Dare to Lead
In her #1 NYT bestsellers, Brené Brown taught us what it means to dare greatly, rise strong and brave the wilderness. Now, based on new research conducted with leaders, change makers and culture shifters, she’s showing us how to put those ideas into practice so we can step up and lead. Leadership is not about titles, status and power over people. Leaders are people who hold themselves accountable for recognising the potential in people and ideas, and developing that potential. This is a book for everyone who is ready to choose courage over comfort, make a difference and lead.When we dare to lead, we don't pretend to have the right answers; we stay curious and ask the right questions. We don't see power as finite and hoard it; we know that power becomes infinite when we share it and work to align authority and accountability. We don't avoid difficult conversations and situations; we lean into the vulnerability that’s necessary to do good work.But daring leadership in a culture that's defined by scarcity, fear and uncertainty requires building courage skills, which are uniquely human. The irony is that we're choosing not to invest in developing the hearts and minds of leaders at the same time we're scrambling to figure out what we have to offer that machines can't do better and faster. What can we do better? Empathy, connection and courage to start.Brené Brown spent the past two decades researching the emotions that give meaning to our lives. Over the past seven years, she found that leaders in organisations ranging from small entrepreneurial start-ups and family-owned businesses to non-profits, civic organisations and Fortune 50 companies, are asking the same questions:How do you cultivate braver, more daring leaders? And, how do you embed the value of courage in your culture?Dare to Lead answers these questions and gives us actionable strategies and real examples from her new research-based, courage-building programme.Brené writes, ‘One of the most important findings of my career is that courage can be taught, developed and measured. Courage is a collection of four skill sets supported by twenty-eight behaviours. All it requires is a commitment to doing bold work, having tough conversations and showing up with our whole hearts. Easy? No. Choosing courage over comfort is not easy. Worth it? Always. We want to be brave with our lives and work. It's why we're here.’

Dare to Lead Details

TitleDare to Lead
Author
ReleaseOct 11th, 2018
PublisherEbury Digital
ISBN-139781473562523
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Leadership, Business, Self Help, Personal Development

Dare to Lead Review

  • Min
    January 1, 1970
    So, I really appreciate Brené Brown. I love her books. I love her cussing (which she does in her talks more than her books) and, most of all, I love her staggering vulnerability and empathy. Dare To Lead continues her conquest of shame, dysfunction, ego, hate, indifference, and everything else that tries to dehumanize and destroy us every day but now, she focuses her work on vulnerability in the workplace.How do we become courageous, bold, creative, caring leaders at work? What does it mean for So, I really appreciate Brené Brown. I love her books. I love her cussing (which she does in her talks more than her books) and, most of all, I love her staggering vulnerability and empathy. Dare To Lead continues her conquest of shame, dysfunction, ego, hate, indifference, and everything else that tries to dehumanize and destroy us every day but now, she focuses her work on vulnerability in the workplace.How do we become courageous, bold, creative, caring leaders at work? What does it mean for us to begin a process of healing from past hurts, growing through our insecurities and shortcomings, and stepping into the arena, as Brown puts it, every single day?Dare to Lead addresses an epidemic need for greater trust, authenticity, empathy, and care within our organizations and places of work. Wherever we work, inevitably we will experience miscommunication, misalignment, mismanagement, conflict, unethical decisions, criticisms, pressures to excel, temptations to hide your weaknesses and failures, and so much more. Worse, we as a culture are becoming increasingly insensitive, outraged, and out of touch to our very own humanity. In the age of social media, algorithms, AI learning, and splintered narratives, we have forgotten that we are “people, people, people.” We are not just our tweets, we are not just our pain, we are not just our jobs or positions, but we are thoroughly and complexly human. Dare to Lead addresses these issues and helps pave a better path for all of us. I wholeheartedly recommend this book! It is relevant, powerful, smooth to read, and deeply real.
