The Hiding Place
Joe never wanted to come back to Arnhill. After the way things ended with his old gang--the betrayal, the suicide, the murder--and after what happened when his sister went missing, the last thing he wanted to do was return to his hometown. But Joe doesn't have a choice. Because judging by what was done to that poor Morton kid, what happened all those years ago to Joe's sister is happening again. And only Joe knows who is really at fault.Lying his way into a teaching job at his former high school is the easy part. Facing off with former friends who are none too happy to have him back in town--while avoiding the enemies he's made in the years since--is tougher. But the hardest part of all will be returning to that abandoned mine where it all went wrong and his life changed forever, and finally confronting the shocking, horrifying truth about Arnhill, his sister, and himself. Because for Joe, the worst moment of his life wasn't the day his sister went missing. It was the day she came back.

The Hiding Place Details

TitleThe Hiding Place
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 5th, 2019
PublisherCrown
ISBN-139781524761011
Rating
GenreMystery, Thriller, Horror, Fiction, Mystery Thriller, Suspense

The Hiding Place Review

  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    The past isn’t real. It is simply a story we tell ourselves. And sometimes, we lie. The result of my first foray into C.J. Tudor’s world, a story teetering on the precipice of being something truly great. One little nudge—or in this case, more in regards to the why—would have sent this novel toppling end-over-end into favorite territory.If I’m being completely candid, had I known there was a supernatural aspect to the storyline, I never would have given this book a chance. I choose to while the The past isn’t real. It is simply a story we tell ourselves. And sometimes, we lie. The result of my first foray into C.J. Tudor’s world, a story teetering on the precipice of being something truly great. One little nudge—or in this case, more in regards to the why—would have sent this novel toppling end-over-end into favorite territory.If I’m being completely candid, had I known there was a supernatural aspect to the storyline, I never would have given this book a chance. I choose to while the days away in my literary comfort zone, where suspension of disbelief is a nonstarter. Well, let me eat those words right now—happily. This book bodes well for taking chances and purposefully stepping away from my status-quo every once in a while. Just look what can happen.Tudor grabbed me with the grotesque and dingy opening. Two dead bodies to make sense of in a tired cottage swarming with bluebottles, flies and the stench of decay. From there the author flashes forward a few months in time, with an introduction to Joe.Life in utter shambles, Joe has made his way back to the small village where he grew up. Arnhill, once a mining town and now little else but a cordoned off pit, doesn’t have much left to offer. And yet here Joe finds himself taking a mediocre teaching job at the high school. You have to wonder why anyone would choose to stay, let alone return to such a dreadful place.What drew me to Joe—despite his faults, and believe me, there are many to contend with—was his sarcasm. Or more pointedly, his penchant for saying one thing, while thinking the complete opposite. Tudor has quite the knack for injecting witty banter at just the right moment, giving some much-needed reprieve from the dark and often cloying feel of the plot lines.Where the story lost some momentum for me was in the back half. “Sometimes, some places, like people, have to want to be found.” WHY? Why does one place in particular choose to lure some, but not others? That’s the crux of my issue. I turned that final page and found myself wanting more. More of an explanation for the creepy happenings in Arnhill. More backstory. More details of some sort. And maybe even more to some of the relationships. Well, one in particular; but that’s just the romance reader in me talking, so feel free to ignore her. Even though I was left wanting—if only Tudor had pushed the envelope a bit further—it won’t deter me from visiting another of her literary creations. In fact, at the moment, I find myself contemplating a peek at her debut, The Chalk Man.*Thank you to Crown Publishing for the free book.
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  • Chelsea Humphrey
    January 1, 1970
    "I don't believe in ghosts. My nan was fond of telling me, "It's not the dead you need to be scared of, love. It's the living." She was almost right. But I do believe you can still feel the echoes of bad things."No one is as disappointed as I am that I’m having to write “that” review. I was sure this would be the easiest 5 stars given in 2018 (or 2019 based on publication), but unfortunately there were too many issues I couldn’t glance over. Between the unnecessary racism and prejudice of people "I don't believe in ghosts. My nan was fond of telling me, "It's not the dead you need to be scared of, love. It's the living." She was almost right. But I do believe you can still feel the echoes of bad things."No one is as disappointed as I am that I’m having to write “that” review. I was sure this would be the easiest 5 stars given in 2018 (or 2019 based on publication), but unfortunately there were too many issues I couldn’t glance over. Between the unnecessary racism and prejudice of people on the spectrum that was added for “character development”, to the plot twist that anyone who has read a certain Stephen King book will find unnervingly familiar, it’s safe to say this one just wasn’t for me. I feel another round of editing to take away some of the choppy presentation might improve the overall quality as well. If you're wanting to go into this one blind, I would recommend you stop reading this review right here as I'll be discussing below in greater detail some of the things that worked and didn't work for me."If newspapers are the place where facts become stories, the Internet is the place where stories become conspiracy theories."I'll be the first to admit that I'm in the minority of early reviewers when it comes to my opinion on this novel, and I highly recommend you take that with a grain of salt and give this one a try to decide for yourself how YOU feel. That said, I had to be honest and true to how certain aspects of this book made me feel, and those are included below. We'll start with our protagonist, Joe Thorne. He's presented as an underdog from the very beginning, even though once he hits his teenage years he joins a crowd of bullies and participates in the very behavior that he initially was plagued by. I don't have a problem with this; I think it's important for stories to portray the psychological effects of bullying and how it can alter a person's moral dna. I also understand the need for a flawed protagonist, but my personal taste is "less is more" when it comes to this. I don't need an anti-hero or a villain who twirls his mustache while spewing maniacally "MUAHAHAHAHAHAHA" that gives me no sense of conflict regarding who they are and what makes them tick. I think Joe's make up was a bit over the top for me; instead of choosing a few unsavory characteristics to portray his flaws, we get numerous accounts of bigotry and prejudice in the form of racism, ablism, homophobia, etc. These portions didn't further the narrative IMO. I grew irritable and distracted at the constant mentions of "Little Miss Scary", the autistic bartender whom our protagonist felt relieved when she was substituted for the old, bald, white fat guy. I could go on and on about this, and frankly these instances will be a matter of the opinion of the reader and how they react to them, but as a stated above it was an unnecessary distraction for me. "...when my sister was eight years old she disappeared. At the time I thought it was the worst thing in the world that could ever happen. And then she came back."Which brings us to the big plot twist. My problem isn't with the insertion of the supernatural into what is being billed as a traditional mystery/thriller, although I know this will be a dealbreaker for some readers. My issue is that I've read this story before. That's right, while both of Tudor's novels tend to read like Stephen King fan-fiction, her first novel seemed to be a mash up of flattering references and inspiration from multiple novels he's published over the years. Friends, if you've read Pet Semetary before, you've read The Hiding Place. I can't tell you how disappointing it was to make it to the 75% mark and realize where this was going. With the buzz surrounding the re-make of PS in film form I can see why the author was inspired to write this, and it could be the fact that I just read PS earlier this year and it was too close to reading this one, but I felt deflated once I reached the point of no return. Tudor is an exquisite storyteller, and I highly respect the way that she blends horror and thriller together for an elevated reading experience, but I think this one felt closer to "ripoff" than "beloved fan-fiction". While I wasn't a fan of this one, I still wish the author all the success in the world and will be anxiously awaiting her next novel. *I received a review copy via the publisher.
