The 18th Abduction (Women's Murder Club, #18)
The #1 bestselling female detective of the past 50 years is back. Detective Lindsay Boxer and her husband Joe Molinari team up to protect San Francisco from an international war criminal in the newest Women's Murder Club thriller. Three female schoolteachers go missing in San Francisco, and Detective Lindsay Boxer is on the case-which quickly escalates from missing person to murder. Under pressure at work, Lindsay needs support at home. But her husband Joe is drawn into an encounter with a woman who's seen a ghost--a notorious war criminal from her Eastern European home country, walking the streets of San Francisco. As Lindsay digs deeper, with help from intrepid journalist Cindy Thomas, there are revelations about the victims. The implications are shocking. And when Joe's mystery informant disappears, joining the ranks of missing women in grave danger, all evidence points to a sordid international crime operation. It will take the combined skills of Lindsay, Joe, and the entire Women's Murder Club to protect their city, and themselves, from a monster.

The 18th Abduction (Women's Murder Club, #18) Details

TitleThe 18th Abduction (Women's Murder Club, #18)
Author
ReleaseApr 29th, 2019
PublisherLittle, Brown and Company
Rating
GenreMystery, Fiction, Thriller

The 18th Abduction (Women's Murder Club, #18) Review

  • Matt
    January 1, 1970
    I always look forward to my annual exploration of the Women’s Murder Club, one of James Patterson’s strongest series alongside Maxine Paetro, who is a stellar collaborator. While many series lose their energy after so long, the eighteenth novel in this collection remains fresh and poignant, perfect for the series fan. After a preface in the present day, the story goes back five years, where Detective Lindsay Boxer finds herself in the middle of a baffling query. Three teachers from a prestigious I always look forward to my annual exploration of the Women’s Murder Club, one of James Patterson’s strongest series alongside Maxine Paetro, who is a stellar collaborator. While many series lose their energy after so long, the eighteenth novel in this collection remains fresh and poignant, perfect for the series fan. After a preface in the present day, the story goes back five years, where Detective Lindsay Boxer finds herself in the middle of a baffling query. Three teachers from a prestigious preparatory school have gone missing while out together. There are few clues as to their whereabouts, which makes it all the most confusion. While Boxer is out handling this, her husband, Joe Molinari, comes across a woman on his way home. She tells a story of having seen a war criminal from her native Bosnia, a man who tortured her and her family years ago. Thought rumoured to have drowned, Slobodan Petrović May still be alive and has the glint in his eye made infamous when he held the moniker as the Butcher of Djoba. It perfectly describes the brutality to which he subjected his victims. Molinari is eager to help this woman, but must cut through her determination to take action on her own, while also working with his FBI contacts to bring Petrović to justice. Living under a pseudonym, Molinari will have to approach Petrović closely and ensure that this was not a case of mistaken identity. Meanwhile, Boxer begins to piece together some early clues and one of the victims turns up brutally murdered. Could there be a deeper connection to these three women, outside their teaching together? The rush is on to find the other two women before they are too long, though they are being mocked by the purported killer, Bloodsucker. In a case with more brutality than any Boxer has seen since she joined SFPD, this may be one killer whose determination to eviscerate their victims has deeply psychological ties. A wonderfully dark thriller that takes series readers on a journey with which they are familiar. This deep into the series, I would strongly suggest readers start at the beginning, allowing them to discover some of the character developments and nuances. James Patterson can be hit and miss for many readers, churning out books faster than many can list them and leaving his name to sell copies. This inconsistency with the quality of writing has soured many and thereby left books like this shunned, forcing new fans not to see that there are still great JP books. Teaming up with Maxine Paetro, Patterson develops this wonderful story that builds on many of the past novels in the series, while adding some new and international flavour. Lindsay Boxer has become a strong character within San Francisco’s Homicide community, working diligently to solve any crime tossed her way. While there is little backstory left to reveal, the reader is always able to see small bouts of development within her work and personal relationships. Her marriage to Joe Molinari has long been a hot/cold situation worthy of exportation, though this book, which flashes back, dodges some of the bumpier parts of their relationship. While the other three ‘Club’ members receive their due mention, there is little the Club does to solve crimes as a unit, as has been the nature of the latter novels in the series. With Patterson’s great use of short and teaser chapters, the reader is pulled into the middle of this thriller in short order and left to explore all aspects of this multi-pronged story. Series fans will likely enjoy this book, as will those who are always looking for strong writing by Patterson and his collaborators. Definitely a series worth exploring for those who have time and are not being drowned by a TO BE READ pile.Kudos, Mr. Patterson and Madame Paetro, as you continue this well-established series.Love/hate the review? An ever-growing collection of others appears at: http://pecheyponderings.wordpress.com/A Book for All Seasons, a different sort of Book Challenge: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/...
