Every Moment After
Best friends Matt and Cole grapple with their changing relationships during the summer after high school in this impactful, evocative story about growing up and moving on from a traumatic past.Surviving was just the beginning. Eleven years after a shooting rocked the small town of East Ridge, New Jersey and left eighteen first graders in their classroom dead, survivors and recent high school graduates Matt Simpson and Cole Hewitt are still navigating their guilt and trying to move beyond the shadow of their town's grief. Will Cole and Matt ever be able to truly leave the ghosts of East Ridge behind? Do they even want to? As they grapple with changing relationships, falling in love, and growing apart, these two friends must face the question of how to move on—and truly begin living.

Every Moment After Details

TitleEvery Moment After
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 9th, 2019
PublisherHMH Books for Young Readers
ISBN-139781328547279
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Contemporary, Fiction

Every Moment After Review

  • Alexandra
    January 1, 1970
    Because my family lived in Sandy Hook when the shooting occurred, I was very reluctant to read this book. Thankfully, a colleague who knew my relationship to this event convinced me that I could handle it. She was right. This is, in my opinion, one of the few books that understands the grief, confusion, rage, discomfort, shame, and indifference that such trauma can yield... even years later. Once I started this story, I couldn’t stop. But as I neared the end, I found myself savoring the time I h Because my family lived in Sandy Hook when the shooting occurred, I was very reluctant to read this book. Thankfully, a colleague who knew my relationship to this event convinced me that I could handle it. She was right. This is, in my opinion, one of the few books that understands the grief, confusion, rage, discomfort, shame, and indifference that such trauma can yield... even years later. Once I started this story, I couldn’t stop. But as I neared the end, I found myself savoring the time I had left with these characters. For the record: there is so much more to this book than the shooting. (What is the opposite of a trigger warning? For those concerned, it isn’t depicted at all. I praise the author for this choice.) The book as a whole is about two teenage boys and their deep (while at times, complicated) friendship. It’s a ragged breath of fresh air.
    more
  • Christian Douglass
    January 1, 1970
    I got an early reading copy - buying for kids in my family when it comes out. A good YA book for all kiddos (and adults - I loved it), but especially boys. Yes, it's about the traumatic aftermath of a school shooting (all too familiar - but the book doesn't feel like it was trying to be timely). The difference here, is it's not the immediate aftermath but several years later. It's the trauma that creeps up over time after the immediate media show. But more importantly, it's about boy's friendshi I got an early reading copy - buying for kids in my family when it comes out. A good YA book for all kiddos (and adults - I loved it), but especially boys. Yes, it's about the traumatic aftermath of a school shooting (all too familiar - but the book doesn't feel like it was trying to be timely). The difference here, is it's not the immediate aftermath but several years later. It's the trauma that creeps up over time after the immediate media show. But more importantly, it's about boy's friendship. In an age of bro-culture and toxic masculinity, it's an honest look at boys friendships at a perilous time in life. I couldn't help but think of my best friend in high school and how we grew apart.
    more
  • Leah Kathleen Parker
    January 1, 1970
    I had the unique opportunity to be an early reader for this amazing novel by Joe Moldover. Moldover has created a story that captures the lasting impact of what it means to be a survivor of a school shooting and the legacy that imparts on an entire community. The story is told in the two voices of Cole and Matt...two graduating seniors who survived a school shooting in elementary school. Moldover portrays both individual voices with incredible authenticity while also showing the depth of their s I had the unique opportunity to be an early reader for this amazing novel by Joe Moldover. Moldover has created a story that captures the lasting impact of what it means to be a survivor of a school shooting and the legacy that imparts on an entire community. The story is told in the two voices of Cole and Matt...two graduating seniors who survived a school shooting in elementary school. Moldover portrays both individual voices with incredible authenticity while also showing the depth of their shared friendship and the tragedy that connects them. However, this book does not dwell in this place of loss…the story unfolds as the two main characters are graduating (years after the shooting) and embarking on the first tentative steps of what it will mean to navigate the world as young adults. Both Cole and Matt struggle to find their best path (don’t want to spoil anything, so that is all I will say here), but find that their friendship is a critical source of support and solid ground when they both need it the most. This portrayal of male friendship is one of the most positive I have seen in contemporary YA literature and is an inspiring foundation to the entire story. I highly recommend this novel to both adult and YA readers…it will be one that stays you.
