The Eighth Sister (Charles Jenkins, #1)
Robert Dugoni is the author of the bestselling Tracy Crosswhite series. He won the 2015 Nancy Pearl Award for Fiction and has written over 15 novels and short stories including The Extraordinary Life of Sam Hell and The Eighth Sister.

The Eighth Sister (Charles Jenkins, #1) Details

TitleThe Eighth Sister (Charles Jenkins, #1)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 9th, 2019
PublisherThomas & Mercer
Rating
GenreMystery, Thriller, Suspense, Fiction, Mystery Thriller

The Eighth Sister (Charles Jenkins, #1) Review

  • Kylie D
    January 1, 1970
    Another marvellous tale from Robert Dugoni, who is fast becoming one of my go-to authors. This book is set in two parts, the first a spy tale, in the mould of the classic cold war espionage novels. As I cut my teeth on these types of books back in the day, it was fantastic to see a modern take, and Dugoni has done a great job here.We have Charlie, former spy for the CIA, now 64 years old, and running a security company with his pregnant wife. Cash flow isn't good and business is failing. Then a Another marvellous tale from Robert Dugoni, who is fast becoming one of my go-to authors. This book is set in two parts, the first a spy tale, in the mould of the classic cold war espionage novels. As I cut my teeth on these types of books back in the day, it was fantastic to see a modern take, and Dugoni has done a great job here.We have Charlie, former spy for the CIA, now 64 years old, and running a security company with his pregnant wife. Cash flow isn't good and business is failing. Then a blast from Charlie's past turns up with a chance to activate on a mission for the CIA, and to solve his money problems at the same time. Charlie has little choice but to take the lifeline, and this plunges him into the turmoil of modern Russia, where memories are long. When the mission goes awry he has to find his way out of Russia, with the FSB, the modern KGB close on his tail.Part two of this story takes a totally different tack, it turns legal thriller, and is classic Robert Dugoni. I'm not going to say too much more, as I don't want to give the plot away. This is a fast paced book that you really don't want to put down. I was reading it waaaaaay past my bed time. It is a compelling and gripping read, and I recommend it to all thriller lovers.My thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for an ARC un exchange for an honest review.
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  • Debra
    January 1, 1970
    Charles Jenkins, a man in his early sixties, needs money. His wife is pregnant with their second child and his security business is facing bankruptcy due to one of his vendors not paying bills on time. Although he finds relief reading Harry Potter to his son at night, thoughts about finances and the future trouble him. When Carl Emerson, his former CIA station chief contacts him, Charlie is intrigued. Charlie walked away from the CIA forty years ago, but when Emerson presents him with a mission Charles Jenkins, a man in his early sixties, needs money. His wife is pregnant with their second child and his security business is facing bankruptcy due to one of his vendors not paying bills on time. Although he finds relief reading Harry Potter to his son at night, thoughts about finances and the future trouble him. When Carl Emerson, his former CIA station chief contacts him, Charlie is intrigued. Charlie walked away from the CIA forty years ago, but when Emerson presents him with a mission and a way to make some money, Charlie cannot refuse. Charlie speaks Russian, had experience working with the KGB years ago when he worked undercover in Mexico, making him the perfect person to gather information for this covert mission.Charlie is soon in Russia engaged in a game of cat and mouse trying to find the identity of the eighth sister, the one who is killing members of US spy cell known as the seven sisters - Russian women who are being killed for being spies. Soon, things become intense and Charlie must put all his past CIA experience to the test in order to come out this alive.There is a lot going on in this book especially in the first section. The cat and mouse game in Russia is exciting, intriguing and kept my attention. Never really knowing what was going to happen next, had me on the edge of my seat. Plus, Charlies found a worthy opponent in Russian Agent Federov. Dugoni shared about his previous trip to Russia with his family, being followed, a child thinking he was military and even rumors of listening devices and walking naked in front of mirrors. He also shared a discussion he had with Kristin Hannah about her inspiration for the Nightingale and his encounters with individuals who shared parts of their lives with him, as his inspiration for this book.It's fair to say, I think Dugoni nailed it. Not only did he create interesting and well-developed characters, he used the environment of Russia as a character as well. I could feel the cold seeping from the pages. I am also not a big spy/espionage fan, but he made me one with this book. He also showcased his research and ability to write in various genres. I found this book to be captivating and although the last half slows down with the court room scenes, they are still interesting and thought provoking. Thank you to Thomas & Mercer and NetGalley who provided me with a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. The thoughts and opinions are my own.
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  • Liz
    January 1, 1970
    I'm not a big fan of spy thrillers, but I'll read anything that Robert Dugoni writes. This stand alone novel has Charles Jenkins, a mid 60s retired CIA agent forced to come out of retirement to raise enough money to save his security business. He is sent to Moscow to discover who is killing the members of a US spy ring.Dugoni once again reeled me in immediately. He does a superb job of painting the Russian atmosphere - the FSB and Putin's power, the Russian character, even the weather. He's also I'm not a big fan of spy thrillers, but I'll read anything that Robert Dugoni writes. This stand alone novel has Charles Jenkins, a mid 60s retired CIA agent forced to come out of retirement to raise enough money to save his security business. He is sent to Moscow to discover who is killing the members of a US spy ring.Dugoni once again reeled me in immediately. He does a superb job of painting the Russian atmosphere - the FSB and Putin's power, the Russian character, even the weather. He's also done his research when it comes to how the spy industry works and effortlessly instructs the reader as well. The book moves at a fast pace, like an action movie. There are a lot of close calls. Nothing is as it should be and Jenkins is constantly running to stay one step ahead. The second part of the book becomes more legal procedural than spy thriller, but it's equally engaging. This might not hold together completely, but it's so much fun I didn't mind. (It's best that one not think too hard about some of the plot points.)I enjoyed the characters, not just Jenkins, but Federov and Paulina. Once again, Dugoni has proven he can handle any genre he decides to take on.My thanks to netgalley and Thomas & Mercer for an advance copy of this book.
