All of Us with Wings
Michelle Ruiz Keil’s YA fantasy debut about love, found family, and healing is an ode to post-punk San Francisco through the eyes of a Mexican-American girl.Seventeen-year-old Xochi is alone in San Francisco, running from her painful past: the mother who abandoned her, the man who betrayed her. Then one day, she meets Pallas, a precocious twelve-year-old who lives with her rockstar family in one of the city’s storybook Victorians. Xochi accepts a position as Pallas’s live-in governess and quickly finds her place in their household, which is relaxed and happy despite the band's larger-than-life fame.But on the night of the Vernal Equinox, as a concert afterparty rages in the house below, Xochi and Pallas accidentally summon a pair of ancient creatures devoted to avenging the wrongs of Xochi’s adolescence. She would do anything to preserve her new life, but with the creatures determined to exact vengeance on those who’ve hurt her, no one is safe—not the family she’s chosen, nor the one she left behind.

All of Us with Wings Details

TitleAll of Us with Wings
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 18th, 2019
PublisherSoho Press
Rating
GenreFantasy, Young Adult, LGBT

All of Us with Wings Review

  • Elise (TheBookishActress)
    January 1, 1970
    according to the author:ALL OF US WITH WINGS is an #ownvoices San Francisco fairytale where queer is the norm. My MC Xochi is bi & Latinx, like me!so basically I really really really need this.
  • Jasmine from How Useful It Is
    January 1, 1970
    I started reading All of Us with Wings on 4/23/2019 and finished it on 4/26/2019. This book is an okay read for me. I picked this book up purely on the cover because it’s cute but the story is more weird than I can handle. There are drugs and mentioned of sex, rape, and tattoos going on in this story with older men and underage girls. There are family abandonment and teenage parenting. The parents of Pallas sleeps with other people while together under one roof. Their daughter experiencing puber I started reading All of Us with Wings on 4/23/2019 and finished it on 4/26/2019. This book is an okay read for me. I picked this book up purely on the cover because it’s cute but the story is more weird than I can handle. There are drugs and mentioned of sex, rape, and tattoos going on in this story with older men and underage girls. There are family abandonment and teenage parenting. The parents of Pallas sleeps with other people while together under one roof. Their daughter experiencing puberty and little green monsters showing up in different places, including dreams. Adults dressing up an underage girl slutty to bring her unwanted attention and giving her access to boozes and drugs. It’s just not my kind of read to be honest. It’s definitely sad that a young girl have to experience this kind of life.This book is told in the third person point of view following Pallas, 12 as she watches her rockstar dad’s band members arriving at her home for an after party from the concert. The alternative view is Xochi, 17 as she says goodbye from hanging out with (babysitting) Pallas to go join the party in the basement. She tried to smoke weed and then feel suffocated so she went out for a walk and ended with a tongue pierce. The third view is of a neighbor’s cat named Peablossom. He witnessed other worldly beings come to life after Xochi and Pallas’ witch rituals. There are other views introduced later into the story to tell their experiences with Xochi.All of Us with Wings is well written. The story started out slow but strong with drugs use and soon got better when readers learn more about Xochi. It’s a hit and miss with me on the magical realism in this story because I don’t find the green monsters interesting nor the cat’s view. I like that Pallas is smart and loves to read. The diversity in this book is vast with Anna having two dads and how people treat her. Levi sounds like a cool guy with his rules. I like the ending with the humor and what the green monsters did.Pro: book cover, a glimpse into the life of rockstars, a glimpse into the life of a child being abandoned, diversityCon: just not my kind of readI rate it 3.5 stars!***Disclaimer: Many thanks to Soho Press for the opportunity to read and review. Please be assured that my opinions are honest.xoxo,Jasmine at www.howusefulitis.wordpress.com for more details
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  • Grace Li
    January 1, 1970
    Finishing this book felt like waking up from a strange, miraculous dream. This is a such beautifully crafted story of found families, music, and unexpected, inevitable magic.
  • ˗ˏˋliaˎˊ˗
    January 1, 1970
    i honestly saw the cover on twitter just now and thought it was incredibly pretty and after looking it up i found out it's a queer story with a latina mc? don't you just love when good things turn out to be even better than expected, i can't wait!