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  • Luffy
    January 1, 1970
    This is the first ARC that I've read. Thanks to all parties.So, this is how a thriller from 2019 is like. I think that though this book was formulaic, it had enough new points to deserve reading. What I'm saying is that I do recommend it. Also, just saying a thriller is formulaic by itself is a cliche and a lazy reviewing.There is much suffering present in the bodies and minds of the special characters in this novel. When I thought a victim would make it free, I was cruelly disappointed. It was This is the first ARC that I've read. Thanks to all parties.So, this is how a thriller from 2019 is like. I think that though this book was formulaic, it had enough new points to deserve reading. What I'm saying is that I do recommend it. Also, just saying a thriller is formulaic by itself is a cliche and a lazy reviewing.There is much suffering present in the bodies and minds of the special characters in this novel. When I thought a victim would make it free, I was cruelly disappointed. It was because of these twists that I granted this 18th book in the series a high score.Ultimately, my relief at finding some victims safe outweighed the punishment meted out to the master criminal. The two authors did well to write an addictive book. I also gave 4 stars to the first Alex Cross novel, if memory serves right. Consistency is the key, and I gingerly declare that James Patterson deserves all the dough he's been getting.
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  • Natalie M
    January 1, 1970
    Some Patterson collaborations are woeful however, this one remains an excellent combination with Paetro. The Women’s Murder Club are back on the trail of three missing teachers and Joe is following-up on the sighting of a Bosnian war criminal. This particular avenue made an excellent plot!The novel starts in the present and then we go back five years. If you’ve read the other 17 in the series it’s a little disconcerting but most pre/current information aligns. If you haven’t read any of the othe Some Patterson collaborations are woeful however, this one remains an excellent combination with Paetro. The Women’s Murder Club are back on the trail of three missing teachers and Joe is following-up on the sighting of a Bosnian war criminal. This particular avenue made an excellent plot!The novel starts in the present and then we go back five years. If you’ve read the other 17 in the series it’s a little disconcerting but most pre/current information aligns. If you haven’t read any of the others, this would be a great starting book in the series. Four stars because of some missing info from previous books which doesn’t align, the slightly unbelievable ‘linking’ of the cases midway but thereafter the novel flies. And I would love to have ‘seen’ a bit more of the other 3 members of the Women’s Murder Club, this one focuses on Boxer and Joe.I’m looking forward to the 19th one due out later this year.
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  • Mandy White
    January 1, 1970
    I love that this series is still going so strong 18 books in. This book was just as good as book 1 and I read it in a day. Can always count on James Patterson for a good read.
  • Deb
    January 1, 1970
    I give this book a 3.5. It was okay. Not up to the usual Womens Murder Club books. The story didnt grab me. There was very little interaction with the other ladies in the group.