    more
  • Mark Cecil
    January 1, 1970
    I don't usually read YA, but I got an advance copy of this book, and the description just got to me right away. The premise of the story - what happens to the kids left behind after a school shooting? - was powerful and original. The topic couldn't be more sensitive, but I'm both happy and relieved to say, the author pulled it off. You get your heart strings pulled, and you get to seriously engage a topic in a safe way.Rest assured: the school shooting isn't presented in detail. It happened year I don't usually read YA, but I got an advance copy of this book, and the description just got to me right away. The premise of the story - what happens to the kids left behind after a school shooting? - was powerful and original. The topic couldn't be more sensitive, but I'm both happy and relieved to say, the author pulled it off. You get your heart strings pulled, and you get to seriously engage a topic in a safe way.Rest assured: the school shooting isn't presented in detail. It happened years before, and there isn't even a single scene of it in the book, though it haunts all the characters in their own unique ways.The author finds a way to approach this (highly important and necessary topic) in an indirect, refracted way, so it allows the reader to think about it, without having to experience it head on. Hopefully this book will help broaden the discussion of this subject nationally, and perhaps even give younger readers a safe framework in which they can address gun violence, and our tragic epidemic of school shooters.My understanding is that the author is also a child psychologist--which probably helped him navigate this delicate matter.Well done.
    more
  • PinkAmy loves books, cats and naps
    January 1, 1970
    Cole and his best friend Matt are part of *that* class. You know, the one a shooter killed seventeen kids and their principal. Now they’re graduating with eighteen empty chairs draped in black. Matt feels guilty for being home sick from his diabetes, is self-destructive and tacitly suicidal, acts like a jerk sometimes and is thoughtful and kind. Cole was the boy in the picture than won the prize for best photo of the year, stone-faced, covered in blood, carried out by the cop. He still has PTSD, Cole and his best friend Matt are part of *that* class. You know, the one a shooter killed seventeen kids and their principal. Now they’re graduating with eighteen empty chairs draped in black. Matt feels guilty for being home sick from his diabetes, is self-destructive and tacitly suicidal, acts like a jerk sometimes and is thoughtful and kind. Cole was the boy in the picture than won the prize for best photo of the year, stone-faced, covered in blood, carried out by the cop. He still has PTSD, is grieving the recent loss of his father from cancer and desperately wants to ask Viola out.Joseph Moldover hits the right notes of mental illness, without naming the conditions. Cole had therapy in the past but Matt is the one who played Russian Roulette with his diabetes. Several of his stunts could have killed him and I wondered whether he’d survive the book.Told from Cole’s and Matt’s points of view, I was able to see the impact each had on the other. Both young men grew throughout EVERY MOMENT AFTER, though at times I wasn’t certain which way Matt was headed. His part of the story ended too quickly for me.EVERY MOMENT AFTER is a sobering look at the aftermath of a school shooting eleven years later.
    more
  • Carol
    January 1, 1970
    An extraordinary book, with an important message, written and expressed so beautifully. Thank you for sharing these characters and this important story with us all, Joseph Moldover. Bravo!
  • Kristy Q
    January 1, 1970
    This book is so devastating sometimes in the depths of grief and guilt that these teens experience in the wake of a childhood school shooting, each young man affected in different ways. There were elements of the story that would hold me back from recommending this to younger YA readers—a sexual relationship between an adult and a teen, rather casual attitude toward illegal use of drug prescriptions. I don’t think the author meant to be cavalier about them, but the teens don’t seem to grasp the This book is so devastating sometimes in the depths of grief and guilt that these teens experience in the wake of a childhood school shooting, each young man affected in different ways. There were elements of the story that would hold me back from recommending this to younger YA readers—a sexual relationship between an adult and a teen, rather casual attitude toward illegal use of drug prescriptions. I don’t think the author meant to be cavalier about them, but the teens don’t seem to grasp the enormity of it. That may be realistic, but the real dangers of those activities could be hinted at. Still and all I was drawn in and felt like I really experienced the pain along with the characters.
    more
  • Allison
    January 1, 1970
    I received an advance copy of this book and am so glad I did. Every Moment After is one of the most genuine and insightful stories of friendship I’ve read. Set a decade after a devastating incident, it examines the repercussions of that event, looking most closely at how it has bound the survivors to one another. The two main characters, Cole and Matt – both of whom have rich and distinct voices – are tied to one another through a mix of love, need, guilt, and resentment; their mutual dependency I received an advance copy of this book and am so glad I did. Every Moment After is one of the most genuine and insightful stories of friendship I’ve read. Set a decade after a devastating incident, it examines the repercussions of that event, looking most closely at how it has bound the survivors to one another. The two main characters, Cole and Matt – both of whom have rich and distinct voices – are tied to one another through a mix of love, need, guilt, and resentment; their mutual dependency is set in stark relief as they spend their final summer together and face the need to let go and move on. I can’t think of another book that depicts so accurately the conflicting facets of friendship, nor one written in such an approachable, compassionate tone. I cannot recommend this book highly enough. I’ve marked its release date on my calendar so that I can buy copies for my friends and family.
