The Book of Dog
It’s the night of the Yellow Puff-Ball Mushroom Cloud and a mysterious yellow fog is making its way across the world, sowing chaos in its path. Mt. Fuji has erupted. The Euphrates has run dry. In America the White House is under attack by giant bears, the President is missing, and the Vice President has turned into a Bichon Frise. It’s Apocalypse Time, my friends. Soon the Beast will rise. And six unlikely women must make the perilous journey to the Pit of Nethalem, where they will stop the Beast from fulfilling its evil purpose, or die trying.The Book of Dog is a novel of startling originality: a tale of female friendship, politics, religion, demon possession, motherhood, love, betrayal, and occasional apocalypse. It’s a contemporary Candide with a dollop of Animal Farm and a dash of Metamorphosis thrown in. It wryly explores how even the most insignificant and powerless of people, when working together, can change the world.“Here is a clever, fearless writer, full of promise and surprise.”—Jim Crace“Lark Benobi unabashedly takes on modern politics in all its bestial madness in The Book of Dog, celebrating the joys of womanhood, diversity, and the wonders of nature…a triumphant tale about marginalized people who work together to effect the greater good.” —Foreword Reviews“Benobi’s story offers wonderfully surreal moments rich with metaphor…a fantasy tale with unforgettable characters and a convincing, insightful message.” —Kirkus Reviews“Playful and surreal, heartwarming and heartbreaking, Lark Benobi’s The Book of Dog delivers a story of determination and love in a time of despair. Rather than merely raising a middle finger toward the age of Trump, Benobi prefers to slam it with her fist.” —Robert Repino, author of Mort(e)“Clearly an author to watch.” —Library Journal

The Book of Dog Details

TitleThe Book of Dog
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 6th, 2018
PublisherVegetablian Books
ISBN-139780999654613
Rating
GenrePolitics, Humor, Science Fiction, Dystopia, Animals

The Book of Dog Review

  • Miranda Reads
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars As for Stella King, she was unexpectedly pregnant with the unborn child of the Beast.It could have happened to anyone. Funny, witty, exciting and engaging! Thoroughly entertaining and thought-provoking throughout - this book had it all. I have a strong feeling that I will be diving back in for a re-read before the year is out. Here is the story of how six unlikely women changed the fate of the world. The Yellow Puff-Ball Mushroom Cloud and its corresponding yellow fog is creeping i 4.5 stars As for Stella King, she was unexpectedly pregnant with the unborn child of the Beast.It could have happened to anyone. Funny, witty, exciting and engaging! Thoroughly entertaining and thought-provoking throughout - this book had it all. I have a strong feeling that I will be diving back in for a re-read before the year is out. Here is the story of how six unlikely women changed the fate of the world. The Yellow Puff-Ball Mushroom Cloud and its corresponding yellow fog is creeping its way across America. "Has no one been out of town lately? It could be the end of the world for all you know." Citizens are slowly succumbing to its inexplicable and inescapable influence - whether it be their minds or their bodies, everyone is changing in one way or another. A great evil that has swept over America, spreading lies and false promises. The Beast could fool the best of them, and he almost always got his way.But maybe not this time. Stella King, along with five other women, stumble their way through the apocalypse and finding the strength in each other. Their group may be unconventional, but together they must rise to fight the good fight. "The undocumented and disabled. The forgotten ones. The left behinds. The last will be first. It's our turn. All of you need to fight together, every which way you can, and then some, and then some more, and even after you do all that, you will probably fail, and then die.""Your advice feels problematic..." If you can't already tell, I adored this one. And I honestly didn't expect to like it - political books aren't my thing. And political commentaries about society are so left-field from what I normally read that I was extremely apprehensive. Turns out, I was worrying for nothing. Lark