Spin
Sixteen-year-old Paris Secord's (aka DJ ParSec) career--and life--has come to an untimely end, and the local music scene is reeling. No one is feeling the pain more than her shunned pre-fame best friend, Kya, and Paris's chief groupie, Fuse. But suspicion trumps grief, and since each suspects the other of Paris's murder, they're locked in a high-stakes game of public accusations and sabotage.Everyone in the ParSec Nation (DJ ParSec's local media base)--including the killer--is content to watch it play out, until Kya and Fuse discover a secret: Paris was on the verge of major deal that would've catapulted her to superstar status on a national level, leaving her old life (and old friends) behind. With the new info comes new motives. New suspects. And a fandom that shows its deadly side. As Kya and Fuse come closer to the twisted truth, the killer's no longer amused. But murdering Paris was simple enough, so getting rid of her nobody-friends shouldn't be an issue...

Spin Details

TitleSpin
Author
ReleaseJan 29th, 2019
PublisherScholastic Press
ISBN-139781338219210
Rating
GenreMystery, Young Adult, Thriller, Contemporary, Fiction, Audiobook

Spin Review

  • OutlawPoet
    January 1, 1970
    First, if you're looking for diverse characters, this is for you. It's not 'diversity for diversity's sake'. In other words, this isn't some dude jumping on the diverse YA bandwagon. He's been writing for a while. The author himself is a POC and (shock!) he understands that POC aren't all the same. We have rich people, poor people, people who love music, people who code. Of all races. This will appeal to any YA reader.Looking beyond the diversity tag, we simply have an excellent YA thriller. It' First, if you're looking for diverse characters, this is for you. It's not 'diversity for diversity's sake'. In other words, this isn't some dude jumping on the diverse YA bandwagon. He's been writing for a while. The author himself is a POC and (shock!) he understands that POC aren't all the same. We have rich people, poor people, people who love music, people who code. Of all races. This will appeal to any YA reader.Looking beyond the diversity tag, we simply have an excellent YA thriller. It's a pretty clean read, but it's not without drama, danger, and (yes!) girl power. Our girls may get off track a little at first, but friendship and power come into play here as they try to solve the murder of one of their own.I loved the characters and loved trying to figure out who did it.This author needs much more exposure and I'm so happy I read this!
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  • Dahlia
    January 1, 1970
    Man, this was so good. I always think Giles's thrillers are good but I think this is my fave so far. I just loved the voices, loved the pacing, loved the way he incorporated the dark web, fandom (and standom), and social justice, and also made it a friendship story, not to mention I thought the mystery went to a very cool place. I am such a fan and this was honestly even better than I thought it'd be.
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  • Bang Bang Books
    January 1, 1970
    3.75I wish Giles would take some thriller writing workshops from E. Lockhart or Jennifer Lynn Barnes because this book could have been so good. He was missing some character development that would have made this book a 4 star or more.This book is basically a thriller/whodunit in the music/rap world which in itself is nuanced. Considering the mysterious deaths of Biggie and Tupac, this setting is not out of the ordinary. My issues with this book are minor but it was a lot of little things that ad 3.75I wish Giles would take some thriller writing workshops from E. Lockhart or Jennifer Lynn Barnes because this book could have been so good. He was missing some character development that would have made this book a 4 star or more.This book is basically a thriller/whodunit in the music/rap world which in itself is nuanced. Considering the mysterious deaths of Biggie and Tupac, this setting is not out of the ordinary. My issues with this book are minor but it was a lot of little things that added up. The pacing was my biggest issue. The first third was a set up for our two main characters and things didn't start kicking in until 35% in. Kya was an interesting character and had a lot of grief that had little to no focus in the first 35% I wish Giles would have gone into her her mental state and her relationship with her mother more. For the first 35% the narrators were barely grieving and the investigation into Paris' murder was absent from the page. I watch a lot of crime TV and I know that detectives try to solve a murder within the first 48 hours but weeks had gone by with no police interaction with the characters. The police eventually did come on page but it was really late. Which leads me to my next issue...Giles tried to do too much in the first 35% of the book which made it drag. Giles tried to use Paris, the murdered girl, as a commentary on how the police and the media ignore the deaths of Black girls over White girls. And while this is prevalent, I just watched a documentary on Amazon called Unseen and you should check it out because it's fascinating, it doesn't quite fit Paris' case. Police ignore common missing Black girls not celebrities. Paris seemed to be equivalent to DJ Khaled-very well known in Virginia and about to be worldwide. The police wouldn't ignore a murder of a well known celebrity. I think the inaction of the police in the first 35% of the book was trying to show the inaction of the real police but once again, they wouldn't ignore a celebrity-I wasn't buying it. If that topic is so strong to Giles, he should have written that book and it probably would have been good. The other BIGGEST issue was the Dark Nation. I understand that Giles was trying to do something different and I applaud it but that just didn't land for me-too