Feminists Don't Wear Pink (And Other Lies)
An urgent and inspirational collection of essays by a diverse group of celebrities, activists, and artists about what feminism means to them, with the goal of helping readers come to their own personal understanding of the word.Feminism has never been more deeply and widely embraced and discussed, but what exactly does the F word mean? Here, personal stories from actors, writers, and activists explore the contradictions and complications at the heart of the movement. By bridging the gap between feminist hashtags and scholarly texts, these essays bring feminism into clear focus.Published in partnership with Girl Up, the UN Foundation's adolescent girl campaign, contributors include Hollywood superstars like Saoirse Ronan, activists like Alicia Garza, a founder of Black Lives Matter, and even fictional icons such as Bridget Jones.Every woman has a different route to their personal understanding of feminism. This empowering collection shows how a diverse group of women found their voice, and it will inspire others to do the same.

Feminists Don't Wear Pink (And Other Lies) Details

TitleFeminists Don't Wear Pink (And Other Lies)
Author
ReleaseOct 2nd, 2018
PublisherPenguin
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Feminism, Writing, Essays

Feminists Don't Wear Pink (And Other Lies) Review

  • Lucy Langford
    January 1, 1970
    ”At a time when we are too often reminded of what divides us, there is common ground to be found when we share our stories.” - Emma Watson. This is an inspirational and powerful book in the time of #MeToo and other movements and protests surrounding gender equality. This book comprises a plethora of actors, activists, journalists and others of "celebrity" status on what Feminism means to them. These essays are incredibly personal and each one unique. Each examines what feminism means to that one ”At a time when we are too often reminded of what divides us, there is common ground to be found when we share our stories.” - Emma Watson. This is an inspirational and powerful book in the time of #MeToo and other movements and protests surrounding gender equality. This book comprises a plethora of actors, activists, journalists and others of "celebrity" status on what Feminism means to them. These essays are incredibly personal and each one unique. Each examines what feminism means to that one person and the closeness or contradictions the individual feels and faces within the feminist movement. This was a great book as it brought together essays from a number of women from diverse backgrounds, with an acknowledgment of experiences of intersectional feminism; black feminism/identity, ableism, trans-women. This book was divided into sections to focus on certain elements of the journey of feminism: epiphany; anger; joy; poetry; action; education; and further reading. This book also provided suggestions for further reading (a nod to "Our Shared Shelf") and your own personal writing space to focus on your own thought and think of your own journey with feminism. My favourite parts of the book included the Education section and Further reading. I loved the Education section as it provided a comprehensible account of the waves of feminism and groups that had formed and taken action throughout the years. In addition, this book also provided statistics (the advantages of equality in women's education and work) and studies (on the colour pink!) which I loved, as I am interested in data.I would recommend this to a number of people as it is very current in describing the different elements of feminism and incorporates so many topics relevant to the movement- FGM, periods, motherhood, weight, and many more! Climate Change? The most cost- effective and practical ways to combat it are the education of girls, and women's reproductive rights.
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  • abilovegood
    January 1, 1970
    The proof is only around 60 pages so I finished it within an hour BUT in those 60 pages there is so much information on feminism and personal experiences that’s it’s easy to mistake it for a much larger book. I loved being able to see feminism through a variety of perspectives from a wide range of women - I’m currently trying to educate myself more on modern issues including feminism, racial bias etc and this was the perfect first step !
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  • Maria
    January 1, 1970
    I feel like we have all at some point walked away from an important conversation because we felt overwhelmed by our lack of knowledge. “Feminists Don’t Wear Pink” is a safe haven. Honest, hilarious and open, a space for exploration.
  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    A feminists must have read for their bookshelf.