    more
  • Christine Higgins powers
    January 1, 1970
    4.5! I loved this book! Having 3 sons, I wasn’t sure I could read a story about a school shooting, but it wasn’t about the shooting...it was about the aftermath (or the “every moment after” which is the aptly named title). The relationship between Cole and Matthew was so touching and genuine and more importantly realistic. The dialogue between the two of them is exactly how 18 year olds speak to each other. I also loved the interactions with the other characters, especially the autistic survivin 4.5! I loved this book! Having 3 sons, I wasn’t sure I could read a story about a school shooting, but it wasn’t about the shooting...it was about the aftermath (or the “every moment after” which is the aptly named title). The relationship between Cole and Matthew was so touching and genuine and more importantly realistic. The dialogue between the two of them is exactly how 18 year olds speak to each other. I also loved the interactions with the other characters, especially the autistic surviving brother, Paul. This book makes you think about things you probably never think about...the far reaching, long term effects of a school shooting, without being political. It is powerful and poignant insight into survivor’s guilt and grief in all its forms, the wreckage left in the wake of such unspeakable violence. I am so glad the author chose to leave the details of the shooting out of the narrative, as it was not necessary to the story. But as sad as a story as this is, you are left with a sense of hope...that although each character holds within them a deep wound that can never fully heal, their will to survive, to connect, to love and to grow will carry them through their next chapters...and that they will always be supported by each other and by their community. I loved this book from the beginning and from every moment after.
    more
  • Karyl Ahn White
    January 1, 1970
    Every Moment After by Joseph MoldoverEvery Moment After is such a fitting title for this book. While it mentions and discusses a bit about the shooting, it doesn’t focus on it. Told in the alternating voices of Matt and Cole, the story is about the two, who have recently graduated, and are survivors of a school shooting that happened in first grade. Though it was many years ago, the young men still deal with PTSD and survivor’s guilt. They are very close friends and this story explores the bond Every Moment After by Joseph MoldoverEvery Moment After is such a fitting title for this book. While it mentions and discusses a bit about the shooting, it doesn’t focus on it. Told in the alternating voices of Matt and Cole, the story is about the two, who have recently graduated, and are survivors of a school shooting that happened in first grade. Though it was many years ago, the young men still deal with PTSD and survivor’s guilt. They are very close friends and this story explores the bond that males share as friends. I loved that aspect. They depend on each other so much, as they suffered the same trauma together. They are growing up, so to speak, and going forward with their lives, and perhaps depending on each other less and less. They still struggle with their feelings even though it has been years ago. The past haunts them both.The writing was impactful and sensitive, considering the subject matter. Moldover did an amazing job at telling the story and expressing the trauma through the boys’ eyes. The author didn’t rely on the atrocity that occurred, but rather, he really touched on the relationships that boys and men form and how they can sometimes grow apart though they still feel that they need each other for support. It is a magnificent work and well worth the read.The characters were relatable and likeable. You could easily sympathize with them from the start. Their growth from boyhood to manhood is so very touching. Their dependency and need for one another’s support was so heartfelt. The plot was ingenious, IMHO. The way Moldover handled the delicate base topic was so impressive.This was an easy and enjoyable read for me, though it was emotional and made me sad and tear up at times. It was very moving. You don’t want to miss this one! It will tug at you heart strings and give you pause to think of the aftermath that leaves its mark long after such a tragedy occurs. 5/5.I was given this book by the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own.This review, or portions thereof, will be posted (when able) on Amazon, B&N, Goodreads, Kobo, IG, FB, Pinterest, Litsy, and my own blog.Unfortunately, I am unable to provide links to all sites as I am using my phone.On various sites I am:Pinterest~ Pinterest.com/katskrapsBarnes & Noble~ Karyl-Ahn-white_7Litsy~ Karylahn or Karyl White
    more
  • Gail Parker
    January 1, 1970
    I was very fortunate to have the opportunity to read and advance copy of EVERY MOMENT AFTER and once I began reading I couldn't put it down. Schoolchildren today are painfully aware of the risks and stories of school shootings. This tells the story of a group of good friends who are preparing to graduate from high school. These friends were all in first grade when there was a deadly school shooting at their school. The author does a masterful job of avoiding graphic or upsetting descriptions and I was very fortunate to have the opportunity to read and advance copy of EVERY MOMENT AFTER and once I began reading I couldn't put it down. Schoolchildren today are painfully aware of the risks and stories of school shootings. This tells the story of a group of good friends who are preparing to graduate from high school. These friends were all in first grade when there was a deadly school shooting at their school. The author does a masterful job of avoiding graphic or upsetting descriptions and crafting a story that is relatable for anyone who has lived through the last decade or so. The actual facts of the incident only come out in bits and pieces as the two main characters face resumed public attention as they graduate and move on to the beginning of adult lives. A great read sure to spark discussions on how ANYone copes with tragedy, unwanted publicity and fame, much less doing so approaching a huge transition in their lives and relationships. The author deftly draws us into these very relatable characters and although the ending is satisfying, leaves us wishing for more.