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  • (Bern) Mom to 2 Posh Lil Divas
    January 1, 1970
    "You can still feel the echoes of bad things. They imprint on the fabric of our reality, like a footprint in concrete. Whatever made the impression is long gone, but you can never erase the mark it left." Joe Thorne finds himself pulled back to his childhood hometown. A place filled with tragedy, regret and mystery. He walked away from Arnhill years ago, vowing never to look back. With his life in shambles, Joe finds himself back at the place where it all started to go wrong. Summoned by an ano "You can still feel the echoes of bad things. They imprint on the fabric of our reality, like a footprint in concrete. Whatever made the impression is long gone, but you can never erase the mark it left." Joe Thorne finds himself pulled back to his childhood hometown. A place filled with tragedy, regret and mystery. He walked away from Arnhill years ago, vowing never to look back. With his life in shambles, Joe finds himself back at the place where it all started to go wrong. Summoned by an anonymous email that he couldn't ignore Joe goes home to finally get answers to the mystery that has plagued his life - what really happened to Annie? "I know what happened to your sister. It's happening again. Tudor has a brilliant mind for bringing small town life and its characters to life. I devoured the creepy backstory of this little town. A tiny dot on a map that outsiders may never have heard from. Yet, those who dwell there are shrouded in the town's eerie, unexplained mystical mystery. Every town, village and city has a history. There's the official history. The bone-dry version collated in textbooks and census reports, related verbatim in the classroom. Then there's the history that is passed down through generations... The secret history." It's been said this book has an early Stephen King vibe and it is definitely true. From the moment you open the book you are pulled in by a horrific opening scene and Tudor never loosens her grip on you. The entire story has that creepy, check under your bed, look behind your shower curtain and peer under the toilet lid vibe. I LOVED it! I could not stop turning the pages. I was drawn in by Joe's flawed but definitely likable character. This was a man marked by his past, living with demons and struggling daily. I enjoyed his witty, inner dialogue. I felt the tension and suspense build as he worked to uncover the truth. And the truth he was searching for - the ending - left me agape for a moment.I must read The Chalk Man which has been on my TBR pile for too long. I have no doubt that I have been firmly made a fan of Tudor's writing. Bring on the creepy and horrific - I excitedly welcome it. I'll simply be sure to read all her books with the lights on. Thank you to C.J Tudor, Crown Publishing and NetGalley for an arc of this book in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Debra
    January 1, 1970
    "But that's all life ever is. A promise. Not a guarantee. We like to believe we have our place all set out in the future, but we only have a reservation. Life can be canceled at any moment, with no warning, no refund, no matter how far along you are in the journey. Even if you've barely had time to take in the scenery."Who said you can never go home again? Well, Joe Thorne does! Home sweet home….errr...I mean, dreary, sad, dark, depressing, full of painful memories. Home. Joe thought he would ne "But that's all life ever is. A promise. Not a guarantee. We like to believe we have our place all set out in the future, but we only have a reservation. Life can be canceled at any moment, with no warning, no refund, no matter how far along you are in the journey. Even if you've barely had time to take in the scenery."Who said you can never go home again? Well, Joe Thorne does! Home sweet home….errr...I mean, dreary, sad, dark, depressing, full of painful memories. Home. Joe thought he would never go back. Not after what happened in Arnhill during his teenage years. He has never gotten over what happened to his sister, Annie, all those years ago. She went missing. She came back. And according to Stephen King (and I think Joe would agree) “Sometimes dead is better." But Joe has received an email letting him know that apparently things are happening again...what things? Strange things, dark things, unspeakable things.So, Joe returns. He needs to right a wrong. Get some revenge while escaping from his current problems. Joe is quite the mess, you see. He lies to get a job at the local school, has an alcohol problem, has an even bigger gambling problem and there is no welcome committee lined up to greet him. In fact, his old friends are not at all happy to see him return. After the first part of the book I wasn't sure what to think. I really did not know where the Author was going with this. I was really hoping she would bring the creep factor on. She did to some degree but honestly, I wanted more - a lot more. She had some interesting characters, most were unlikable and were up to no good. Geez Louise, no wonder he left town. Forget the pit. The people were not too warm and fuzzy in this town.The Second part of the book reminded me of two books by Stephen King. I get it, the Author is a big fan....but, I really want her to NOT remind me of Stephen King. When I read her books, I only want to think of HER books. Aside from that, the reader or shall I say the "constant reader" (Hey, even I can make nods to Stephen King!) will finally learn what happened to Annie, why Joe and his high school friends are friends no more, and learn the towns deep, dark secret.The ending had a little bit of a shock to it that I did not see coming. That was a nice touch. Overall, this was an enjoyable book, but I wanted it to be even darker, creepier and with more dread and suspense. Again, enjoyable with interesting characters. I look forward to reading more of her books in the future. Again, I want to read Her books. If want to read Stephen King, I will read Stephen King. I personally think this Author is doing herself a disservice by being similar to Stephen King. So many reviewers are mentioning him in their reviews of her books. She has a great book in her, I know it. Her writing is good. I would love to read something very original by her. Thank you to Crown Publishing and NetGalley who provided me with a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All the thoughts and opinions expressed in this review are my own.
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  • Dorie - Traveling Sister :)
    January 1, 1970
    ***NOW AVAILABLE***Well this one has taken me a bit of time to collect my thoughts. It is a quite a bit different from The Chalk Man, it has a much darker feel and mystical elements. I will also tell you that I will never look at a black beetle again without getting the shivers!Once again there is a young man returning to the town he grew up in. Joe Thorne has a dual purpose to his return, he needs a job, teaching, and he will never get over what happened to his little sister Annie. Once all is ***NOW AVAILABLE***Well this one has taken me a bit of time to collect my thoughts. It is a quite a bit different from The Chalk Man, it has a much darker feel and mystical elements. I will also tell you that I will never look at a black beetle again without getting the shivers!Once again there is a young man returning to the town he grew up in. Joe Thorne has a dual purpose to his return, he needs a job, teaching, and he will never get over what happened to his little sister Annie. Once all is revealed you will have a hard time getting her out of your head as well! He wants revenge and an ending to what seems to be “happening again” in this town.Joe starts a job teaching English at the school in the small town of Arnhill in Nottinghamshire. He finds few people who are happy to see him back and one in particular who wants him gone in one way or another. There is a shroud of mystery about the town since a mining accident in the 1940’s took the lives of 18 men in “the pit”. Joe revisits this site again, a place that his group of friends found another entrance to when they were teens. Something terrible and unexplainable happened there and Joe wants it sealed forever. “I walk slowly around, breathing deeply, trying to keep myself calm. This is just a cave. The dead cannot hurt us. Bones are just bones. Shadows are nothing but shadows. Except shadows are never just shadows, they are the deepest part of the darkness. And the deepest part of the darkness is where the monsters hide.” This book was a slower start, I think I was into 50% before the book took off for me. But I know this author and was willing to wait. I’m glad that I did. C.J. Tudor excels at character development. I feel as though I really know Joe and some of his old high school friends, Chris, Stephen, Marie. There are some great twists in this book but they come more from the characters than the plot, but that’s a good thing. It seems easier to turn a plot one way or another than to help us understand how people can hide their inner selves.I’m still ruminating about the ending, I have some questions that I’d really like answers to, but perhaps that is the author’s intent. I recommend this to anyone who loves intelligent, character driven mysteries, with some added “chill” factors.I received an ARC of this novel from the publisher through Edelweiss.