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  • Berit☀️✨
    January 1, 1970
    50% Spy Thriller. 50% Legal Thriller. 100% Thrilling! Wow! Robert Dugoni you have a new fan, right here! This was a wild action packed story bursting with intrigue and adventure. I don’t read many spy thrillers, but this one was done extremely well. I was seriously on the edge of my seat this entire book and when the spy thriller turned into a legal thriller this book was just as compelling and nerve-racking. Reading this book was like watching an intense action adventure movie, but better. Cha 50% Spy Thriller. 50% Legal Thriller. 100% Thrilling! Wow! Robert Dugoni you have a new fan, right here! This was a wild action packed story bursting with intrigue and adventure. I don’t read many spy thrillers, but this one was done extremely well. I was seriously on the edge of my seat this entire book and when the spy thriller turned into a legal thriller this book was just as compelling and nerve-racking. Reading this book was like watching an intense action adventure movie, but better. Charles Jenkins is exCIA now running a security company in Seattle. Now a family Man with a loving wife, a nine-year-old son, and a baby on the way. When Charles is approached by the CIA to go back into Russia he cannot resist the paycheck, it will get his business out of the red. But the assignment and the people involved aren’t quite what they seem. Soon Charles discovers himself in the middle of a precarious situation, in terrible danger. Now he finds himself on a chase across Europe, fighting to save his life, and the lives of those he loves. What transpires is a riveting tale that will keep you glued to the pages. This book definitely got my heart pounding. I had no idea how Charles was going to get himself out of this situation. Charles was very likable, reminiscent of the spies of old. In fact this entire book had a bit of a nostalgic feel to it, a homage to Russian spy books of the past. All the secondary characters are as interesting as Charles, even the relentless Russian. A riveting story that will quench your thirst for action, adventure, and spies! Definitely recommend!*** many thanks to Thomas & Mercer for my copy of this book ***
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  • Carolyn
    January 1, 1970
    The first half of this novel is a real roller-coaster with cold war style undercover espionage in Moscow and a heart stopping manhunt across Europe. The second half segues into a legal drama, which is no less riveting. The main character Charlie Jenkins, a former CIA agent for a short time in the 1970s has bought himself some real trouble when financial troubles and a family to support leads him to accept an undercover job for the CIA in Moscow where he has business dealings. Although it sounds The first half of this novel is a real roller-coaster with cold war style undercover espionage in Moscow and a heart stopping manhunt across Europe. The second half segues into a legal drama, which is no less riveting. The main character Charlie Jenkins, a former CIA agent for a short time in the 1970s has bought himself some real trouble when financial troubles and a family to support leads him to accept an undercover job for the CIA in Moscow where he has business dealings. Although it sounds simple enough, nothing goes to plan and Charlie is soon fighting for his life and his freedom. The characters were excellent, especially the dogged Russian agent who never gave up, the female spy who helped Charlie and lawyer Sloane and his son Jake. While I enjoyed both the suspense and intense action followed by the clearly laid out legal drama, I felt there were a few loose ends that weren't resolved and prevented me awarding a full 5 stars. (view spoiler)[ Such as why did Emerson set Charlie up in the first place - was it just to have those two agents killed and if so why Charlie? Were the three women killed part of the seven sisters or was that just a myth to get Charlie involved? Was there an eighth sister or was that also a fabrication? I don't think Paulina was Putin's counteragent because she was anti-Russia - or was she a double agent? I'd welcome any clarification on these points if you've read it- you can PM me your theories or add in a spoiler alert below. Thanks! (hide spoiler)] 4.5★With thanks to Netgalley and Thomas & Mercer for a digital ARC to read.
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  • Matt
    January 1, 1970
    First and foremost, a large thank you to NetGalley, Robert Dugoni, and Thomas & Mercer for providing me with a copy of this publication, which allows me to provide you with an unbiased review.While Robert Dugoni is the author of two successful series, his standalone novels grip the reader just as effectively. There is something refreshing about an author who has so many ideas and whose name is indicative of stellar writing and plausible storylines. Charles Jenkins has been out of the spy gam First and foremost, a large thank you to NetGalley, Robert Dugoni, and Thomas & Mercer for providing me with a copy of this publication, which allows me to provide you with an unbiased review.While Robert Dugoni is the author of two successful series, his standalone novels grip the reader just as effectively. There is something refreshing about an author who has so many ideas and whose name is indicative of stellar writing and plausible storylines. Charles Jenkins has been out of the spy game for many years. After serving as a CIA field agent in Mexico City, he left abruptly and eventually began work on his own security company. Four decades on, Jenkins has found solace in his wife, Alex, as well as a son, with a second child on the way. When a former Agency colleague pays a visit, Jenkins knows that it is not a friendly check-in, especially after all this time. Jenkins soon learns that a number of Russian women are turning up dead in and around Moscow. While this is nothing concerning on the surface, they were all feeding secret intel to the Americans, part of a group called the ‘Seven Sisters’. While these women were excellent at their jobs, none knew they were anything but isolated individuals defying Mother Russia during her time as the USSR. With the rise of Putin and a new authoritarian regime, whispers of the Seven Sisters re-emerged, especially since Putin was once a KGB officer and keenly interested in the rumours. Now, it would seem that there is an eighth sister working for Putin and the FSB; one who is tasked with sniffing out these traitors. Enter, Charles Jenkins, who is being sent to Russia under cover of checking up on one of his client’s former offices, to seek to have the newest sister reveal herself and let the Americans take it from there. However, when Jenkins’ mission is compromised, he becomes the hunted inside Russia, while the CIA denies any knowledge and will offer no help. Back in America, Alex is given instructions by her husband to leave their home and seek out David Sloane, a friend and established Seattle attorney. While Sloane and Alex know nothing of what is going on, they can only hope that Jenkins still has the antics he possessed forty years ago to extricate himself from this mess. Little does he know, his fight to get away from the FSB is only the start to the headaches that await him. Another stunning novel by Dugoni that reignites old Cold War drama, alongside some stunning legal developments. Recommended for those who love stories of espionage, especially the reader who is a longtime fan of Robert Dugoni’s writing.I always flock to a new Robert Dugoni novel, knowing that I will not be disappointed. Even his standalone pieces keep me intrigued, helping to fill the void that arises when I have to wait for the next instalment of his popular Tracy Crosswhite series. Dugoni enjoys filling his novels with details that are more poignant than fillers, keeping the reader educated as well as entertained from the opening paragraphs until the tumultuous final sentences. The development of his protagonist, Charles Jenkins was quite effective, hinting at a past within the Agency without offering up too many details. Pulling on this and linking it effectively to the Cold War-esque storyline helped the reader see the connection, as well as seek to know a little more. As the story progresses and Jenkins finds himself on the run, the reader learns a little more about Jenkins and his family, a core part of why he has stayed off the grid for so long. The story also tests Jenkins’ resolve to better understand just how far he can go as an agency plant to extract needed information with ease. Working with that is a handful of characters, both in Russia’s FSB and back in America, trying to help Jenkins flee the trouble in which he finds himself. Dugoni effectively juggles both sets of characters, developing a strong espionage theme throughout as the race to safety (or elimination) mounts with each passing page. Of particular note in the inclusion of David Sloane into the story. Longtime fans of Robert Dugoni will know that this was the author’s first series protagonist and an effective lawyer he was. I cut my teeth on that series and respected Dugoni the more I read of it. Sloane, still a Seattle attorney, plays an effective and essential role, giving fans a jolt of excitement to see him back on the page. The story was quite strong, particularly in an age when Russia is back to play a key role on the international political and spy scene. Dugoni keeps the chapters flowing and the action mounting as the struggle for freedom becomes more desperate. Dugoni is on the mark with this piece and it goes to show just how masterful an author he has become.Kudos, Mr. Dugoni, on another splendid addition to your writing list. I am always eager to see what you have in store for fans and was not disappointed with this effort.Love/hate the review? An ever-growing collection of others appears at: http://pecheyponderings.wordpress.com/A Book for All Seasons, a different sort of Book Challenge: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/...