farfetched. The Dark Nation was comparable to The Beehive except they were online and in person-they came after you on social media AND in person. WHAT?! They were kidnapping people and threatening physical harm because Paris' case wasn't moving fast enough and they stopped because they were given unreleased music? WHAT? No, just no. The attacks on social media was realistic and okay and when they were at the concert at the end and they all came together was realistic and okay but the kidnapping was just stupid.Now for the minor issues. There was not enough of Paris. The story began the night of her death and we meet Paris during the months before. I thought Paris was an interesting character but she wasn't on the page enough. She quickly began to spiral out of control during her rise in success but we didn't see the before Paris and if we had, her spiral would have made a larger impact to her story. I liked Paris a lot and she just didn't get enough page time. I liked Paris A LOT more than Bri in On the Come Up. Now for the likes. I liked how Giles used social media. I thought Fuse's social media savviness was authentic and added to her character. I liked the female friendships and I liked that THERE WAS NO ROMANCE!!! Giles didn't create some stupid romance that would have distracted the reader from the thriller or Paris-THANK YOU. I liked Fuse's relationship with father and the resolution at the end. The pacing on the last two thirds of the book was pretty good; I read almost the whole thing. I usually skip through the end of most books because I'm over it. I guessed who the murderer was when Giles basically wanted the reader to guess so it wasn't predictable from the beginning and it wasn't some rando character. I liked how the murder was revealed and I thought it was well written. Giles has a lot to say and he is a good writer. His characters were pretty spot on and the whole mystery aspect was pretty good. I liked the diversity of the Black characters. There are poor Black people and wealthy Black people and book smart Black people and talented Black people and Black people who are raised by their grandparents and Black people who have two parents and a lot of times in books like this, that is the focal point. But in this book, they were just Black and Hispanic teens who happened to come from different neighborhoods with different families and I appreciated that. I thought the inclusion of old school rap and new school was just enough and I thought Spin was much better than On the Come Up. I know they are different genres and dealt with different issues but Giles writing and execution was far better than Thomas' in On the Come Up. If you are a librarian, I think this is a pretty good book for book club as there is a lot to discuss and it's a great book talk title.
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  • Jamie Canaves
    January 1, 1970
    I love Giles’ characters and this time he gave me three great ones! DJ ParSec, real name Paris Secord, is a sixteen-year-old up-and-coming DJ ready for fame and most importantly fortune–or was before she was murdered. Being questioned in the police station are Fuse, basically her social media hype girl, and Kya, her childhood best friend. But the questioning doesn’t last long because the girls’ parents refuse to let the police keep questioning them, plus they swear they just found Paris dead and I love Giles’ characters and this time he gave me three great ones! DJ ParSec, real name Paris Secord, is a sixteen-year-old up-and-coming DJ ready for fame and most importantly fortune–or was before she was murdered. Being questioned in the police station are Fuse, basically her social media hype girl, and Kya, her childhood best friend. But the questioning doesn’t last long because the girls’ parents refuse to let the police keep questioning them, plus they swear they just found Paris dead and don’t know what could have happened. This alternates between the present where Kya and Fuse, who don’t like each other, try to figure out what happened to Paris while reconciling how their relationships had deteriorated prior to Paris’ death. We get to know Paris in flashback chapters that show her rise and struggle with leaving it all behind in order to “make it.” Giles gives us three different girls, with different families and struggles who are all trying to find their way, while shining a light on the inequalities of social justice, obsession, and the dark side of social media and fame. If you haven’t read Giles’ novels yet you really should–he’s writing some fantastic teen characters in the crime genre.--from Book Riot's Unusual Suspects newsletter: https://link.bookriot.com/view/56a820...
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  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    A really compelling mystery about a murdered DJ, her two closest friends/fans who -- at the time of her death -- were on the outs with her, and about police brutality, black justice, racial inequality in the media (there was a lot here reminiscent of Tiffany D. Jackson's MONDAY'S NOT COMING), and about social media and technology and the Dark Web. The twists here are solid and compelling, and both Kya and Fuse both have outstanding voices. This is my first Giles and won't be my last. Though Angi A really compelling mystery about a murdered DJ, her two closest friends/fans who -- at the time of her death -- were on the outs with her, and about police brutality, black justice, racial inequality in the media (there was a lot here reminiscent of Tiffany D. Jackson's MONDAY'S NOT COMING), and about social media and technology and the Dark Web. The twists here are solid and compelling, and both Kya and Fuse both have outstanding voices. This is my first Giles and won't be my last. Though Angie Thomas's ON THE COME UP isn't a mystery, I'd hand this book to readers who absolutely love that book. Lots of interesting similarities.