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  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    I had a long drive to make this week and couldn't decide between buying this on audio or picking it up in print, and a friend suggested I listen to it on audio, then when it hits in paperback, buy that and mark it up. I think this was a great suggestion, and it was a nice reminder, too, how we pick up different things when we listed, as opposed to when we read in print.Brown is one of the best thinkers on leadership and confidence, and this book is no different. There are strategies here for bei I had a long drive to make this week and couldn't decide between buying this on audio or picking it up in print, and a friend suggested I listen to it on audio, then when it hits in paperback, buy that and mark it up. I think this was a great suggestion, and it was a nice reminder, too, how we pick up different things when we listed, as opposed to when we read in print.Brown is one of the best thinkers on leadership and confidence, and this book is no different. There are strategies here for being a better person, for developing empathy (which is a wonderfully deep section in the book -- a lengthy discussion of empathy vs. sympathy helps conceptually define the two ideas and showcases actions that define each). I'm a big believer that part of success comes from understanding people are people, and Brown's big mantra throughout the book is "people, people, people." Everyone has a story and everyone's minds make up stories to help them get through the day. When we remember this simple thing, it becomes easier to be a leader and to be an advocate for what it is you want, what you need, and where you fit into the grander scheme of your life. Because this book isn't about leadership in organizations only; sure that's there. But it's a book about being a leader in your life and showing up, day after day, for yourself. Maybe my favorite of hers so far. It incorporates a lot of what research she did in previous books but adds even more depth to them. I also enjoyed being reminded to reconsider what my core values are and I'm itching to get into her worksheets to suss those out. We all operate from a set (and yes, SET) of core values and when we can remember them, we can show up for ourselves again and again. Brown reads the audio and performs it less like a stiff reader and more like she's giving a TED talk or having a conversation with a group of people in an organization. There are good breaks and laughs, and I just really like hearing these ideas and seeing what sticks from the verbal explanation. I'm eager to revisit this in a year or so in print and read it with pen in hand.
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  • Mehrsa
    January 1, 1970
    It’s Brene Brown for your corporate retreat! I was turned off by the management speech, which I thought she said in the beginning she wouldn’t do (the temptation is great). I was also annoyed at the commodification of her vulnerability insights into cute little worlds. “We’re going to rumble with this.” My SFD is... etc. Its sort of what happens to good insights—once they go thru the corporate retreat circus, they come out as weird nouns that can also be verbs and lose their original meaning.Hav It’s Brene Brown for your corporate retreat! I was turned off by the management speech, which I thought she said in the beginning she wouldn’t do (the temptation is great). I was also annoyed at the commodification of her vulnerability insights into cute little worlds. “We’re going to rumble with this.” My SFD is... etc. Its sort of what happens to good insights—once they go thru the corporate retreat circus, they come out as weird nouns that can also be verbs and lose their original meaning.Having said that, it’s useful insights as always. Just maybe read the first few books as all her ideas can be applied to the workplace without becoming cute phrases and procedures and meetings.
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  • Rose
    January 1, 1970
    Brene Brown's "Dare To Lead" takes several discoveries and ideals from Brown's previous books and compiles them into a guide to be successful in business and leadership pursuits. A combination of personal stories, research from a wide variety of fields and concepts, Brown talks about having empathy, being able to rumble within difficult conversations, recognizing shame, being vulnerable, and using these concepts to become more daring leaders. "Courage over Comfort" is emphasized among a number o Brene Brown's "Dare To Lead" takes several discoveries and ideals from Brown's previous books and compiles them into a guide to be successful in business and leadership pursuits. A combination of personal stories, research from a wide variety of fields and concepts, Brown talks about having empathy, being able to rumble within difficult conversations, recognizing shame, being vulnerable, and using these concepts to become more daring leaders. "Courage over Comfort" is emphasized among a number of phrases. I thought this book was more focused and came together much better than "Braving the Wilderness" and I thought it was a very well done merging of Brown's eloquence in naming these specific issues while making the narrative personable, funny, engaging, and constructive. I definitely see myself coming back to listen to this audiobook in the future and I'm glad that I had the chance to read it.Overall score: 4.5/5 stars.
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  • Veronica
    January 1, 1970
    With respect to Brené Brown, I could not even finish this book; as the genre goes, it's probably a wonderful work. But I hate this genre of books and don't know why I continue to seek them out with the naïve hope that I might find an exception to the rule. Attempting to read Dare to Lead was a blunt reminder of the reason I never read self-help books.
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  • Stephanie
    January 1, 1970
    Courage > Comfort.
