the description of a women's revolution and freeing our voices. I was also taken aback by the fat-shaming, and discussions of eating disorders which seem very flippant and not addressed in a healthy manner. There is no mention in the book of seeking out medical or mental healthcare, which I found irresponsible.I worry that readers will not find many things to relate with in her life's story, as Zaman describes herself as a beautiful, popular, and intelligent person who people seem to fall in love with regularly. She continuously asks the reader to remember her as a chubby, lonely, and acne prone 15-year-old as to try to make us feel amazed by her now gorgeous looks, which lend to her model and acting careers. However, who has not felt this way at 15? Instead, few of us have the opportunities she has had in her life. Her descriptions of working with underprivileged children also left a bad taste in my mouth, and added nothing to her overall thesis; instead of coming off looking like a savior in her eyes (especially in the chapter about her working at a Thai orphanage). I appreciate the sentiment of wanting to be the voice for those who don't have one, but I was not convinced as to why Zaman is the one to have this honor. She says throughout she was searching for a certain book her entire life, coming to realize that said book is the one that she needs to write. Unfortunately, I think this book is also only meant for her as well.Thank you to NetGalley and Amberjack Publishing for an advance copy.
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  • Angela
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't know that this was a memoir when I requested it from Netgalley and I'm so glad that I didn't because I normally don't read that genre very often. It wouldn't have been my first choice and then I would have missed out on this absolute gem of a book. That said, addressing some of the negative reviews of the novel, this is a memoir of HER life. She doesn't have to be representative of anything other than herself, or explain why she made any of her decisions because it's HER life. That's li I didn't know that this was a memoir when I requested it from Netgalley and I'm so glad that I didn't because I normally don't read that genre very often. It wouldn't have been my first choice and then I would have missed out on this absolute gem of a book. That said, addressing some of the negative reviews of the novel, this is a memoir of HER life. She doesn't have to be representative of anything other than herself, or explain why she made any of her decisions because it's HER life. That's literally what a memoir is. I'll never understand picking someone apart for their beauty simply because they are beautiful. That doesn't make her any less deserving of compassion for the struggles that she's encountered in this life. Her DNA strand was put together in a particular way. How is she responsible for that? Pfst. Anyway. Back to the book. Her writing is absolutely gorgeous. It's lyrical, it's poetic, and it brings her story to life in a way that I've seen few authors accomplish. Her story in and of itself almost fell by the wayside sometimes because I got lost in the music of her writing. The subtle way she made changes in her life, to bring herself back to life and to heal from some of the traumas that she endured was more convincing to me than some of the so called *self help* books that I've read because I read them, and I don't identify with them. I don't see myself in them. I read about people that have come back from addiction, and they have these great life changing epiphanies, and I think, I struggled with alcohol for years, where was my epiphany? There wasn't one. Reema didn't struggle with alcohol but her healing was a subtle shift too, and I identified with that more than some of the addiction memoirs that I've read. There was one passage in particular that was stunningly beautiful: "Wounds tally. Addictions anesthetize the pain. We try to stitch while moving. But life's racing pace continually tears open old scars and mangles the new ones. Mending-while-enduring is well meant but ultimately futile, the sutures never tight enough to hold." That paragraph stopped me in my tracks. It reached out to me and tapped on my heart and brought me to tears. I fought for years with alcohol, trying to do as she said. Stitch while mending. And like her, it didn't work. The wounds always tore back open. And like her, there came a time when I had to stop. I had to take stock and over a period of time, had a subtle shift in my life where I was able to truly heal. I guess this book isn't for everyone. But if you're a lover of words, a lover of prose that leaps off the page like music, a woman finding her voice, this book is for you.
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  • Jenny Forrester
    January 1, 1970
    The leaves of the Mimosa Touch-Me-Not plant fold inward and droop when touched and so the species is given to labels like Shame Plant and Humble Plant and Sensitive, names many of us are given when we behave in particular ways or are born to particular fates or particular bodies or particular places or times, but isn’t it all self-protection – this folding, this drooping, this adapting, this being? Zaman’s debut memoir is radical self- and other-love, claimed and gathered through shining languag The leaves of the Mimosa Touch-Me-Not plant fold inward and droop when touched and so the species is given to labels like Shame Plant and Humble Plant and Sensitive, names many of us are given when we behave in particular ways or are born to particular fates or particular bodies or particular places or times, but isn’t it all self-protection – this folding, this drooping, this adapting, this being? Zaman’s debut memoir is radical self- and other-love, claimed and gathered through shining language, hard-won and thoughtful. It’s poetry and social deconstruction and revolution – a book to be kept close at hand, a nightstand book lit from within by the audacity to cherish the Self, independent and whole.