  • Celia McMahon
    January 1, 1970
    Once in a while, a book comes along that completely blows my mind. This is one of those books. Thank you to Edelweiss and the publisher for allowing me to review this book ahead of its release date. What is it about, you ask?Our 17-year old protagonist is named Xochi. She's a governess to a 12-year old girl named Pallas. Pallas is our second POV, and she lives in a grand old house in San Fran with her rock star parents and their colorful array of friends. Xochi has a troubled past that she's run Once in a while, a book comes along that completely blows my mind. This is one of those books. Thank you to Edelweiss and the publisher for allowing me to review this book ahead of its release date. What is it about, you ask?Our 17-year old protagonist is named Xochi. She's a governess to a 12-year old girl named Pallas. Pallas is our second POV, and she lives in a grand old house in San Fran with her rock star parents and their colorful array of friends. Xochi has a troubled past that she's running away from, but the further she goes the more she realizes she must do something more than running. One night, on the Equinox, Xochi and Pallas cast what they think is a silly spell that ultimately summons a pair of fey children from their slumber to protect Xochi at all costs. Between Pallas' growing pains and Xochi's painful past, they find themselves in more trouble than they planned. The third POV is from the perspective of a cat named Peasblossom So, from page one I got serious anime vibes so throughout the entire book I imagined this one of Miyazaki's magical, emotional films. Or better yet, A Letter to Momo which is one of the few movies that seriously made me cry my eyes out. Michelle, Ruiz Keil took me through the lives of these people, and I felt as though I was there with them, feeling their joy and their pain and their confusion. It was well paced and excellently written. Some things were a bit cringe-worthy, such as Xochi's attraction to Pallas' dad as well as the drug use, BUT I could see how they played into the story intricately. This book is about finding yourself. To do that you must make a ton of mistakes along the way. The environment Xochi found herself in and the life Pallas grew up in, was not the most stable and by the end, I think everyone knew it and strived to make changes. At times, I was a bit confused about what these weird fey kids were, and maybe I still am. That and the quick ending knocked it down a star for me. But overall this was a beautiful and engaging coming of age story. I seek out magical realism because they are the most intriguing for me. This book falls into books like Summer of Salt and The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender so if you liked those; this book is for you.Warnings for: drug use, rape (off the page).
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    EXCUSE ME WHY DID NO ONE TELL ME ABOUT THIS BOOK??? This book sounds like my dream book. I need this book right effing now.
  • Debbie Gascoyne
    January 1, 1970
    There was a lot to like about this novel, and I imagine it will appeal to its target audience, especially as it is written under the #ownvoices rubric, and features diverse characters. It is a well-written and at times suspenseful urban fantasy with many interesting and sympathetic characters. It portrays 70s-80s San Francisco very vividly, including reference to the AIDS epidemic. It deals sensitively with a teen-age girl dealing with neglect and trauma and finding an oasis in a "found family." There was a lot to like about this novel, and I imagine it will appeal to its target audience, especially as it is written under the #ownvoices rubric, and features diverse characters. It is a well-written and at times suspenseful urban fantasy with many interesting and sympathetic characters. It portrays 70s-80s San Francisco very vividly, including reference to the AIDS epidemic. It deals sensitively with a teen-age girl dealing with neglect and trauma and finding an oasis in a "found family."My only reservation, for its age-group, was a lot of sex and drugs. Don't get me wrong - I know these things are part of life, and particularly part of the rock music world. But heroin use? In a YA novel? Even though it was in the context of a mistake - the main character is drunk out of her skull and some not-very-nice people give it to her and try to involve her in a threesome - there is a suggestion that one of the other positive and more adult characters had been a user, and it was all presented very casually. I have read reviewers of other books complaining about the sex or drug use and thought they were being unrealistic or prudish, but in this case I myself was quite shocked, which doesn't happen often.However, I would not let that stop me from recommending the book to students or to anyone who likes urban fantasy. As I said, there's a lot to like.I was provided with an ARC of this book by NetGalley and the publishers in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Dia
    January 1, 1970
    WHY did no one tell me about this book? It sounds amazing
  • Yamile Méndez
    January 1, 1970
    Wow. Intoxicatingly beautiful. I've never read anything quite like it before. Beautiful, lush language. The characters! OMG. Starting out with their names, and then how perfectly crafted they are.I don't think I've emerged from the "reading dream" that experiencing this novel was. Excellent. *thanks to the publisher and the author and Netgalley for a digital ARC of this gorgeous book!