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  • Sandy
    January 1, 1970
    This is a stand alone that ties in to the author’s David Sloane series. Charlie Jenkins is the MC, a former CIA agent whose past comes back to haunt him. Forty years ago, Charlie walked away from his career after a case left him disillusioned & disgusted with the job. Now he lives on a farm in Washington state with his wife & son & runs a private security firm. Money is tight, especially with another baby on the way.So when his old CIA handler shows up with a paying proposition, it g This is a stand alone that ties in to the author’s David Sloane series. Charlie Jenkins is the MC, a former CIA agent whose past comes back to haunt him. Forty years ago, Charlie walked away from his career after a case left him disillusioned & disgusted with the job. Now he lives on a farm in Washington state with his wife & son & runs a private security firm. Money is tight, especially with another baby on the way.So when his old CIA handler shows up with a paying proposition, it gets Charlie’s attention. The job: go to Moscow for the security firm, make contact with the FSB (new KGB) & convince them he’s a disgruntled former CIA agent with info for sale. His real task is to identify a Russian agent who is killing long time American assets. Sure. What could possibly go wrong?Oh man, where to start……Suffice to say things don’t go as planned & on his second trip to Moscow, Charlie finds himself running for his life. But what he doesn’t realize is getting home in one piece is only half the battle. The first 60% is a rip-roaring tale of espionage with all the proper ingredients. Clandestine meetings, deadly Russians, Gorky Park & lots of vodka. There’s even a femme fatale. Charlie has to draw on old skills as he tries to evade a determined FSB agent & make it back to the States.It’s a tense, wild ride & we all breathe a collective sigh of relief when he makes it home. But maybe don’t pop the champagne just yet. Seriously, this guy cannot buy a break. I don’t want to give away too much about the second act but at this point, action switches to the court room after Charlie is arrested. He calls on old friend/lawyer David Sloane to defend him in what is literally a hopeless case that could put him away for life.Dugoni excels at creating clever suspense populated with well developed characters. In Charlie, we get a sympathetic MC, a man with integrity who just wants to provide for his family. The surrounding cast is an interesting mix & it can be a challenge to tell the good guys from the bad. One of the standouts was Viktor, a burly FSB agent who I became quite fond of. All in all, it’s an entertaining read full of twists that will keep you turning the pages.
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  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    Like the raw frigid winds of a Russian winter, this one is gonna get your attention.Robert Dugoni is switching gears in The Eighth Sister with quite the jaunt into a face-to-face with the FSB, a Russian counter-intelligence agency that is a successor to the ol' KGB. The KGB should conjure up an image of Putin injecting measures of barbaric Russian interrogation methods. You just don't walk away from one of those intact.Dugoni introduces us to Charles Jenkins, a sixty-four year old African Americ Like the raw frigid winds of a Russian winter, this one is gonna get your attention.Robert Dugoni is switching gears in The Eighth Sister with quite the jaunt into a face-to-face with the FSB, a Russian counter-intelligence agency that is a successor to the ol' KGB. The KGB should conjure up an image of Putin injecting measures of barbaric Russian interrogation methods. You just don't walk away from one of those intact.Dugoni introduces us to Charles Jenkins, a sixty-four year old African American former CIA agent. He showcased his expertise nearly 40 years ago while working undercover in Mexico. Long behind him, Charles now has a young son and another child on the way. His wife, Alex, was a case officer for CFO. His family is everything to him.But there's no picket fence involved in this one. Charles runs a security company based out of Seattle. He's invested everything he has into his company with not a nickle to spare. He's already taken on more debt than he can handle making his payroll. His top customer is forever late with payments. His cash flow is just not flowin'.There's a knock on his door one morning. Standing before him is Carl Emerson, the CIA station chief. He's got quite the offer for Charles. There's an intelligence group of Seven Sisters trained to infiltrate Russian sources and provide crucial information to the United States. The term Seven Sisters refers to Stalin's plainly constructed buildings in Moscow that would confuse bombers during the war. Three of the sisters have been killed in the past two years. None of the sisters have any knowledge of one another. So who exactly is on a rampage and why now?Emerson leans on Charles. Charles is quite fluent in Russian and has an extreme "boots on the ground" mentality as opposed to total electronic intelligence technology vs man power. It's hardly an instant decision for Charles. He's putting a lot on the line for country here. But the sleepless nights worrying about finances and the well-being of his family finally clicks in. Charles will take on a brutal challenge unlike he's ever seen before in his career.The Eighth Sister is a stellar read in the hands of the very talented Robert Dugoni. He's widened his scope in this one and we are grippin' knuckles on the steering wheel throughout this read. Just keep 'em comin', Dugoni. Just keep 'em comin'.I received a copy of The Eighth Sister through NetGalley for an honest review. My thanks to Thomas & Mercer and to Robert Dugoni for the opportunity.