    more
  • Aoife
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 rounded upIt's so hard to rate a book like this. Although both main characters were unlikable at times...Matt rather more so, I felt...they were never anything less than real. For a story about a shooting, showing the actual shooting is neatly avoided by having one POV character be absent when it happened and the other suffering complete amnesia. Therefore, the shooting is never directly described, but the little bits we get are plenty enough to paint the scene.I loved the friendship between 4.5 rounded upIt's so hard to rate a book like this. Although both main characters were unlikable at times...Matt rather more so, I felt...they were never anything less than real. For a story about a shooting, showing the actual shooting is neatly avoided by having one POV character be absent when it happened and the other suffering complete amnesia. Therefore, the shooting is never directly described, but the little bits we get are plenty enough to paint the scene.I loved the friendship between these two boys. Neither was afraid to show the other how he felt. It's a relief to read a relationship like that.I enjoyed reading this and I'll be on the lookout for more books by this author.Receiving an ARC did not affect my review in any way.
    more
  • Alyssa
    January 1, 1970
    An extraordinary book, with an important message, written and expressed so beautifully. Every Moment After wonderfully depicts the effect that one moment can have on someone's life even years later. Thanks to the publisher for providing me with an advanced reader's copy.
    more
  • Ryley (Ryley Reads)
    January 1, 1970
    I don't quite know if I've decided how I feel about this one yet, so please bear with my stream-of-consciousness review.Thanks so much to Raincoast Books for sending me an ARC of this book for an honest review, as always, all opinions are my own.**TRIGGER WARNING: school shooting - while the book itself doesn't contain any direct, descriptive detailing of the school shooting, please proceed with caution if the mention of is harmful.**This book follows the perspective of two characters, Cole and I don't quite know if I've decided how I feel about this one yet, so please bear with my stream-of-consciousness review.Thanks so much to Raincoast Books for sending me an ARC of this book for an honest review, as always, all opinions are my own.**TRIGGER WARNING: school shooting - while the book itself doesn't contain any direct, descriptive detailing of the school shooting, please proceed with caution if the mention of is harmful.**This book follows the perspective of two characters, Cole and Matt. Both are graduating high school - eleven years after a gunman came into their grade one classroom and killed eighteen of their classmates. Dealing with the guilt of surviving as well as trying to figure out what to do with the rest of their lives, this coming of age story is about more than just the aftermath of a school shooting.Going into this book, I wasn't sure how graphic and immersive it was going to be. I was worried we would be put right into the middle of the shooting and I wasn't sure I had the emotional strength to handle that. Moldover, however, focuses on the later impacts. How the community reacts, who leaves and who stays, the long-term psychological impacts.Interestingly, there was a bit of discussion on gun laws and restrictive practices. While Moldover gives a voice to both sides, Cole, one of the children who was present for the shooting, seems to be on the stricter side of things, which is unsurprising given his trauma. I'm not going to get into it too much but I just thought it was also interesting how there was a depiction of the other side as well.While the shooting is the main focus of the background story, the central focus is about Cole and Matt. It's been a while since I've read a book from inside a teenaged boy's head but I think this was a really great coming of age story centred specifically around growing up as a boy. This book takes an honest look at male friendships and how critical they are to the boys' lives.There were a few things I didn't love about this book, but I think those flaws are part of the flawed life-story of Cole and Matt. Nothing, as they know, goes according to plan and while there were some things that I could have lived without, they added something else to the story.Overall, an interesting read.