  • Sophie
    January 1, 1970
    "The goal of the feminist movement...aims to give each person on this planet the freedom to live their life the way they want to live it, unhindered by sexism or oppression or aggression."Some of my favourite contributions in this book include:The Weaker Sex by Keira Knightly (so raw, so beautiful)10 Ways to Support the Women in Your Life by Olivia PerezThe female Wank by Grace CampbellBe a Fun Feminist by Nimco AliDismantling and Destroying Internalised Misogyny: To-Do List by Dolly AldertonI f "The goal of the feminist movement...aims to give each person on this planet the freedom to live their life the way they want to live it, unhindered by sexism or oppression or aggression."Some of my favourite contributions in this book include:The Weaker Sex by Keira Knightly (so raw, so beautiful)10 Ways to Support the Women in Your Life by Olivia PerezThe female Wank by Grace CampbellBe a Fun Feminist by Nimco AliDismantling and Destroying Internalised Misogyny: To-Do List by Dolly AldertonI found a few of the pieces a out of place with the rest of the collection but overall I really enjoyed reading this and think it's an important contribution to intersectional feminism today.
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  • Jenks
    January 1, 1970
    This was the pre published version sent to read. I liked the different women in the world has contributed to this book , coming together to squash the small minded views around feminism and also correct the misunderstanding . That we can wear pink ! The truth of the matter is to be a feminist doesn’t mean superiority for different rights for women - it is equality and on that basis both men and women alike should all be feminist in their view of ensuring equal pay etc . The feminist movement its This was the pre published version sent to read. I liked the different women in the world has contributed to this book , coming together to squash the small minded views around feminism and also correct the misunderstanding . That we can wear pink ! The truth of the matter is to be a feminist doesn’t mean superiority for different rights for women - it is equality and on that basis both men and women alike should all be feminist in their view of ensuring equal pay etc . The feminist movement itself can sometimes be a disappointing one - and with recent events it’s the perfect time for a few light hearted chapters and some serious reflection in this book to pull together some important views.
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  • Magali Milbergue
    January 1, 1970
    Rating this book is pretty tough because I realized pretty fast that I had made a mistake : I was not the public targeted for that collection of essays on feminism. The fact that adult women, older than me, were saying it was a brilliant book that everyone should read made me buy it. But it actually feels more like a book for teenagers, for very young women wanting to know more about that new word they just learned : feminism and not a book for a 30+ woman that has been a feminist since she was Rating this book is pretty tough because I realized pretty fast that I had made a mistake : I was not the public targeted for that collection of essays on feminism. The fact that adult women, older than me, were saying it was a brilliant book that everyone should read made me buy it. But it actually feels more like a book for teenagers, for very young women wanting to know more about that new word they just learned : feminism and not a book for a 30+ woman that has been a feminist since she was 10. So it's pretty hard for me to write an objective review. I found the book pretty underwhelming, and boring at times. Some essays actually weren't about feminism at all, some were about a very weird conception of feminism. I don't know if I would actually recommand it for young girls that would want to discover feminism, because I'm not sure whether the book actually gives answer at some point. Most (adult) women that wrote in it don't seem to know what feminism is either. There were some good essays in it. But they were not the majority, and none of them were great. An obsolete read for anyone that knows a little about feminism, I would be pretty interested to have the review of someone belonging to the public targeted.
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  • Nina
    January 1, 1970
    "There are female voices out there carrying testimony you might not relate to. But they can provide you with a source of hope or fury that will translate into one thing. Energy. Use it." I received a copy of this book from Random House.This book was a compilation of essays, personal stories, advice, reading recommendations and general information about social issues and the history of feminism that everyone should know. I love the way that this book combined so many different aspects of feminis "There are female voices out there carrying testimony you might not relate to. But they can provide you with a source of hope or fury that will translate into one thing. Energy. Use it." I received a copy of this book from Random House.This book was a compilation of essays, personal stories, advice, reading recommendations and general information about social issues and the history of feminism that everyone should know. I love the way that this book combined so many different aspects of feminism, diving into some, and just scraping the surface of others. I just tried to write down some of my favorite sections, and once I hit the 12th on my list I had to just stop or risk going on forever. But if I had to pick my top three, They would be Angela Yee's Braless White Women, Alaa Murabit's Imposter Syndrome, and Charlotte Elizabeth's With Darkness Comes Light. I feel bad that I narrowed it down to only three and couldn't mention more, but I could have gone on for quite some time talking about all of the sections I loved. This is the perfect book for you, or the delightful young feminist in your life.