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  • Paromjit
    January 1, 1970
    This is CJ Tudor's follow up novel to her brilliant debut The Chalk Man, and it is a fantastic macabre horror mystery featuring Joe Thorne, a has-been teacher whose gambling addiction has transpired to burden him with debts that he cannot afford to pay off to the scary and menacing Fatman. Joe returns home to the old mining village of Arnhill in Nottinghamshire. Arnhill has a history of misfortune, with a failing Academy, a school where Joe has been taken on as a English teacher, a post he conne This is CJ Tudor's follow up novel to her brilliant debut The Chalk Man, and it is a fantastic macabre horror mystery featuring Joe Thorne, a has-been teacher whose gambling addiction has transpired to burden him with debts that he cannot afford to pay off to the scary and menacing Fatman. Joe returns home to the old mining village of Arnhill in Nottinghamshire. Arnhill has a history of misfortune, with a failing Academy, a school where Joe has been taken on as a English teacher, a post he conned his way into. Being short of funds, he rents a notorious house where a recent tragedy still haunts the place. When Joe was a child, his beloved 8 year old younger sister, Annie, disappeared for 48 hours, only to return a completely different girl. Joe is a man of secrets, prone to bearing grudges and holding on to resentments as he confronts the past, the fallout from his membership of a gang run by the brutal bully, Stephen Hurst, a suicide, a murder and his childhood infatuation with the beautiful Marie Gibson.Joe is not welcomed by the community with open arms, his former gang members and others project deeply held animosity and hostility and willing to express this violently. Stephen Hurst is now a powerful and wealthy man locally, on the school governing board, and makes it transparently clear he will do anything to ensure that Joe leaves. Stephen married Marie Gibson, now a dying woman suffering from cancer. Joe's problems have followed him to Arnhill with the appearance of Gloria, a hitwoman intent on ensuring that Joe pays his debts. Joe befriends the art teacher, Beth Scattergood, and becomes aware that little has changed at the school and in a community harbouring dark deeds. He is plagued by vibrantly vivid nightmares and the house is exhibiting some eerie and creepy vibes linked to the dreadful events that occurred there. As the past haunts the present, and the pressure piles up on Joe, we learn of what happened to Annie, and of an ancient evil that has dwelled in the area.There is no doubt there are familiar horror tropes in this utterly gripping story, from a one eyed doll called Abbie Eyes, to the overflowing presence of beetles and more, but Tudor uses them with panache as she spins the most spellbinding of yarns in an area littered with abandoned mines. Joe is a terrific protagonist, the anti-hero returning home to address the issues that drove him away. There are twists galore as Joe learns that not all his perceptions of past history are accurate. I found this a riveting novel that drew me in instantly from the moment I began to turn the pages. Tudor is a talented and entertaining storyteller, and I cannot wait to read what she writes next. This will appeal to those who enjoy dark unsettling mysteries with elements of the supernatural. Many thanks to Penguin Michael Joseph for an ARC.
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  • Mary Beth *Traveling Sister*
    January 1, 1970
    Julia had a history of depression. She just had a divorce from Ben's father. She had stopped her medication and requested a leave of absence and took Ben out of school. Then she bludgeoned her son to death before she blew her own head off. She wrote three words in blood on the wall of Ben's bedroom, NOT MY SON. Are these the actions of a mad woman or an unbalanced mind or is this something a lot more sinister?Joe never wanted to return to his hometown, Arnhill. But he is really didn't have a cho Julia had a history of depression. She just had a divorce from Ben's father. She had stopped her medication and requested a leave of absence and took Ben out of school. Then she bludgeoned her son to death before she blew her own head off. She wrote three words in blood on the wall of Ben's bedroom, NOT MY SON. Are these the actions of a mad woman or an unbalanced mind or is this something a lot more sinister?Joe never wanted to return to his hometown, Arnhill. But he is really didn't have a choice, because of what happened to Ben Morton and also what happened years ago to Joe's sister is happening again. It was really hard for him to return to the abandoned mine where it all went wrong and changed his life forever. He did not want to confront the shocking, horrifying truth about Arnhill, his sister and himself. The worst moment for Joe wasn't the day his sister went missing. It was the day she came back. I loved this book. It was dark and so creepy. If you love creepy then I think you will love this book. It kept me on the edge of my seat throughout the whole book. It was horrifying in some parts. It had a very creepy supernatural factor to it that I just loved. I noticed that this book had some similarities to two of Stephen King's books. I love Stephen King, so I really loved this book. This book was so bizarre. I thought this book was more darker and more supernatural than The Chalk Man. I loved this one a little bit more. In the beginning, I did not know what was going on and so many times I read the phrase, "It is happening again" which kept me intrigued. I just had so many questions and was happy that they were all answered in the end. I loved the twists, and I found it to be a fast paced book and hard to put down. I can't wait for my next C.J. Tudor book.This was a Traveling Sister Read and we all had mixed feelings about this book. I am just happy that I ended up loving it. I want to thank Netgalley, Crown/Penguin Random House and the author for the copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Kaceey
    January 1, 1970
    Creepy with a hint of horror....Joe Thorne returns to his hometown of Arnhill. A place he swore he would never return. And now, no one is exactly over-joyed to see him back in town. Joe is here looking for answers. His sister disappeared at the age of 8, and when she returned days later she was never the same…there were others that also came back different. This is the second book I’ve read by C.J. Tudor. While I wasn’t a huge fan of her previous work, The Chalk Man I was ready to try again. I r Creepy with a hint of horror....Joe Thorne returns to his hometown of Arnhill. A place he swore he would never return. And now, no one is exactly over-joyed to see him back in town. Joe is here looking for answers. His sister disappeared at the age of 8, and when she returned days later she was never the same…there were others that also came back different. This is the second book I’ve read by C.J. Tudor. While I wasn’t a huge fan of her previous work, The Chalk Man I was ready to try again. I really wanted to love this one. Unfortunately this book also ended up falling a little flat for me. I do like my thrillers dark but this one went just a bit too far over that line. Even with an ending that was somewhat shocking, I was still left with too many unanswered questions. I hope it will work better for you!A buddy read with Susanne!Thank you to NetGalley , Crown Publishing and C.J. Tudor for an ARC to read and review.
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  • Liz
    January 1, 1970
    One of my favorite things about The Chalk Man was the writing. And it’s equally good here, in The Hiding Place. It’s not often I find myself highlighting phrases in a mystery. But that’s exactly what I’ve done with both of Tudor’s books. Joe Thorne returns to his dismal home town of Arnhill and gets himself hired as a teacher. Joe’s not one to make friends. He’s hiding from folks outside of town, while taking on his old school friends in town. Joe, despite his numerous faults, is a character I c One of my favorite things about The Chalk Man was the writing. And it’s equally good here, in The Hiding Place. It’s not often I find myself highlighting phrases in a mystery. But that’s exactly what I’ve done with both of Tudor’s books. Joe Thorne returns to his dismal home town of Arnhill and gets himself hired as a teacher. Joe’s not one to make friends. He’s hiding from folks outside of town, while taking on his old school friends in town. Joe, despite his numerous faults, is a character I could really care about. He’s a gambler, a bit of a drunk, but he still means well and has trouble turning his back on the students who need his help. The town is as much a character as any of the people and Tudor does an excellent job of portraying that small town, claustrophobic, cloying nature. The book is as much a horror story as a mystery. There are some particularly gruesome scenes. There are ghosts. There are creepy, crawly things that sent shivers up my spine. The story kept me engaged and I kept wanting to read just one more chapter. The ending had a few nice twists, even if it was a tad contrived.My thanks to netgalley and Crown Publishing for an advance copy of this book.