    more
  • MimiMaybeMiriam
    January 1, 1970
    I was really impressed by this debut novel by Joseph Moldover. Every Moment After is a book that demonstrates compassion for its characters and for the people who may still be hurting even as they read. There is a universality to the experiences of the main characters beyond the tragedy of the school shooting they were part of as small children. They deal with teenage relationships growing into adult ones, struggle to maintain friendships during times of transition, navigate very honest emotiona I was really impressed by this debut novel by Joseph Moldover. Every Moment After is a book that demonstrates compassion for its characters and for the people who may still be hurting even as they read. There is a universality to the experiences of the main characters beyond the tragedy of the school shooting they were part of as small children. They deal with teenage relationships growing into adult ones, struggle to maintain friendships during times of transition, navigate very honest emotional journeys and search for meaning in the moments. Additionally the way that chronic health conditions are discussed and portrayed is both accurate and heartfelt. I'd love to see more YA books that deal with chronic conditions like Diabetes and mental health concerns with the same skill seen here. Moldover's background in psychology and neuropsychology is obvious in the way he writes so succinctly about the emotional heartbeats of his characters. He uses his knowledge to carefully explore the trauma of the school shooting that occurred without bringing in gory details or resorting to shock imagery. There is a delicacy and respect here for victims, survivors and communities who live through violence. In today's 24 hour news cycle and online media world we don't often find such grace and clarity.I was glad to hand this book off to my 15 and 13 year old kids and will recommend it to parents and children alike.
    more
  • Karen Barber
    January 1, 1970
    Told in alternating viewpoints this story takes a topical issue - school shooting - but does it in a way that is really quite unsettling.The shooting in question took place when the kids were in first grade. They are now 18 and about to graduate. With Matt kept at home because of a diabetic episode and Cole unable to recall the event, there’s very little detail given about the shooting which I’m grateful for. The story focuses instead on the little details, the small parts of the story that show Told in alternating viewpoints this story takes a topical issue - school shooting - but does it in a way that is really quite unsettling.The shooting in question took place when the kids were in first grade. They are now 18 and about to graduate. With Matt kept at home because of a diabetic episode and Cole unable to recall the event, there’s very little detail given about the shooting which I’m grateful for. The story focuses instead on the little details, the small parts of the story that show the true extent to which lives are affected by such an event.There were a lot of peripheral characters within the book which fleshed out the town/setting, but did - on occasion - meant I feel less connected to some of the key events. However, it was the kind of story that really got under my skin.A definite must-read. Thanks to NetGalley for providing me with an early copy to read in exchange for my thoughts.
    more
  • Tiffany Neal
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you NetGalley for providing me with this digital ARC.I really liked this book. It’s a simple storyline in many ways, yet lots of complex themes and issues thread their way throughout. This is a realistic fiction YA telling the story through two male POVs. It’s the summer after graduating from high school, but what makes this story unique is that both MCs were a part of a 1st grade class that suffered a school shooting. The story does not focus on the shooting itself, rather the aftermath, Thank you NetGalley for providing me with this digital ARC.I really liked this book. It’s a simple storyline in many ways, yet lots of complex themes and issues thread their way throughout. This is a realistic fiction YA telling the story through two male POVs. It’s the summer after graduating from high school, but what makes this story unique is that both MCs were a part of a 1st grade class that suffered a school shooting. The story does not focus on the shooting itself, rather the aftermath, even a decade later for the boys and others around them.I definitely felt connected to the main characters, and I appreciated the transparency and realness of them. They are both very flawed and there are even times where the reader may dislike the characters, but because of the honest portrayal, you end up rooting for their best interest.While this is a YA, I would caution this getting into younger classrooms: there’s a sexual relationship between an adult and 18 year old, quite a few scenes dealing with prescription drugs, and characters dealing with heavy feelings including depression and anxiety.
    more
  • Kris
    January 1, 1970
    I had a feeling this book was going to be very moving, just by reading the synopsis. I will say I was extremely happy to see it focus’ on a lot more than just the past. It showed how character’s have grown and how they handle their grief and guilt over different aspects of the past tragedy. One thing I loved reading about was one of the characters trials a tribulation of living with type 1 diabetes. I know a lot about type 2 and would consider myself quite knowledgable about the subject, but I n I had a feeling this book was going to be very moving, just by reading the synopsis. I will say I was extremely happy to see it focus’ on a lot more than just the past. It showed how character’s have grown and how they handle their grief and guilt over different aspects of the past tragedy. One thing I loved reading about was one of the characters trials a tribulation of living with type 1 diabetes. I know a lot about type 2 and would consider myself quite knowledgable about the subject, but I never knew much about type 1 and I enjoyed the chance.Matt and Cole were great characters to hear from. I loved that each chapter alternated between the two. I found Cole the more interesting of the two to read from. They are both in such a similar place in their lives and it’s wonderful to see how differently they navigate through the summer. This books was very character driven to say the least and that made it different from others I’ve read about similar topics.I found the topics covered in this story to be done in a very sensitive and respectful way and would absolutely recommend it to anyone wondering about the affects. I was frustrated a to throughout the book, but not so much plot-wise more character-wise. I would have given it a lower rating, but the writing was just so beautiful I couldn’t.