Benobi covered the politic aspect with such an amazing touch that I was continuously impressed and delighted by every moment.One of my favorite examples can be found when Benobi comments on religious extremists. [Stella's] little pink pocket Bible fell open and she read: THE BEAST STOOD BEFORE THE WOMAN ... TO DEVOUR HER CHILD AS SOON AS IT WAS BORN."Well, that can't be good," she murmured. "Honestly I had no idea that religious people had such violent beliefs." It's hilarious, to the point and above all, doesn't rely on horribly abrasive humor to force a laugh. Honestly, I feel like my review will never be adequate for this book - you will just have to check it out yourself!With thanks to the publisher for a free copy in exchange for an honest reviewBlog | Instagram | Twitter
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  • karen
    January 1, 1970
    NOW AVAILABLE!!#vacationreadingno. 5"Well that was something," Stella said.this is a very…contemporary satirical look at the run-up to a possible apocalyptic scenario that begins with the spread of a “Yellow Puff-Ball Mushroom Cloud,” which disrupts the weather before going on to overturn the order of the world, eventually turning people into different animals. a pregnant teen is about to pop out the spawn of The Beast (and the fetus is very chatty), and a group of “unlikely,” “insignificant” wo NOW AVAILABLE!!#vacationreadingno. 5"Well that was something," Stella said.this is a very…contemporary satirical look at the run-up to a possible apocalyptic scenario that begins with the spread of a “Yellow Puff-Ball Mushroom Cloud,” which disrupts the weather before going on to overturn the order of the world, eventually turning people into different animals. a pregnant teen is about to pop out the spawn of The Beast (and the fetus is very chatty), and a group of “unlikely,” “insignificant” women (or, once-women, now animals) will be placed into position to prevent the full-on apocalypse from coming to pass: ”The undocumented and disabled. The forgotten ones. The left behinds. The last will be first. It's our turn. All of you need to fight together, every which way you can, and then some, and then some more, and even after you do all that, you will probably fail, and then die.""Your advice feels problematic…”it’s a fun, crazy, thought-provoking journey and - yes - it is illustrated:even though i’m not much for political fiction (reading is how i escape from all of the things in the world), it’s a broad-spectrum satire that encompasses not only today's worrisome political sphere, but it also lassos in various aspects of the social, cultural, religious, personal and natural worlds for pointed commentary. as far as political satires involving anthropomorphized animals, this one is a lot more rollicky fun than Animal Farm and has more pig latin than actual pigs. there’s something - to me - a little freeing about turning into an animal, as long as you get to be a good one, like a bear. or one of these little creatures in a traveling pack of mischief pals: Just when both of Josefina Guzman’s feet were safely back on the ground, some shapes made their way out of the muck and reeds. The shapes were trotting toward her. Her eyes were bad and she thought they were dogs until they stopped right in front of her: a fox and three raccoons, traveling together. Their eyes glowed. They nodded their small animal heads wisely. Josefina Guzman half-expected them to speak. Next she wondered if they were rabid. She wasn’t sure whether to step toward them boldly to scare them off, or to run away. Before she could decide, the fox let out a cry that sounded like laughter and the four creatures ran away together into the dark. “That’s right, scat, get out of here,” Josefina Guzman said.But she felt disgruntled to be so easily dismissed by these creatures. Also it worried her to be talking out loud to animals. later on, she turns into a goat, so the lesson here is, ‘don’t worry about looking crazy, because crazy things happen all the time.’ lesson two is ‘please don’t ever let me turn into a goat.’ i wanna be something chubby and fuzzy with big eyes and clever hands. lesson three is 'read this book if you want to feel hopeful about how even marginalized, habitually overlooked people can overcome impossible odds by working together. even if they are goats.'come to my blog!