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  • Liz
    January 1, 1970
    Trigger warnings: sexual assault, rape, age-inappropriate relationshipsI received an ARC of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Honestly, I had to stop 50% of the way through this book. While the writing and world-building felt like a love letter to San Francisco through the ages: the Beats, hippies, glam, punk, and all with a hint of witchcraft (all of which I enjoy), it was heavy-handed. I didn’t realize going in to it that there would be so many upsetting, uncomfort Trigger warnings: sexual assault, rape, age-inappropriate relationshipsI received an ARC of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Honestly, I had to stop 50% of the way through this book. While the writing and world-building felt like a love letter to San Francisco through the ages: the Beats, hippies, glam, punk, and all with a hint of witchcraft (all of which I enjoy), it was heavy-handed. I didn’t realize going in to it that there would be so many upsetting, uncomfortable, stomach-churning, and triggering scenes in the book. I appreciate the way Xochit’s sexual assault was revealed (while her assailant was being punished by demons she had accidentally conjured) and I think I could have kept on reading if more of the book was in the same vein-- avenging the wrongs that had been done to her throughout her childhood, but I could not keep reading as Xochit continued to be put into sexual situations with men over a decade older than her! It made me so angry and sad for her and sick to my stomach. The mythical/paranormal elements of the story, while beautifully written, just weren’t enough to redeem the story when I decided I couldn’t keep reading it (after the icky-romantic Leviticus/Xochit scene).
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  • Janet
    January 1, 1970
    Review book.
  • Regsly
    January 1, 1970
    How hadn't I heard about this book before?? It sounds wonderful!
  • Salieri
    January 1, 1970
    Easiest five stars I've given this year, it's so beautiful I'm gonna cry.Full review to come closer to publication date. Thanks a lot to Soho Press and Edelweiss+ for sending an ARC my way!
  • *Stani*
    January 1, 1970
    Rating: close to 4.5 stars actuallyPremise: A 17-year old girl name Xochi (pronounced So-Chee) is a governess/babysitter to a 12-year old girl named Pallas. Pallas lives in a beautiful Victorian house in San Francisco with her rocker parents and blended family/friends. Xochi is running away from a dark past and secrets she would rather forget. On the night of the Equinox, Xochi and Pallas cast a spell that summons a fey children from their slumber to avenge all the wrongs from Xochi's past. No o Rating: close to 4.5 stars actuallyPremise: A 17-year old girl name Xochi (pronounced So-Chee) is a governess/babysitter to a 12-year old girl named Pallas. Pallas lives in a beautiful Victorian house in San Francisco with her rocker parents and blended family/friends. Xochi is running away from a dark past and secrets she would rather forget. On the night of the Equinox, Xochi and Pallas cast a spell that summons a fey children from their slumber to avenge all the wrongs from Xochi's past. No one is safe and least of all Xochi, who has a huge crush on Pallas' dad, despite all the reasons why she shouldn't. What I loved: the book was pretty much 5 stars for the majority of the book - all the way to the end for me. All the characters were penned out so well - good or bad, they were real people from page 1. With their loves and hopes and dreams and insecurities and worries. I loved Xochi most of the time - she reminded me a lot of me when I was that age - wise beyond her years (the "old soul"), hanging out with older people, getting into trouble, being raised by my grandma...it all checks out. Now, I never took drugs, unlike Xochi, which is was where it turned a bit sour for me. Also different POVs were definitely great to really get the feel from many points of views and perspectives. One of my most favorite ones was the POV from the perspective of a cat - Peasblossoms. Absolutely brilliant. What I didn't like: The swear words were fine, the one thing I didn't like was the use of heavy drugs. Now I know why it was used here, but it still bugged me a bit. She is a 17 year old girl, under the watchful eye of many adults, who not only encourage her to party and drink and smoke, but also lend her clothes and make up to make her look more "mature" and to be honest kinda "slutty". I know, they are rockers and "free spirits", but still...not cool. The ending: The ending bugged me probably the most. It was an ambiguous, open ending, kinda leaving it "out there"....at least write an epilogue where you tell where people ended up or what is up with them. The writer made me care about all these characters and then she just leaves them to live their lives without letting us know what has happened to them....not cool at all. Magic/Fantasy: This part was written so well...the magical/supernatural elements did blend beautifully with the story and made for a thrilling read. Writing: The writing was very engaging and I had a hard time pulling away from the story. For a debut novel, this is a very strong and very well thought out and executed book. Recommend for anyone, who likes YA, fantasy, magical and supernatural elementsThank you to publisher and Edelweiss + for providing me with the ARC.