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  • Mary Thomas
    January 1, 1970
    Giles has a winner here!! Gripping from the start, I loved this mystery about the murder of a talented young DJ. I think teen readers will LOVE this book- the social media, the friendships, school life and language was all spot on. And it will certainly appeal to our high taste readers (s/o to Nic Stone) even with the length. Giles manages to layer in a lot here: the characters meditate on class, race, and whose story gets told in the media and why. I will absolutely be purchasing two copies for Giles has a winner here!! Gripping from the start, I loved this mystery about the murder of a talented young DJ. I think teen readers will LOVE this book- the social media, the friendships, school life and language was all spot on. And it will certainly appeal to our high taste readers (s/o to Nic Stone) even with the length. Giles manages to layer in a lot here: the characters meditate on class, race, and whose story gets told in the media and why. I will absolutely be purchasing two copies for my high school library! Bravo! 👏🏻🎧👏🏻🎧👏🏻
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  • Carli
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Edelweiss and Scholastic for the advance Kindle copy of this 1.29.19 release. All opinions are my own.•⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐/5 for this engaging thriller. When teen DJ ParSec (Paris, to her friends) is found dead, her childhood best friend and new friend/groupie/promoter have to put aside their (major) differences as they search for her killer. They find themselves being pursued by a dangerous fan group as they near the truth. I absolutely love that this book has older characters and a gritty premi Thank you to Edelweiss and Scholastic for the advance Kindle copy of this 1.29.19 release. All opinions are my own.•⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️/5 for this engaging thriller. When teen DJ ParSec (Paris, to her friends) is found dead, her childhood best friend and new friend/groupie/promoter have to put aside their (major) differences as they search for her killer. They find themselves being pursued by a dangerous fan group as they near the truth. I absolutely love that this book has older characters and a gritty premise while still being accessible to middle school readers. It also features a diverse cast of characters, which I love. It is exactly what I have been looking for to add to my collection. Highly recommend for grades 7/8+.
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  • Regina
    January 1, 1970
    This book was DOPE.The mystery was well done, with enough red herrings to keep me entranced. And the beautiful acknowledgment and integration of current and past hip-hop was extremely on point.My only complaint was the audiobook, which would have done better to secure younger narrators to match the tone of the text. Bahni Turpin is always amazing, but there were a lot of times throughout the book where it was easy to forget the intended ages of the characters. I also think that this was a great This book was DOPE.The mystery was well done, with enough red herrings to keep me entranced. And the beautiful acknowledgment and integration of current and past hip-hop was extremely on point.My only complaint was the audiobook, which would have done better to secure younger narrators to match the tone of the text. Bahni Turpin is always amazing, but there were a lot of times throughout the book where it was easy to forget the intended ages of the characters. I also think that this was a great book to read just after "Monday's Not Coming", as they both dealt with the differences in which violence against black girls is handled in comparison to white girls. Recommend.
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  • Ellen
    January 1, 1970
    Overall, it was a decent mystery. I was a little disappointed in the "reveal" because a) I'd already figured it out; and b) it was a little anti climatic. I liked the main two girls, though I sometimes struggled remembering which point of view I was in. I did like the style and that it was a diverse book written by a diverse author. I may check out some more books by Lamar Giles.Content Warning: Some fairly mild language and a little violence.2019 challenge: An "own voices" book
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  • Carolyn
    January 1, 1970
    This was fun! Liked the mystery, like the girls’ personalities. The mystery wrapped up a little fast for the pace of the rest of the story. I’d love to actually here these tunes.Re: classroom library: the characters are in high school and might be a little out of middle schoolers’ interest, but there wasn’t anything worrisome or inappropriate so I’d be OK putting this in my 6th/7th library (if this was my copy! I actually borrowed it from our school librarian).
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  • Sarah Dawson
    January 1, 1970
    Interesting points of view, particularly ParSec's countdown to the day she died.
  • Jen McGraw
    January 1, 1970
    Can you say Beyhive? I enjoyed reading this young adult mystery, and my students are going to love it also! The pop culture references were excellent!
  • Lupita
    January 1, 1970
    A mystery like Veronica Mars. Girls that are enemies, but become friends. And a recipe on how to honor a lost friend. Highly recommend this fast action packed read!
