Cicada
A picture book for anyone who has ever felt unappreciated. Cicada work in tall building. Data entry clerk. Seventeen year. No sick day. No mistake. Tok Tok Tok! Cicada works in an office, dutifully working day after day for unappreciative bosses and being bullied by his co-workers. But one day, something truly extraordinary happens . . .

Cicada Details

TitleCicada
Author
ReleaseJan 29th, 2019
PublisherArthur A. Levine Books
ISBN-139781338298390
Rating
GenreChildrens, Picture Books, Sequential Art, Graphic Novels, Cultural, Australia

Cicada Review

  • Brenda
    January 1, 1970
    What an absolutely delightful book! Aussie author Shaun Tan is one very talented man! The artwork in Cicada, a short but beautifully written children’s book, is spectacular; the story wonderful. Cicada has been working for the same company for seventeen years – a hardworking little guy who was completely unappreciated. But he gets the last laugh – as I did – in the end! I loved it, my grandchildren love it – it’s one to recommend highly. Magic!With thanks to Hachette AU for my copy to read and r What an absolutely delightful book! Aussie author Shaun Tan is one very talented man! The artwork in Cicada, a short but beautifully written children’s book, is spectacular; the story wonderful. Cicada has been working for the same company for seventeen years – a hardworking little guy who was completely unappreciated. But he gets the last laugh – as I did – in the end! I loved it, my grandchildren love it – it’s one to recommend highly. Magic!With thanks to Hachette AU for my copy to read and review.
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  • Trudie
    January 1, 1970
    Ahhhh.I love Shaun Tan but this one was a massive disappointment. It looks as you would expect, bleakly gorgeous. But it takes about one minute to read and lacks much of the charm and depth of all his other works. Back to reread the The Red Tree and The Arrival to cheer myself up .
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  • Figgy
    January 1, 1970
    Proper review to come.Another stunning book from Shaun Tan, with a really important message about racism and immigrants, but told by a cicada.Having an insect (something that is decidedly not human) in place of a human who is treated the same as migrants will hopefully open some eyes.There's a real gut-punch here towards the end which probably won't mean much to kids but is sure to get to adults reading the book to them.
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  • ns510
    January 1, 1970
    2.5 stars - 3 stars.Excellent artwork, story was ok. (But I guess I’m not the target audience!)
  • Tracey Allen at Carpe Librum
    January 1, 1970
    This children's picture book by Shaun Tan is about Cicada, who is employed in an office as a data entry clerk and is under-appreciated and bullied in the workplace. I instantly felt for Cicada and was astonished at how quickly I became caught up and invested in his work/life circumstances. The illustrations and minimalist accompanying text are simple yet surprisingly moving. This is an exploration of bullying within the corporate environment and I think many readers - regardless of age - will re This children's picture book by Shaun Tan is about Cicada, who is employed in an office as a data entry clerk and is under-appreciated and bullied in the workplace. I instantly felt for Cicada and was astonished at how quickly I became caught up and invested in his work/life circumstances. The illustrations and minimalist accompanying text are simple yet surprisingly moving. This is an exploration of bullying within the corporate environment and I think many readers - regardless of age - will readily identify with the themes of loneliness, belonging and transformation.The only reason this wasn't a five star read for me was the ending. I just didn't get it! I've read it over and over and just don't understand why they laugh at the end.Shaun Tan is an acclaimed Australian creator of picture books for children and Cicada is his latest release. This delightfully presented hardback contains moving artwork and splendidly evocative end papers and Cicada is a character I won't forget any time soon.* Copy courtesy of Hachette Children's Books *
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  • Brona's Books
    January 1, 1970
    For anyone who has been under-appreciated, over-worked, ignored or misunderstood Shaun Tan's latest offering, Cicada, will break your heart, then put it back together again.He does it to me EVERY SINGLE TIME!With his magic combination of perfect word choice and stunning illustrations, Tan brings Cicada's internal life to light. I'd love to tell you more about it, in great detail, but I want you to discover the joy of this story for the first time yourself.
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  • Bec
    January 1, 1970
    I don't know how, in 150 words, Shaun Tan ripped my heart out and then breathed it back to life. His drawings, detail and observation of life is nothing but raw and beautiful. Immediately after finishing it, my first thought was: "How burdened and grey we are, without freedom and creativity." As usual, another work of Shaun Tan's that is not only beautiful, but soulful, and I will no doubt be cracking this open many more times to revisit this cute, sad, honest and revitalising story.