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  • Robin
    January 1, 1970
    Before I delve into my review, I need to make a confession of sorts: I am an ostrich. A wild, Canadian ostrich - when it comes to politics. It's pathetic. I'm NOT proud of it. But there it is. I despise watching the news. I often declare: "I am not a political person." I obstinately nestle my head in the sand. If I don't know about it, it's almost like it's not happening. And because I am Canadian, and an ostrich, I can *almost* believe in this often snowed-in enclave of the world, whatever is h Before I delve into my review, I need to make a confession of sorts: I am an ostrich. A wild, Canadian ostrich - when it comes to politics. It's pathetic. I'm NOT proud of it. But there it is. I despise watching the news. I often declare: "I am not a political person." I obstinately nestle my head in the sand. If I don't know about it, it's almost like it's not happening. And because I am Canadian, and an ostrich, I can *almost* believe in this often snowed-in enclave of the world, whatever is happening south of the border has nothing to do with me.I know, of course, this is not true. I do know this. And as I mentioned, I don't say any of this with pride. But I'm putting it out there, as it needs to be acknowledged in this review. Because Lark Benobi's book is a delightfully political, satirical piece on the state-of-the-nation (and actually, world) in light of the results of the most recent American election.Like-minded people who share the author's sense of apocalypse with the ascension of the 45th president (who is never named, though his Samson-like locks are referred to a few times) will find much to appreciate in this book. If you are NOT like-minded, it will probably piss you off :DThe story features a diverse group of women who find themselves in the midst of strange events that mirror the book of Revelations, complete with the Rapture and "The Beast". The world is in chaos. And, people are turning into animals. The animal part is wonderful, by the way. I smiled at how animals are so present they have a hard time scheming, or thinking about things beyond the current smell that has captured their attention.I have to say, the novel surprised me. This feminist fable doesn't take itself too seriously. It's funny, clever, decorated with the author's own charming illustrations, and oddly, given the topic, is optimistic and hopeful. Perhaps the world will never be the same again, is the message I received. But maybe, if people work together, we can come out on the other side better and stronger.The message of hope is probably why this ostrich enjoyed the whole experience, causing me to see that pulling my head out of the sand might not be such a bad thing after all. Thank you to Lark Benobi and Vegetablian Books for providing me with a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Jenny (Reading Envy)
    January 1, 1970
    My penultimate read of 2017. This very funny book had me giggling in the corner about apocalypse and dogs. The author was inspired to write it as a response to the presidential election. I found even more funny bits in the attempts to control/understand apocalypse/rapture, the willingness to embrace new identities, and the adaptability of the characters. The ending is particularly rewarding, and I find this so often to not be the case when approaching the end of an apocalypse novel. ETA: I read My penultimate read of 2017. This very funny book had me giggling in the corner about apocalypse and dogs. The author was inspired to write it as a response to the presidential election. I found even more funny bits in the attempts to control/understand apocalypse/rapture, the willingness to embrace new identities, and the adaptability of the characters. The ending is particularly rewarding, and I find this so often to not be the case when approaching the end of an apocalypse novel. ETA: I read a prepub version and the book was revised between my reading and publication. Official pub date is after this, as often occurs in review copy reviews.
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  • jo
    January 1, 1970
    this story goes way back. there is a person participating in the same goodreads group i participate in, and i like her (i figure it's a she, don't ask me why), and we follow each other through the many alleyways, corridors, and thoroughfares of goodreads. we have a good time. we respect each other, and often disagree. quite often. she finds faults in books i find faultless. she's a persnickety reader. i am basically hmmm it's awesome what was the problem again? then i learn she has written a boo this story goes way back. there is a person participating in the same goodreads group i participate in, and i like her (i figure it's a she, don't ask me why), and we follow each other through the many alleyways, corridors, and thoroughfares of goodreads. we have a good time. we respect each other, and often disagree. quite often. she finds faults in books i find faultless. she's a persnickety reader. i am basically hmmm it's awesome what was the problem again? then i learn she has written a book. i never get around to reading it, cuz reading is a very complex thing for me. then, then she writes another book. i ask for the ARC and she graciously sends it to me. and i think, wow how is this book going to be? cuz this person, this friend of mine who i never met but feel i know a little, is a quite exacting reader. am i worried that her book will not do justice to her exactingness as a reader? maybe.and then i read it, and the book is perfect. i mean perfect. in tone, in the writing, in characterization, in attention to details, in what it does, in what it chooses not to do. it's a compelling and fantastic read, frothy and funny and also generous and loving, and i read it with great joy and amazement that someone who often finds the books i like flawed can write a book i find flawless. (there is no reason for this amazement, but there you go). so, this book. this book is a fairy tale. just like Mohsin Hamid's Exit West, it is a post-apocalyptic utopia. as i pointed out when i read Exit West, it is difficult to write convincing utopias. i think hamid succeeds in doing it cuz he gets there through generous heapings of pain and anguish. i think benobi succeeds in doing it by employing great humor and a fantastically rendered view of christianity. what this book has taught me: you can pull off a utopia if 1. you don't take yourself too seriously and 2. you are willing to delve into the most sacred, most revered myth about the "after" and treat it with the right mixture of respect, gentleness and irreverence. as all the sages and mystics know, there is no faith without much laughter and a good dose of irreverence. The Book of Dog is a fabulistic rendition of the book of revelation, which unfortunately i know very little, which in turns means you'll have to draw your own comparisons when you read the novel (something you should do immediately). there is a motley group of women of various races and ethnicities, each with her own story, and these women ultimately find themselves the chosen ones to defeat the ultimate plague of the world and the seven-headed beast. hilariousness ensues. seriousness ensues. beautifully drawn characters ensue. a prose so lovely it makes you weep ensues. the seven headed beast is partly, of course, our dear leader, our very own president, donald j trump. this makes The Book of Dog the first novel of the trumpian era that i am aware of.it's also a burningly feminist book. the ending is a masterpiece of no-holds-barred patriarchy takedown. it's absolutely hilarious and life affirming and hopeful and lovely. i think you should read this book. you should find for yourself what a world in which fearless and big hearted women saunter about and do their thing can look like. you should let yourself be encouraged by the majestic power of women of good sense who unite against evilry. cuz, right now, we need precisely this kind of encouragement.