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  • Linda
    January 1, 1970
    The unattainable.......Those things beyond reach in life, never designated as ours.Joe Thorne knows this wrong-end-of-the-stick phenomenon since the early days of his youth. The pieces of life's puzzle just don't seem to fit together. But something is drawing him back to his hometown. Arnhill in Nottinghamshire is just about the last place he'd like to hang his hat. Too many bad vibes and too many heavy memories that wind their way into your dreams at night like odorous trickles of swamp water.B The unattainable.......Those things beyond reach in life, never designated as ours.Joe Thorne knows this wrong-end-of-the-stick phenomenon since the early days of his youth. The pieces of life's puzzle just don't seem to fit together. But something is drawing him back to his hometown. Arnhill in Nottinghamshire is just about the last place he'd like to hang his hat. Too many bad vibes and too many heavy memories that wind their way into your dreams at night like odorous trickles of swamp water.But Joe is leaving behind a questionable past from the last school that he taught at. A bit of creativity in his resume will most assuredly secure him a position at the Arnhill Academy.....that and the fact that the Academy is desperate to fill the opening left by the previous teacher who was found dead along with her son in the very cottage that Joe will be renting. Joe will be telling y'all about those spiffy accommodations soon.The town of Arnhill has been plagued with many misfortunes that linger from the past. Back in 1949 a mining disaster took the lives of 18 men in "The Pit". The regional stories in the local pubs conjure up many a ghost story that take on a life of their own.And Joe has his own personal bag of phantoms from the past. He'll be tossing back quite a few at the pub after school hours. But it's never enough to drown out the loss of his little sister, Annie. And you'll be wanting to know the mind-boggling details that won't be surfacing until much later.C.J. Tudor has a remarkable writing style that snaps you up and brings you right in the midst of shifting sands. Just when you think you know......you most certainly don't. For those of you who have read The Chalk Man, you realize this full out. But The Hiding Place absorbs the darkness surrounding it. It is on a far different plane than The Chalk Man. There was a true camaraderie of friends uplifting one another in her previous novel. This one dabbles in the dark underbelly of treacherous individuals engaging in treacherous acts. There's almost a Stephen King flavor added to this electrified punch. Quirky dialogue, topped with humor, always finds its way into Tudor's writing. She's a master. 'Nuff said.I received a copy of The Hiding Place through NetGalley for an honest review. My thanks to the talented C.J. Tudor and to Crown Publishing for the opportunity.
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  • Matt
    January 1, 1970
    First and foremost, a large thank you to NetGalley, C.J. Tudor, and Crown Publishing for providing me with a copy of this publication, which allows me to provide you with an unbiased review.After the great success of her debut novel, C.J. Tudor returns with another psychological thriller that straddles two time periods to bring readers an enthralling novel. Joe Thorne left the village of Arnhill after a problematic childhood that included some tragic personal events. Now, armed with a teaching d First and foremost, a large thank you to NetGalley, C.J. Tudor, and Crown Publishing for providing me with a copy of this publication, which allows me to provide you with an unbiased review.After the great success of her debut novel, C.J. Tudor returns with another psychological thriller that straddles two time periods to bring readers an enthralling novel. Joe Thorne left the village of Arnhill after a problematic childhood that included some tragic personal events. Now, armed with a teaching degree and having fled his last posting under a cloud of suspicion, Thorne is back to teach at the local academy. While many years have passed, Arnhill seems to still be the same speck on the map, with the problems flowing through to the next generation. As Thorne tries to acclimate himself to old grievances, he is reminded about his sister and her desire to chum along with him when she was a precocious eight. As he has memories of the events that led to her disappearance, Joe sees things differently and remembers the great changes in Annie when she turned up two days later. This led to an Annie he did not recognize, which snowballed into a fatal car accident that left Thorne orphaned. Struggling with those memories and how to handle his new crop of students, Joe Thorne’s recent past catches up to him and creates a gaping void. However, someone holds the truth to his past and a deep secret that he has spent decades trying to hide. With nothing to lose, Joe Thorne forges to rectify some of the pains of his youth and avenge Annie’s disappearance at the hands of another, while burying everything else a little deeper. Tudor presents another masterful psychological thriller that keeps the reader guessing as the story unravels at break-neck speed. Recommended for those who enjoyed her debut, as well as readers who like a little chill in their novels.I admit that I was not as enveloped in Tudor’s opening novel as some, but I did find there to be some redeeming qualities, which is why I was happy to return for another go. Tudor makes no excuses for her writing style, which mixes a well-balanced narrative and flashback chapters to fill in the backstory gaps. Joe Thorne has an interesting role in this novel, living in both the past and present, while offering the reader a smorgasbord of development and backstory on which to feast. While he is a loner of sorts, the reader can see a Joe who has a purpose, even if it is fogged in an odd connection to his sister who died in a horrible crash many years ago. Many of the other characters prove useful vessels, both to propel the flashback sequences forward and to offer sober revisiting in their older incarnations. Tudor does well to keep the reader involved while also keeping large gaps out of the narrative. The guesswork left to the reader is interesting, though there are some nagging aspects that plague the narrative until the final chapters, rectifying an entire story’s worth of confusing in a single reveal. Tudor paces her story well and keeps the reader on edge, only pushing the final piece into place in time for the reader to catch their breath and end the intense novel.Kudos, Madam Tudor, for another winner. I quite enjoyed this piece and hope others will find as many chills as I did throughout. Love/hate the review? An ever-growing collection of others appears at: http://pecheyponderings.wordpress.com/A Book for All Seasons, a different sort of Book Challenge: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/...
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  • Susanne Strong
    January 1, 1970
    3.25 Stars (rounded down)Dark and Foreboding.Joe Thorne grew up in Arnhill. He has no happy memories of his childhood and never thought he’d return to Arnhill yet here he is. He got a job at Arnhill Academy replacing Julia Morton, the teacher who shot herself and killed her own son, Ben. Joe even rents out their cottage where it happened not believing in ghosts. He has his reasons. Joe grew up with a gang of kids who were the town bullies and most still live in Arnhill. Something bad happened ba 3.25 Stars (rounded down)Dark and Foreboding.Joe Thorne grew up in Arnhill. He has no happy memories of his childhood and never thought he’d return to Arnhill yet here he is. He got a job at Arnhill Academy replacing Julia Morton, the teacher who shot herself and killed her own son, Ben. Joe even rents out their cottage where it happened not believing in ghosts. He has his reasons. Joe grew up with a gang of kids who were the town bullies and most still live in Arnhill. Something bad happened back then. Something festers there, an unease, something you can feel, under your skin and on the hair at the back of your neck. It always has, and it’s not just the people. There is a sense of angst and dread and you just know that there are things left unfinished. Joe has a plan, a for revenge and he is going to see it through.C.J. Tudor’s “The Hiding Place” is a followup to last year’s “The Chalk Man” which I loved (and to me was a nod to Stephen King’s earlier works). Unfortunately for me, I was a little let down by “The Hiding Place” - parts of it felt familiar and very similar to “The Chalk Man” (though the pacing of that was faster), in addition, for a good 75% of this book, very little actually happened and when it did it was quite predictable. That said, this had elements of genius: specifically the characters: Joe, Annie, Marcus, and they were spot on. C.J. Tudor is brilliant at character development and she clearly has a knack for writing about the workings of small towns. Perhaps if I had not read “The Chalk Man” first, I would have liked this one more. I am an outlier here so please do not let my review dissuade you.This was another buddy read with Kaceey!Thank you to NetGalley, Crown Publishing and C.J. Tudor for an ARC of this novel in exchange for an honest review.Published on NetGalley and Goodreads on 11.22.18.