  • Liz
    January 1, 1970
    What a great series this is. Two completely different, but equally compelling, storylines make this book very difficult to put down.4-5 stars
  • Scott
    January 1, 1970
    Let me be honest up front. I read most of James Patterson’s books and have for several years. Some might ask why and that’s another whole discussion best saved for another day. I have really enjoyed some, liked some, and didn’t really care for others. On a personal level, I must admit that his Women’s Murder Club series – focused on the professional and personal lives of four women in San Francisco - has been hit and miss over the last couple of years. Last year’s outing was pretty good, but the Let me be honest up front. I read most of James Patterson’s books and have for several years. Some might ask why and that’s another whole discussion best saved for another day. I have really enjoyed some, liked some, and didn’t really care for others. On a personal level, I must admit that his Women’s Murder Club series – focused on the professional and personal lives of four women in San Francisco - has been hit and miss over the last couple of years. Last year’s outing was pretty good, but the prior year’s book was absolutely weak. “The 18th Abduction” begins like other books in the series with two mysteries – one with the disappearance of three young school teachers and one the sudden appearance of a supposedly dead notorious war criminal. With the public pressure mounting, Lindsay Boxer and her partner, Conklin, race the clock to save the teachers before they turn up dead. At the same time Lindsay’s husband and FBI agent, Joe, has been approached by a Bosnian refuge who suffered serious personal loss at the hands of a war criminal that is now running a restaurant in San Francisco. The refugee, Anna, experienced the brutal death of her husband, her child, as well as being raped repeatedly and left with permanent physical scars. Now, Joe is the only person who can provide her with the justice that no one should have to beg for. Patterson and Paetro weave both investigations in a fast but predictable manner. There are the usual twists and turns along the way, but the challenges and obstacles were not very complex, nor that compelling. In typical Patterson fashion, the standard multi-plots come together in the end and provide the link that most readers saw coming after reading the book jacket. And the key penultimate scenes leading to the climax happened mostly off-screen, which weakened the ending a bit.In addition, there was no growth or development for any of the main characters, either professionally or on the home front. Our fearless club members are stagnant, including Cindy Thomas playing a small role and Yuki Castellano being completely absent. Although I truly love Lindsay and Claire Washburn, leaving them out was disappointing to me Overall, Patterson and Paetro lost some of their Women’s Murder Club mojo this time out. If you like the standard Patterson recipe, then enjoy to your heart’s content. But this one breaks no new ground, and feels too casual and comfortable when reading.
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  • Donna Hines
    January 1, 1970
    Is there anything better than Maxine Paetro and James Patterson's Women's Murder Club novels?I think not and notice how I put the lovely lady first in mentioning her work as it's only courteous right?So with this said this 18th novel to the series is one that holds it own quite nicely tucked away with the narcissist fan in all of us whose processing power, control, and above the law modus operandi techniques.War crimes are in the news these days, toxicity is increasing daily, narcissism and the Is there anything better than Maxine Paetro and James Patterson's Women's Murder Club novels?I think not and notice how I put the lovely lady first in mentioning her work as it's only courteous right?So with this said this 18th novel to the series is one that holds it own quite nicely tucked away with the narcissist fan in all of us whose processing power, control, and above the law modus operandi techniques.War crimes are in the news these days, toxicity is increasing daily, narcissism and the discussion surrounding these personality trait disordered individuals is becoming more well known in our political culture today.This novel focuses solely upon three teachers who went missing and turn up murdered.It's a scary thought but Detective Linsay Boxer is on the case and determined to get justice or die trying.Now you know I have a love v hate relationship with James Patterson who I commend for his promotional reading especially for our students and librarians.This one did not disappoint the masses as it was non stop action, heightened with just enough flavor of the insane in terms of the evidence of each crime, and then shored up with Anna our informant who took on a mighty power in our very own war criminal.While monsters do not wish to be coined the term they are deadly so please don't believe the hype that narcissism is all vanity because that trap is what has resulted in many deaths.Joe Molinari was another one of those specialty characters placed nicely in the flow of this plot who held his own going after Petrovic .Nobody is above the law! Remember that!A great fresh novel in a series that's been extraordinary. A must read for thriller fans everywhere! A wonderful collaboration of this duo writing team.While I often dislike the mass production of many of James works this one is one I hope sticks around for a long time to come. Cheers!
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  • Kay
    January 1, 1970
    One of my favorite JP's collaboration series, but book 18 didn't wow me. The case was interesting, with Joe and Lindsay end up trying to pin down the same suspect. It was the women's group exchange that were a bit lacking and underwhelming. However, I'm still looking forward to 19th in October.
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  • Mahoghani 23
    January 1, 1970
    The book was hyped up to draw you in but the storyline did not deliver. I've read this entire series and was disappointed in the book. The story starts in the present but reverts back to the past, 5 years ago. This story is not talked about in the entire series of the Women's Murder Club. There are missing characters in the story but as I stated before, the story reverted back to the past. The book kind of dragged in the middle but picked up off and on. Don't allow my opinion to deter you from r The book was hyped up to draw you in but the storyline did not deliver. I've read this entire series and was disappointed in the book. The story starts in the present but reverts back to the past, 5 years ago. This story is not talked about in the entire series of the Women's Murder Club. There are missing characters in the story but as I stated before, the story reverted back to the past. The book kind of dragged in the middle but picked up off and on. Don't allow my opinion to deter you from reading this book. You may enjoy it. I didn't.