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  • Claire Wellstood
    January 1, 1970
    Books like this are so important. They are not there to bully people into following their truth but to help young women and girls to find their own truth and from there their own path. This book highlights that there is no right or wrong way to believe that all people are equal; that feminism doesn't have to mean abandoning femininity; and that each woman who chooses to be unashamedly who they are because it is WHO THEY ARE, and NOT because society told them it's who they should be, is helping t Books like this are so important. They are not there to bully people into following their truth but to help young women and girls to find their own truth and from there their own path. This book highlights that there is no right or wrong way to believe that all people are equal; that feminism doesn't have to mean abandoning femininity; and that each woman who chooses to be unashamedly who they are because it is WHO THEY ARE, and NOT because society told them it's who they should be, is helping to change the narrative about what being a woman really means.
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  • RaeAnna Rekemeyer
    January 1, 1970
    Feminists Don't Wear Pink and Other Lies is a collection of women’s stories and experiences with feminism ranging from hopefully to angry. Curated by Scarlett Curtis and in partnership with Girl Up. You can’t not feel empowered reading it. || Read more at: https://onthebl.org/2018/10/18/femini...
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  • Sophie
    January 1, 1970
    Inspiring, witty and relatable - finally, a feminist book that I can get behind! As a girl I went to a highly academic all-girls school in Oxford and I traversed my teenage years fed up of with feminism. The 'girls are better than boys' and 'down with the patriarchy' -flavored spiel that underpinned on average at least two of our three weekly assemblies really didn't sit right with me - the men in my life were lovely and there was never any suggestion that I would be any less successful than my Inspiring, witty and relatable - finally, a feminist book that I can get behind! As a girl I went to a highly academic all-girls school in Oxford and I traversed my teenage years fed up of with feminism. The 'girls are better than boys' and 'down with the patriarchy' -flavored spiel that underpinned on average at least two of our three weekly assemblies really didn't sit right with me - the men in my life were lovely and there was never any suggestion that I would be any less successful than my male counterparts so what was all the fuss about? Coupled with the fact that I was surrounded by brilliant-minded girls, well on their way to academic and professional success, I don't think I ever really believed that sexism was a real issue in the UK. Simply put, I had a privileged upbringing.Fast-forward a couple of years to an internship I did in London with an events company (who I won't name) and BANG, there it was. Cold-blooded sexism. Case number oneManager: Can anybody help me use the staple gun to put up these posters?*All three female interns raise their hands*Manager: (Looks around. Sees girls offering to help. Turns to only male intern who is busy doing something else) Denis, come and help me with this.Case number twoBoy intern's job description: Organising bar stock, arranging schedule for performers, stock take, security etc.Girl intern's job descriptions: Stand by the door and look pretty. Case number threeI get (literally) cornered by two very drunk, older men while working. They ask me to join them after the event. I politely decline. They corner me in more tightly and ask again. I politely decline again. They keep pressing me for another 10 minutes. Eventually I catch the eye of the manager, who can clearly see how distressed I am. He does nothing. Finally, the men leave (bored of pestering and getting thirsty). My manager came up to me five minutes later and asked me "What's with the resting bitch-face?" I explain about the two men and he tells me that I should have agreed to go out with them.Now I know these aren't the most appalling cases of sexism by any means, but this all happened within three days (I quit the internship thereafter) and it was a total shock to me that this kind of stuff REALLY HAPPENS. Sexism is real, and it exists EVERYWHERE. I know this because it continued to happen in my first full-time job in bar (where it was especially bad) and then later in what my mother would describe as my first 'serious job' for a well-respected company.However, despite this I've still to this day been wary of putting my name next to any feminist material because of the man-hating, bra-burning stigma that so often seems to go hand in hand with descriptions of the average feminist. I don't hate men. I don't believe 'at home mums' should feel ashamed or like they are somehow lesser women for not having full-blown careers and I don't want to walk around bra-less, wearing tampons as earrings.But I loved about this book and I loved it for the total lack of any of that stuff that I just can't relate to. There was no man-bashing, no listing of all the terrible things the patriarchy has ever done, but a simple message: women should be able to do anything they want without being judged and they shouldn't be ashamed of the things that go hand-in-hand with womanhood. So if you're a bit of a feminism virgin like me, or if you're still forming your opinions (I am!) then this is a great, accessible way to kick-off your research. I really hope that the message in this book will influence this new wave of feminism and I highly recommend this book for all girls, everywhere!Plus there's a fab reading list at the back so it gets bonus points for that, because who doesn't need more book recommendations?!