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  • Ronita Banerjee
    January 1, 1970
    "I am here. I love you. I am yours."Name- I am YoursWritten by- Reema ZamanPublished by- Amberjack PublishingPages- 317Review-Who does we truly belong to in this world?There might be several answers to this question but the right one would be- "ourselves".."I am yours" is a beautiful memoir written by Reema Zaman. Memoirs are personal, memoirs truly belong to the author. Reema Zaman's life might not be special or out of ordinary but it is much more. A tale of a journey. A journey towards self-di "I am here. I love you. I am yours."Name- I am YoursWritten by- Reema ZamanPublished by- Amberjack PublishingPages- 317Review-Who does we truly belong to in this world?There might be several answers to this question but the right one would be- "ourselves".."I am yours" is a beautiful memoir written by Reema Zaman. Memoirs are personal, memoirs truly belong to the author. Reema Zaman's life might not be special or out of ordinary but it is much more. A tale of a journey. A journey towards self-discovery and self love.Born in a Bangladeshi Muslim family Reema pens down her life's journey first as a daughter, then as a lover, a wife and ultimately as an individual with an identity.An identity is something we all crave. A desire to love and be loved in the most unselfish manner. Reema wished the same. Does she get it in the end? If so in what way? The questions can be truly answered by reading the book and learning from her life.Reema's life was surrounded by the people whom she loved. Her mother, her father, her brother, her sister and her step Dad. None of whom she mentions by name. Even her first husband is named Peter Pan, which was quite funny if not hilarious and one of her lovers as Prince.Though she didn't name any yet the characters were detailed and perfectly described.Reema got attracted to love like a moth to flame and in this attempt she became someone she never wanted to be- ever compromising like her mother.But sometimes we don't realize that there are all kinds of love in this world and we get what we are meant to.A poignant memoir which is definitely recommended to all.
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  • Dana Mich
    January 1, 1970
    The #MeToo movement has created a vital outlet for women to break the silence, and understandably, the focus has centered on women’s anger. But what women need, now more than ever, is a courageous first-person narrative that celebrates the one true agent of empowerment: self-love. Reema Zaman’s memoir, I Am Yours, (which I was lucky enough to read in advance) is the manifestation of this message. Readers follow Zaman's journey beginning with her upbringing in a patriarchal society and household, The #MeToo movement has created a vital outlet for women to break the silence, and understandably, the focus has centered on women’s anger. But what women need, now more than ever, is a courageous first-person narrative that celebrates the one true agent of empowerment: self-love. Reema Zaman’s memoir, I Am Yours, (which I was lucky enough to read in advance) is the manifestation of this message. Readers follow Zaman's journey beginning with her upbringing in a patriarchal society and household, through to her rape and emotional abuse in her twenties, and finally ending with her stunning revival. Reema's writing is a testament to the power of using our voices to free ourselves from our past and to heal our deepest wounds.
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  • Dora Okeyo
    January 1, 1970
    The beauty of memoirs is that they give you an insight into an author’s experiences, struggles and life changing moments. Reema’s childhood is one where she sees what conforming does to the voice of her loved ones."I search myself for hunger only to realize I haven’t the kind that can be sated with a meal. Still, I should join them."She also struggles with control and the strong desire to be heard, respected and most of all- to have her word taken as first of all her truth and also law like she’ The beauty of memoirs is that they give you an insight into an author’s experiences, struggles and life changing moments. Reema’s childhood is one where she sees what conforming does to the voice of her loved ones."I search myself for hunger only to realize I haven’t the kind that can be sated with a meal. Still, I should join them."She also struggles with control and the strong desire to be heard, respected and most of all- to have her word taken as first of all her truth and also law like she’s seeing in the lives of the women she encounters.“It’s just how it is. The sentiment I hate the most after that’s not allowed.”I love the prose of this book. It’s divided in different sections that Reema calls ACTS and each brings to light different stages of her coming to terms with who she is, what she wants and most of all, why and how she wants it. Anyone who has ever been silenced or yearned to be heard would answer this book’s call, perhaps the greatest question and sorrow is that even after all these years/ movements/ milestones and policies women are still fighting to be heard.Thank you Netgalley for the eARC and since we live in a world of ratings my verdict would be 4-stars!