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  • Jean
    January 1, 1970
    Robert Dugoni is a wonderful writer. He’s written six police detective novels featuring Tracy Crosswhite. I’ve enjoyed them all. I’ve liked the two legal thrillers featuring David Sloane that I’ve read and hope to get to the others. I have read two standalones as well, both very well written. Now Dugoni’s trying something different – a spy thriller. The Eighth Sister features a former CIA agent-turned private security consultant who gets caught up in a secret agency operation known as “the sev Robert Dugoni is a wonderful writer. He’s written six police detective novels featuring Tracy Crosswhite. I’ve enjoyed them all. I’ve liked the two legal thrillers featuring David Sloane that I’ve read and hope to get to the others. I have read two standalones as well, both very well written. Now Dugoni’s trying something different – a spy thriller. The Eighth Sister features a former CIA agent-turned private security consultant who gets caught up in a secret agency operation known as “the seven sisters.” Named for the seven Stalinist style skyscrapers built in Moscow during the late 1940s to early 1950s, the sisters refer to Russian women who work for the Russian government who are spying for the CIA.Charles Jenkins left the CIA forty years earlier. He was angry and disillusioned, and he has put that behind him. When his former superior shows up out of the blue to recruit him to try to find a Russian agent who is killing the CIA spies one by one, Jenkins thinks long and hard. He has a wife. A nine-year-old son. A baby on way. His company is also in financial trouble. He is led to believe that he will find the agent, “the eighth sister,” get paid, and go home. End of story, right?That wouldn’t be much of a thriller, now would it? Jenkins – Charlie – does meet a woman, but is she the killer? He winds up having to avoid the police, go into hiding, and somehow flee Russia with the law hot on his trail. All this takes ingenuity, courage, trust, stamina, and help from others along the way. It’s not easy to go unnoticed, given that Jenkins is a six-foot-five black man, who does by the way, speak Russian.When he finally does make it home, he suspects that somehow his problems are not over. He learns that the CIA has forsaken him, and now it’s up to his friend, lawyer David Sloane, to preserve his freedom. Some of the aspects of the case were a bit confusing to me at first, but as the details emerge, things made more sense.This is a fast-paced story filled with tension and drama. Charles Jenkins is a clever, intelligent man who seems to have maintained his skills despite the many years since his days in the Agency. He also displays warmth and humanity, not only toward his family, but also toward the Russian women whom he has never met. He feels a sense of duty toward them as fellow agents who have sacrificed much for the sake of the US.I liked most of the characters in this book, even the Russian FSR agent, Federov. He goes by the book, but he is incredibly smart. However, he actually seems to respect Jenkins and acknowledges that he is a worthy opponent. I loved Pauline’s story; it felt very “Russian” to me. I also loved Charlie’s family – wife Alex, son CJ, and their new baby. David and Jake are great as friends and skilled professionals too. Those who were unlikeable were written to be that way.So The Eighth Sister is part espionage, part legal thriller, and all enjoyment. I don’t normally read spy novels, but I read this in two days. I highly recommend The Eighth Sister.Thanks to NetGalley, Thomas & Mercer, and the author for an ARC digital copy in exchange for my unbiased review.5 stars
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  • Monnie
    January 1, 1970
    One thing I've learned about books by this author: It's not likely I'll be disappointed. No surprise, then, that this one earned yet another five-star rating from me. Here's the scoop:Charles Jenkins is in his 60s now, married to a younger woman who's close to delivering their new baby. A former CIA case officer, he left the agency with a bad taste in his mouth after a case that didn't go as planned some 40 years ago. Now, he runs a security consulting business that appears to have a single clie One thing I've learned about books by this author: It's not likely I'll be disappointed. No surprise, then, that this one earned yet another five-star rating from me. Here's the scoop:Charles Jenkins is in his 60s now, married to a younger woman who's close to delivering their new baby. A former CIA case officer, he left the agency with a bad taste in his mouth after a case that didn't go as planned some 40 years ago. Now, he runs a security consulting business that appears to have a single client - a high-profile firm in Seattle that tends to be in arrears when it comes to payment for services rendered. Then one day, Charlie gets a surprise visitor: his long-ago CIA station chief, Carl Emerson, who begs him to take on an undercover job in Moscow (where, conveniently, Charlie's client has an office). The task is to determine the identity of the "eighth sister," a Russian agent who is behind the recent murders of a couple of members of a U.S. spy cell known as the seven sisters. They've operated successfully and secretly for many years until now; the hope is that Charlie will nail the eighth sister before she finishes off all the others.Desperate to stop the red ink in his business, Charlie reluctantly takes the assignment without letting his wife in on his secret. But early on, he learns something is dead wrong; for openers, the woman he believes is behind the killings isn't the assassin. Even more frightening, what she tells him - if in fact she can be believed - forces him to doubt everything he's been told about the case so far.Everything goes totally haywire when Charlie and the woman find themselves in the crosshairs of a Russian agent who wants them in jail (or better still, six feet under). But why? Nothing Charlie has said or done should have triggered that kind of response. Could it be that something or someone's gone afoul in the CIA? And if so, who? Everything ends up in a trial, during which a possible insight on that question (as an aside, especially relevant these days) is offered. When Charlie asks, "How do we get the government to lie?" the response speaks volumes: "We just get them to move their lips."Fast-paced, exciting and another winner, this is a not-to-be-missed thriller. Many thanks to the publisher, via NetGalley, for the opportunity to read and review an advance copy.
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  • Louise Wilson
    January 1, 1970
    Former CIA case officer Charles Jenkins is a man at a crossroads: in his early sixties, he has a family, a new baby on the way and a security consulting business on the brink of bankruptcy. Then his former bureau chief shows up at his house with a risky new assignment: travel undercover to Moscow and locate a Russian agent believed to be killing members of a clandestine US spy cell known as the seven sisters. Desperate for money, Jenkins agrees to the mission.This is another action packed and fa Former CIA case officer Charles Jenkins is a man at a crossroads: in his early sixties, he has a family, a new baby on the way and a security consulting business on the brink of bankruptcy. Then his former bureau chief shows up at his house with a risky new assignment: travel undercover to Moscow and locate a Russian agent believed to be killing members of a clandestine US spy cell known as the seven sisters. Desperate for money, Jenkins agrees to the mission.This is another action packed and fast paced read of which I've come to expect from the author, Robert Dugoni. This is a gripping spy thriller. The story kept moving in different directions ago you are constantly trying to guess where the story is leading us to. I liked the main character, Charles Jenkins, a dedicated family man. I have not read any of the books in the Sloane series, but that does not matter as this book reads perfectly well without any background information on the other series.I would like to thank NetGalley, Thomas & Mercer and the author Robert Dugoni for my ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Adrian Dooley
    January 1, 1970