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  • Astrid Edwards
    January 1, 1970
    Cicada is a work that packs a punch regardless of your age. Shaun Tan had my family – my 62 year old mother and 46 year old partner, as well as my 7 and 4 year old nieces – quiet, contemplative and on the edge of their seats.On the surface, this is a commentary about the inanity and heartlessness of 21st century corporate life, told through the eyes of the eponymous Cicada. But this brilliant short story is of course more than that. In only 150 words (many of them repeated), Tan evokes powerful Cicada is a work that packs a punch regardless of your age. Shaun Tan had my family – my 62 year old mother and 46 year old partner, as well as my 7 and 4 year old nieces – quiet, contemplative and on the edge of their seats.On the surface, this is a commentary about the inanity and heartlessness of 21st century corporate life, told through the eyes of the eponymous Cicada. But this brilliant short story is of course more than that. In only 150 words (many of them repeated), Tan evokes powerful emotional responses as he illustrates literally and metaphorically what it is like to be different, to be alone, and to be marginalised.Cicada has any number of interpretations, and it is a story I expect every reader will identify with. Depending on your own view point, it is a story about feeling alone before finding your tribe, about being exploited before taking control, about losing your way before finding your calling.Cicada is not a tale to make you laugh. The refrain ‘tok, tok, tok’ represents everything we feel but can not always express in words. It is injustice, it is abandonment, it is cruelty. But Cicada is also full of hope. By the end, ‘tok, tok, tok’ represents liberation, freedom, and that glorious feeling that all is right with the world.If you are an adult, Cicada will make you question how you spend your days. Somehow, by the end of those 150 words office life feels like the punchline of a cruel joke.But Cicada is also a conversation starter. If you have a younger reader in your orbit who may be feeling different from their peers or left out by those around them, this is a story to spark all sorts of discussions.Despite being set in an office (not the usual haunt of either cicadas or children), Cicada is accessible to younger readers. Whether they are being read to or exploring Tan’s world on their own, Cicada will be a childhood tale that resonates with them into adulthood (as Toni Ungerer’s illustrated version of Han Christian Anderson’s The Little Match Girl still resonates with me).This review was first published on The Garret (www.thegarretpodcast.com) on 7 July 2018.
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  • Yolanda Sfetsos
    January 1, 1970
    I just received this lovely book, and the cover is so adorable I just had to read it right away. Well, I read it to my hubby. :)Cicada works in a building, and is an overworked, unappreciated data entry clerk. Cicada works and works. No matter how he's treated or ignored or doesn't fit in.Until one day it's time to retire...OMG. This book is beautiful. Not just because the artwork is absolutely stunning, but because the simple story is one that hooked me in from the very beginning. I kept readin I just received this lovely book, and the cover is so adorable I just had to read it right away. Well, I read it to my hubby. :)Cicada works in a building, and is an overworked, unappreciated data entry clerk. Cicada works and works. No matter how he's treated or ignored or doesn't fit in.Until one day it's time to retire...OMG. This book is beautiful. Not just because the artwork is absolutely stunning, but because the simple story is one that hooked me in from the very beginning. I kept reading and went through so many emotions.By the end, I had tears in my eyes and they weren't entirely from heartbreak.It's amazing how such a wonderful story unfolds with minimal--but totally gripping--details. A lot of it also has to do with the amazing and eerie art.I loved this. It's so cute.Cicada rocks.
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  • Simon Sweetman
    January 1, 1970
    Every Shaun Tan book is amazing. A journey. A trip. A world. This is one of his very best.
  • Lili
    January 1, 1970
    While this is lovely, as is always the case for Shaun Tan's works, I felt that it fell a bit short of expectations, and didn't quite live up to the memory (my own personal memory) of his other works. Tales from Outer Suburbia, The Arrival and The Rabbits all resonated much more deeply with me than this one, but the art work remains stunning, and the story nonetheless poignant and entertaining.
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  • Bethwyn (Butterfly Elephant Books)
    January 1, 1970
    Wow, Shaun Tan just... breaks my heart and then gives me hope to mend it. More in-depth review to come closer to release date.