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  • Laura Angell
    January 1, 1970
    This is a phenomenal collection of essays by women from all walks of life, explaining what feminism means for them. I loved it because no two stories are the same, which in turn reflects how feminism is unique for every individual. This is probably one of the best collections I have read in terms of diversity and Scarlett Curtis worked really hard on making this reflect true intersectional feminism. It took me a little longer to finish than I had anticipated because I kept stopping to google so This is a phenomenal collection of essays by women from all walks of life, explaining what feminism means for them. I loved it because no two stories are the same, which in turn reflects how feminism is unique for every individual. This is probably one of the best collections I have read in terms of diversity and Scarlett Curtis worked really hard on making this reflect true intersectional feminism. It took me a little longer to finish than I had anticipated because I kept stopping to google so many of the amazing women featured! This will be THE feminist book that I recommend to my friends from now on!
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  • Danielle Murray
    January 1, 1970
    4/5 - This book made me want to rip off my coat to reveal my wonder woman leotard hiding underneath. It made me want to run up to the top of a building and shout as loud as I can on behalf of all women everywhere. It made me want to actively crush all false preconceptions about women that have been created by society and the patriarchy. Most importantly, this book made me want to do SOMETHING. It made me proud to be a woman. Many of the challenges highlighted and described within the book were s 4/5 - This book made me want to rip off my coat to reveal my wonder woman leotard hiding underneath. It made me want to run up to the top of a building and shout as loud as I can on behalf of all women everywhere. It made me want to actively crush all false preconceptions about women that have been created by society and the patriarchy. Most importantly, this book made me want to do SOMETHING. It made me proud to be a woman. Many of the challenges highlighted and described within the book were so familiar to me but hearing others openly talk about them completely validated my feelings. Everyone; male, female, and non-comformers NEED to read this book.
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  • Madeleine
    January 1, 1970
    This is a book every young woman (and man) should read - it contains such a diverse range of opinions from many famous/influential women (actors, activists, writers, poets, entrepreneurs) on what it means to be a feminist. One of the best and most honest books about feminism I’ve ever read!
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  • Carolina Ibanez
    January 1, 1970
    Amazing book. It represents a huge deal of what we have to go through as women. It’s written by many inspiring women who encourage you to take action, to be part of this amazing movement.Totally recommend it.
  • Teresa
    January 1, 1970
    An uneven collection of essays only a couple of which resonated for me but clearly I'm not the target market for this. If you've just heard the word feminism and aren't sure what it's about this might provide a light introduction and point you towards other reading.
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  • Amelia
    January 1, 1970
    Written for a younger teen audience chock full of smart and inspiring essays.
  • Zainab Ali
    January 1, 1970
    The writer says she wrote this book for her 15-year-old self. I'd like to read that.
  • Marielle
    January 1, 1970
    I am enormously grateful that this book now exists.
  • Natashaketel
    January 1, 1970
    I feel empowered. I feel supported. I feel stronger as a woman than ever before. Thank you so much Scarlett Curtis for this feminist bible. Everyone should read this.
  • Sarah Grantham
    January 1, 1970
    A great place for women to start on the path to discover their own feminist voice as it explores feminism in its various forms and what it means to women from different generations and backgrounds.
  • Cass faulknor-Sharp
    January 1, 1970
    It took a little bit to get into. I didn't love the first 3rd of this book but I really really loved a good chunk of it. Definitely worth a read.
  • Maja
    January 1, 1970
    Eye opening
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