    I’ve read a lot of Dugonis books. A lot of the Tracy Crosswhite series and some of his stand alone books and I loved all of them. Given that, I was delighted to find out he had written a new book - The Eighth Sister. This is a spy thriller of sorts but not necessarily the book I thought it was going to be. I didn’t read the blurb about it at all so went in blind, confidently enough based on the author. It’s the story of Charles Jenkins, an ex CIA agent in his early sixties, retired from the CIA I’ve read a lot of Dugonis books. A lot of the Tracy Crosswhite series and some of his stand alone books and I loved all of them. Given that, I was delighted to find out he had written a new book - The Eighth Sister. This is a spy thriller of sorts but not necessarily the book I thought it was going to be. I didn’t read the blurb about it at all so went in blind, confidently enough based on the author. It’s the story of Charles Jenkins, an ex CIA agent in his early sixties, retired from the CIA for almost forty years, he has moved to Washington, married with a young son and another child on the way, he runs a security firm. Out of the blue his ex boss from his CIA operative days when based Mexico turns up with a proposal for him to be “reactivated” and go on a mission to Moscow to plant some information with the Russian authorities to draw out a secret agent. Having spent his former time in the CIA infiltrating KGB agents and being fluent in Russsian, his boss tells him he is the ideal candidate. There is also a healthy monetary reward for completing the mission and with his business in serious financial trouble he reluctantly accepts and heads to Russia to begin the mission. That’s how the book starts and develops and spends a large chunk in Russia as he makes contact with Russian agent and the game of cat and mouse begins between the two of them. With this set up I expected the entirety of the book to be spent in Russia as Charles’s mission and the secrets of it play out and are revealed. But it doesn’t stay on script as his cover is kind of blown and it turns into a sort of road/chase type book and then a courtroom drama!I really loved this book and the surprises it provided. Not so much the “reveals” but the surprise directions that it took. Just as I though I knew what the main narrative of the book would be about it moved in a different direction. It felt like the narrative of three different books rolled into one. The thing is they all worked perfectly. If anything the book got better and better as it went on. I’ve said it before but there is just something about Dugonis writing style and storytelling that just clicks with me. Every book I’ve read of his I’ve felt thoroughly satisfied at the end and no more so than this one. The book had me so much the more I got into it, that, as I write this review, I had 50% of it read at the start of this day and just spent the afternoon reading and completing the second half of it(which is some going for a rather pedestrian paced reader like myself). I got lost in the book, some classic rock on in the background to accompany it and a few cups of tea, a fantastic way to spend a wet and dreary afternoon. Highly recommend, Mr Dugoni has yet to put a foot wrong in my reading experience. I’m off to amazon now to find the remaking books that I haven’t read in his series. Many thanks to Netgalley, Thomas & Mercer and Robert Dugoni for an ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Lou
    January 1, 1970
    For readers there simply isn't any other feeling more welcome than knowing that you can wholeheartedly trust an author to write endlessly compelling stories on which you can rely to capture your interest from very early on and hold you hostage until it's over; they are indeed a rare breed and for me Mr Dugoni is one of those. The Eighth Sister is the first book in the brand spanking new thriller series featuring protagonist and central character, Charles Jenkins. The narrative gets off to a flyi For readers there simply isn't any other feeling more welcome than knowing that you can wholeheartedly trust an author to write endlessly compelling stories on which you can rely to capture your interest from very early on and hold you hostage until it's over; they are indeed a rare breed and for me Mr Dugoni is one of those. The Eighth Sister is the first book in the brand spanking new thriller series featuring protagonist and central character, Charles Jenkins. The narrative gets off to a flying start with more action than you can shake a stick at. There is simply no let-up and this married with the easy, highly reading readable style of writing made it an unputdownable adventure that had my nerves jangling.The author masterfully recreates the fear and alarm surrounding the frosty relationship between Soviet Russia and The West during the Cold War era. The clandestine activity, espionage, disinformation/propaganda and topics pertaining to that epoch are woven into the very core of this story. It's a thrilling, addictive and one heck of a wild ride, and it's clear once again Dugoni knows how to give readers exactly what they crave.If you enjoy books with a strong, relatable hero and danger lurking around every corner with a superb series of twisty surprises and misdirection then you'll have as much of a fun, entertaining time as I did throughout this novel. I am already eagerly anticipating the next instalment to be reacquainted with Charles for hopefully another nail-biting adventure.Many thanks to Thomas & Mercer for an ARC.
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  • Bam
    January 1, 1970
    This is the first in what is apparently a new series featuring Charles Jenkins, a friend and associate of David Sloane, the lawyer in another Dugoni series. It's my first taste of Dugoni's writing and I'm hooked! Charlie is a 6'5" black man who was once a CIA agent back in the 70s. He's now 64 and married to a much younger woman who is pregnant with his second child. He has a security business in Seattle, WA that is in danger of going belly up because his major client has stopped paying on time This is the first in what is apparently a new series featuring Charles Jenkins, a friend and associate of David Sloane, the lawyer in another Dugoni series. It's my first taste of Dugoni's writing and I'm hooked! Charlie is a 6'5" black man who was once a CIA agent back in the 70s. He's now 64 and married to a much younger woman who is pregnant with his second child. He has a security business in Seattle, WA that is in danger of going belly up because his major client has stopped paying on time and he can't meet his payments to his contractors. His home AND his business are both endangered. So when his former CIA chief shows up at his front door with an offer to do an important job for them in Russia, Charlie can't refuse. Keeping his wife in the dark, he heads off on what should be a simple mission...but it is anything but! The book really has two parts: one, an excellent spy story and two, a tense courtroom drama. The action kept this reader on the edge of her seat turning those pages right till the end. I thoroughly enjoyed this novel and will definitely be looking forward to reading more of Dugoni's thrillers, etc. I was provided with an arc of this book by the publisher via NetGalley for my honest review. Many thanks for the opportunity and introduction to this author.
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    An intense and thrilling book of international espionage. I enjoyed every minute of this USA vs Russia clandestine chess game which brought back thoughts of the old Cold War yet remains relevant today. Memorable characters and I especially enjoyed the relationship dynamics between Jenkins and Paulina. Only my second Dugoni book and so different from my first, The Extraordinary Life of Sam Hell (great book I highly recommend!). Look forward to reading the next in this new series. Thanks to Thomas An intense and thrilling book of international espionage. I enjoyed every minute of this USA vs Russia clandestine chess game which brought back thoughts of the old Cold War yet remains relevant today. Memorable characters and I especially enjoyed the relationship dynamics between Jenkins and Paulina. Only my second Dugoni book and so different from my first, The Extraordinary Life of Sam Hell (great book I highly recommend!). Look forward to reading the next in this new series. Thanks to Thomas & Mercer for this ARC in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Dana-Adriana B.
    January 1, 1970
    This is an alert spy book and I couldn't let it down. Charles Jenkins is asked to help with the Seven Sisters case. But in Moscow he finds out there is an eight sister. Really intriguing.Thank you Netgalley for this adventure.