  • Carolina
    January 1, 1970
    i didn't feel any type of connection towards this story, but it wasn't bad at all, it just wasn't my cup of tea.actual rating: 2.75/5
  • Sam Bloom
    January 1, 1970
    Highest 4.5 star rating possible
  • Nikki S
    January 1, 1970
    Review to come.**EDIT 3/04/2019**You can find more of my reviews here at my blog: Take Me Away... Somehow, this is the first book by Lamar Giles I've ever read. His book Overturned that came out in 2017 was super high on my TBR, but I never got a hold of it. I knew not to make this mistake with Spin. And with its badass characters, amazing music references, and so much more, I'm glad I didn't miss out on it. DJ ParSec was gearing up to be just as big as DJ Khaled. But just as she is growing in Review to come.**EDIT 3/04/2019**You can find more of my reviews here at my blog: Take Me Away... Somehow, this is the first book by Lamar Giles I've ever read. His book Overturned that came out in 2017 was super high on my TBR, but I never got a hold of it. I knew not to make this mistake with Spin. And with its badass characters, amazing music references, and so much more, I'm glad I didn't miss out on it. DJ ParSec was gearing up to be just as big as DJ Khaled. But just as she is growing in the music industry, her life is suddenly taken from her. No one knows who did it, but its looking alot like her old best friend Kya or her new friend, Fuse. Both of whom claim to have just found her. ParSec's fanbase is furious thinking that they did something, so they make Kya and Fuse find out who took their beloved musician too soon. The best part about this book was hands down the characters. I LOVED that we got to see inside both Fuse and Kya's head. It was interesting to see the mystery from both sides of the story. And I really loved the two of them together and they way they interacted with each other. (Am I the only one who shipped them? lol) Which makes this next point kind of weird to admit.... As much as I liked Fuse and Kya, I did not care for Paris. She was "not nice" for most of the book and even with her being dead, it didn't help me see her in a better light. It just seemed like the music and fame turned her and made her question the people she knew her whole life (grandma, Kya). I didn't like that. As for the writing style, it started out slow at first, but as the answers to the mystery started coming out, the story got better and better. For me to read so many mysteries, I had not expected for so many things in this story to surprise me like they did! The last secret that came out literally made me make a "peep" out-loud. Totally wasn't expecting that. This mystery is full of surprises and the end result left me reeling long after I turned the last page! The last thing about this book I really liked was the music references. The artists, the Smithsonian exhibit (that I WISH I could one day see) and her parties, and so much more. I love music and seeing all these references, like the Pac quote at the beginning, the mentions of Jam Master Jay, and BIG, I felt seen. These are the artists I adored and I still listen to. Although the teens in the story didn't know who Jam Master Jay was and I felt old, it was still pretty cool to see them spoken about in a teen book at all. This book was a definite surprise and I can't wait to see what else I might have missed from Giles.This story of growth, pain, and friendship was just what I needed right now and I hope it reaches many others like it did for me.
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  • Liz Friend
    January 1, 1970
    The story: Rising star DJ ParSec has been murdered. Both Kya and Fuse are on the suspect list--even worse, they can't stand each other. Worst of all: they're both suspects. When it becomes clear they're going to have to work together, strange things start happening courtesy of a whacko set of ParSec's groupies, the Dark Nation. Now Kya and Fuse are going to have to watch their backs as they try to track an elusive killer and work through their own troubled history.June Cleaver's ratings: Languag The story: Rising star DJ ParSec has been murdered. Both Kya and Fuse are on the suspect list--even worse, they can't stand each other. Worst of all: they're both suspects. When it becomes clear they're going to have to work together, strange things start happening courtesy of a whacko set of ParSec's groupies, the Dark Nation. Now Kya and Fuse are going to have to watch their backs as they try to track an elusive killer and work through their own troubled history.June Cleaver's ratings: Language: PG-13; Violence PG-13; Sexual content PG; Nudity G; Substance abuse PG; Magic & the occult G; adult themes (murder, racism) PG-13; overall rating PG-13. Best for 8th-up.Liz's comments: I liked this one a lot better than "Overturned". It had the same on-point sense of place while lacking the gritty frowsiness of Las Vegas and its casinos. All the characters are well drawn, and the mystery will draw fans of the genre. Great cover, too.