  • Kathleen Dixon
    January 1, 1970
    This book came into the shop, and sold out almost immediately. Now we've got some more copies in and I've made sure to buy one for myself. Shaun Tan has a gift for saying a lot with simple pictures and very few words. So this book tells of workplace bullying (which is largely unchanged over the centuries (well, millennia really) but has only recently been named as a problem), and human rights (and don't we know our appalling history where people have been treated as non-human simply because of t This book came into the shop, and sold out almost immediately. Now we've got some more copies in and I've made sure to buy one for myself. Shaun Tan has a gift for saying a lot with simple pictures and very few words. So this book tells of workplace bullying (which is largely unchanged over the centuries (well, millennia really) but has only recently been named as a problem), and human rights (and don't we know our appalling history where people have been treated as non-human simply because of their skin colour, or because they speak a different language or have a different religion).Interestingly, there were 3 customers in the shop today talking about and looking at this book. One was a middle-aged woman who had read the book already. She made a comment about Cicada 'getting his own back at the end'. I found myself really disliking her choice of words. The other 2 were older teenagers and they looked only briefly at the book. They laughed (I couldn't see the page they were viewing when they did so, though it wasn't at the end), and I couldn't think what they would have found amusing. This has disturbed me.
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  • Jenna
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars
  • Dariusz Płochocki
    January 1, 1970
    Przejmujące. Krótkie. Małe. Jak cykada.Tok. Tok. Tok.
  • Ely
    January 1, 1970
    Well that was both cute and depressing as hell.
  • Pat
    January 1, 1970
    So thought provoking!
  • Pauline
    January 1, 1970
    There are really few words that can do justice to describing the work of Shaun Tan. His picture books are true works of art that challenge the reader’s assumptions and beliefs encouraging us to think about life and humanity in different ways. The little cicada in this book is one of the ignored members of society. He goes about his business as a data entry clerk, tirelessly working for 17 years beside humans who ignore, reject and bully him. Whilst this is a book for older readers, and perhaps e There are really few words that can do justice to describing the work of Shaun Tan. His picture books are true works of art that challenge the reader’s assumptions and beliefs encouraging us to think about life and humanity in different ways. The little cicada in this book is one of the ignored members of society. He goes about his business as a data entry clerk, tirelessly working for 17 years beside humans who ignore, reject and bully him. Whilst this is a book for older readers, and perhaps even adults, younger children will nevertheless relate to the isolation, loneliness and bullying experienced by the cicada. It is certainly a book that will open up many avenues for discussion with the students in the classroom. The ending, in particular, will be open to interpretation and imagination.To see Shaun talking about the book: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gnIs_...Teachers resources: https://www.hachette.com.au/content/r...
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  • Jessica M
    January 1, 1970
    http://jessjustreads.comCicada by Shaun Tan is an absolutely beautiful picture book about an unappreciated office worker who is bullied by his coworkers and treated terribly by his bosses. He’s a hard worker — diligent and competent. The little cicada is a data clerk and his colleagues are humans. He’s not allowed to use the office bathroom and he has to sleep in the office wallspace.Cicada work in tall building.Data entry clerk. Seventeen year.No sick day. No mistake.Tok Tok Tok!When he retires http://jessjustreads.comCicada by Shaun Tan is an absolutely beautiful picture book about an unappreciated office worker who is bullied by his coworkers and treated terribly by his bosses. He’s a hard worker — diligent and competent. The little cicada is a data clerk and his colleagues are humans. He’s not allowed to use the office bathroom and he has to sleep in the office wallspace.Cicada work in tall building.Data entry clerk. Seventeen year.No sick day. No mistake.Tok Tok Tok!When he retires from his city job after seventeen years of working in a confined cubicle, he walks up to the roof of the building and something extraordinary happens. Shaun Tan delivers such magnificent books. His illustration style is careful, considered and so vibrant. I’ve loved his work for such a long time and I love looking through his artwork.Human never finish work.Cicada always stay late. Finish work.Nobody thank cicada.Tok Tok Tok!The illustrations in the book appear to be paintings, with such detail and depth that you have to take the time to really run your eyes over all the pages. The book definitely speaks to many readers — it’s about someone who feels under appreciated at work, and I think a lot of people will be able to relate to this little cicada.This may be a picture book, but it’s not just for children. Adults will pour over these illustrations and marvel at how beautiful this book is. The ending of the book even allows for some humour!Thank you to the publisher for mailing me a review copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    5 stars10 out of 10WOULD RECOMMEND
  • lucy black
    January 1, 1970
    Best children’s book I have read in a very long time. It’s simple and beautiful and moving. It’s harsh and not schulmzy. The story of an office worker, prejudice, capitalism, life, death and beauty.
  • Hmy
    January 1, 1970
    Shaun Tan has done it again - a deep yet whimsical look at our world. Lots to think about and talk about here.
  • Ümit Mutlu
    January 1, 1970
    "Cicada work in tall building.Data entry clerk. Seventeen year.No sick day. No mistake.Tok Tok Tok!"
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