  • Cheryl
    January 1, 1970
    I have read several books by this author and really enjoyed them. Thus the reason that I wanted to read this new book. Mr. Dugoni presents a strong offering with this new book in what I hope to be a new series. The Eighth Sister is fast paced and has the vibes of James Bond meets Jason Bourne! Lead character, Charles Jenkins is an very engaging character. The fact that he is a dedicated family man and the reason for taking this case made me like him even more. Speaking of the case; it was intrig I have read several books by this author and really enjoyed them. Thus the reason that I wanted to read this new book. Mr. Dugoni presents a strong offering with this new book in what I hope to be a new series. The Eighth Sister is fast paced and has the vibes of James Bond meets Jason Bourne! Lead character, Charles Jenkins is an very engaging character. The fact that he is a dedicated family man and the reason for taking this case made me like him even more. Speaking of the case; it was intriguing. It got even more intriguing the further I read. Mr. Dugoni transported me around the world and back. In fact, this book made me imagine I was a spy again. When I was younger; I used to pretend I was one. Anyone looking for a great thriller/espionage book to read, need to get their hands on a copy of this book.
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  • Bridgett
    January 1, 1970
    This book settles any debate (if there ever was one)...Robert Dugoni can write virtually anything. I've been obsessed with the Tracy Crosswhite series for years, and The Extraordinary Life of Sam Hell was one of my favorite books...and one of my only 5 star reviews...of 2018. Admittedly, going in, I was a little unsure about The Eighth Sister. Spy novels have never really intrigued me, and often times, when involving foreign countries, I've found them downright confusing. Not so with this story This book settles any debate (if there ever was one)...Robert Dugoni can write virtually anything. I've been obsessed with the Tracy Crosswhite series for years, and The Extraordinary Life of Sam Hell was one of my favorite books...and one of my only 5 star reviews...of 2018. Admittedly, going in, I was a little unsure about The Eighth Sister. Spy novels have never really intrigued me, and often times, when involving foreign countries, I've found them downright confusing. Not so with this story. Robert Dugoni has such an incredible ability to pull even reluctant readers in. His writing is always clear, sharp, on-point, and easy to understand. And his characterization is probably the best I've read. I'm always so incredibly vested in his characters. In this novel, I (oddly) loved both the protagonists and the antagonists. Beginning and ending in Seattle (Dugoni's home town), this story takes it's readers around the world, with fast-paced, old-school espionage. Throughout the first 60'ish% of the novel, the action never stopped. The final 40% morphed into a legal thriller. Different, but just as tantalizing. One reason I didn't give this book a higher rating...there were many unanswered questions. Beyond that, the two sections lacked cohesiveness, which made the story, at times, feel a little clunky. Nevertheless, I'd recommend this book to anybody who enjoys fast-paced, action-packed, legal thrillers, with a twist of espionage. Robert Dugoni never disappoints.3.5 spy-worthy stars!**Many thanks to NetGalley, Thomas & Mercer, and Robert Dugoni for providing me with an ARC in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Jean
    January 1, 1970
    Spy/Legal thrillers is not usually a genre I like to read but I'm a big fan of Robert Dugoni. I really enjoyed reading his Tracy Crosswhite series. I would say this is 75% spy thriller and 25% courtroom drama. It was exceptionally well written with an interesting plot. Definitely realistic and probably does happen. Well developed characters but am I the only one who has an issue with a 64 yr old having another baby? Even though it was different than his other books, I would recommend this book.T Spy/Legal thrillers is not usually a genre I like to read but I'm a big fan of Robert Dugoni. I really enjoyed reading his Tracy Crosswhite series. I would say this is 75% spy thriller and 25% courtroom drama. It was exceptionally well written with an interesting plot. Definitely realistic and probably does happen. Well developed characters but am I the only one who has an issue with a 64 yr old having another baby? Even though it was different than his other books, I would recommend this book.Thank you to NetGalley and Thomas & Mercer for a copy of Robert Dugoni's "The Eight Sister" in exchange of an honest review.
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  • Kathy
    January 1, 1970
    I guess I am feeling brave enough to say I did not embrace much of what went on in this book.
  • Bent Hansen
    January 1, 1970
    Writing other books - including the excellent and entertaining Tracy Crosswhite series - Robert Dugoni has taken a 7-year break from his first major series about lawyer David Sloane and his investigator and friend Charles Jenkins. Actually, this book doesn't seem to be acknowledged as part of the Sloane series, which makes sense as Sloane has but a rather large supporting role in the book where Jenkins is the absolute main character.This time around, Dugoni takes us - along with Jenkins - to Rus Writing other books - including the excellent and entertaining Tracy Crosswhite series - Robert Dugoni has taken a 7-year break from his first major series about lawyer David Sloane and his investigator and friend Charles Jenkins. Actually, this book doesn't seem to be acknowledged as part of the Sloane series, which makes sense as Sloane has but a rather large supporting role in the book where Jenkins is the absolute main character.This time around, Dugoni takes us - along with Jenkins - to Russia on an adventure that is nailbitingly exciting and gives us new insights on Jenkins that has only played a minor part in the "real" Sloane series.Dugoni masters both the international parts of the story as well as the domestic and courtroom parts, and the book grabs the reader straight away and doesn't let go until the very end.One thing in the book annoyed me quite a lot: Dugoni includes quite a lot of transcribed Russian dialogue in the parts taking place in Russia (as Jenkins revives his Russian from his days as a CIA agent), and then spends the next sentence explaining the meaning to readers that don't understand Russian. That is unnecessary showing off, boring for people who don't understand Russian, and a simple waste of letters, if you ask me - and also a little embarrassing when the translation is wrong (which I found to be the case on at least one occasion). Well, summing up, Dugoni continues his line of brilliant books - both thrillers and "other fiction" - and has added an international spy dimension to his Sloane series - or almost. New readers can easily jump into this book without having read any of the Sloane books due to the independent nature of this book.[An ARC of the book was generously provided by the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review]
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  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    This is a test: can I write well enough to convince you to read THE EIGHTH SISTER, to make you believe, if you’ve read Robert Dugoni before, that this is his best and, if you haven’t, that this first book in his Charles Jenkins (who you may remember from the David Sloane series) series is a great place to start? I finished reading it last night in the middle of the night, when I should have been sleeping. And I’m a picky reader. And I write honest reviews.Part 1 of THE EIGHTH SISTER places Jenki This is a test: can I write well enough to convince you to read THE EIGHTH SISTER, to make you believe, if you’ve read Robert Dugoni before, that this is his best and, if you haven’t, that this first book in his Charles Jenkins (who you may remember from the David Sloane series) series is a great place to start? I finished reading it last night in the middle of the night, when I should have been sleeping. And I’m a picky reader. And I write honest reviews.Part 1 of THE EIGHTH SISTER places Jenkins in Russia after he believes he has been reactivated as a CIA agent. His objective is to find the identity of the eighth “sister.” The other seven “sisters” are CIA spies. Already, two have been found out and probably killed. Can Jenkins help prevent a similar fate for the other five “sisters”?Before long, though, Jenkins learns that all is not as he had been told.Descriptions of Russia and Turkey sound so authentic that I wondered throughout this part where and how Dugoni got his information. (Read the “Acknowledgements.”) These details, along with Jenkins’s struggles there, make this the best kind of book, i.e., the unputdownable kind, the kind you have to keep reading, even during lunch and dinner.I never describe a book’s plot so much that the reader’s enjoyment might be spoiled. Therefore, I don’t describe Part 2 because it might say too much about what happened in Part 1. (Warning: Don’t read other reviews unless it isn’t important to you that you experience this book as the author intended.) But David Sloane is back in Part 2 and so is his stepson, now a law student. Let’s hope Sloane continues in the rest of the Jenkins series.Other reviews compare THE EIGHTH SISTER to books by LeCarré. In my experience, THE EIGHTH SISTER is better. Really.