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  • Tory
    January 1, 1970
    Phew. Think Francesca Lia Block but way longer and way more complicated and convoluted, not in a good way. An upsetting amount of sex/drugs/rock and roll for a book where the two main characters are 17 and 12! Like HARD drugs too, and prolific, ENCOURAGED BY THE ADULTS, underage drinking. Very disjointed at times, with characters see-sawing wildly through emotions over the course of a paragraph. WAY too many characters and POVs; unrealistic dialogue; Pallas' voice is NOT that of a 12-year-old. T Phew. Think Francesca Lia Block but way longer and way more complicated and convoluted, not in a good way. An upsetting amount of sex/drugs/rock and roll for a book where the two main characters are 17 and 12! Like HARD drugs too, and prolific, ENCOURAGED BY THE ADULTS, underage drinking. Very disjointed at times, with characters see-sawing wildly through emotions over the course of a paragraph. WAY too many characters and POVs; unrealistic dialogue; Pallas' voice is NOT that of a 12-year-old. There was a hint of some gorgeous imagery and writing here, but sadly buried beneath too many adjectives and very choppy/jerky/confusing sentences and structure. SPOILERS I GUESS........Xochi is SEVENTEEN, y'all. She. Is. Legally. A. Minor. WHY DOES THAT ACTUAL FACT NEVER SEEM TO BE CONSIDERED. "If she and Leviticus date, will that wreck the family dynamic?" SHE IS SEVENTEEN AND HE IS NEARLY THIRTY. IT IS IMMORAL AND ***ILLEGAL.*** Who gives a SHIT about the fAmIlY dYnAmIc when you're committing STATUTORY RAPE??????????
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  • Danielle
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this! So, so delightful and dark. It's perfect for fans of TEN THOUSAND SAINTS or Francesca Lia Block with a big splash of Miyazaki animal magic. It is a strong "New Adult" or crossover read, containing graphic descriptions of drug use, sexual abuse, and body modification. Is it fate that intertwines 17-yr-old Xochi and 12 yr-old Pallas, or are they kindred spirits? On the night of Autumn Equinox, they cast a playful spell and summon two eerie, green forest children - "water babies" acco I loved this! So, so delightful and dark. It's perfect for fans of TEN THOUSAND SAINTS or Francesca Lia Block with a big splash of Miyazaki animal magic. It is a strong "New Adult" or crossover read, containing graphic descriptions of drug use, sexual abuse, and body modification. Is it fate that intertwines 17-yr-old Xochi and 12 yr-old Pallas, or are they kindred spirits? On the night of Autumn Equinox, they cast a playful spell and summon two eerie, green forest children - "water babies" according to Native American lore - but these creatures do more than cause vivid dreams. While the water babies seek revenge, Xochi revisits the trauma that pushed her out of the Redwoods and into a San Francisco Victorian full of musicians and artists. To move forward she must face her past and deal with consequences of new, alluring temptations. Pallas, on the other hand, struggles to come into womanhood without ethereal mom Io and rocker dad Leviticus providing structure. She wants her new governess to fill that role, but instead Xochi disturbs the careful balance of the band's free-love lifestyle. Pallas is precocious and kind and, much in the way of children raised outside heteronormative structures, is unperturbed by her parents' nonmonogamous marriage. I loved the mix of class, race, and romantic love represented by the characters as well as the normalized presentation of their predilection for the supernatural. Told from multiple POV's (including a bookstore cat named Peasblossom!) with interludes of verse and oral storytelling , ALL OF US WITH WINGS is a lush, magical tale of first loves and found family.