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  • Dan Friedman
    January 1, 1970
    Lark Benobi’s the Book of Dog is a tale of the logical, or at least understandable, consequences of the Age of Trump, with scene after scene ricocheting between uproarious and absurd satire, all with a recognizable core of contemporary American society and politics. The Book of Dog ends on a strangely optimistic note, leaving me feeling that all isn’t necessarily lost in 2017 America. My limited imagination and equally limited knowledge of contemporary American popular culture leave me feeling a Lark Benobi’s the Book of Dog is a tale of the logical, or at least understandable, consequences of the Age of Trump, with scene after scene ricocheting between uproarious and absurd satire, all with a recognizable core of contemporary American society and politics. The Book of Dog ends on a strangely optimistic note, leaving me feeling that all isn’t necessarily lost in 2017 America. My limited imagination and equally limited knowledge of contemporary American popular culture leave me feeling as if I didn’t fully understand and can’t do full justice to The Book of Dog. But even from my limited perspective, I can comfortably say that in my reading experience The Book of Dog is an incomparably unique novel: Margaret Atwood with a riotous sense of humor and of the absurd, relocated to California?; James Thurber reborn from my boyhood to illustrate The Book of Dog? Incidentally, it’s worth your time to check out Lark Benobi’s bookshelf on her website, with enough enticing titles to keep me busy for months: http://larkbenobi.com/wp-content/uplo....
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  • Ace
    January 1, 1970
    4 starsIt's not often that I find myself in the position of reviewing a book that hardly anyone else has read. If you have a sense of adventure and hope, this book is worth a read. Funny, with a very rewarding ending (particularly if you share Lark's views of the current ruler of 'the free world' which I definitely do), this book will take you through an apocalypse like none you've read before. I know Lark through Goodreads and consider her to be a friend and valuable part of my virtual online b 4 starsIt's not often that I find myself in the position of reviewing a book that hardly anyone else has read. If you have a sense of adventure and hope, this book is worth a read. Funny, with a very rewarding ending (particularly if you share Lark's views of the current ruler of 'the free world' which I definitely do), this book will take you through an apocalypse like none you've read before. I know Lark through Goodreads and consider her to be a friend and valuable part of my virtual online booking experience. I am proud of her accomplishment and the emotional and creative impetus to write (and draw) that made this into the great story that it is. I mean, (view spoiler)[ women end up ruling the world, (hide spoiler)] so it's brilliant in that respect alone. I dropped a star because I think there was a lot of prior mythology, literary and religious references that went right over my head. I hope to have the opportunity to discuss this as more people get a chance to read and review it here.I also learned a valuable life lesson to never leave home without the Kitchen Shears!!!!
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  • Marchpane
    January 1, 1970
    Fun and fearless, and somehow both trenchant and sweetly optimistic at the same time. What an unexpected treat. It's a quick read, playful, clever and with a very satisfying ending. Woof Say All!
  • Nadine
    January 1, 1970
    If you think the drawings are cute, odds are you'll like the story. A dystopian satire that marries the horrible and the adorable ;)
  • Carol Peters
    January 1, 1970
    A mad unlikely impossible romp while the world as we know it ends. No end of legerdemain. Brilliant riff after brilliant riff. Politicians you'll recognize down the drain. If only what happens in The Book of Dog could really happen!