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  • j e w e l s
    January 1, 1970
    FIVE CREEPY STARSFor reasons beyond my comprehension, some novels get renamed and re-covered in the U.S., losing their original U.K. title and identity. Personally, I feel the original title, THE TAKING OF ANNIE THORNE is much more intriguing than the vanilla bland THE HIDING PLACE. But, nobody asked me. Also, I loved that original cover! It matches well with CJ Tudor’s brand and her previous hit, THE CHALK MAN.Oh, well. Title and cover changes aside, this is one freakin’ fun and twisted spooky FIVE CREEPY STARSFor reasons beyond my comprehension, some novels get renamed and re-covered in the U.S., losing their original U.K. title and identity. Personally, I feel the original title, THE TAKING OF ANNIE THORNE is much more intriguing than the vanilla bland THE HIDING PLACE. But, nobody asked me. Also, I loved that original cover! It matches well with CJ Tudor’s brand and her previous hit, THE CHALK MAN.Oh, well. Title and cover changes aside, this is one freakin’ fun and twisted spooky tale! The tone is very similar to THE CHALK MAN, but I liked this one a bit more. The novel starts with a grisly bang and your attention is immediately hooked. I found this book super-addictive. I could not wait to see what had happened to Annie Thorne!!Much like THE CHALK MAN, we have a main character (Joe, an unreliable narrator-HOORAY!) who had a crazy, weird tragedy befall him in childhood. He has understandably never quit thinking about this incident and is determined to go back to his hometown to live and perhaps, get some closure. The events that follow, interspersed with some flashbacks, is one heckuva story! The twists start coming in the end and they just don’t stop.Tudor has that grown-up Scooby Doo vibe going in her books, which I love. All the gang getting together and solving a mystery. SO MUCH FUN!CJ Tudor has been criticized for writing too much like Stephen King. I say PHEWYYYY! I think Tudor is a hundred times more user (reader) friendly than King. I’m a fan of this super talented author.Thanks to Netgalley for the opportunity to read and honestly review this book.
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  • Felicia
    January 1, 1970
    "The past isn't real.It is simply a story we tell ourselves.And sometimes, we lie."This is one of those books that you cover your eyes with your hand while still looking through the space between your fingers, saying no, no, no, not that. It can't be THAT! It only took me a few chapters to start comparing Tudor's writing style to that of Stephen King, and I mean that in the most flattering of ways.I cannot believe the author is a woman. Now calm down feminists, this is a huge compliment. This st "The past isn't real.It is simply a story we tell ourselves.And sometimes, we lie."This is one of those books that you cover your eyes with your hand while still looking through the space between your fingers, saying no, no, no, not that. It can't be THAT! It only took me a few chapters to start comparing Tudor's writing style to that of Stephen King, and I mean that in the most flattering of ways.I cannot believe the author is a woman. Now calm down feminists, this is a huge compliment. This story is told exclusively through the POV of a male protagonist and I am astonished at how competently Tudor was able to cultivate this character as if she had lived and breathed in his shoes. This is not an easy feat and one that, more often than not, is not attempted by female writers, and certainly not to this level of proficiency. I'm still not convinced she's not a man. Once the concluding storyline was revealed, first I gasped and then followed that up with the thought of... wait a minute, I've read this story before (again a nod to Stephen King). But I was wrong. So wrong. The author took things so much further than I could have ever imagined I was left thinking Stephen who?This a complex, multilayered story with an unreliable narrator that peaked my curiosity from sentence one until the final period of the epilogue.I'm left wondering why, up until now, I haven't felt compelled to read Tudor's debut novel The Chalk Man, which I promptly corrected by adding to my tbr list upon completion of this book. Highly recommended to readers that enjoy a dark thriller peppered with moments of complete horror.This book now has a new cover and a new name, The Hiding Place. I received an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Lisa
    January 1, 1970
    My thanks to Crown Publishing, Netgalley, and the author C.J. Tudor for the chance to read and review this e-book. Truth is that I despised Ms. Tudors first book-Chalk Men. I felt it was an obvious theft of quite a few Stephen King books. I still feel that way. Yet, I thought I saw something in this author that would and could get better. So, not being a complete dumbkins, I decided to keep her in my radar. I'm glad I did! I really enjoyed this book. She's getting better at building her characte My thanks to Crown Publishing, Netgalley, and the author C.J. Tudor for the chance to read and review this e-book. Truth is that I despised Ms. Tudors first book-Chalk Men. I felt it was an obvious theft of quite a few Stephen King books. I still feel that way. Yet, I thought I saw something in this author that would and could get better. So, not being a complete dumbkins, I decided to keep her in my radar. I'm glad I did! I really enjoyed this book. She's getting better at building her character's. It's still lacking, but so much better than before. About the 70% mark, I did get a wee bit angry because I thought it was drifting off into S.K. territory.Ala/Pet Semetary. Did it? Yes. Some words were almost spoken Verbatim from the s.k. book. Almost, not quite. Does that still count? Well, yeah. Course it does. Ms. Tudor doesn't seem to be a deep thinker. No, she may think deep thoughts, but what she comes out with on paper is not quotable. It's all surface. That's actually fine with me, because she may eventually come up with something that blows my mind! I give this book 3 stars. Mostly because I believe Ms. Tudor will get better. I look forward to the next book!
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  • Melisa
    January 1, 1970
    There are no two ways around it - C.J. Tudor is a storyteller extraordinaire. She can write a terrifying tale, one that will burrow into the deepest recesses of your mind and have you frightened without being entirely sure why. It’s the creation of an overall atmosphere of fright and terror, and she excels at this. Tudor once again skirts the line between horror and thriller in this sophomore book, similar genre-wise to her breakout debut, The Chalk Man (a MUST read!). A personal favorite trait There are no two ways around it - C.J. Tudor is a storyteller extraordinaire. She can write a terrifying tale, one that will burrow into the deepest recesses of your mind and have you frightened without being entirely sure why. It’s the creation of an overall atmosphere of fright and terror, and she excels at this. Tudor once again skirts the line between horror and thriller in this sophomore book, similar genre-wise to her breakout debut, The Chalk Man (a MUST read!). A personal favorite trait is that Tudor is the queen of showing vs. telling - everything is implied rather than “told” - a true gift for a writer. And please pay attention, dear reader, because nothing here is a throw away comment or an oversight, every single detail is wrapped into the story one way or another. The characters are spot on, the setting takes on a life of its own, and you will be fully immersed into the storyline, dying to find out how it will come together. Unfortunately, I feel as if I was left with more questions than answers in the end (perhaps that was the point? Or perhaps it’s user error and I missed a few points) and I would love to sit down with this author and chat over coffee. One day, maybe!3.5 starsThank you to Crown Publishing for my advance copy. This book will be available February 2019.