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  • USOM
    January 1, 1970
    (Disclaimer: I received this book from Edelweiss. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.)Xochi has a secret, one that's haunting her dreams. In many ways, this story is about Xochi, her relationship to family, growing up, and falling in love. But it's also a story that weaves in the lives of those around her - her twelve year old best friend, the other people she lives with, and their lives.  What makes All of Us with Wings so magical is that it features a world made of st (Disclaimer: I received this book from Edelweiss. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.)Xochi has a secret, one that's haunting her dreams. In many ways, this story is about Xochi, her relationship to family, growing up, and falling in love. But it's also a story that weaves in the lives of those around her - her twelve year old best friend, the other people she lives with, and their lives.  What makes All of Us with Wings so magical is that it features a world made of stories, of fragments from legends and myths and bedtime tales. Things that go boo in the dark, and imprint themselves on our consciousness, our memories.
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  • Acqua
    January 1, 1970
    I got approved for an arc of this! On edelweiss!
  • Alison
    January 1, 1970
    I’m pretty sure this book found me in the same way the kindred spirits in the story found each other, through some level of magic and match making beyond our control. Or maybe it was the Jane’s Addiction quote in the first pages that brought us together. If you’re not into fantasy or magic realism, don’t let the inclusion of a few ancient creatures scare you away. Surprisingly, they fit right into the underground California music scene and don’t feel like a stretch to the story or the setting. I I’m pretty sure this book found me in the same way the kindred spirits in the story found each other, through some level of magic and match making beyond our control. Or maybe it was the Jane’s Addiction quote in the first pages that brought us together. If you’re not into fantasy or magic realism, don’t let the inclusion of a few ancient creatures scare you away. Surprisingly, they fit right into the underground California music scene and don’t feel like a stretch to the story or the setting. I do, however, caution younger readers who might not be ready for vivid descriptions of drug use and sex, some non consensual. But if you’re up for these hard subjects they’re handled with a nuance and depth that’s surprising for a magical YA novel.
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  • Anita
    January 1, 1970
    A wonderful unique coming of age, complex, refreshing, surprising and well-paced story taking place in the 60's in San Francisco with hardwired realism and fantasy commingling.
  • Samantha Fondriest
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Edelweiss and the publisher for an ARC of this novel. All opinions are, as always, my own.All of Us With Wings is a wonderfully unique, atmospheric magic realism book that kicked me out of my 2019 fantasy funk. After reading the same old story over and over, this original, beautifully written book was a breath of fresh air. If you were a fan of The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender, this is the book for you!The magic of this book exists in both the not-quite-human creatu Thank you to Edelweiss and the publisher for an ARC of this novel. All opinions are, as always, my own.All of Us With Wings is a wonderfully unique, atmospheric magic realism book that kicked me out of my 2019 fantasy funk. After reading the same old story over and over, this original, beautifully written book was a breath of fresh air. If you were a fan of The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender, this is the book for you!The magic of this book exists in both the not-quite-human creatures and intelligent animals sharing San Francisco’s streets with normal people and in the incredibly atmospheric writing. It has witchy, Victorian, punk-rock vibes without being dark or gloomy. It’s sensual and filled to the brim with sexually-ambiguous (and adventurous) rock stars. There are houses with secret passages and bookstore cats who perform miraculous readers’ advisory. It revels in fairy tail logic and the bizarre. Between the fantastical elements, we grapple with themes of growing up, being in-between, redemption, revenge, jealousy, and found families. This was a beautiful story in a unique world and I’m so glad I picked this one up. Recommended for: Older teens (17+) and twenty-somethings - due to the content (rape, hard drug use, lots of adult partying, sex) I would feel uncomfortable recommending this to younger teens; fans of fairy tales and magic realism
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  • Mwinchester97
    January 1, 1970
    I won an arc copy of All of Us with Wings from the publisher, SOHO Teen / Penguin Random House, and the author, Michelle Ruiz Keil. A huge thank you to them!Does your past ever truly leave you, even if you get a new life?17 year old Xochi is in San Francisco, running away from her past. At Golden Gate Park, she meets Pallas, precocious 12 year old with a rock star family. When Pallas takes Xochi home and introduces her, Xochi quickly becomes Pallas's governess and part of the families free love I won an arc copy of All of Us with Wings from the publisher, SOHO Teen / Penguin Random House, and the author, Michelle Ruiz Keil. A huge thank you to them!Does your past ever truly leave you, even if you get a new life?17 year old Xochi is in San Francisco, running away from her past. At Golden Gate Park, she meets Pallas, precocious 12 year old with a rock star family. When Pallas takes Xochi home and introduces her, Xochi quickly becomes Pallas's governess and part of the families free love philosophy. This balances out the rockers side of their