  • LindaJ^
    January 1, 1970
    Read this while traveling from US to Italy. It was a humorous, sometimes scary, apocalyptic farce with Thurberesque (maybe not a real word but it is the adjective I want) drawings of various scenes in the book. Five plus woman turned to bears, dogs, a panther, a goat, and a majestic & large bird, as well as a pregnant, unwed, teenager, save the world from the seven-headed beast of the Book of Revelations. The beast being the less than beloved US President. Highly recommended.
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  • Leslie Martinez
    January 1, 1970
    So good!I am recommending this book to all I know. Once I started I could not put it down. Absolutely wonderful!
  • Mary
    January 1, 1970
    Strange, cataclysmic events are occurring. People are transforming into animals and the veneer of civilization has shattered. At the center of these events is a group of women, some of whom are dogs, panthers, bears, and condors, who gather together in Nethalem, CA to defeat evil and to protect the pregnant protagonist and her ill-fated spawn of Satan.This charming fable was written by the author, Lark Benobi, to channel her feelings about the current P45*, who may be the Beast of the Apocalypse Strange, cataclysmic events are occurring. People are transforming into animals and the veneer of civilization has shattered. At the center of these events is a group of women, some of whom are dogs, panthers, bears, and condors, who gather together in Nethalem, CA to defeat evil and to protect the pregnant protagonist and her ill-fated spawn of Satan.This charming fable was written by the author, Lark Benobi, to channel her feelings about the current P45*, who may be the Beast of the Apocalypse. The text is accompanied by delightful illustrations. I enjoyed this book immensely.
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  • Matthew
    January 1, 1970
    Very much enjoyed reading this laugh out loud funny and smart feminist fable. Finding some humor in our current political situation was just what I needed as it becomes more obvious every day what the Tweeter in Chief actually is.
  • Janice (JG)
    January 1, 1970
    A quirky, slyly humorous, and stylistically written apocalyptic story reminiscent of Douglas Adams... with wonderful Thurber-esque drawings adding to its charm. And women save the world!
  • Susan Lee Thuener
    January 1, 1970
    A different sort of story.I think I have never read such a strange book. Females become animals while retaining conscious attributes. It takes a while for all the men to either die or get transported up to whatever awaits. A great battle ensues sort of following the Book of Revelations. I like the idea of the females winning for a change.
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  • Colored Ink
    January 1, 1970
    Read this!I don't like books like this, and I loved this one! Needs a little more editing--there are some typos and errors. But, somehow strong, and hopeful, and triumphant, all the same. All will be well.
  • Jeff
    January 1, 1970
    A book about the apocalypse written by two dogs?! Yes! This was a delightful book and I took it all in over the Labor Day weekend. The book is set to be released on September 6th. I was lucky to received an Advance Review Copy. In The Book of Dog, human life on the planet is impacted by a mysterious yellow cloud that affects individual people in different ways. I don't want to say more than that. In America, the President (the current sitting President!) is hunkered down in his Colorado bunker t A book about the apocalypse written by two dogs?! Yes! This was a delightful book and I took it all in over the Labor Day weekend. The book is set to be released on September 6th. I was lucky to received an Advance Review Copy. In The Book of Dog, human life on the planet is impacted by a mysterious yellow cloud that affects individual people in different ways. I don't want to say more than that. In America, the President (the current sitting President!) is hunkered down in his Colorado bunker trying to deal with the situation and reacts in ways we all know he probably would. The plot follows a six women who compelled to travel to a central location at which a final confrontation will take place. Will the underdogs prevail? This book was sometimes hilarious, sometimes heartbreaking, and sometimes kooky as hell. It was never once boring. At times it reminded me of Vonnegut and other funny and absurd fiction I've read. Plus, the book is full of charming illustrations. A very fun read. Highly recommended. 4.5 stars.