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  • Ryan
    January 1, 1970
    Who murdered DJ ParSec? Was it a best friend? Was it a crazed fan? Was it a member of her team? This story told in alternating voices seeks to solve this case.Kya is a nerd. She likes apps, she likes computers, she likes coding. She is best friends with Paris Secord, who will become DJ ParSec by the time this book takes place. Fuse is new to the group. She is in charge of marketing and graining fans for DJ ParSec. Yes she is a fan, but she is also a friend.Paris Secord is a girl who likes to mak Who murdered DJ ParSec? Was it a best friend? Was it a crazed fan? Was it a member of her team? This story told in alternating voices seeks to solve this case.Kya is a nerd. She likes apps, she likes computers, she likes coding. She is best friends with Paris Secord, who will become DJ ParSec by the time this book takes place. Fuse is new to the group. She is in charge of marketing and graining fans for DJ ParSec. Yes she is a fan, but she is also a friend.Paris Secord is a girl who likes to make music. It’s all she wants to do in life. And she is good. So good, that her career takes off and DJ ParSec and #ParSec nation is born. But fame is fast, and sometimes it’s hard to tell who your friends are, and who is just riding coat tails. This story is told in alternating voices. Kya and Fuse are current, and Paris tells her story starting two year ago, up to her untimely demise. Kya and Fuse find the body. Slopped over her DJ equipment just before a pop up show. Neither trusts the other, as they both think that the other was part of the nails in the coffins of friendship with Paris.However, the dark side of a fandom is going to rear its ugly head and make the two girls work together to do what the police can't, and wont do...find Paris’s killer. I enjoyed this story but parts felt far fetched, such as #DarkNation, but then again when you have things like #Pizzagate, anything is possible. I liked this book for things and events it made me look up, where it was real historical events, or types of music and equipment, or even songs I know I heard in my teen years, but don’t remember.I would consider this title an #ownvoices work. The author did help launch “We Need Diverse Books”. But would that still be true as a man writing a story about 3 girls? To be honest I don’t know where this line would fall. I mention this because of something I felt to be annoying. All three of the girls go to the same school. But only one talks in AACV, Paris. While the others seem to speak textbook english most of the time. The reason this bothers me is not the AACV as I expect to find it reading this type of book and enjoy it use. It’s that the only character to really use it is the character that drops out of school, that plays music, that doesn’t care about her education. The nerd and the girl from the rich family, while all POC, don’t appear to speak in the same vocal patterns. This probably shouldn’t bother me but it does. It almost seems like a “dumbing” down of a character. Wouldn’t kids from the same school have the same language patterns, mostly? Or is this code switching, and only the “proper english” side is seen. This is part of this reader not knowing and wanting to learn more about AACV, code switching, #Ownvoices, etc.#KillYourTBR - Verb in the title#LittleLoveBingo - picked by litten i admire (Bill Blume)#Booked2019 - Social Media Focus#NancyDrewChallenge - less than 50 reviews
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  • Kacey
    January 1, 1970
    I wanted something a little different after all the fantasy I'd been reading lately, and having this be about a dead musician who had a social media fanbase? I was really excited to see how all that was handled. The actual mystery part was a little disappointing, since it was basically the girls going around confronting people they thought killed their friend, but I thought the rest was pretty solid.What I enjoy about mysteries is gathering clues-- either by them being pointed out by the main ch I wanted something a little different after all the fantasy I'd been reading lately, and having this be about a dead musician who had a social media fanbase? I was really excited to see how all that was handled. The actual mystery part was a little disappointing, since it was basically the girls going around confronting people they thought killed their friend, but I thought the rest was pretty solid.What I enjoy about mysteries is gathering clues-- either by them being pointed out by the main character or through the narrative-- and then piecing the puzzle together. We weren't ever given any clues, since we were stuck in the POVs of the two girls, who of course wouldn't be in on the police investigation. So we were stuck with clues based on narrative, which gave the answer fairly quickly even if neither girl realized it. I feel the conclusion was a little lackluster, though maybe that was the author's intention. Though I'm not sure I like the conclusion of "don't trust the police to do their jobs, take justice into your own hands even if it ends up being more like revenge".One of the more annoying parts of the book was trying to make the police seem incompetent or that they didn't care. But police can only go with the evidence they have, and since we never got the police's side, we have no idea what leads they were going after or what the coroner's report said or anything that could've helped piece events together. I get that writers do this so their characters are the ones to save the day, but it's still aggravating when so many problems could've been solved by them going to the police.I liked the two main girls well enough. I wish I could've seen their thoughts and reactions to certain events, and certain information was withheld for no reason other than to be a twist or surprise later on. I never understand why that happens in first person POVs unless they're directly speaking with the audience. I also liked Paris's sections, even if she wasn't always the most pleasant character. It showed how the pressure of fame can get to a person, and the stress of maintaining a certain work ethic.Probably the better parts of this novel were the ones highlighting how social media and fandom works. This book did a great job in showing the power of these forums, both in good and bad ways. Maybe parts of it were a little over-exaggerated, but for the most part it felt pretty true to how it really works. I also like the friendship between the three girls. It wasn't always perfect, but the dynamic between them was good and seeing them grow together and apart throughout the course of the novel felt genuine.It was an entertaining story that did a decent job in the mystery, but a much better job in the female friendship and the portrayal of social media and the ups and downs of fame.
