My Solo Exchange Diary Vol. 2
The sequel series to the award-winning My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness!Living on her own is harder than Nagata Kabi expected. Building relationships is difficult too, but with a new friendship to cultivate and a new perspective on her family, she's doing her best to open up and become a warm, compassionate person!

My Solo Exchange Diary Vol. 2 Details

TitleMy Solo Exchange Diary Vol. 2
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 12th, 2019
PublisherSeven Seas
ISBN-139781626929999
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Manga, Lgbt, Graphic Novels, Nonfiction, Comics, Glbt, Queer

My Solo Exchange Diary Vol. 2 Review

  • Jessica Peregrym
    January 1, 1970
    I really respect Nagata Kabi for putting herself out there and talking so openly about her anxiety and depression. I understand that mental illness is a painful thing to live with, especially in a place like Japan where seeking therapy is still fairly frowned upon. But I still found it hard to read about this woman doing little more than running circles in her own little pit of despair. I hope she can get out someday and find happiness, but I honestly have my doubts.
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  • Sara Mul
    January 1, 1970
    This follows "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness" as a kind-of sequel. Thematically, it's all very similar to us: Kabi Nagata is learning how to be self-sufficient, to love and to be loved, and to function as a person. However, this one was structured differently: now, it felt less like a stream of consciousness and more like diary entries (makes sense cause of the name of this one, ha!), and I enjoyed the format much more this time around. Each chapter is another diary entry, what Nagata cal This follows "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness" as a kind-of sequel. Thematically, it's all very similar to us: Kabi Nagata is learning how to be self-sufficient, to love and to be loved, and to function as a person. However, this one was structured differently: now, it felt less like a stream of consciousness and more like diary entries (makes sense cause of the name of this one, ha!), and I enjoyed the format much more this time around. Each chapter is another diary entry, what Nagata calls "a solo exchange" which is basically a diary entry to yourself to allow introspection. Even though Nagata's struggles feel familiar to what she expressed in MLEWL, the formatting and language this time around was refreshing, presenting her struggles as an analysis of herself than laying herself bare for her audience. My favorite part was discussing the pressure and validation from an online presence, especially as a content creator and the effect it had on her too. It seems to be a common struggle with many content creators that gain an influx of attention.*Even though I like this one a bit more than the first, I would suggest reading "My Lesbian Experience with Loneliness" first to gain context and insight into Kabi Nagata.
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  • Alex
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed Nagata's previous work, but I can only handle so much paralyzing, debilitating depression before it starts to rub off on me. She's brutally honest, which I can respect, but I just had a hard time enjoying the book. Also, I'm not sure what's up with the cover illustration. This book didn't really have any sex in it like the last two did. It seems to be following the trend of the previous two books, but it's really out of place in this volume.
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  • Valkyrie Vu
    January 1, 1970
    I still love this one quite the same way I do with the 1st one in the sequel . I admire her for putting herself on the naked paper so other people know that they're not alone.I just wish she could find a girlfriend and enjoy life. Well , at least someone to cuddle with :))
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  • Ellis
    January 1, 1970
    3.4
  • Meaghan Steeves
    January 1, 1970
    I was a bigger fan of the first book but still related to her desire for independence.
  • tatterpunk
    January 1, 1970
    Progress, as they say, is a spiral.I am deeply grateful to these books and their honesty about the mundane nature of recovery, the struggle within success, and how sometimes all the love we crave is already present in our lives -- we only need to become the version of ourselves who is ready to experience it. I won't be surprised if this volume gets lower ratings than the first two. The cultural dissonance about the treatment of mental health and the importance of family probably won't go over ea Progress, as they say, is a spiral.I am deeply grateful to these books and their honesty about the mundane nature of recovery, the struggle within success, and how sometimes all the love we crave is already present in our lives -- we only need to become the version of ourselves who is ready to experience it. I won't be surprised if this volume gets lower ratings than the first two. The cultural dissonance about the treatment of mental health and the importance of family probably won't go over easily if a reader is unfamiliar with Japanese attitudes. (I am familiar with them, but it was still stressful to read at times.) Moreover, there's less the air of triumph about this volume -- more setbacks than victories, more confusion than conclusions. The theme of this book, in contrast, is perseverance. And maybe that doesn't make for as enthralling a read -- something Nagata Kabi addresses textually in the second epilogue: "But it's still my life." And that's why I'm so grateful for it, for the fact the books conclude on that note of still needing to strive, still getting knocked down and back up again. So many stories about mental health and self-acceptance give the reader a pat narrative arc, but that's not life. Stories of success are essential; they give us hope. But life -- which My Solo Exchange Diary tries to honestly record -- can be more complicated, and with so many of us struggling there is the need for empathy and recognition just as much as hope. These journeys to happiness are long and many people think a lack of concrete achievement means failure, day after day after day. But Nagata is so very good at sketching a picture, out of dismissable and even miserable details, that convalesces into a portrait of self-forgiveness. Even unhappiness and setbacks can teach us, is the moral of these painful episodes, and I'd rather that message be broadcast out into the world: the message that struggle is not failure. You are worth fighting for, even when you feel like you can't win for losing. Five stars, and not because of love for previous volumes or because I admire the author's overall effort. This book earns every one of them.
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    The author continues with her efforts to have a satisfying life. I don't know what the mental health system is like in Japan, but she could use at least some counseling. Instead, writing her story as manga is her therapy, and she does it very well. She seems sweet and quirky, but generally not very happy. Three and a half stars, rounded up because I like her.
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  • Raquel Castellanos
    January 1, 1970
    I relate too much to the endless cycles of depression and anxiety, that it makes me a little scared tbh. Her realizations about her family also hit too close to home for me. I felt the same way not too long ago about what she felt about her mom about my dad. Almost made me cry but I had to stop because I already had a headache. ✌ I relate too much to the endless cycles of depression and anxiety, that it makes me a little scared tbh. Her realizations about her family also hit too close to home for me. I felt the same way not too long ago about what she felt about her mom about my dad. Almost made me cry but I had to stop because I already had a headache. ✌️
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  • Chloe Crist
    January 1, 1970
    Wow, I still admire Nagata for being able to put so much of herself on the page; I really found it interesting that she included the repercussions of her first book in this one. I mean, considering this is a memoir, it makes sense, but she could have just as easily left things out to help with her relationship with her family.Kudos for being so candid and honest, and frankly, brave.
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  • DrCalvin
    January 1, 1970
    Depression and hospitalization. Less gripping than volyme one, with more simplistic art.
  • Flynn
    January 1, 1970
    Really wonderful, and resolved questions I had about the first volume! It's impressive how open she is about everything.
  • Esteli
    January 1, 1970
    Kabi, If you are out there reading this: Be gentle to yourself. Your books are beautiful. Keep making themselves and keep loving yourself and keep taking care of yourself.
  • Rekki
    January 1, 1970
    Another honest peek into Kabi Nagata's life. This sequel makes me want to see more, and hopefully her life continues to improve.
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