personalities. At one of the rock and roll parties the family has Pallas and Xochi perform a pagan ritual and unintentionally summon creatures determined to right the wrongs of Xochi past. Trying to keep her new afloat, Xochi's past is never far behind.All of Us with Wings had such an interesting premise. A lot going on, but honestly it was intriguing. Sadly the execution failed miserably. I struggled to follow the story, it as it felt all over the place. The story jumped around a lot and I was left exhausted trying to keep up. The sheer amount of characters didn't help either. There were almost too many to keep straight.We followed three characters journeys in this world. Xochi, running from her past, Pallas, a young girl trying to find her way in the world, and Peasblossom, a cat with a deep affection for Pallas and Xochi. I felt no connection to any of the characters. None of them reached out and had lovable qualities or a compelling enough story she make me love them. That wasn't completely their fault though.As I mentioned before the story jumps around a lot. Not only from both the present and Xochi's past, but in a jumbled mess of moments in the present as well. This stopped me from making a lot of sense of any of the characters narratives. When I was able to understand what was going on , Peasblossom's pointview was my favorite. The cat's adventure was more enticing to read about then the humans.This book had a lot of great concepts, rockers lifestyle, the concept of free love, horribly traumatic past events, and coming-of-age. None of these were done to their full potential. They where a collage of moments that you could still see where the glue holding them together should have been but the glue did not exist. All of Us with Wings deals with some incredibly heavy topics as well. Trigger warnings for rape, girls use, underage drinking and relationships, and violence.The fantasy element seemed to be thrown in whenever was convenient. There was nothing solid about the creatures, or "Waterbabies". I'm not really sure why they were included in the story other than to say " Hey look here's another genre this book could be included in." From what I could make out, there was no solid background or any world-building to learn more about them. The " Waterbabies " seemed haphazardly thrown in. Michelle Ruiz Keil's writing style wasn't my favorite either. Overly flowery and wordy, yet it still failed to paint a picture of what was going on in the book. None of the characters had a very distinctive voice. When we switched narratives usually I had no idea that we had switched narratives until about two-thirds of the way in.This is an own voices debut.Maybe I am too picky, because I clearly seem to be in the minority of not liking this book. Take my review with a grain of salt because you may end up loving this book.
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  • Olivia Farr
    January 1, 1970
    Find my full review here: http://www.yabookscentral.com/yaficti...ALL OF US WITH WINGS is a quirky fantasy/magical realism that follows three main points-of-view. First, we have Xochi, a seventeen-year-old running from her past. Then there is Pallas, a twelve-year-old who lives with her larger polyamorous family and rock group. The third is that of a cat, Peasblossom. Xochi is working as a live-in governess/companion for Pallas. Pallas’s parents and the adults frequently have wild parties after Find my full review here: http://www.yabookscentral.com/yaficti...ALL OF US WITH WINGS is a quirky fantasy/magical realism that follows three main points-of-view. First, we have Xochi, a seventeen-year-old running from her past. Then there is Pallas, a twelve-year-old who lives with her larger polyamorous family and rock group. The third is that of a cat, Peasblossom. Xochi is working as a live-in governess/companion for Pallas. Pallas’s parents and the adults frequently have wild parties after concerts and such in the house.It is after/during one such party that Xochi and Pallas make a silly spell that brings two fey siblings into the world. They protect Xochi against the hurts that she has received. This is relatively background to the main story of Xochi finding her way and really coming of age, while Pallas is entering puberty and her world is also changing. What I loved: This is a complex storyline which gives a lot to consider and evaluate. The fantasy elements are interwoven really well into the overall storyline. The added point-of-view by Peasblossom also adds quite a lot to the story and gives it something really unique. Xochi is a complex character who we understand more as the book goes on and she reflects on the past and current events in her life.What left me wanting more: At places, I found the book hard to follow. There are a lot of characters in the book, and some people appear for a short amount of time. As such, I found myself flipping through the book to try to figure out who they were and to try to remember how everyone is related. Adding to that, a lot of Xochi’s past is slow to reveal, which could work, but often left me feeling a little lost within the plot. Around a third of the way into the book. I started to feel like I could follow it better, so it does get easier as you go.I was also surprised by the amount of sexual situations (some non-consensual and/or statutory rape type situations) as well as the drug use/abuse, which I had not anticipated and which appear throughout the book. I would add content warnings for these and for sexual harassment, domestic violence, sexual abuse, and unequal power dynamics in sexual situations.Final verdict: Overall, this is an interesting story which weaves fantasy into a contemporary coming of age type story. I found the first part difficult to follow but it became easier to follow further into the story. The main characters were intriguing and well-crafted (Xochi, Pallas, and even Peasblossom the cat). I would recommend for mature readers who are looking for something different.