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  • Teenreadsdotcom
    January 1, 1970
    To quote Jake Peralta of “Brooklyn Nine-Nine,” “Good news for all you murder fans!” SPIN is a new whodunit by Lamar Giles about the dark side of fandom.Before SPIN, Lamar Giles wrote OVERTURNED, ENDANGERED and FAKE ID. SPIN is similar to I WAS BORN FOR THIS by Alice Oseman and I AM PRINCESS X by Cherie Priest. If this music-themed book were a song, it would be “Pretender” by Steve Aoki, Lil Yachty and AJR. SPIN has the same energy as a TV crime drama like “Elementary,” but without all of the pre To quote Jake Peralta of “Brooklyn Nine-Nine,” “Good news for all you murder fans!” SPIN is a new whodunit by Lamar Giles about the dark side of fandom.Before SPIN, Lamar Giles wrote OVERTURNED, ENDANGERED and FAKE ID. SPIN is similar to I WAS BORN FOR THIS by Alice Oseman and I AM PRINCESS X by Cherie Priest. If this music-themed book were a song, it would be “Pretender” by Steve Aoki, Lil Yachty and AJR. SPIN has the same energy as a TV crime drama like “Elementary,” but without all of the predictable clichés where you can guess the murderer in the first 15 minutes.Kya was DJ ParSec’s best friend before she became famous. Fuse was DJ ParSec’s social media manager before she was murdered. Kya and Fuse hate each other, but they’re the ones that find Paris Secord, also known as DJ ParSec, dead at her turntables. They definitely didn’t kill Paris...but who did?The police tell them to go home and focus on school. Their parents tell them they need to rest and process their friend’s shocking death. Fuse’s father tells her to avoid Kya. Kya’s mother tells her to avoid Fuse.Obviously Kya and Fuse don’t do that.After Kya and Fuse meet at Paris’s funeral, they get kidnapped by the dark side of ParSec Nation. They realize that the police won’t do much to solve DJ ParSec’s murder and they have to take matters into their own hands to get justice and to avoid the wrath of the Dark Nation. Together, they must navigate the fandom that Fuse created, as well as the side of the fandom she never intended to make. Do Kya and Fuse have a chance at catching the murderer?I read SPIN in less than 24 hours. The book’s plot had so many twists that kept me guessing. I’ve seen plenty of TV crime dramas, so you could say that I’m a pretty decent sleuth. But this story was original and surprising, and I didn’t see any of the plot twists coming.Kya and Fuse’s dynamic is also fantastic. Both Kya and Fuse are developed characters and they have strengths that help solve the mystery and their friendship grows throughout the book. There’s always some kind of romance in young adult fiction, but there isn’t much in SPIN. Instead, the focus is on the murder and Kya’s and Fuse’s friendship.Lamar Giles also does a good job of portraying ParSec Nation realistically, with a good side and a toxic side. There are the fans who just love DJ ParSec’s music and mourn her death, but there are also the fans who will stop at nothing to find DJ ParSec’s killer.I’d recommend this book to fans of mysteries and music. It’s the perfect book to read while waiting for season five of “Sherlock” (will it ever come?) or after finishing whatever mystery TV show you’re obsessed with. Just make sure you have an airtight alibi.
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  • Jaina Rose
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars. This review is also available on my blog, Read Till Dawn.I think it's pretty well-established on this site that I am a fan of murder mysteries. Usually Agatha Christie's novels are my poison of choice (pun intended), but I'm always game to try out new authors. I am often very interested to see how different books approach the mysteries from different angles, either focusing on the personality of the victim or on the character of the detective or just treating the mystery as a puzzle t 3.5 stars. This review is also available on my blog, Read Till Dawn.I think it's pretty well-established on this site that I am a fan of murder mysteries. Usually Agatha Christie's novels are my poison of choice (pun intended), but I'm always game to try out new authors. I am often very interested to see how different books approach the mysteries from different angles, either focusing on the personality of the victim or on the character of the detective or just treating the mystery as a puzzle to be solved as an intellectual pursuit.Spin takes an interesting approach by making the two main characters be the victim's current and ex-best friend, who don't like each other and in fact begin a social media war in the aftermath of her death. We learn more and more about Paris's story as the book goes on, and it's very interesting to see the process of ascending to fame and the pain and torn relationships that came with it. All of the characters in Spin are multi-dimensional, and the story is full of nuance. I really appreciated that.I also liked watching the social media and technological aspect of the story, because Giles does a good job really making it feel like a realistic aftermath of the murder of a celebrity. There are some aspects of the dark web that seem to be pushing reality a smidge, but overall the details about Paris's fans, her social media presence, and the issues with her publicist, all seem very honest.At this point I have to be honest: it's been a few months since I read the book, so I can't comment much more on the details or language. I do know that the story and characters have stayed with me much better than those of many other books do, so I can vouch that it's a fairly memorable book. Overall, I remember having some issues with it (and getting really ticked off at Paris at one point, though again that's part of the realism of the book I suppose). At the end of the day, it was a compelling and entertaining read that I enjoyed having access to. If you want to read it, I say go for it!Disclaimer: I received a complimentary copy of this novel from the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