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  • Linda Zagon
    January 1, 1970
    Robert Dugoni, Author of "The Eighth Sister" has written an intense, captivating, intriguing,  chilling and thrilling,  suspenseful, action packed, page-turning novel. The Genres for thiovel are Espionage, Mystery, Suspense, Legal and Criminal Thriller. .  This novel plays out like a game of chess, or cat and mouse game. There are twists and turns. The time-line for the story is in the present and goes to the past when it pertains to the characters or events of the story.  The author describes h Robert Dugoni, Author of "The Eighth Sister" has written an intense, captivating, intriguing,  chilling and thrilling,  suspenseful, action packed, page-turning novel. The Genres for thiovel are Espionage, Mystery, Suspense, Legal and Criminal Thriller. .  This novel plays out like a game of chess, or cat and mouse game. There are twists and turns. The time-line for the story is in the present and goes to the past when it pertains to the characters or events of the story.  The author describes has dramatic cast of characters as complex and complicated.Former CIA Agent Charles Jenkins, is now in his sixties with a young family.He is also working  in a security consulting business with some other partners , which is going bankrupt.  It seems luck might be with him or not, but a blast from his CIA past, his former boss approaches him and offers him the opportunity to work for the CIA and save some lives and also make some fast cash.  Jenkins will have to go to Russia, and locate some people. This is dangerous, and if his mission goes off, the CIA will disavow any knowledge of him or his activity. Now this has become a game of life and death.It seems that Jenkins has some very formidable Russian agents after him. Not only that, if Jenkins makes it home, he has other major problems .I would highly recommend this riveting novel for readers who enjoy suspenseful stories.s n
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  • Scott Parsons
    January 1, 1970
    Intriguing Spy ThrillerCharles Jenkins, who retired from the CIA years earlier because he did not agree with some of the activities being undertaken by his agency, now runs his own private security company. His company is struggling financially. So when his former bureau chief appears on his doorstep and offers him a contract to go to Moscow to try to determine who is betraying seven embedded spies known as the Seven Sisters Charles accepts the assignment. When he arrives in Russia Charles disco Intriguing Spy ThrillerCharles Jenkins, who retired from the CIA years earlier because he did not agree with some of the activities being undertaken by his agency, now runs his own private security company. His company is struggling financially. So when his former bureau chief appears on his doorstep and offers him a contract to go to Moscow to try to determine who is betraying seven embedded spies known as the Seven Sisters Charles accepts the assignment. When he arrives in Russia Charles discovers that the situation is much murkier than he was led to believe. As he attempts to track down who the seven sisters are(were) and reveal the so-called Eighth Sister (the betrayer), he becomes a person of interest to Russian intelligence and has several encounters with a senior Russian intelligence manager Victor Federov . Charles becomes embroiled with another Russian who is digging into these secrets. Soon Charles realizes that he has been betrayed by someone who knows his mission. Aided by the Russian he sets out to flee Russia but cannot fly out through the usual airports. So he and his companion drive to an obscure location on the Black Sea, with Turkey as his destination. In mad pursuit is the Russian intelligence chief Federov. With the assistance of a Turkey fishing captain Charles makes his way to Turkey and from there back to the States by subterfuge to elude his pursuers. Back in the States hefindst he has been framed for espionage on behalf of Russia. He has to fight his accusers and seek to uncover the person who set him up and then betrayed him.Well plotted and well written spy thriller with byzantine twists and turns. Highly recommended.I received a pre-publication ARC of this novel via NetGalley
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  • Andrew Tucker
    January 1, 1970
    2.5 stars rounded up to 3.I have really enjoyed Dugoni's Tracy Crosswhite series so when I saw a new book from him I jumped on the chance to get an ARC from netgalley. The blurb describes this book as a spy novel, but its really 60% spy novel and 40% courtroom drama. This complete change was a bit of a turnoff for me and I would have enjoyed the book a lot more if it had stayed in the spy genre and explored those topics instead of turning into legal proceedings. The main lawyer, David Sloane, is 2.5 stars rounded up to 3.I have really enjoyed Dugoni's Tracy Crosswhite series so when I saw a new book from him I jumped on the chance to get an ARC from netgalley. The blurb describes this book as a spy novel, but its really 60% spy novel and 40% courtroom drama. This complete change was a bit of a turnoff for me and I would have enjoyed the book a lot more if it had stayed in the spy genre and explored those topics instead of turning into legal proceedings. The main lawyer, David Sloane, is the main character in another series by Dugoni and it feels more like this should have been another book in that series instead of being billed as a standalone spy novel.The plot was interesting though its a bit of stretch that after only 2 years in the CIA in the 1970s the protagonist would still be so valuable and skilled at spying 40 years later. My biggest beef with the spy part is soooooo many threads left unresolved. The title is Eighth Sister yet we never find out anything about her because once stuff blows up we end up in a courtroom. The motivations and reasons for the antagonist causing the main conflicts in the book are left completely unexplained. These kind floating questions left me pretty unsatisfied and is my main reason for a low rating. Perhaps the intent is that this the first of a series and more will be explained in a future book, but thats not what I thought I was getting and I am not sure I care enough to read a follow up to find out more of the why behind the story.