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  • NMonroe
    January 1, 1970
    Loved it buuuuut a couple questions. I think JP got a little greedy. The transition from the 17th book is questionable? Things and people are missing... like the daughter.
  • Carol
    January 1, 1970
    I always look forward to the near annual James Patterson installment of the Women's Murder Club. I have a friend in my book friends that invited me to be a member of his friends and as I've finally got caught up in all the books in this series, he was very encouraging as I finally got all the books read. I really liked that Lindsey and Joe M and their daughter and dog they seemed close and a lot tighter than they they have during other books. I probably liked this book less than about any of the I always look forward to the near annual James Patterson installment of the Women's Murder Club. I have a friend in my book friends that invited me to be a member of his friends and as I've finally got caught up in all the books in this series, he was very encouraging as I finally got all the books read. I really liked that Lindsey and Joe M and their daughter and dog they seemed close and a lot tighter than they they have during other books. I probably liked this book less than about any of them. I was remembering some of them such as the one where Lindsey is buck naked carrying stuff for the bad guy. Detective Lindsay Boxer’s investigation into the disappearance of three teachers quickly escalates from missing persons to murder in the newest Women’s Murder Club thriller. The girl's club spent less time together but they did work together when they needed to.For a trio of colleagues, an innocent night out after class ends in a deadly torture session. They vanish without a clue — until a body turns up. With the safety of San Francisco’s entire school system at stake, Lindsay has never been under more pressure. As the chief of police and the press clamor for an arrest in the “school night” case, Lindsay turns to her best friend, investigative journalist Cindy Thomas. Together, Lindsay and Cindy take a new approach to the case, and unexpected facts about the victims leave them stunned.While Lindsay is engrossed in her investigation, her husband, Joe Molinari, meets an Eastern European woman who claims to have seen a notorious war criminal — long presumed dead — from her home country. Before Lindsay can verify the woman’s statement, Joe’s mystery informant joins the ranks of the missing women. Lindsay, Joe, and the entire Women’s Murder Club must pull together to protect their city, and one another — not from a ghost, but from a true monster. Way too many people were killed or hanged in this book. Very depressing. It was a very difficult book to read and ponder. The #1 bestselling female detective of the past 50 years is back.Detective Lindsay Boxer and her husband Joe Molinari team up to protect San Francisco from an international war criminal in the newest Women's Murder Club thriller. Three female schoolteachers go missing in San Francisco, and Detective Lindsay Boxer is on the case-which quickly escalates from missing person to murder. Under pressure at work, Lindsay needs support at home. But her husband Joe is drawn into an encounter with a woman who's seen a ghost--a notorious war criminal from her Eastern European home country, walking the streets of San Francisco. As Lindsay digs deeper, with help from intrepid journalist Cindy Thomas, there are revelations about the victims. The implications are shocking. And when Joe's mystery informant disappears, joining the ranks of missing women in grave danger, all evidence points to a sordid international crime operation. It will take the combined skills of Lindsay, Joe, and the entire Women's Murder Club to protect their city, and themselves, from a monster.Overall a pretty good book, just not my all time favorite. I'll probably read and/or listen to it again.
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  • Tiffany PSquared
    January 1, 1970
    In a bit of a departure from the status quo with the ladies of the Women's Murder Club, Lindsay Boxer and Joe Molinari team up to take down a vicious war criminal who is now running a steak joint in San Fran.Yeah, you read that correctly. But despite that kooky intro to this story, it is actually quite dark. The book contains several strong triggers for those sensitive to stories of rape, torture, war crimes, and abduction.The story jogs back in time, so it isn't sequential to the events in the In a bit of a departure from the status quo with the ladies of the Women's Murder Club, Lindsay Boxer and Joe Molinari team up to take down a vicious war criminal who is now running a steak joint in San Fran.Yeah, you read that correctly. But despite that kooky intro to this story, it is actually quite dark. The book contains several strong triggers for those sensitive to stories of rape, torture, war crimes, and abduction.The story jogs back in time, so it isn't sequential to the events in the previous book, but don't let that throw you (some readers have complained, "Where's their baby? etc., but this was set before she was born). It's a solid WMC story, even if most of the WMC only play peripheral roles in the action.