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  • DJL
    January 1, 1970
    This is my first novel by Lamar Giles, and I know it won't be the last. Having grown up learning to love mysteries, thanks to my mom, I can say that Giles spins an excellent yarn without giving away too much too soon.At the heart of this mystery are Kya and Fuse, two young Black women who, while in conflict with each other at first, are able to set aside their issues with one another in order to figure out what really happened to their mutual friend, Paris "DJ ParSec," when she died. There's a l This is my first novel by Lamar Giles, and I know it won't be the last. Having grown up learning to love mysteries, thanks to my mom, I can say that Giles spins an excellent yarn without giving away too much too soon.At the heart of this mystery are Kya and Fuse, two young Black women who, while in conflict with each other at first, are able to set aside their issues with one another in order to figure out what really happened to their mutual friend, Paris "DJ ParSec," when she died. There's a lot of character growth as the story is slowly revealed both through Kya and Fuse's points of view with Paris filling in the story gaps that led up to her death. The really intriguing parts involved both the use of music and the power it possesses whether used for good or bad. It also raises the eyebrows to see the darker side of social media. Yes, this is a timely novel, but I believe it will resonate with many different readers whether they appreciate good mystery, the music industry, or what ultimately amounts to young women standing up for themselves. I hope more readers will enjoy Lamar Giles' Spin and look forward to more that comes from him.
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  • Renee
    January 1, 1970
    This book is really good! It’s a fast paced music inspired mystery that has two black girl leads (three of you want to count ParSec) and it definitely passed the Bechdel test. Someone has killed Paris Secord, an up and coming underground DJ that was on the verge of branching out. ParSec’s two closest confidants— Kya and Fuse— can’t stand one another and are high key pointing the finger at one another on social media which brings them to the attention of not the police (who has ruled them out) bu This book is really good! It’s a fast paced music inspired mystery that has two black girl leads (three of you want to count ParSec) and it definitely passed the Bechdel test. Someone has killed Paris Secord, an up and coming underground DJ that was on the verge of branching out. ParSec’s two closest confidants— Kya and Fuse— can’t stand one another and are high key pointing the finger at one another on social media which brings them to the attention of not the police (who has ruled them out) but the slightly deranged core of fans that call themselves ParSec nation. The fan base demands justice is answered for the death of their favorite musician and with high tech trickery strong arms Kya and Fuse into investigating fornthem.You don’t have to like music or mysteries to like this book but if you do it’s a bonus. It has strong writing and the shout outs to Gen X R&B/Hip Hop from the 90s will stoke music lovers or give the uninitiated something to listen to while reading.I definitely recommend this book
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  • Dee Carney
    January 1, 1970
    Good mystery overall though I'll admit that had another trusted author/reader not recommended this story, I would have DNF'd it very early on. The author's voice is very much YA, which normally is fine, but for some reason it grated on my nerves for this story. (You can only read "turn up" so many times!) It's very much a contemporary story; it'll be interesting to come back 20 years from now to see how/if it can hold up due to how much it relies on current social media, etc. Figuring out the mu Good mystery overall though I'll admit that had another trusted author/reader not recommended this story, I would have DNF'd it very early on. The author's voice is very much YA, which normally is fine, but for some reason it grated on my nerves for this story. (You can only read "turn up" so many times!) It's very much a contemporary story; it'll be interesting to come back 20 years from now to see how/if it can hold up due to how much it relies on current social media, etc. Figuring out the murderer wasn't difficult, but the reason didn't come together until it was explained, so that's something. Otherwise, the plot itself is rock solid and so is the characterization of almost everyone in the story. Overall, it wrapped up very nicely. I don't believe I'd rush out to read another book by this author based on this book, BUT I would recommend this story to teens and parents of teens. Sadly, I might be a little too antiquated for it. lol
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  • Carro Herdegen
    January 1, 1970
    Language: PG13 (22 swears, 0 “f”); Mature Content: PG; Violence: PG13Both at the scene to discover their friend’s, DJ ParSec’s, dead body, nemeses Kya and Fuse throw dirt on each other to prove who the better friend was. Unforeseen consequences quickly make them both regret their actions, but it’s too late—they must work together to find the murderer as demanded by extremist ParSec fans. Or else.The overall mystery was exciting to read, but my favorite thing about this book is that there were mu Language: PG13 (22 swears, 0 “f”); Mature Content: PG; Violence: PG13Both at the scene to discover their friend’s, DJ ParSec’s, dead body, nemeses Kya and Fuse throw dirt on each other to prove who the better friend was. Unforeseen consequences quickly make them both regret their actions, but it’s too late—they must work together to find the murderer as demanded by extremist ParSec fans. Or else.The overall mystery was exciting to read, but my favorite thing about this book is that there were multiple compelling secrets to uncover other than the main one. However, I was disappointed that the big reveal seemed to be something that I, as the reader, would never be able to solve on my own because Giles did not give me the clues I would need to do so. While the violence has a rating of PG13 for multiple descriptions of the murder scene and threats with various weaponry, Giles does not go into the gory details.Reviewed for https://kissthebook.blogspot.com/