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  • Erin Khar
    January 1, 1970
    I was so fortunate to be sent an advanced copy of this phenomenal book. Reema Zaman spins literary magic out of love, emotional abuse, and life affirming moments. Her voice is so compelling. The prose is beautiful. This book is all about finding love in and around yourself. I highly recommend.
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  • Karma
    January 1, 1970
    Nothing new you will learn from this that you will not find reading the rest of her writing. Can you focus on anything other than you or your assault that occurred over 10 years ago? Granted, I am sorry that you and billions of other women before you had to endure and many others will go through. Perhaps focusing on just you is not so helpful for others, try focusing on helping others like you preach. It seems you want others to pity you rather than see you as the strong, empowered woman you are Nothing new you will learn from this that you will not find reading the rest of her writing. Can you focus on anything other than you or your assault that occurred over 10 years ago? Granted, I am sorry that you and billions of other women before you had to endure and many others will go through. Perhaps focusing on just you is not so helpful for others, try focusing on helping others like you preach. It seems you want others to pity you rather than see you as the strong, empowered woman you are trying to be. I agree with Tess about the fat shaming and eating disorders. What did you do? I cannot tell the difference between your 'eating disorder days' photos and your current ones.
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  • Terra
    January 1, 1970
    The writing is nice, and it's an interesting read. The stories at each age, the relationships. I just dont feel like this book is for me. It does appear to be a culture that I am unfamiliar with. Parenting is hard so i can understand part of where the parents are coming from in the beginning. I almost feel like there was some low confidence with being overweight and its a real thing people are hard on themselves about in general.I liked the quote "mai pan rai" (nevermind, just go with the flow). The writing is nice, and it's an interesting read. The stories at each age, the relationships. I just dont feel like this book is for me. It does appear to be a culture that I am unfamiliar with. Parenting is hard so i can understand part of where the parents are coming from in the beginning. I almost feel like there was some low confidence with being overweight and its a real thing people are hard on themselves about in general.I liked the quote "mai pan rai" (nevermind, just go with the flow). There is a mentioned here and there of an eating disorder, anorexia.I don't like how her uncomfortable feeling with a male cousin is brushed off by her father like "boys will be boys". No sir, responsibility, its a thing. Not cool with that attitude.There is other things that liked and disliked that i cant think of but i would give it a 3/5 stars.Thanks for giving me the chance to try this book and i hope others love it.
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  • Renee // Feminist Book Club Box and Podcast
    January 1, 1970
    I Am Yours is a wild ride from page 1. Zaman's experience growing up as an average-looking Bengali girl where she stood out no matter what in Oahu and Bangkok gave her the strength and tenacity to endure the chaos of becoming a working actor and model in New York while juggling difficult romantic relationships, anorexia, and a desire to make an impact on this wold. This book is that impact. It's clear the author draws inspiration from writers like Elizabeth Gilbert and Glennon Doyle and her memo I Am Yours is a wild ride from page 1. Zaman's experience growing up as an average-looking Bengali girl where she stood out no matter what in Oahu and Bangkok gave her the strength and tenacity to endure the chaos of becoming a working actor and model in New York while juggling difficult romantic relationships, anorexia, and a desire to make an impact on this wold. This book is that impact. It's clear the author draws inspiration from writers like Elizabeth Gilbert and Glennon Doyle and her memoir could easily stand amongst those ranks. Absolutely recommend.Thank you to NetGalley and Amberjack Publishing for a reader's copy.