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  • Teri
    January 1, 1970
    This one was just ok for me. He's become one of the authors that are hit or miss for me. I still love this series and am sure I'll read more as they come out.
  • Soho_Black
    January 1, 1970
    Having spent my reading time recently reading through James Patterson’s “Women’s Murder Club” series in order, it comes as something of a relief to have finally caught up with him, if only for the next 6 months. The reason for this is that the series has been over-burdened by plots and sub-plots and often weighed down by court cases separate to the main plots, leaving little time for much character building and often resulting in the endings being rushed.After Lindsay had been benched due to ill Having spent my reading time recently reading through James Patterson’s “Women’s Murder Club” series in order, it comes as something of a relief to have finally caught up with him, if only for the next 6 months. The reason for this is that the series has been over-burdened by plots and sub-plots and often weighed down by court cases separate to the main plots, leaving little time for much character building and often resulting in the endings being rushed.After Lindsay had been benched due to illness at the end of the 17th novel in this series, I’ll admit to being curious as to how “18th Abduction” would move forward without its main character. The opening to the novel surprised me, as after an opening where Joe and Lindsay have gone to the appeal hearing in the International Criminal Court in The Hague, the rest of the story is told in flashback, which is a device Patterson hasn’t used previously in this series.The story takes us backwards 5 years, when a woman who was a victim of atrocities during the Balkan conflict sees the man responsible for raping her and many of her friends and the murders of many civilians, including her husband and young child. In his war crimes trial, this man had been released and allowed to change his name and move to San Francisco, but his victim, Anna, is determined that justice should be served and speaks to Joe Molinari at the F. B. I.Joe’s husband, meanwhile, is investigating the disappearance of three school teacher colleagues, who went for a meal together one evening after classes were done and hadn’t been seen since. There are no clues and less evidence, until one of the women is found murdered in a low budget hotel and it becomes apparent that she had a secret life outside school that may have placed her in danger. However, neither Lindsay’s or Joe’s investigations seem to be progressing terribly well, as whilst they are turning up ideas and suppositions, there is no evidence to back them up.This book surprised me, as it stepped away from the template Patterson has been using for his “Women’s Murder Club” series in a number of ways and it managed to get away from the common failings which have dogged the series for 17 previous novels. The first surprise was that, in terms of the plotlines, this was it and whilst there were two avenues of enquiry to start with, they linked together quite nicely, without too much of a need to force one into another, or to drop a secondary plot part way through to leave space and time to finish the main plot.The other aspect which came as a surprise is that this was more of a Lindsay and Joe novel than a “Women’s Murder Club” novel as such. Whilst Claire’s role was integral here, albeit minimal, this was a nice touch as she’s been shunted aside for many of the recent novels, Yuki and Cindy were barely mentioned. There were virtually no mentions of any of the group’s personal lives, aside from Joe and Lindsay having a home life as a married couple, with Cindy and Rich’s relationship barely being touched upon and the timeframe pre-dating the inclusion of Yuki’s husband Brady into the series. This meant that there was no real requirement for character building, which has long been a weakness of the series and didn’t clutter up the novel with relationship dramas which were entirely unrelated to the plot and slowed the pace down.Whilst there was no character building within the main cast, the characters who were integral to the plot were well described. Admittedly, some of the Serbian antagonists did blend into each other a little, but the main antagonist Petrovic and his victim Anna were nicely drawn, although in the case of Petrovic I suspect this was helped by parts of his career at least reflecting real people, if not being explicitly based upon them, which would have made research much easier, another failing in Patterson’s novels which is particularly apparent in his “Private” series.This realism is carried into the plot, which relied far less on deus ex machina plot devices to reach the conclusions. Admittedly, there were a couple of aspects which were a little unlikely and a couple of sudden jumps of logic which were implausible, but admittedly not impossible as in most of the novels. This made for a much more focussed and enjoyable read, as the plotline didn’t suddenly shake you out of the world due to something unreasonable happening.The great thing about these improvements in the series are that Patterson hasn’t lost the one strength of the series, that of the pacing. As ever, he writes in the short chapters and simple language his fans have become used to and which helps keep the pages turning. This aspect of the series has been one of the few consistent areas and the only one I have enjoyed throughout. The combination of this with the reasonable and uncluttered plotline means that whilst this is by no means the perfect novel, it is much more focussed than any of the previous ones in this series and it’s by far the best one so far and I hope this will continue even after Lindsay, and thus, I suspect, the series as a whole, return to normal.