  • Shanique Edwards
    January 1, 1970
    This book combines Brene's (we're friends in my head) previous work and puts it in the context of being a strong, healthy leader. She takes her work on wholehearted living (Gifts of Imperfection), vulnerability & shame (Daring Greatly), the reckoning, rumble & revolution (Rising Strong), assuming the best intent (Braving the Wilderness) and much more and places those principles in an organizational environment. She gives practical advice about what it means to lead wholeheartedly, with v This book combines Brene's (we're friends in my head) previous work and puts it in the context of being a strong, healthy leader. She takes her work on wholehearted living (Gifts of Imperfection), vulnerability & shame (Daring Greatly), the reckoning, rumble & revolution (Rising Strong), assuming the best intent (Braving the Wilderness) and much more and places those principles in an organizational environment. She gives practical advice about what it means to lead wholeheartedly, with vulnerability (and what it doesn't), how to encourage and empower your team, and how to allow everyone to be their whole and best selves, using stories in her signature style. Of course Brene will wreck your whole life, in a good way, so be prepared to have thoughts and feel feelings and react viscerally as applicable.
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  • Rozana
    January 1, 1970
    I liked the practical ideas that can be done in meetings, in communication, in brainstorming, in decision making.. etc. I liked how the concepts were translated into skills and behaviors that can be measured and observed! This makes it 100 times easier to apply in organizations and in one’s team!
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  • Ismail Elshareef
    January 1, 1970
    Clear is kind. Unclear is unkind.One of the best books I've read so far on leadership. Brene Brown is an inspiring storyteller and a great leader. This book is a required reading for all aspiring leaders and bosses. Servant leaders, in particular, will find this book a delight. I bought 20 copies to give my leads next week. It's that good.
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  • Igor Razumnyy
    January 1, 1970
    Very solid five stars. Brene Brown keeps getting better. This book in particular kept me being super emotional in the first third of the book. First half was in significant part a repetition of Daring Greatly and other works of her. The second part though felt like mostly new material.Especially I enjoyed discussion about empathy and giving & receiving feedback. There is an interview with Bruce Lee where he is talking about his dives into other marital arts outside of his alma mater school. Very solid five stars. Brene Brown keeps getting better. This book in particular kept me being super emotional in the first third of the book. First half was in significant part a repetition of Daring Greatly and other works of her. The second part though felt like mostly new material.Especially I enjoyed discussion about empathy and giving & receiving feedback. There is an interview with Bruce Lee where he is talking about his dives into other marital arts outside of his alma mater school. In that interview he emphasises his approach to other styles: "take what is useful, drop what is useless". Brene is taking same approach to receiving feedback which makes a lot of sense to me. Also discussion about importance of trust and analysis of how trust is built (that it is built in smallest of moments and we need to treat those moments as marbles in a marble jar) - really really awesome. After this book I realised that has been exactly true in my experience. I have really paid attention to small actions or lack of those small actions - I now understand why.She also made me to realise my two core values: courage and seeking wisdom (seeking because wisdom can never be found but it can be sought after). I'm really under impression of this revelation.All in all the book is really good. I did it in audio version with Brene reading the book herself - I definitely recommend the book in this format. Brene is awesome in delivering her own material.Quotes:Data made clear that care and connection are irreducible requirements for productive relationships between leaders and team members.Trust is earned in the smallest of moments. It is not earned through grand deeds.In any interaction there is a possibility of connecting with your partner or turning away from your partner.You must never confuse faith that you will prevail in the end, which you can never afford to loose, with discipline to confront most brutal facts of your current reality.You don’t need to experience exactly same thing as the other person to be able to show empathy. If you ever experienced same underlying emotions you are qualified.I’m not a fan of anything brutal including honesty.Honesty that is motivated by shame, anger or hurt is not honesty. It is shame anger or hurt disguised as honesty.People do not care how much you know until they know how much you care.Show up for people in pain and don’t look away.Choose courage over comfort. Discomfort lasts around 8 seconds on average.Receiving feedback: I’m brave enough to listen. I do not have to take it in, but I’m brave enough to listen.Receiving feedback from unskillful in that area person: There is something in it. Take what is useful, drop the rest.Receiving feedback from person skilful in giving feedback but when you still feel resistant: This is the path to mastery. The person cares enough to give it and give it in proper way.Trust is not nice to have, it is must have.