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  • Jennifer ~ TarHeelReader
    January 1, 1970
    This little nugget is my first book by C.J. Tudor, and I loved it! ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ ⭐ Joe attended Arnhill school as a child along with his many friends. He does not have good memories of his time there and vowed not to return because he left under difficult circumstances…including a suicide and a murder; all on a bed of lies and deceit. Now Joe HAS to return to Arnhill. Something bad has happened to another student, all eerily similar to what happened to Joe’s sister. He’s the only one who can get to the This little nugget is my first book by C.J. Tudor, and I loved it! ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ ⭐️ Joe attended Arnhill school as a child along with his many friends. He does not have good memories of his time there and vowed not to return because he left under difficult circumstances…including a suicide and a murder; all on a bed of lies and deceit. Now Joe HAS to return to Arnhill. Something bad has happened to another student, all eerily similar to what happened to Joe’s sister. He’s the only one who can get to the bottom of what is happening because he knows the truth. Joe lies to get the job as a teacher, and he faces his old friends that no longer want anything to do with him and vice versa. The tragedies center around an abandoned mine. What happened to his sister, the secrets at Arnhill, and all that has changed Joe’s life are enclosed in the shadows of that mine, and Joe will have to confront them. Oh my, what a thrilling page-turner this one is. I was hooked on The Hiding Place and had to know what happened to Joe’s sister. The shock value is high, the writing is fluid, and the pacing is on point. Why is Arnhill so deliciously creepy? Why do horrific things happen there?Overall, The Hiding Place is an exquisite thriller with a touch of horror, and I’ll be waiting in line for Tudor’s next book AND reading The Chalk Man asap! Thanks to Crown Publishing for the complimentary book. All opinions are my own. My reviews can also be found on my blog: www.jennifertarheelreader.com
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  • Carol
    January 1, 1970
    First off, I want to say I don't want to miss anything C. J. Tudor writes. THE HIDING PLACE is her second novel just recently released and was just as good (for me) as her debut, THE CHALK MAN. "Arnhill is a grim little village where lots of bad things have happened." AND.....they're happening again. You could say the town is cursed or perhaps it's just the ghosts of Joey's past that want him gone. Joe Thorne grew up in Arnhill and has recently returned to fill an opening as an English teacher. First off, I want to say I don't want to miss anything C. J. Tudor writes. THE HIDING PLACE is her second novel just recently released and was just as good (for me) as her debut, THE CHALK MAN. "Arnhill is a grim little village where lots of bad things have happened." AND.....they're happening again. You could say the town is cursed or perhaps it's just the ghosts of Joey's past that want him gone. Joe Thorne grew up in Arnhill and has recently returned to fill an opening as an English teacher. He is kind of a quiet, mysterious guy with a multitude of secrets....and personal faults, and now on top of everything else, he must face....and relive his darkest memory of all....what happened to his beloved little eight year old sister. "Sometimes I think it's not the passing of the years that really ages you, but the passing of the people and things you care about." While renting an old dilapitated cottage with a bloody history, and icky creepy-crawling creatures in the bathroom...all he can afford, Joe and his sarcastic mouth ponder how he will manage to avoid dangerous enemies and entities of his past....and present who threaten to do him deadly harm. Dark and twisty; and as with THE CHALK MAN, somewhat reminiscent of a Stephen King read, but with her own skittering chittering flair. ***ARC provided by Crown Publishing in exchange for review***
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  • sue
    January 1, 1970
    C. J. Tudor wrote The Chalk Man which I thoroughly enjoyed.Because of that I couldn’t wait for her next book.This one is just as good but in a very different way, more sinister, more creepy and definitely (on audio) it had its spine chilling moments.I crossed from reading this on my kindle to listening to it on audio so that I could continue reading it yesterday in the car. Yes, I was hooked.I think a lots been written already in reviews so I’m very reluctant to add more as I’m a great believer C. J. Tudor wrote The Chalk Man which I thoroughly enjoyed.Because of that I couldn’t wait for her next book.This one is just as good but in a very different way, more sinister, more creepy and definitely (on audio) it had its spine chilling moments.I crossed from reading this on my kindle to listening to it on audio so that I could continue reading it yesterday in the car. Yes, I was hooked.I think a lots been written already in reviews so I’m very reluctant to add more as I’m a great believer of allowing a potential reader of a book going in at least semi blind. Returning to his home town and taking a job in the local school is it on purpose or to make ends meet?Is there a reason he’s gone back to where he grew up and if so, why?I felt the plot inch by inch widen as I slipped more and more down its cracks sucking me in.A few places I gasped and wondered how this author came up with this story.The main character had a great way with sarcasm and quirks. It satisfied my warped sense of humour and was very realistically done. I was well on par with his replies. I get a bit like that myself, tongue in cheek, so it was brilliant. The ending wasn’t what I thought either. It was a satisfying finale to the plot but not to the teacher.....or the one female I thought connected to him.I felt a bit sad for them not. I’ll definitley be awaiting this authors next book without a doubt.
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  • *TUDOR^QUEEN*
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 Stars rounded down to 3.Thank you to Crown Publishing who provided an advance reader copy via NetGalley.When I read author C.J. Tudor's debut novel "The Chalk Man" I was blown away by her "Stephen King-like" writing style, where I had noticed she incorporated some very similar themes of King's into the book. Since I had eagerly devoured King's earlier works during the 70s and 80s, I appreciated Tudor's homage afforded to her famous predecessor. I rated "The Chalk Man" 5 stars and voted for i 3.5 Stars rounded down to 3.Thank you to Crown Publishing who provided an advance reader copy via NetGalley.When I read author C.J. Tudor's debut novel "The Chalk Man" I was blown away by her "Stephen King-like" writing style, where I had noticed she incorporated some very similar themes of King's into the book. Since I had eagerly devoured King's earlier works during the 70s and 80s, I appreciated Tudor's homage afforded to her famous predecessor. I rated "The Chalk Man" 5 stars and voted for it in the Goodreads Choice Awards. So, when I saw a new offering from C.J. Tudor I pounced upon it.While I noticed multiple King homage in "The Chalk Man", I wasn't expecting such an outright copy of a theme this time from of one of Stephen King's best known books..."Pet Cemetery". Yes, I rejoiced in the King similarities in her debut book, but I frankly became a bit cynical when I realized what this book was about. Though lacking in originality due to its pilfered plot, Tudor manages to flesh out her own version that will give you the willies. Trust me, when you hit about 50% into the book, you will experience claustrophobia and sheer dread. It became so frightening and overwhelming that I nearly stopped reading the book, but I persevered. The book takes place in a bleak and sooty former mining town called Arnhill in England. A lot of strange things have occurred during the decades, concerning the death of children. Oddly enough, though, there doesn't seem to be any children buried in Arnhill's church cemetery. There is a former colliery site that is cordoned off with fencing, but sometimes kids sneak through gaps and trespass. There have been plans in recent years for building a country park or housing on the former mining site, but the local board seems to always stall on the matter. Joe Thorne, now an adult, returns to Arnhill, where he re-connects with childhood gang members and re-visits their shared dark secret. If you've already read Stephen King's "Pet Cemetery" or perhaps have seen the movie, you'll well know how frightening the premise of this book is. I don't want to ruin the surprise element for those yet to read this book, but to quote one of the most famous lines from Pet Cemetery..."Sometimes dead is better".
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  • Joey R.