    more
  • Katie
    January 1, 1970
    Best friends Matt and Cole grapple with their changing relationships during the summer after high school in this impactful, evocative story about growing up and moving on from a traumatic past.Surviving was just the beginning. Eleven years after a shooting rocked the small town of East Ridge, New Jersey and left eighteen first graders in their classroom dead, survivors and recent high school graduates Matt Simpson and Cole Hewitt are still navigating their guilt and trying to move beyond the sha Best friends Matt and Cole grapple with their changing relationships during the summer after high school in this impactful, evocative story about growing up and moving on from a traumatic past.
Surviving was just the beginning. 
Eleven years after a shooting rocked the small town of East Ridge, New Jersey and left eighteen first graders in their classroom dead, survivors and recent high school graduates Matt Simpson and Cole Hewitt are still navigating their guilt and trying to move beyond the shadow of their town's grief. Will Cole and Matt ever be able to truly leave the ghosts of East Ridge behind? Do they even want to? 
As they grapple with changing relationships, falling in love, and growing apart, these two friends must face the question of how to move on—and truly begin living.
 
Ya'll, this one was SO. GOOD.
 

♥ I don't even know how much the synopsis does the book justice. Matt and Cole are one of the best friendships I've ever seen. In our world of toxic masculinity, boys will be boys, and bro-culture, Cole and Matt are the most supportive friends, even when they don't entirely understand each other. Matt has never had the problems Cole has with talking to the girl he has a crush on, but Matt isn't here to make him feel bad about it. Matt is here to help create opportunities for Cole to interact with his crush, and to encourage him the whole time. Cole would never take the risks that Matt does with his Type 1 diabetes, but he knows that Matt is going to keep on doing it, so Cole learned everything he could years ago to help keep his buddy safe. They're just there for each other, day in, day out.

♥ Eleven years after a school shooting that devastated their first grade class, Cole and Matt are finally graduating from high school with the rest of their class.
“People want to forget. No one would ever say it, but I think this town will be glad to see our class leave. They put up all the memorials you’d expect, but there was no need: we’re living reminders.” 
This book is about the aftermath, the toll that being one of the living can take. There's little talk about the shooting itself. And as often as they mention the shooter himself, there's no discussion of why he did it, or if there was a trial later. This book is about the survivors, the way the parents of the dead chose to grieve, the injuries that still plague some of the children. Graduation day is handled with grace and respect for the students who died, even as they all hope that this is the last time that the media will be so involved.
♥ Cole and Matt both suffer from some major undiagnosed PTSD and survivors guilt (I thought I was very smart for diagnosing them both on my own and wondered how the author never figured it out until I read his bio and realized he's a psychologist sooo...yeah. Undiagnosed on purpose, Katie, duh). Cole is The Boy in the Picture, after a photo of him being carried out of the classroom by a police officer was widely circulated, even winning a Pulitzer prize. But Cole also can't remember a thing about the shooting. He knows what happened from the accounts of others, but has no memories of his own. This is endlessly frustrating to Matt, who was kept home from school the day of the shooting due to his diabetes. He's always wondering where he would have been sitting that day, what might have happened to him, if he would have lived or died. He doesn't really know if he should still be here or not.
"Still, I don't move. I wait, though I don't know what I'm waiting for, other than for this summer to be over, for life to move on, and for me to find out whether I'm supposed to be a part of it or not."
People say how lucky he was, but Matt can't see staying home sick as lucky. He sees not being there that day as unfinished business. He's got major, major survivor's guilt, and he and Cole so desperately need someone to help them both through their emotions from that day.

♥ Look, there is so much else that I can't even get into because this review would go on forever, but it's all just incredible. The Type 1 diabetes rep, which I so rarely see in books, is woven throughout the story without taking over. There's a lot of information presented, and the disease definitely impacts Matt's life. It isn't just mentioned a few times before fading into the background. Cole is also still grieving the death of his father only a year ago, and Matt is trying to connect with the autistic twin brother of he and Cole's friend, Andy, who died in the shooting.
