A Fortune for Your Disaster
In his much-anticipated follow-up to The Crown Ain't Worth Much, poet, essayist, biographer, and music critic Hanif Abdurraqib has written a book of poems about how one rebuilds oneself after a heartbreak, the kind that renders them a different version of themselves than the one they knew. It's a book about a mother's death, and admitting that Michael Jordan pushed off, about forgiveness, and how none of the author's black friends wanted to listen to "Don't Stop Believin'." It's about wrestling with histories, personal and shared. Abdurraqib uses touchstones from the world outside—from Marvin Gaye to Nikola Tesla to his neighbor's dogs—to create a mirror, inside of which every angle presents a new possibility.

A Fortune for Your Disaster Details

TitleA Fortune for Your Disaster
Author
ReleaseJan 1st, 1970
Rating
GenrePoetry

A Fortune for Your Disaster Review

  • jeremy
    January 1, 1970
    hanif abdurraqib's new collection of poetry, a fortune for your disaster is an emotionally-stirring and deeply personal work of grief, sorrow, loss, self-reflection, remembrance, violence, love, death, and heartbreak (romantic and otherwise). the polymathic authors casts a wide net, but his precise and unabashed imagery commands an unflinching gaze. with his trademark interpolation of popular culture, hanif's poems can stir your heart almost as easily as they can stop it. an obviously gifted and hanif abdurraqib's new collection of poetry, a fortune for your disaster is an emotionally-stirring and deeply personal work of grief, sorrow, loss, self-reflection, remembrance, violence, love, death, and heartbreak (romantic and otherwise). the polymathic authors casts a wide net, but his precise and unabashed imagery commands an unflinching gaze. with his trademark interpolation of popular culture, hanif's poems can stir your heart almost as easily as they can stop it. an obviously gifted and candid writer, hanif's poetry (as well as his prose) maps the connections between the forgotten and the unforgettable. a fortune for your disaster is gritty and graceful, piercing and profound.it's not like nikola tesla knew all of those people were going to dieeveryone wants to write about godbut no one wants to imagine their godas the finger trembling inside a grenadepin's ring or the red vine of blood coughed into a child's palmwhile they cradle the head of a dying parent.few things are more dangerous than a manwho is capable of dividing himself into several men,each of them with a unique river of desireon their tongues. it is also magic to pray for a daughterand find yourself with an endless march of boyswho all have the smile of a motherfucker who wronged youand never apologized. no one wants to imagine their godas the knuckles cracking on a father watching their sonpicking a good switch from the tree and certainlyno one wants to imagine their god as the tree.enough with the foolishness of hope and how it bruisesthe walls of a home where two people sit, stubbornly in lovewith the idea of staying. if one must pray, i imagineit is most worthwhile to pray towards endings.the only difference between sunsets and funeralsis whether or not a town mistakes the howlsof a crying woman for madness.