    January 1, 1970
    3.0 Stars— I noticed that many of my Goodreads friends had recently read “The Hiding Place” and gave it favorable reviews so I decided to read C.J. Tudor for the first time myself. Tudor is an English author who wrote “The Chalk Man” (which also got good reviews) so I really was looking forward to reading this one. The book started a little slow for me as Joe, the main character, moves back into the town where he grew up with an obvious agenda. Joe ends up having a lot of personal issues like ga 3.0 Stars— I noticed that many of my Goodreads friends had recently read “The Hiding Place” and gave it favorable reviews so I decided to read C.J. Tudor for the first time myself. Tudor is an English author who wrote “The Chalk Man” (which also got good reviews) so I really was looking forward to reading this one. The book started a little slow for me as Joe, the main character, moves back into the town where he grew up with an obvious agenda. Joe ends up having a lot of personal issues like gambling, alcohol, smart mouth etc. Joe’s main problem though is his sarcasm which gets him into a lot of trouble over and over again. It soon becomes apparent that Joe’s purpose for moving back into town is to blackmail an old ex- friend Steven who Joe despises because of major problems they had that led to the death of Joe’s younger sister when she was 8. This book was all over the place as both a “revenge thriller”, a “run from the loanshark/ mob enforcer thriller” and a “supernatural mystery” all in one. Basically the plot is very similar to “Pet Sematary” by Stephen King mixed with a little “Grist Mill Road” by Christopher Yates and “Stand by Me aka The Body” by Stephen King. But Stephen King did a much better job than Tudor in building both suspense and horror in his story. I noticed in the author’s acknowledgements at the end of the book, she thanked Stephen King... which she should have considering Pet Sematary was the obvious inspiration for much of the plot of this book. All in all I did enjoy the book but hope in future books for a little more Tudor and a lot less King.
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  • Tammy
    January 1, 1970
    This is better than other thrillers I’ve read lately but not spectacular. While the writing is solid the plot comes directly from a B horror film. A cheese-fest complete with skittering beetles. Spare me. I’ll chalk this up to thriller fatigue and return to reading the Churchill biography post-haste.
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  • Melisa
    January 1, 1970
    Please see review of the US title over at: https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...
  • Carrie
    January 1, 1970
    Having read C. J. Tudor’s first book, The Chalk Man, and really enjoying it I was quite looking forward to reading The Hiding Place. After finishing this one though this thriller just didn’t seem as thrilling to me as the first book.Joe Thorne never wanted to return to his hometown of Arnhill after everything that had happened to him and his family growing up. Joe’s sister Annie had disappeared when Joe was a teen but she did come back but things were never the same. After getting an email that Having read C. J. Tudor’s first book, The Chalk Man, and really enjoying it I was quite looking forward to reading The Hiding Place. After finishing this one though this thriller just didn’t seem as thrilling to me as the first book.Joe Thorne never wanted to return to his hometown of Arnhill after everything that had happened to him and his family growing up. Joe’s sister Annie had disappeared when Joe was a teen but she did come back but things were never the same. After getting an email that things are happening in Arnhill again Joe decides he needs the answers to what happened all those years ago and are happening again now.I do believe when I wrote up my review for The Chalk Man I had mentioned how it reminded me a lot of Stephen King. The story seemed to take on it’s own life but the style had that distinct flavor to it. Well, now with this second book I really failed to find the originality with this one. This to me was really a turn off when I kept comparing the book the entire read instead of just getting that feeling to the style. What I’d rather see from this author is to tackle something completely original that will wow me next time as this one was just one of those meh reads to me after too much comparing.I received an advance copy from the publisher via NetGalley.For more reviews please visit https://carriesbookreviews.com/
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  • Sandy
    January 1, 1970
    Sooo….my best advice before cracking the cover is take a deep breath. And prepare to be shoved into the deep end. If the prologue to this book doesn’t grab you, find a mirror. You might be in a coma. Initially Arnhill seems like a million other small towns. Slightly faded, nothing much to do & everyone knows your business. It’s a place that inspires people to leave which is exactly what Joe Thorne did. But Joe’s reasons were a little more personal. There are 2 time lines that alternate & Sooo….my best advice before cracking the cover is take a deep breath. And prepare to be shoved into the deep end. If the prologue to this book doesn’t grab you, find a mirror. You might be in a coma. Initially Arnhill seems like a million other small towns. Slightly faded, nothing much to do & everyone knows your business. It’s a place that inspires people to leave which is exactly what Joe Thorne did. But Joe’s reasons were a little more personal. There are 2 time lines that alternate & as the story of his childhood progresses, we become acquainted with the ghosts that drove him away. So it’s surprising to find him applying for a job at his old high school in the present. Turns out there are a couple of very good reasons. HIs current situation is a little dicey & he urgently needs to make himself scarce. He’s also come to realize you can’t outrun ghosts when they live in your head. It’s time to head back & learn the truth about what happened to his little sister Annie.If you’ve read "The Chalk Man" , this may have a familiar ring to it. A guy returns to his home town to face the friends, bullies & trauma of his past. But the similarities end there. This is a decidedly darker story. Where the first book was more mystery/suspense, this one lands squarely in horror territory. But “Sandy” you say, “how icky could it be?” Just wait ’til the bathroom scene (told ya 😏).The other big difference is Joe himself & the relationships he left behind. His character is nothing like Eddie. Joe is a damaged, cynical man whose main coping strategy is booze. And as we quickly discover, his old school chums have rather firm opinions about his return. It’s a bit of a slow burner because there’s a lot of back story to establish. Joe’s present day life is complicated & it inevitably catches up with him in Arnhill. The historical story line is chock full of events that only get creepier as we learn what happened to Annie, Joe & others. For me there was a lull in this middle section. I was turning the pages thinking it was a solid read. Then I hit the the last few chapters. And that’s all I’ll say about that. Just know it made me bump up my rating.The author excels at describing small town life & the grim, claustrophobic setting hangs over the whole story like low storm clouds. The characters are well defined & I was particularly fond of Joe’s colleague Beth Scattergood, a teacher with funky clothes & a gift for sarcasm. We’re all freaked/grossed out by different stuff so there may be a few scenes that make you check under the bed. Whether or not you’re a horror fan, I bet you’ll keep reading just to find out what happened to Annie Thorne.
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  • Sheri
    January 1, 1970
    I really struggled with what to say in this review as I didn’t care for this one. Is it the author’s writing style? Is it the storyline itself? I think it’s a bit of both. After reading The Chalk Man, I was left with questions that were never answered directly. Instead the reader was allowed to infer some things on their own which I found to be a novelty of sorts (even though it really isn’t, if that makes any sense). But now in her second offering, I find Tudor’s style to be more of a ploy. I w I really struggled with what to say in this review as I didn’t care for this one. Is it the author’s writing style? Is it the storyline itself? I think it’s a bit of both. After reading The Chalk Man, I was left with questions that were never answered directly. Instead the reader was allowed to infer some things on their own which I found to be a novelty of sorts (even though it really isn’t, if that makes any sense). But now in her second offering, I find Tudor’s style to be more of a ploy. I was hooked by never being quite sure of the reasons behind happenings but looking forward to the reveals later on. But my disappointment came when I didn’t get those reveals. I was left with the why of so many things still being a mystery. For me, it’s almost as if the author just threw in a bunch of cliché happenings hoping they would carry the story. It’s not a very long book, yet somehow I still felt as if it either needed to be shorter or fleshed out more. I thought the first 2/3 of the book was slow and really nothing more than a tease at what might come, much of which is quite predictable. The last 1/3 is where the story really picks up the pace, but unfortunately for me, I had just gotten there later at night and didn’t think it would be a good idea to continue reading now that the skittering and chittering had picked up in earnest. So I set it aside and didn’t pick it back up for a long while. I was interested, yet I also think I knew it wasn’t going to be as captivating a read as I had hoped after its slow start.I found this to be a decent read but the lack of closure and the ill-defined genre left me feeling like the author is trying too hard to appeal to the masses. Is this horror? I don’t read horror as I think it will be too scary/creepy for me, but this was nothing. Maybe I should try a true horror read just to see how it compares. Is this a thriller or suspense? No, a bit of suspense is there but overall not enough. I can’t decide how to categorize this. The author has talent and I think she would be better received by many if she chose a genre and worked to develop a plot denoting that genre. I will most likely check out her next book but sadly it won’t be near the top of my list.