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  • Bookreporter.com Mystery & Thriller
    January 1, 1970
    The Women’s Murder Club series from James Patterson and Maxine Paetro continues to impress well into its second decade. At a point where they could annually submit a reasonably crafted novel with minimal effort and still garner a respectable readership, the authors never fail to find ways to stretch themselves and readers’ expectations in new and unexpected directions. THE 18th ABDUCTION is a sterling example of this and is one of the best episodes in the canon thus far.This latest installment f The Women’s Murder Club series from James Patterson and Maxine Paetro continues to impress well into its second decade. At a point where they could annually submit a reasonably crafted novel with minimal effort and still garner a respectable readership, the authors never fail to find ways to stretch themselves and readers’ expectations in new and unexpected directions. THE 18th ABDUCTION is a sterling example of this and is one of the best episodes in the canon thus far.This latest installment features an enigmatic, present-day beginning before ducking five years into the past to present an unreported case involving the Women’s Murder Club and setting up another, the repercussions of which radiate forward. One thing that does not change from book to book in this series is the penchant of Patterson and Paetro to include at least two solid mysteries in each installment, and they do so in fine form once again here.One of the plot lines brings Joe Molinari --- the husband of Lindsay Boxer, a homicide detective for the San Francisco Police Department --- into the fore when he stops to assist a cyclist who has sustained some minor injuries in traffic. It turns out that Anna, who’s from Bosnia, had seen a man who she thought was Slobodan Petrović, a Serbian war criminal directly responsible for atrocities perpetrated on Bosnians in general and Anna and her family in particular. She can't believe that Petrović is living his life in San Francisco --- guilty as hell and free as a bird --- while she bears the physical and emotional scars of his actions. Joe can’t believe it either, but once he verifies that the man Anna saw is indeed Petrović, he begins investigating how such a thing could've happened and, more significantly, what can be done about it.Meanwhile, Lindsay is under tremendous pressure to solve a case of her own. Three schoolteachers --- friends who were out for a night on the town --- have disappeared, seemingly without a trace. When the body of one of them is discovered, it develops that one or more of the teachers may have had a hidden life. Lindsay, though, is at a dead end in the case until investigative journalist Cindy Thomas, another member of the Women’s Murder Club, is able to provide her with a potential clue. San Francisco Medical Examiner Claire Washburn’s painstaking efforts on behalf of the victim uncovers a bit of crucial evidence that ultimately leads to the apprehension of the guilty party. However, it all may be for naught, with the outcome of both cases in doubt until almost the very last page of the book.Longtime readers of the Women’s Murder Club know what to expect with each installment, and this latest entry more than delivers on all counts. As if two intriguing cases aren't enough, Patterson and Paetro also include the first few chapters from THE 19th CHRISTMAS, which may signal that fans of the series will not have to wait a full year to encounter Lindsay Boxer and her friends again. In the meantime, consider THE 18th ABDUCTION to be an early present.Reviewed by Joe Hartlaub
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  • Ed
    January 1, 1970
    #18 in the Women's Murder Club series (15th by James Patterson co-written with Maxine Paetro). This 2019 series entry gives a nod to the ethnic cleansing during the Balkan Wars and the subsequent War Crimes tribunals but essentially it an average entry in this paint-by-the-numbers series. It's essentially Lindsay's SFPD case intersecting with husband Joe's FBI case with medical examiner Claire contributing some forensic evidence. Prosecutor Yuki and Crime Reporter Cindy have cameo roles in this #18 in the Women's Murder Club series (15th by James Patterson co-written with Maxine Paetro). This 2019 series entry gives a nod to the ethnic cleansing during the Balkan Wars and the subsequent War Crimes tribunals but essentially it an average entry in this paint-by-the-numbers series. It's essentially Lindsay's SFPD case intersecting with husband Joe's FBI case with medical examiner Claire contributing some forensic evidence. Prosecutor Yuki and Crime Reporter Cindy have cameo roles in this 5 year flashback episode.Three female schoolteachers go missing in San Francisco, and Detective Lindsay Boxer is on the case-which quickly escalates from missing person to murder. Under pressure at work, Lindsay needs support at home. But her husband Joe is drawn into an encounter with a woman who's seen a ghost--a notorious war criminal from her Eastern European home country, walking the streets of San Francisco. As Lindsay digs deeper, with help from intrepid journalist Cindy Thomas, there are revelations about the victims. The implications are shocking. And then Joe's mystery informant disappears, joining the ranks of missing women in grave danger.