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    This book was a delight. From the opening chapter it had a gorgeous whimsical quality. I love that there are a host of fully rounded and believable female characters, and the interactions between the characters are what makes it so warm to read. The illustrations are beautiful and really add to the text. It was almost a five star for me, but as it progressed it became more convoluted plot-wise - whilst I appreciated the references to current politics, I would have preferred if they were introduc This book was a delight. From the opening chapter it had a gorgeous whimsical quality. I love that there are a host of fully rounded and believable female characters, and the interactions between the characters are what makes it so warm to read. The illustrations are beautiful and really add to the text. It was almost a five star for me, but as it progressed it became more convoluted plot-wise - whilst I appreciated the references to current politics, I would have preferred if they were introduced with a little more subtlety while retaining the wonderful magic of the start. Regardless I devoured it, and would definitely recommend it to others, for me it was a welcome escape from the everyday.I received an advanced copy of this book from Netgalley in return for an honest review.
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  • Nichole
    January 1, 1970
    I was pleasantly surprised by The Book of Dog. It is a very interesting take on a dystopian future of women taking the shapes of animals and depleting the world of men. It was a funny and enjoyable read that took me by surprise. I did not think I'd like this book as much as I did.
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  • Rohan
    January 1, 1970
    Strange and magical tale of solidarity in the face of the Apocalypse. Read this book, you won't regret it.
  • TR
    January 1, 1970
    "The Vice President has been turned into a Bichon Frise."Count me in.
  • Kirby
    January 1, 1970
    The Book of Dog is a brilliant homage to Kurt Vonnegut with both doodles and a post-apocalyptic bend. I think he'd be quite proud to read this little novel. Especially a surprise little doodle towards the end with some political relevance - I personally liked that one best.I must admit, about halfway through the reading of this novel my apprehension of where things were going to end up almost caused me to proverbially throw my kindle across the room in annoyance. As a nonreligious person, I do n The Book of Dog is a brilliant homage to Kurt Vonnegut with both doodles and a post-apocalyptic bend. I think he'd be quite proud to read this little novel. Especially a surprise little doodle towards the end with some political relevance - I personally liked that one best.I must admit, about halfway through the reading of this novel my apprehension of where things were going to end up almost caused me to proverbially throw my kindle across the room in annoyance. As a nonreligious person, I do not take kindly to proselytizing on any level. However, the climactic reveal and resolution of this story are so deeply satisfying that now I applaud the discomfort the rising action put me through. Well done, Lark Benobi. You've made a new and loyal fan in me.
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  • Kirby
    January 1, 1970
    The Book of Dog is a brilliant homage to Kurt Vonnegut with both doodles and a post-apocalyptic bend. I think he'd be quite proud to read this little novel. Especially a surprise little doodle towards the end with some political relevance - I personally liked that one best.I must admit, about halfway through the reading of this novel my apprehension of where things were going to end up almost caused me to proverbially throw my kindle across the room in annoyance. As a nonreligious person, I do n The Book of Dog is a brilliant homage to Kurt Vonnegut with both doodles and a post-apocalyptic bend. I think he'd be quite proud to read this little novel. Especially a surprise little doodle towards the end with some political relevance - I personally liked that one best.I must admit, about halfway through the reading of this novel my apprehension of where things were going to end up almost caused me to proverbially throw my kindle across the room in annoyance. As a nonreligious person, I do not take kindly to proselytizing on any level. However, the climactic reveal and resolution of this story are so deeply satisfying that now I applaud the discomfort the rising action put me through. Well done, Lark Benobi. You've made a new and loyal fan in me.
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  • Jessica Bronder
    January 1, 1970
    This story is a twisted, comedy of errors as he world we know goes to hell. You have five normal women that have been changed into animals yet can retain their human logic. You have a pregnant teenager with the spawn of Satan. Then you have the beast straight from the book of Revelations. Oh, don’t forget that the president has been changed into a Bichon Frise. This book was laugh out loud funny with its humorous and snarky look at the world. It was the perfect read for me as I needed a laugh. I This story is a twisted, comedy of errors as he world we know goes to hell. You have five normal women that have been changed into animals yet can retain their human logic. You have a pregnant teenager with the spawn of Satan. Then you have the beast straight from the book of Revelations. Oh, don’t forget that the president has been changed into a Bichon Frise. This book was laugh out loud funny with its humorous and snarky look at the world. It was the perfect read for me as I needed a laugh. It was a great break from the dreariness of regular life and one that I recommend everyone checking it. If you laugh at least once, this book was worth it.I received a complimentary copy of this book. I voluntarily chose to read and post an honest review.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed this surreal tale of the apocalypse, the illustrations were great too.If you like Yann Martel then you will love this, the analogies drawn are perfect and the story is well executed.