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  • Kendall
    January 1, 1970
    "You didn't own this place. It might let you think so. Might even want you to think so. But that was how it got you. That was how it drew you down here. That was how it owned you."Get ready to be unnerved and on edge. The Hiding Place is coming for you! Oh my GAWWWDDD C.J Tudor does it again folks! With having loved her first book The Chalk Men... I had my doubts about loving this book too. But, I loved this just as much as her first book.C.J reminds me in so many ways of Stephen King.... I love "You didn't own this place. It might let you think so. Might even want you to think so. But that was how it got you. That was how it drew you down here. That was how it owned you."Get ready to be unnerved and on edge. The Hiding Place is coming for you! Oh my GAWWWDDD C.J Tudor does it again folks! With having loved her first book The Chalk Men... I had my doubts about loving this book too. But, I loved this just as much as her first book.C.J reminds me in so many ways of Stephen King.... I love it! The story reminded me of a previous story that I had read by Stephen King but oh no my friends..... Tudor takes this spin in such a creepy and clever way of her own. C.J is such a master storyteller that wavers between horror and thriller. The Hiding Place makes you check under your bed before you lay your precious head down to sleep. The story is dark, creepy, and leaves you breathless with wanting more. The supernatural aspects make this story come alive at the seams and it leaves you feeling that much more satisfied with the ending.Oh my goodness.... what a story!!! I devoured this book over a day and a half! I have become such a huge fan of C.J Tudor and this book once again will be one of my favorites for 2019. I highly highly recommend this one! Thank you to Netgalley and Crown Publishing for the arc in exchange for my honest review.5 stunning stars!!Expected publication date: 2/5/19Published to Goodreads: 1/14/19
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  • NZLisaM
    January 1, 1970
    Two for two for C.J. Tudor!In January of last year, C.J. Tudor's debut, The Chalk Man ticked all the right spooky boxes, and earned a well-deserved 5 stars from me. So, you can imagine how much I was anticipating whatever Tudor penned next? And when the summary for The Taking of Annie Thorne was released, my anticipation tripled. Then, it skyrocketed, when I was selected to review an early digital copy. Halfway through the prologue I knew I was in for a treat. TTOAT is not only worthy of The Cha Two for two for C.J. Tudor!In January of last year, C.J. Tudor's debut, The Chalk Man ticked all the right spooky boxes, and earned a well-deserved 5 stars from me. So, you can imagine how much I was anticipating whatever Tudor penned next? And when the summary for The Taking of Annie Thorne was released, my anticipation tripled. Then, it skyrocketed, when I was selected to review an early digital copy. Halfway through the prologue I knew I was in for a treat. TTOAT is not only worthy of The Chalk Man – it's better.When Joe Thorne was fifteen, his eight year-old beloved sister, Annie, disappeared. She was found forty-eight hours later, seemingly fine. But she wasn’t fine – she was his worst nightmare. Now, with unfinished scores to settle, and in need of a place to lay low, Joe is drawn back to his hometown of Arnhill. His return will reopen past wounds, antagonise old enemies, and force him to confront his darkest guilt and fears.TTOAT is frightening and unsettling, with chapter after chapter of mounting tension and suspense, culminating in an explosive conclusion. The mystery/s center on missing children, murder, psychopaths, and suspicious accidents. There are horror elements to savour – an ancient, abandoned, claustrophobic setting, ghost stories, beetle infestations, a creepy doll, as well as themes of possession, paranoia, and resurrection. Factor in a dose of childhood nostalgia – friendship, first crushes, a sense of adventure and exploration, and some serious teen issues – bullying, suicide, peer pressure, playground gangs, and you have a winning formulaWe jump back-and-forth between our protagonist, Joe's, present and past – normally with the present ending on a cliffhanger, that is then followed up on in the past. It’s evident early on that Joe is an unsympathetic, far-from-innocent character. In fact, less than a handful of the characters were likeable or redeemable, but they were all vividly drawn and essential to the plot, and to be honest, Joe kind of grew on me. I loved his brand of sarcasm, the banter between him and Beth, and any time he interacted with Lauren was hilarious. Not only that, it effectively lightened the mood in an otherwise dark book. I thought it was uniquely done how the prologue was from the POV of police sergeant Gary Barnes, yet despite the crime-ridden plot, his character never appeared again, and was only mentioned twice.The plot straddled the line between real world mystery and paranormal, meaning no easy or straightforward answers were given for some of the events that occurred. Instead, they were left up to your own interpretation, beliefs, and imagination – dependent upon how much of the plot you attribute to the supernatural versus rational explanation. I'm a skeptic, so unless a book explicitly states it's supernatural (and this one didn't), then I'm going to be come up with theories to fit the latter, and I relished puzzling over this illusive plot. Nothing was ever what it seemed, and my perception of things was constantly challenged and changing.Parts reminded me of three Stephen King novels, as well as The Exorcist, but I viewed this as a welcome tribute. TTOAT had too much originality for it to be called a copy. And let's face it, is any story ever completely original anymore? And do we really want it to be? I know it's only February, but this is going to be a tough one to beat, and earns top spot for my favourite read of 2019 thus far. Pre-order now, not only for all the reasons stated above, but who can resist such glorious cover art?I’d like to thank Netgalley UK, Penguin UK – Michael Joseph, and C. J. Tudor for the e-ARC.UK/AUS/NZ Release Date: 21st February, 2019.Published in the US under the title, The Hiding Place.
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  • ELLIAS (elliasreads)
    January 1, 1970
    this creepy little shit.(slow claps).
  • Jan
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 starsI didn't realize how much I missed a good story with a male protag until I read one!It seems all the novels I have read for the past few months have been female dominated, so this was an unexpected pleasure.I really like this author's writing style. I immediately got that feeling you get when you put on your favorite pair of sweats and settle down for the night....pure comfort. I felt the same way about Tudor's first book as well. (The Chalk Man)There is a great story here, full of myst 4.5 starsI didn't realize how much I missed a good story with a male protag until I read one!It seems all the novels I have read for the past few months have been female dominated, so this was an unexpected pleasure.I really like this author's writing style. I immediately got that feeling you get when you put on your favorite pair of sweats and settle down for the night....pure comfort. I felt the same way about Tudor's first book as well. (The Chalk Man)There is a great story here, full of mysteries to unfold along with a good level of darkness. Well written characters and a few twists that were perfectly executed. And just when you think it's safe to take a breath, nope-Tudor still has one more surprise left to reveal. Just brilliant!I am not going to get into plot reveal here. I truly think this is a book that you need to go in blind and just sit back and enjoy what's coming....ARC provided by NetGalley
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