Final Thoughts: There is a LOT going on in this one, and I really really recommend it. I went into it not expecting much, because there have been a lot of books with school shootings as a background and very few that have done them well. But this was so compelling, the voices were distinct, and I wanted so badly to savor every page and make it last forever, but in the end I sped through it in a day because it was just so good.

Favorite Quotes: "Maybe they'll forget about us after this, and then we'll know whether it's worse than being remembered."


"Show. The. Fuck. Up. Like, all the way."


"There's a difference between what we want and what we get."
 
All quotes are taken from an uncorrected proof of the book

    more
  • Lizz Axnick
    January 1, 1970
    I thought this was a really intriguing book but I was very frustrated it was missing a key piece of information that for me made the story just a little hard to follow. I will put it below so if you don't want a spoiler, skip that part.This is the story of a small town in New Jersey with it's graduating class missing 18 students. These students were killed in a school shooting in first grade. The story focuses on Cole, who is now the famous "boy in the photo" that was taken in the aftermath of t I thought this was a really intriguing book but I was very frustrated it was missing a key piece of information that for me made the story just a little hard to follow. I will put it below so if you don't want a spoiler, skip that part.This is the story of a small town in New Jersey with it's graduating class missing 18 students. These students were killed in a school shooting in first grade. The story focuses on Cole, who is now the famous "boy in the photo" that was taken in the aftermath of the shooting. He doesn't want to be recognized or noticed because of this. Cole's best friend, Matt, is still dealing with the aftermath even these years later because he missed school that day (these are not spoilers as they are mentioned in the beginning of the book). We also see their classmate, Chris, who suffered a crippling injury and is worried he gets too much public pity, even years later.These boys are coming to grips with the uncertainty following graduation, though unlike for most graduating seniors, it is not a happy trepidation of what the future holds but rather another day in the life of the "survivors". Matt says this event is something one never gets past, even though he wasn't there, and feels tremendous guilt over such.I thought the book is well written for a debut novel. The dialogue was convincing and the alternating perspectives of Cole and Matt, the introvert and the popular jock, were interesting.Spoiler alert coming so skip this part if you don't want to know - I am just revealing what I thought was missing that cost the book a star.You have been warned!***SPOILER: I hated that the shooting was never explained. I don't want long detailed terrible memories of what happened. It would have been helpful to have a preface saying that on this date this kid walked into a classroom and killed 19 people. I was never clear on whether this person who committed this crime was a peer of these poor first graders or what. His name is mentioned repeatedly in the story, including the local fascination with the house he occupied, so why not give the readers just that short background information? I think it would have really added to the characters being haunted by the past.
    more
  • Kassandra
    January 1, 1970
    I went into this book expecting one thing and was surprised to find that I came out the other side adoring it for something else. I thought the portrayal of the characters and the long-term trauma they were going through was done very well, and I felt that the survivors guilt that some of the characters felt was written and expressed very well. Not only that, though, but the friendship between Matt and Cole could not have been done any better. Of course this book is excellent for its portrayal o I went into this book expecting one thing and was surprised to find that I came out the other side adoring it for something else. I thought the portrayal of the characters and the long-term trauma they were going through was done very well, and I felt that the survivors guilt that some of the characters felt was written and expressed very well. Not only that, though, but the friendship between Matt and Cole could not have been done any better. Of course this book is excellent for its portrayal of the effects a tragic event can have on a town and it’s people but it is even more excellent for promoting a good, healthy male friendship. Matt and Cole have known each other practically their whole lives, they would do anything for each other, and they are not afraid to express the affection they have for one another. We definitely need more friendships like theirs in books, especially in YA.
    more
  • Anna
    January 1, 1970
    Every Moment After gives us complex, believable characters set it an all-too real context to tell the compelling story of surviving tragedy. This fantastic YA book is an easy and engrossing read, driven by dialogue that reads true to the boys' ages and handles the very sensitive subject of school shooting with tact and compassion. Kudos to Moldover for breathing life into Cole and Matt and for giving us an intimate look at the relationship between these two young men. Every Moment After does a g Every Moment After gives us complex, believable characters set it an all-too real context to tell the compelling story of surviving tragedy. This fantastic YA book is an easy and engrossing read, driven by dialogue that reads true to the boys' ages and handles the very sensitive subject of school shooting with tact and compassion. Kudos to Moldover for breathing life into Cole and Matt and for giving us an intimate look at the relationship between these two young men. Every Moment After does a great job depicting a diverse cast of characters without feeling awkward in its inclusivity and manages to explore the broad spectrum of emotions central to loss, grieving, coping, and healing in a way that feels sincere rather than voyeuristic. This was an all around great read.