  • Alison Kertis
    January 1, 1970
    Weirdly enjoyable. Thank you to NetGalley and Vegetablian Books for the free advanced copy.I am still not quite sure how to frame my review of The Book of Dog by Lark Benobi. The novel took me about 40-ish pages to get into, but once I started reading the story flew by. Essentially, the story follows six women during an apocalypse: a giant yellow cloud - the result of a chemical agent negligently released (I think...? I don't know if this was ever fully resolved) and is turning women into animal Weirdly enjoyable. Thank you to NetGalley and Vegetablian Books for the free advanced copy.I am still not quite sure how to frame my review of The Book of Dog by Lark Benobi. The novel took me about 40-ish pages to get into, but once I started reading the story flew by. Essentially, the story follows six women during an apocalypse: a giant yellow cloud - the result of a chemical agent negligently released (I think...? I don't know if this was ever fully resolved) and is turning women into animals. While women are turning into animals, the Rapture happens, and most of the men are raptured into heaven. A teen girl, Stella King, is impregnated by the Devil, but she doesn't know the man was the devil. She runs away from home to get to the city of Nethalem in Northern California. Along the way, she meets various characters who all eventually turn into animals. The American Government is in chaos and doesn't know why women are turning into animals, but decides to bomb tons of countries in retaliation and also tries to kill all the women-turned-animals. The President of the United States turns into the Beast of the Apocalypse and tries to eat Stella's baby, but she stabs him in the balls, and along with the five women who have turned into animals, defeats the beast. No men remain and the women live in a newly established Eden and procreate without the aid of men. The Book of Dog reminded me a lot of a more modern Doctor Strangelove in novel form. There were a lot of hilarious absurdities and subtle (some not so subtle) references to current events. The Beast of the Apocalypse was clearly Donald Trump (thanks to the illustrations and the fact that the Beast was orange and the Beast yelling "WITCH HUNT!" upon his death). I also appreciated Benobi's many literary references.What I appreciated was that the characters that had the most intelligence as animals (the dogs) were the first to recognize that they had been infected by the chemical agent. The animals that were slower to develop intelligence and an ability to communicate with other animals were the ones who denied the apocalypse the longest - and eventually die along with the Beast. This is a good analogy to the nature of "truth" that keeps getting bandied about in current politics. Even with - take your pick, climate change, the current president's collusion, etc. - no matter how many blatant and objective facts are presented, some people will still continue to deny the fact that such facts exist. Hopefully, however, once the Beast of the Apocalypse is gone, only women will remain to rule the world. The Book of Dog would be an excellent book club read - I had the feeling upon finishing that I would either need to read it again or discuss it in a group to fully digest the analogies and metaphors Benobi presented.
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  • Nancy
    January 1, 1970
    A Feminist Fable of the End TimesA group of six women are caught up in the destruction of the world. A yellow fog is moving across America sowing chaos across the country. People are being turned into animals. The women band together to confront the apocalypse beast and save the world. Although the book has political overtones, it can be read and enjoyed as a fable. The line drawings add a nice addition to the text. In many ways, the book is whimsical recalling Watership Down, Animal House, and A Feminist Fable of the End TimesA group of six women are caught up in the destruction of the world. A yellow fog is moving across America sowing chaos across the country. People are being turned into animals. The women band together to confront the apocalypse beast and save the world. Although the book has political overtones, it can be read and enjoyed as a fable. The line drawings add a nice addition to the text. In many ways, the book is whimsical recalling Watership Down, Animal House, and other fantasy tales.The characters are interesting. Each woman has a distinct personality which isn’t easy with so many characters. The book moves at a good pace and the writing is clear. If you enjoy fantasy novels with a political bent, you may enjoy this book. I received this book from PR bu the Book for this review.
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  • Rachel Stansel
    January 1, 1970
    A fable of the book of revelations, clearly influenced by the politics of 2017/8 America. Clever, thoughtful, and addictive. I read it in a few hours on a lazy Saturday. The style reminds me of Douglas Adams. Highly recommend!Full disclosure- I received a copy of the book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Trish
    January 1, 1970
    I got 20% done with this book and just couldn't do it. It just felt like all kinds of things were just thrown together in this book.
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