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  • Pallavi
    January 1, 1970
    RATING: 3.5/5 STARS You truly have to read this book in order to experience the unique world-building, beautiful rockstar-fairytale vibes, diverse characters, and fun dialogue. I really enjoyed the main character Xochi’s adventures and the way her story was written. Michelle Ruiz Keil's debut is a breath of fresh air compared to other young adult books because of how complicated and deep the characters are. If you are looking for a cute young adult book with a simple plotline, this is not it. AL RATING: 3.5/5 STARS You truly have to read this book in order to experience the unique world-building, beautiful rockstar-fairytale vibes, diverse characters, and fun dialogue. I really enjoyed the main character Xochi’s adventures and the way her story was written. Michelle Ruiz Keil's debut is a breath of fresh air compared to other young adult books because of how complicated and deep the characters are. If you are looking for a cute young adult book with a simple plotline, this is not it. ALL OF US WITH WINGS contains a heavy narrative that can sweep you away with emotions, especially when Xochi revisits her past in Redwoods. Two aspects of the book I liked were chapters from the POV of Peasblossom (the book store cat) and exploration of free love among characters with a kindred spirit. There are some trigger warnings with Xochi's past and mentions of sensitive topics such as abuse and drugs throughout the story. These aspects lowered my rating a little in the end.But I definitely recommend this whimsical book to fans of magical realism!A sincere thanks to Soho Press for providing an advanced reading copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Social: @_shelf.awareness on Instagram
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  • Emily
    January 1, 1970
    *ARC provided via Baker & Taylor* TW: sexual abuse. Though I am not a fan of magical realism, those elements of the story were fine for me. I really struggled with Xochi's relationship with a much-older man, and the amount of drinking and drug use. Many adults in the story condone Xochi's drinking, which is problematic for me, even if they are rock stars. The writing is beautiful and haunting, but this book is a LOT for a YA audience. The book shows a traumatized teen dealing with her situat *ARC provided via Baker & Taylor* TW: sexual abuse. Though I am not a fan of magical realism, those elements of the story were fine for me. I really struggled with Xochi's relationship with a much-older man, and the amount of drinking and drug use. Many adults in the story condone Xochi's drinking, which is problematic for me, even if they are rock stars. The writing is beautiful and haunting, but this book is a LOT for a YA audience. The book shows a traumatized teen dealing with her situation, and this will appeal to other teens dealing with trauma. However, I worry that some teen readers will not understand the serious issues in the relationship between Xochi & Leviticus, since the book takes a very nuanced stance on this, and the other adult members of the household are making jokes about it by the end of the story. I do love that there are multiple queer characters, and that Xochi is biracial (Mexican American) and bisexual.
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  • CL
    January 1, 1970
    I was lucky enough to receive an advanced copy from the publisher. This is exquisite--one of my absolute favorites this year. Gorgeous, lyrical prose that doesn't get in the way of a story that will delight your imagination and nourish your soul.If you like magical realism, you will absolutely adore this.
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  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    DNF at 59%.
  • Dane
    January 1, 1970
    I am so much in love with this book! Everyone should read it!
  • Jaime
    January 1, 1970
    A darker, more mystical and sharper Weetzie Bat, almost. Lovely lyrical writing that is beautiful to read.
  • Mary
    January 1, 1970
    Magical realism which is not my cup of tea. Not a bad book, just not my genre.
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