    more
  • Amie
    January 1, 1970
    This book was recommended to me based on reading many YA books as well as several books about school shootings. I was pleasantly surprised that while being about 2 boys who survived a school shooting, the actual event is merely a backstory in the novel. The boys' friendship is really what this book is about. I have 2 elementary aged sons, and really appreciate the honest and caring way the main characters' relationship grew. I am trying to raise my sons in an environment where boys can show thei This book was recommended to me based on reading many YA books as well as several books about school shootings. I was pleasantly surprised that while being about 2 boys who survived a school shooting, the actual event is merely a backstory in the novel. The boys' friendship is really what this book is about. I have 2 elementary aged sons, and really appreciate the honest and caring way the main characters' relationship grew. I am trying to raise my sons in an environment where boys can show their feelings openly, cry in public, etc. and not feel shame. Every Moment After was well written and overall enjoyable to read.
    more
  • Alexis
    January 1, 1970
    This is a much needed book that explores the lives of two boys as they move into adulthood after experiencing a tragedy that is becoming far too familiar for children today. While the book deals with the lives of the survivors of a school shooting it is not centered on the actual shooting so it spares the reader from overly graphic details. There is plenty of focus on the moments that make the main characters relatable: first love, parental struggles, mischief and petty squabbles but there is al This is a much needed book that explores the lives of two boys as they move into adulthood after experiencing a tragedy that is becoming far too familiar for children today. While the book deals with the lives of the survivors of a school shooting it is not centered on the actual shooting so it spares the reader from overly graphic details. There is plenty of focus on the moments that make the main characters relatable: first love, parental struggles, mischief and petty squabbles but there is also a depth to their emotion, their grief and humour, their fight for meaning and their will to make something of their lives which were spared one fateful day 11 years prior.
    more
  • Lynie
    January 1, 1970
    What a story. Written in the frame of mind of the event being in the past, and the outlook of the survivors. What the story does not have is descriptions of the actual school shooting, or the shooter. What is does have is stories of the the survivors...the main characters and their families and community. I think it does justice to not only the kids that survived, but the town that survived. It offered insight that I don't know I had thought about too much. And I appreciated that the insights we What a story. Written in the frame of mind of the event being in the past, and the outlook of the survivors. What the story does not have is descriptions of the actual school shooting, or the shooter. What is does have is stories of the the survivors...the main characters and their families and community. I think it does justice to not only the kids that survived, but the town that survived. It offered insight that I don't know I had thought about too much. And I appreciated that the insights were portrayed through the eyes of teenage boys who not only have growing up to contend with, but the realities of survivorship as well. Well done and thought out.
    more
  • Gillian
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. I don’t really have much to say about this book. I didn’t really like the characters. I didn’t really like the story arc. The end was meh and didn’t really feel all that satisfying to me. I kind of forced myself to read it because I was given an ARC and felt that I should finish it. There were some parts that were good and I liked the premise but it was a grief book written by a psychologist. It was about what one might expec I received an ARC from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. I don’t really have much to say about this book. I didn’t really like the characters. I didn’t really like the story arc. The end was meh and didn’t really feel all that satisfying to me. I kind of forced myself to read it because I was given an ARC and felt that I should finish it. There were some parts that were good and I liked the premise but it was a grief book written by a psychologist. It was about what one might expect from that.
    more
  • Hira Chaudhary
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free copy of this book through NetGalley in exchange for my honest review.I really liked the idea behind this book, and the first few chapters at the graduation were really well-written and gut-wrenching and powerful. I really loved Matt and Cole’s relationship and the demons they were both dealing with.But I think I wasn’t as big a fan of the two love stories, or most of the rest of the general plot? I did really like seeing how differently everyone was affected by the shooting and I received a free copy of this book through NetGalley in exchange for my honest review.I really liked the idea behind this book, and the first few chapters at the graduation were really well-written and gut-wrenching and powerful. I really loved Matt and Cole’s relationship and the demons they were both dealing with.But I think I wasn’t as big a fan of the two love stories, or most of the rest of the general plot? I did really like seeing how differently everyone was affected by the shooting and it was really well done all around.
    more
  • Jacob Collier
    January 1, 1970
    This is a life changing book that I have read after a long time. You can buy this and many other bestsellers at great discounts from here: https://www.amazon.com/s?i=stripbooks...
  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    Very moving portrayal of teen boys struggling to find themselves in the aftermath of a school shooting. As the mother of teens so much rang true in the depiction of kids trying to find their way. Well done!
  • Arden
    January 1, 1970
    I understand it handles very important topics, but I dnf’d at 50%.
Write a review