Pencil
Pencil and his boy Jackson are a great pair: they draw, they sketch, they scribble. But then Jackson gets Tablet and Pencil finds himself dumped in the dreaded junk drawer; he just can't compete with Tablet's videos, games, and movies. How will Pencil ever reclaim Jackson's attention? With the help of some new pun-loving junk-drawer friends (and a drooling, pencil-chomping dog), Pencil sketches out a plan to draw Jackson back into their friendship.A former educator whose first book was shortlisted for a Crystal Kite award, author Ann Ingalls uses kid-friendly puns and an upbeat tone in this story that celebrates friendship, collaboration, and unplugged fun. Buoyed by award-winning artist Dean Griffith's always-exuberant illustrations, Pencil: A Story with a Point is a gentle reminder that technology is no match for imagination.

Pencil Details

TitlePencil
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 15th, 2019
PublisherPajama Press
ISBN-139781772780475
Rating
GenreChildrens, Picture Books, Fiction, Humor

Pencil Review

  • Barbara
    January 1, 1970
    In today's tablet-filled age, many pencils and sheets of paper will be able to relate to this story. So will those of us who are still a little bit old school when it comes to writing and drawing. Jackson used to enjoy drawing illustrations with his trusty pencil, but once he receives a tablet, poor old Pencil is discarded. The digital artwork shows the characters' facial expressions vividly, and I was particularly impressed with the look on Jackson's face as he marvels at his tablet. When the t In today's tablet-filled age, many pencils and sheets of paper will be able to relate to this story. So will those of us who are still a little bit old school when it comes to writing and drawing. Jackson used to enjoy drawing illustrations with his trusty pencil, but once he receives a tablet, poor old Pencil is discarded. The digital artwork shows the characters' facial expressions vividly, and I was particularly impressed with the look on Jackson's face as he marvels at his tablet. When the tablet is broken, Jackson becomes sad and mopes around. With the help of his friends, Pencil finds a way to get Jackson interested in drawing and using good old Pencil again. Although the ending seems a bit unlikely, I did love all the puns that fill the book's pages, starting with the one in the title. This one would be a good book to share to teach youngsters about personification and to remind them that doing some things by hand can be just as fun as relying on digital tools and high technology.
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  • Sandy Brehl
    January 1, 1970
    I'm a fan of humor, word play, and layered stories, so this book is a winner. I also admire illustrations that effectively convey emotions, often accomplished through the eyes. In some picture books the eyes are richly detailed, and in some the tiniest stroke reveals all by the location, angle, and density. In this case a simple but genuine partnership between a boy and his pencil is challenged by the arrival of "tablet". pencil and the many other occupants of the dreaded junk drawer have incred I'm a fan of humor, word play, and layered stories, so this book is a winner. I also admire illustrations that effectively convey emotions, often accomplished through the eyes. In some picture books the eyes are richly detailed, and in some the tiniest stroke reveals all by the location, angle, and density. In this case a simple but genuine partnership between a boy and his pencil is challenged by the arrival of "tablet". pencil and the many other occupants of the dreaded junk drawer have incredible stories to tell with their eyes. This will be a hit with kids and adults and merits close examination as metro text for humor writers and model illustration for kids and adults who seek to tell visual narratives.
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  • Jana
    January 1, 1970
    This clever picture book reminds readers that even though our world is filled with exciting technology, sometimes the best fun comes from the simplicity of pencil and paper. Pencil and Jackson always had great fun together drawing, until Jackson got Tablet. For a while, Jackson was only interested in Tablet's flashy entertainment and Pencil was tossed into the junk drawer. Pencil and his new friends worked together to convince Jackson to give Pencil another try. Humorous, pun-filled text along w This clever picture book reminds readers that even though our world is filled with exciting technology, sometimes the best fun comes from the simplicity of pencil and paper. Pencil and Jackson always had great fun together drawing, until Jackson got Tablet. For a while, Jackson was only interested in Tablet's flashy entertainment and Pencil was tossed into the junk drawer. Pencil and his new friends worked together to convince Jackson to give Pencil another try. Humorous, pun-filled text along with terrific artwork will make this a fun book to share with young children.
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  • Karyn
    January 1, 1970
    In my opinion the author was playing on too many puns. This made the story feel overly corny. The other thing was that the prints felt unfocused and the print was done in light grey. This made it more difficult to read.
  • Awjtf
    January 1, 1970
    Great book!
  • Annese
    January 1, 1970
    A punny book about a pencil.
  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    Lots of fun. Silly, cute puns, and fantastic illustrations.
  • Edward Sullivan
    January 1, 1970
    Amusing in a punny kind of way.
  • Kirsti Call
    January 1, 1970
    This story is delightfully funny! Filled with puns, and clever wordplay!
  • Miss Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    A pencil who is beloved by a boy is thrown in the junk drawer. Can he get his beloved spot back? Cute and creative. Preschool and up
  • Esutterlin
    January 1, 1970
    I liked the idea and Cute illustrations, but the story/wording was a little too forced. I enjoyed the play-on-words ending.
  • Ms Threlkeld
    January 1, 1970
    Pun-filled story about technology.
  • Cathy
    January 1, 1970
    Very punny book. Yep.
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