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  • Darcy
    January 1, 1970
    At first I found myself a bit confused when reading this one. You had events taking place in the past, that threw me because it's harder to notice that in an audio book. It was the lack of mention of different people and events that made me really clue in.I found it interesting the crimes both Lindsey and Joe were working on. I was glad that they were able to talk to each other about their cases, it helped when they realized their cases were related. And how horrible were their cases! I think wh At first I found myself a bit confused when reading this one. You had events taking place in the past, that threw me because it's harder to notice that in an audio book. It was the lack of mention of different people and events that made me really clue in.I found it interesting the crimes both Lindsey and Joe were working on. I was glad that they were able to talk to each other about their cases, it helped when they realized their cases were related. And how horrible were their cases! I think what made the all the more horrible is that you knew the base idea was ripped from real life. I hate to think that there are people out there in the world that are that evil. I was glad that the bad guy got his in the end, but think his end was too easy. I only hope Anna is at peace knowing he is no longer in the world.
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  • Sue
    January 1, 1970
    Women’s Murder Club NEVER lets me down!! Good read although hard to read due to the atrocities committed by the criminal. The book was well researched and shamed me into realizing that these things happened in my lifetime while I enjoyed life on the other side of the world. Thanks JP for making me think. Docked him a star because after 18 volumes, I don’t need a back story to Lindsay’s time on the streets. Too late to go back that far.
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  • Sandra Livingston
    January 1, 1970
    I love this book James Patterson along with Maxine Paetro had done a wonderful job as always. The Women's Murder Club is always good I will read this series as long as the write it. I was a little confused because Joe and Lindsey had not had the baby yet and Jabcoi was still the Leu. I don't remember it say it was 5 or so years earlier I guess I missed that part of the book. But I got sucked into it and I loved it
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  • Lindsey Gandhi
    January 1, 1970
    This is really a 3.5 star review. I enjoyed the story, but they really got away from the main plot line that makes this series the women's murder club. The other ladies had very very minor roles in the book. And it threw me off a tad with the story going back 5 years knowing the current histories of the ladies and their relationships. So for those reasons I rounded down.
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  • Linda A.
    January 1, 1970
    JusticeFor me, this was a novel of obtaining justice however long denied. You feel for all of the characters and feel anger how governments can pervert justice and fairness. Too often we forget that crimes in the past have not always punished the guilty. In this novel, I feel justice was served.
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  • Mean Drake
    January 1, 1970
    Strictly average. Wasted a lot of time building up the narrative and in the end shut it down much too quickly.
  • Laura Rash
    January 1, 1970
    A really more in depth and thrilling book for this series that had some real chilling moments
  • Bev Hudson
    January 1, 1970
    The book kept me turning pages to see what happens and it wasn't too gruesome. I was just happy to see it end.
  • Nicky Mottram
    January 1, 1970
    Audio version of this book 📚- Great listen , highly recommend
  • J. Taylor
    January 1, 1970
    When there aren't a storyline for every single main character, just having two that tied in together makes this a much better novel then most in the series.
  • Jessii Grofski
    January 1, 1970
    Women’s Murder Club are my favourite Patterson novels but this one just didn’t grab my attention. Slow read, bland.
  • Jo Halsall
    January 1, 1970
    Couldn’t read this quickly enough! James Patterson at his best. The story had me hooked quickly and drew me in, leaving me constantly needing more and unable to put down. Loved it!
  • Tala Lucy
    January 1, 1970
    Waiting a whole year for these books are torture. Lucky the 19th book is coming out in October this year!!!!
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