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  • Jacob Bernknopf
    January 1, 1970
    Had I not read any of Brene Brown’s work before, I would have undoubtedly given this book 5 stars. As with any Brene Brown book, this one is full of wisdom and insights. IMO, she is one of the most articulate writers I’ve come across and does exceedingly well at making complex/ abstract ideas easy to comprehend, practical and applicable. However, I feel like she follows the same formula with her books. Pick an abstract idea, discuss how courage and vulnerability are critical to it, and then disc Had I not read any of Brene Brown’s work before, I would have undoubtedly given this book 5 stars. As with any Brene Brown book, this one is full of wisdom and insights. IMO, she is one of the most articulate writers I’ve come across and does exceedingly well at making complex/ abstract ideas easy to comprehend, practical and applicable. However, I feel like she follows the same formula with her books. Pick an abstract idea, discuss how courage and vulnerability are critical to it, and then discuss stories and research about it. That deeper reason why I give this 4 stars is because if you have read her books before, this one will have a general brush of Deja vu. I was mostly disappointed in the last part, which felt like she pretty much copied and pasted from sections in “Rising Strong.” Though Brene acknowledges this early in the book, the repetitiveness was more than I would have liked.That being said, moving forward I think I will return to this book more than her others as it is a great synthesis of her ideas with some new insight into leadership. Even if you have read her work before, I still highly recommend this one, just be warned it isn’t completely full of new stuff from her. If you never read her work before, get this one and/ or listen to “The Power of Vulnerability” ASAP.
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  • Dayne
    January 1, 1970
    I’ve been a fan of Brené Brown’s work for years and this book does an excellent job of applying her main themes—courage, vulnerability, shame and empathy—to leadership. Brown’s definition of a leader, “Anyone who takes responsibility for finding the potential in people and processes and has the courage to develop that potential.” There is so much to unpack in this book and it will be a valuable manual to reference again and again.
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  • Annie
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars. I have appreciated and used Brene Brown's work for over 10 years. What I especially enjoyed about this volume was the many tangible tips for enacting the principles she proposes. Because I have read her other books I did find myself skimming over the passages that were direct re-copies of previous works. Overall, though, these research findings can be of benefit to pretty much anyone who is interested in showing up more authentically and wholeheartedly at work and life.
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  • Brian Heckber
    January 1, 1970
    I really wanted to like this bookI'm a big fan of Brown and couldn't wait to read this. If you've read her other books, there is a lot of overlap (she mentions this in the introduction) and not as much leadership as I was hoping. The organization of the book was challenging to understand.
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  • Bronwyn Orsatti
    January 1, 1970
    Another masterpiece by Brene Brown. The world needs us all to be brave leaders and an open conversation on the delta to get there. This book provides to individuals, teams and organizations the starter place and path to get going. This should be a must read for anyone who is a leader or who is courageous enough to become one.
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  • Carrie Froese
    January 1, 1970
    I love books that are read by the people who wrote them. Brene Brown makes good use of personal stories to illustrate her points effectively. She clearly isolates specific steps to follow in order to have difficult conversations and forage courageous decisions as a leader. I found the book helpful in preparation for my week.
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  • carrie short-lippert
    January 1, 1970
    Brene did it again! I love how she strung together The Gift of Imperfection, Daring Greatly, Rising Strong, and Braving the Wilderness. If you live with people-read these. If you work with people-read these.
  • Nicole
    January 1, 1970
    Super interesting. For someone who has trouble identifying her own emotions and processing them, I really liked this book's breakdown. Gave me a lot to think about in how I connect with others not only at work but in my personal life.
  • Joy
    January 1, 1970
    Great book for anyone who wants to be more effective as a leader, team member, friend or family member.
  • Megan
    January 1, 1970
    There are sections that are quite "business-y", but still a TON of great thoughts and advice about the rest of life. SO glad to hear Brene's voice again.
  • Sarah Goss
    January 1, 1970
    Not her best book, but I still loved it!
  • Teri
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars.While there were some new insights for me, I imagine that if I had read all of Dr. Brown’s books, there would be very few new insights.
  • Tim
    January 1, 1970
    I give myself permission to start an SFD!
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