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  • Paris (parisperusing)
    January 1, 1970
    3.5/5.I'm still fresh on Hanif's approach to poetry, though I really enjoyed quite a few of these — "It Is Once Again the Summer of My Discontent & This Is How We Do It," "Watching A Fight At the New Haven Dog Park, First Two Dogs and Then Their Owners," "The Ghost of Marvin Gaye Plays the Dozens With the Pop Charts," "I Tend to Think Forgiveness Looks the Way It Does In Movies," and "Welcome to Heartbreak."I love the way Hanif leans into the experience of heartbreak, death, and mourning, an 3.5/5.I'm still fresh on Hanif's approach to poetry, though I really enjoyed quite a few of these — "It Is Once Again the Summer of My Discontent & This Is How We Do It," "Watching A Fight At the New Haven Dog Park, First Two Dogs and Then Their Owners," "The Ghost of Marvin Gaye Plays the Dozens With the Pop Charts," "I Tend to Think Forgiveness Looks the Way It Does In Movies," and "Welcome to Heartbreak."I love the way Hanif leans into the experience of heartbreak, death, and mourning, and how perceptive he is of his surroundings and how meaning can be drawn from even banal happenings of the day ("Watching A Fight," for example, illustrates this with haunting detail). Collectively, however, I wasn't entirely taken with the poems here. Hanif has a charming style, that's for certain, but there seemed to be a lack of congruence.Thanks, Tin House, for supplying me a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Dre
    January 1, 1970
    Reading A Fortune for Your Disaster by Hanif Abdurraqib was engaging, cathartic, and soul-stirring all at the same time. These poems will haunt you, leave you deep in thought long after you’ve finished reading. They will sit with you like a recently-found, long-lost friend who has no intentions of leaving anytime soon. And I think it’s necessary. So often we want to push tragedy and sadness out of our hearts and minds, using any catalyst for comfort we can conjure up. These poems trigger us, mak Reading A Fortune for Your Disaster by Hanif Abdurraqib was engaging, cathartic, and soul-stirring all at the same time. These poems will haunt you, leave you deep in thought long after you’ve finished reading. They will sit with you like a recently-found, long-lost friend who has no intentions of leaving anytime soon. And I think it’s necessary. So often we want to push tragedy and sadness out of our hearts and minds, using any catalyst for comfort we can conjure up. These poems trigger us, make us remember, make us mourn, then challenge us to carry on. Thank you to Tin House Books and Netgalley for an ARC of this beautifully heart-breaking collection of poetry in exchange for an honest review. I will share more about this book closer to the release date.
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  • Tiana Reid
    January 1, 1970
    breathless
  • David
    January 1, 1970
    First I read it through. Then I re-read all the poems with the title "How Can Black People Write About Flowers At a Time Like This" (I counted 12). Then I re-read all the poems with "The Ghost of Marvin Gaye" in the title (7). Then I re-read all the poems with the title "It's Not Like Nikola Tesla Knew All Those People Were Going to Die" (3). Then I re-read the two poems entitled "I Tend to Think Forgiveness Looks the Way It Does in the Movies." Then I re-read all the poems that had non-repeatin First I read it through. Then I re-read all the poems with the title "How Can Black People Write About Flowers At a Time Like This" (I counted 12). Then I re-read all the poems with "The Ghost of Marvin Gaye" in the title (7). Then I re-read all the poems with the title "It's Not Like Nikola Tesla Knew All Those People Were Going to Die" (3). Then I re-read the two poems entitled "I Tend to Think Forgiveness Looks the Way It Does in the Movies." Then I re-read all the poems that had non-repeating titles, only this time from the back to the front (I don't know why I did it that way). There are also two (or maybe three) poems entitled "The Prestige" which open and close the book, so I read those a bunch of times as well. I got this book from the library, but I may have to go buy a copy so I can keep reading it whenever I want to. The author is from Columbus, Ohio, but I haven't met him yet. Somehow his readings always seem to happen when I'm out of town. Hope that won't keep happening, as I'd like to hear him read these!
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  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    Hanif Abdurraqib’s writing never fails to move me, puzzle me, and make me think. I tried to pace myself through this poetry collection, focusing and contemplating, but taking breaks to let it sink in.The poems in this collection are heavy, exploring topics like loss, grief, loneliness, and how mourning can bring us together and eventually lead to celebration and moving forward.Some of these are hard to read, and there’s emotion on every page. Abdurraqib has done an amazing job as usual 👏👏👏
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  • Billy
    January 1, 1970
    Hanif Abdurraqib demonstrates a wide range of influences in A Fortune for Your Disaster, which takes its title from Fall Out Boy song lyrics, with poems that weave together Nikola Tesla, Christopher Nolan's film The Prestige, the ghost of Marvin Gaye, and song lyrics from artists including Kanye West, Drake, and Bruce Springsteen. Abdurraqib is able to synthesize these elements and more to create extraordinary poems that offer profound meditations on violence, death, and heartbreak.