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  • Donna Hines
    January 1, 1970
    Charles Jenkins is in need of change so when the opportunity arises he latches on.This former CIA agent knows the risks he faces in bringing down the Russian agent but he must do what's required to keep his country safe.This Russian agent is ruthless as he takes out U.S. spy cell known as the seven sisters.Since he's already on the brink of financial disaster he takes the money in hopes of achieving success for his country only to learn there's not 7 but 8 sisters.The eight sister is not who she Charles Jenkins is in need of change so when the opportunity arises he latches on.This former CIA agent knows the risks he faces in bringing down the Russian agent but he must do what's required to keep his country safe.This Russian agent is ruthless as he takes out U.S. spy cell known as the seven sisters.Since he's already on the brink of financial disaster he takes the money in hopes of achieving success for his country only to learn there's not 7 but 8 sisters.The eight sister is not who she claims to be and now he must face the consequences.Those consequences could just take his life or the life of those he loves.Nail biting action which could've been ratcheted up more midway to end.All in all a great thrill.Thank you to Robert, the publisher, NetGalley, and Aldiko for this ARC in exchange for this honest review.
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  • Lori
    January 1, 1970
    I would like to thank Netgalley and Thomas and Mercer for a copy of the book to read and review. I have loved every book that I have read from this author and this was no exception. This was absolutely a wonderful, action packed spy thriller. I found myself reading so fast that I would have to backtrack to see what I missed, but I couldn't slow down because I was so anxious about what would happen next. I loved the characters and was especially glad that we were able to get things all tied up wi I would like to thank Netgalley and Thomas and Mercer for a copy of the book to read and review. I have loved every book that I have read from this author and this was no exception. This was absolutely a wonderful, action packed spy thriller. I found myself reading so fast that I would have to backtrack to see what I missed, but I couldn't slow down because I was so anxious about what would happen next. I loved the characters and was especially glad that we were able to get things all tied up with a nice little bow. Thank you Mr. Dugoni for giving me another wonderful story. I only wish that this was already out in hard copy because I know my Uncle would love this for Christmas. As I was reading this book I kept thinking that this would make a wonderful movie, HINT HINT
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  • Jim
    January 1, 1970
    Seattle area based lawyer ROBERT DUGONI has produced another extremely fast paced book, THE EIGHTH SISTER. It combines his talent as an international bestselling legal thriller writer with a new found ability to write espionage adventures. In this book, Dugoni features Charlie Jenkins, a long retired C.I.A. spy, who had cameo appearances in the David Sloane legal dramas.After a short but unremarkable career in the spy agency, Jenkins retired to Camano Island about one hour north of Seattle, Wash Seattle area based lawyer ROBERT DUGONI has produced another extremely fast paced book, THE EIGHTH SISTER. It combines his talent as an international bestselling legal thriller writer with a new found ability to write espionage adventures. In this book, Dugoni features Charlie Jenkins, a long retired C.I.A. spy, who had cameo appearances in the David Sloane legal dramas.After a short but unremarkable career in the spy agency, Jenkins retired to Camano Island about one hour north of Seattle, Washington. He sets himself up as a private investigator and security expert, most often working for attorney David Sloane. Eventually, Charlie marries Alex and they have a son C.J. The couple form a small multinational security firm. Its largest client has fallen behind on its payments to C.J. Security and Jenkins goes into debt to keep the business running. And Alex is about to have baby number two.Along comes Carl Emerson, his former C.I.A. boss whom he has not seen in three or four decades. Carl offers Charlie a lot of money to do one more mission for the C.I.A. Jenkins is to go to Russia and make contact with the F.S.B., successor to the infamous KGB (Vladimir Putin’s former employer). His bona fides for this mission includes two names of deceased U.S. double agents who had been working in Russia.The mission is jinxed from the start and Jenkins is forced to flee Russia through a back door. His escape takes him to the Black Sea, Turkey and the Greek island of Chios. Arriving safely back in Seattle, Charlie is arrested by the F.B.I. and charged with treason. His trial is handled by none other than David Sloane and his son Jake. No spy has ever been acquitted at a trial in the U.S. There is one courtroom scene that I predict will become a classic.I highly recommend this combination spy thriller and courtroom drama. It is 400 pages long but I read it in a week of two hour binges.GO! BUY! READ!
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  • Jean Kolinofsky
    January 1, 1970
    Charles Jenkins was a spy. Working for the CIA in Mexico, he provided intelligence that led to the deaths of a number of people. It was an operation that led to disillusionment with the organization and he just walked away. Years later he runs CJ Securities, named after his son. He is owed money by his chief client and is now in financial trouble. Approached by his former bureau chief to be re-activated for a special assignment in Moscow, he initially turns him down, but lives are on the line an Charles Jenkins was a spy. Working for the CIA in Mexico, he provided intelligence that led to the deaths of a number of people. It was an operation that led to disillusionment with the organization and he just walked away. Years later he runs CJ Securities, named after his son. He is owed money by his chief client and is now in financial trouble. Approached by his former bureau chief to be re-activated for a special assignment in Moscow, he initially turns him down, but lives are on the line and the payment could help save his business.The Seven Sisters were a group of Russian women who had infiltrated various departments to provide intelligence to the United States. A counter-agent, dubbed the eighth sister, has been discovering their identities and three of the sisters have now been killed. Jenkins is to fly to Moscow under the cover of his own firm’s business and discover the identity of the eighth sister. At that point he Is to turn over the operation to other agents. Once again the operation is not as it seems. What follows is a daring escape from Russia, chased by a determined FSB colonel.Once Jenkins is home he is still not safe. He is branded as a traitor and disavowed by the CIA. The second part of Robert Dugoni’s story is a study in frustration as Jenkins and David Sloan, his lawyer, come up against one brick wall after another. His bureau chief has disappeared and every document that might back up Jenkins’ story becomes classified and inadmissible to the courts. As his trial approaches, his future looks bleak. While the opening section of this book is a study in deception and espionage tradecraft, the later chapters involve masterful legal manipulation and a trial whose outcome is in doubt to the last moments. This is truly a book that keeps you on the edge of your seat and will appeal to fans of both spy thrillers and legal thrillers.I would like to thank NetGalley and Thomas and Mercer Publishers for providing a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Michele
    January 1, 1970
    In “The Eighth Sister” by Robert Dugoni we are introduced to Charles Jenkins, a former CIA agent, who is asked to help his former employer with a case. He agrees, for a price, since he is having money problems. What Charles faces after he agrees is a race for his life – both in Russia and on American soil.This book is fast paced and very realistic – a definite read. As a huge fan of the authors Tracy Crosswhite Series I had high expectations and they were all met.I received this book through Net In “The Eighth Sister” by Robert Dugoni we are introduced to Charles Jenkins, a former CIA agent, who is asked to help his former employer with a case. He agrees, for a price, since he is having money problems. What Charles faces after he agrees is a race for his life – both in Russia and on American soil.This book is fast paced and very realistic – a definite read. As a huge fan of the authors Tracy Crosswhite Series I had high expectations and they were all met.I received this book through Net Galley and this is my honest review.
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