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  • Reema Zaman
    January 1, 1970
  • Reema Zaman
    January 1, 1970
  • Deborah Stevens
    January 1, 1970
    Memoirs are so hard to review. Their authors expose themselves on the page and my impulse is to clap and cheer and wish them well. So let me start by clapping, cheering, and wishing Ms. Zaman well!But a brave and eventful life does not guarantee a good book, and what I am evaluating here is the book, not the life. This book is addressed throughout to "my love." We learn that this is both the voice in Ms. Zaman's head, and her since-childhood imaginary friend. I found this jarring. And much of th Memoirs are so hard to review. Their authors expose themselves on the page and my impulse is to clap and cheer and wish them well. So let me start by clapping, cheering, and wishing Ms. Zaman well!But a brave and eventful life does not guarantee a good book, and what I am evaluating here is the book, not the life. This book is addressed throughout to "my love." We learn that this is both the voice in Ms. Zaman's head, and her since-childhood imaginary friend. I found this jarring. And much of the language throughout is inflected with Bangladeshi idiom in a way that must be an editorial choice, but that I found unnecessary and distracting. For example, "a toddler hasn't concept of patience." In taking a look at other works of this author on the web, there's no hint of this affectation.The author also seems a bit too close in time to the events she recounts to do them justice. For example, a theme running through this work is her use of her appearance and sexuality to get her jobs and attention. She seems both repelled and committed to her stiletto heels, cocktail dresses, and even her anorexia. I suspect that I am not the intended audience for this book, and that it may be more appreciated by other readers. With thanks to NetGalley and AmberJack Publishing for an ARC in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Lisa Ellison
    January 1, 1970
    Constructed as a love letter to her highest self, Zaman’s memoir chronicles her journey from young Bangladeshi girl trying to accommodate a world of loud silences filled with male rage and female grief to a force of nature who authors her own truth. As a teen and young adult, Zaman strives for perfection in beauty, creativity, and love, hoping her hard work will allow her to give voice to the voiceless. The barriers she faces along the way—loneliness, an eating disorder, sexual violence, and emo Constructed as a love letter to her highest self, Zaman’s memoir chronicles her journey from young Bangladeshi girl trying to accommodate a world of loud silences filled with male rage and female grief to a force of nature who authors her own truth. As a teen and young adult, Zaman strives for perfection in beauty, creativity, and love, hoping her hard work will allow her to give voice to the voiceless. The barriers she faces along the way—loneliness, an eating disorder, sexual violence, and emotionally abusive relationships—are common to so many women. As she attempts to cope with expectations established by the patriarchy, we see how easy it is to cut off parts of the self to placate those in power. While this book aligns with movements like #MeToo and #TimesUp, her memoir is no simple a trauma narrative. Zaman’s explicit use of the writing process to re-author her story coupled with her iconic lyric style are what make her story so unique. Every word of Zaman’s memoir is grounded in a profound love and compassion that allows readers to engage with her pain without being accosted by it. We see not a victim, but a fierce warrior woman in charge of her narrative. Her book serves both as a prayer for healing and a guidebook leading us to our higher selves. I devoured every word of her memoir and can't wait to read it again. Whether you are looking for your voice, waiting to be inspired, or just like a well-crafted story, I Am Yours has been written for you.
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  • Lara Lillibridge
    January 1, 1970
    I Am Yours is unlike any memoir I’ve read. It’s written as a love letter to her inner voice, an outpouring of love and acceptance. Reema Zaman has taken back her voice from those who wished to silence it, writing for all of us whom have ever felt invisible. This book is intrinsically female, and that is its overwhelming beauty and its strength. Zaman takes the reader from her childhood through an path littered with men who sought to own her, diminish her, and wound her, and then brings us out in I Am Yours is unlike any memoir I’ve read. It’s written as a love letter to her inner voice, an outpouring of love and acceptance. Reema Zaman has taken back her voice from those who wished to silence it, writing for all of us whom have ever felt invisible. This book is intrinsically female, and that is its overwhelming beauty and its strength. Zaman takes the reader from her childhood through an path littered with men who sought to own her, diminish her, and wound her, and then brings us out into the light of reclaiming herself, her voice, and her power. Laced through it all is the reflective, wiser narrator, putting the events of her life in context of the greater feminine experience. In this way, Zaman makes the personal universal.
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  • Melanie Brooks
    January 1, 1970
    A Fearless and Gorgeously Rendered MemoirReema Zaman's inspiring journey to free her voice from the cultural binds that kept her silent is an enthralling and cinematic read. Her unflinching honesty and the poetic beauty of her words are the pearls residing in the pages of this book. Zaman meticulously unpacks the complexity of her own experiences with sexual violence, intimate partner abuse, and anorexia with the clear purpose of offering hope, healing, and companionship to anyone who might find A Fearless and Gorgeously Rendered MemoirReema Zaman's inspiring journey to free her voice from the cultural binds that kept her silent is an enthralling and cinematic read. Her unflinching honesty and the poetic beauty of her words are the pearls residing in the pages of this book. Zaman meticulously unpacks the complexity of her own experiences with sexual violence, intimate partner abuse, and anorexia with the clear purpose of offering hope, healing, and companionship to anyone who might find themselves in similar circumstances. I am awed by her compassion to herself and to others, and I celebrate the power of her voice to open space for all of our voices to be heard.
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