Death and Other Holidays
The 2017 Miami Book Fair/de Groot Prize winner, this debut fiction introduces a distinctive new American voice.Funny, tender, and wholly original, Death & Other Holidays is a year in the life of a young woman coming to terms with the death of her beloved stepfather, while attempting to find love in LA. We are introduced to her friends and family, as she struggles to launch herself out into the world, to take the risks of love—the one constancy in all the change.Told with a great good humor and underlying affection for all her characters, Death and Other Holidays announces a brilliant and assured new voice in American fiction.

Death and Other Holidays Details

TitleDeath and Other Holidays
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseNov 13th, 2018
PublisherMelville House
Rating
GenreFiction, Relationships, Novella, Female Authors

Death and Other Holidays Review

  • James
    January 1, 1970
    Perceptive and quietly charming, Marci Vogel's first novel is the unassuming but sneakily profound story of a year in the life of a young woman grieving the death of her loved stepfather. A friend's marriage, a new relationship, depression and an old dog are the foci around which the story moves, capturing the beauty and awkwardness of life. Not a word is wasted, and Vogel manages the neat trick of making reading about the experience of grief, an inherently boring thing, fascinating and even fun Perceptive and quietly charming, Marci Vogel's first novel is the unassuming but sneakily profound story of a year in the life of a young woman grieving the death of her loved stepfather. A friend's marriage, a new relationship, depression and an old dog are the foci around which the story moves, capturing the beauty and awkwardness of life. Not a word is wasted, and Vogel manages the neat trick of making reading about the experience of grief, an inherently boring thing, fascinating and even funny.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    A charming story of loss and discovery told by a young woman mourning the loss of her father. The author’s deft prose and light touch make this a pleasure to read.
  • Ardent
    January 1, 1970
    I have no idea what to make of the last paragraph, but I loved the book overall.
  • Latkins
    January 1, 1970
    Set in 1998 and 1999, this novella tells the story of a year in the life of its narrator, April. At the beginning, in the spring, her stepfather Wilson has just died, and she is grieving for him. Her father and mother split up when she was a child and her father committed suicide when she was a teenager. Now in her late 20s, she's living alone after her roommate Libby has moved out to live with her fiance Hugo. The story takes us through the year in short chapters, highlighting a moment from her Set in 1998 and 1999, this novella tells the story of a year in the life of its narrator, April. At the beginning, in the spring, her stepfather Wilson has just died, and she is grieving for him. Her father and mother split up when she was a child and her father committed suicide when she was a teenager. Now in her late 20s, she's living alone after her roommate Libby has moved out to live with her fiance Hugo. The story takes us through the year in short chapters, highlighting a moment from her present or her past as she come to terms with Wilson's death and goes through several relationships. Life and death in miniature, somehow made more profound with the ordinary details of the everyday. A short but memorable novel.
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    This was an interesting, though hard to describe, little book of vignettes following 20-something April through a year of grieving over her step-father, falling in love, and trying to figure out what to do with her life.
  • Molly
    January 1, 1970
    Like listening to a friend tell a story. I was all in until the literal last page took me out.
  • Salt344
    January 1, 1970
    Mercifully short.
  • Naomi
    January 1, 1970
    A quick read, lovely writing, intriguing..fun! Short essays - sometimes closely connected, sometimes not.
  • Devon H
    January 1, 1970
    Vogel's debut work of fiction is the story of a young woman coping with the death of her stepfather and going about her life for a year after his death. I didn't catch the main character's name, but it really felt as if I was experiencing things from her perspective. The structure of this book was fascinating. Each chapter was a different essay like piece about a day in her life or a certain topic she was coping with or experiencing. The prose felt very poetic, and her words were chosen carefull Vogel's debut work of fiction is the story of a young woman coping with the death of her stepfather and going about her life for a year after his death. I didn't catch the main character's name, but it really felt as if I was experiencing things from her perspective. The structure of this book was fascinating. Each chapter was a different essay like piece about a day in her life or a certain topic she was coping with or experiencing. The prose felt very poetic, and her words were chosen carefully to evoke emotion in a unique way. I felt extremely connected to this young woman, and felt a depth of empathy I don't often experience in novels, particularly in such a short novella of only 144 pages. I thoroughly appreciated Vogel's word choice throughout the book, as she created this way of speaking that felt like a conversation but also like a journal entry, which was a very intimate reading experience. I was really startled by the ending, and I have to say I'm not totally sure what was going on there. I think Vogel left it intentionally vague, but I'm looking forward to seeing what others think of the ending. After such a realistic book, the ending struck me as almost fantastical and abrupt. I received a copy of this book from the publisher via Edelweiss + in exchange for an honest review.
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