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  • Jacob Hoefer
    January 1, 1970
    I do not know how Hanif Abdurraqib does it. Everytime. These poems beat out the already amazing poems from The Crown Ain't Worth Much.
  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    Is the best thing about poetry books how you can read them backwards?No.(Though that is nice.)The best thing about poetry books is finding someone who speaks your language, who revels in the same source material, the same melodic progressions as you; who can make you feel—for lines or pages at a time—like your preoccupations and obsessions are other people’s. Like your weird lonely brain places aren’t actually population: 1. Like your ugliest convictions also deserve the light.🗯In A FORTUNE FOR Is the best thing about poetry books how you can read them backwards?No.(Though that is nice.)The best thing about poetry books is finding someone who speaks your language, who revels in the same source material, the same melodic progressions as you; who can make you feel—for lines or pages at a time—like your preoccupations and obsessions are other people’s. Like your weird lonely brain places aren’t actually population: 1. Like your ugliest convictions also deserve the light.🗯In A FORTUNE FOR YOUR DISASTER, Hanif Abdurraqib writes primarily about heartbreak, but also about people living inside of songs, and what it means to leave a place that has its teeth in you and what it means to return, and what it is when the thing with teeth is a person or acountry,a memory ora song.🗯The best poetry is like being on really good drugs, the kind that crack open your gates and fill you with a power like the unknowable sensation of running across a water’s surface. Hanif’s poems are that for me: a conduit to emotion and the freedom of gracelessness forgiven.🗯What a gift that is, to feel high, and loved, and free, all thanks to typeset on a page. And what a gift given. Thanks to Hanif Abdurraqib and @tin_house for the gift (& @netgalley for approving my ARC request...after I managed to snag this at #ALAac19). I couldn’t pre-order this fast enough.
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  • Caleb Masters
    January 1, 1970
    Like so much of Hanif Abdurraqib’s writing, his latest poetry collection, A Fortune for Your Disaster, is an engaging work of cultural mash-ups, intersectionality, and personal reflection. From the ghost of Marvin Gaye, The Prestige, “No Diggity”, Nikolai Tesla, and Abdurraqib’s own lived experience; each of the poems in this tightly constructed collection build on each other creating something truly transformative and unique. A Fortune for Your Disaster is a fresh, challenging collection of poe Like so much of Hanif Abdurraqib’s writing, his latest poetry collection, A Fortune for Your Disaster, is an engaging work of cultural mash-ups, intersectionality, and personal reflection. From the ghost of Marvin Gaye, The Prestige, “No Diggity”, Nikolai Tesla, and Abdurraqib’s own lived experience; each of the poems in this tightly constructed collection build on each other creating something truly transformative and unique. A Fortune for Your Disaster is a fresh, challenging collection of poems about personal myth-making and identity, told with great humor and emotion. I’ll definitely be revisiting these poems again.
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  • (a)lyss(a)
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of this book through the Amazon Vine program in exchange for an honest review.This book was bigger than I expected and full of a variety of poems. Talking about race and growth and trauma there are both long and short poems that tell a variety of stories. Overall an interesting collection that's worth reading.
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  • Kevin Krein
    January 1, 1970
    there were phrasings and ideas in this book that absolutely devastated me; more than any book should.
  • Jhoanna
    January 1, 1970
    📚📚📚📚 1/2 (Libro.fm audiobook)
  • Daniel
    January 1, 1970
    Topical and touching, intermittently highly personal and relatable, would recommend for poetry fans and Hanif fans alike!Ohio Against the World.
  • Mugren Ohaly
    January 1, 1970
    Terrible
  • Caleb Bollenbacher
    January 1, 1970
    Still great
  • Jamie
    January 1, 1970
    Abdurraqib’s poetry spins circles around his reader, creating layers of imagery and language that bring his work to life. A master of language, he plays with form while bringing in modern topics.
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