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  • Stacy
    January 1, 1970
    DJ ParSec is an up-and-coming DJ, just about to hit it big, until she's found dead by two of her ex-best friends. Kya and Fuse could not be more different, but when the seedy side of #ParSecNation comes after them with accusations and demands for answers, they find themselves as detectives in their former friend's murder. Treachery, deceit, anger, and grief are all involved as the two girls try to unravel the mystery. The representation of characters of color, including the diversity within POC DJ ParSec is an up-and-coming DJ, just about to hit it big, until she's found dead by two of her ex-best friends. Kya and Fuse could not be more different, but when the seedy side of #ParSecNation comes after them with accusations and demands for answers, they find themselves as detectives in their former friend's murder. Treachery, deceit, anger, and grief are all involved as the two girls try to unravel the mystery. The representation of characters of color, including the diversity within POC communities, as well as the coastal Virginia setting obviously written by a local, were greatly appreciated and well-done. The audio edition was not great; one narrator in particular really threw off the narrative. However, it is a quality mystery involving hip-hop, social media, family, friendship, and the drawbacks of fame. Recommended for readers in grades 7+, due to mild violence and peril but no sexual situations or language concerns. Hand to fans of Stone, Thomas, or Carter.3.5 stars
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  • Kristin
    January 1, 1970
    Paris Secord is a high school music sensation known as DJ ParSec. She spins, writes, and produces music. As her fame is on the rise, she's found dead at her turntables and the two girls closest to her are prime suspects.Besides the obvious mystery, this story looks at the local music scene. DJ ParSec wants fame and fortune to escape her rough childhood. And it seems everyone around her wants a piece of her from her fans, other rising stars, the media, and of course the music executives. Topics o Paris Secord is a high school music sensation known as DJ ParSec. She spins, writes, and produces music. As her fame is on the rise, she's found dead at her turntables and the two girls closest to her are prime suspects.Besides the obvious mystery, this story looks at the local music scene. DJ ParSec wants fame and fortune to escape her rough childhood. And it seems everyone around her wants a piece of her from her fans, other rising stars, the media, and of course the music executives. Topics of social media, technology, and privilege are also wound into the plot.Although different genres, the music background of this story makes it an obvious pairing with Angie Thomas' On the Come Up. Teen readers who liked Kevin Emerson's music scene mystery trilogy, Exile, would also enjoy this one in my opinion.
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  • Afoma Umesi
    January 1, 1970
    I really enjoyed this fast-paced YA mystery! A riveting story of two high-schoolers thrown into solving the mystery of their best friend’s death. After popular teen DJ, Paris Secord is murdered, two of her friends (who are not on speaking terms) come under public suspicion. Both girls are forced to band together against a group of darkly fanatic supporters, uncooperative police staff, and other hindrances to their efforts.This novel is captivating, and I finished the 10-hour audiobook in two day I really enjoyed this fast-paced YA mystery! A riveting story of two high-schoolers thrown into solving the mystery of their best friend’s death. After popular teen DJ, Paris Secord is murdered, two of her friends (who are not on speaking terms) come under public suspicion. Both girls are forced to band together against a group of darkly fanatic supporters, uncooperative police staff, and other hindrances to their efforts.This novel is captivating, and I finished the 10-hour audiobook in two days. It addresses the use of social media, music fandom, and police response to Black homicide. Especially remarkable in this one is the absence of foul language which is a breath of fresh air for me. Narration: A+ Would recommend.
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  • Ren
    January 1, 1970
    This is more for the audio version and the enjoyment I found in it. If I was rating for story, I would say it's 3.5 because....Paris was becoming an awful person. If that's how she was before she really went big, then she was going to be a nightmare. I was done with her when she and Kya had their last meeting. Fuse wasn't so great either. The only character I truly liked was Kya. I get it: people have layers. However, I can they have some sort of likeability if the whole story hinges on them? Al This is more for the audio version and the enjoyment I found in it. If I was rating for story, I would say it's 3.5 because....Paris was becoming an awful person. If that's how she was before she really went big, then she was going to be a nightmare. I was done with her when she and Kya had their last meeting. Fuse wasn't so great either. The only character I truly liked was Kya. I get it: people have layers. However, I can they have some sort of likeability if the whole story hinges on them? Also, the narrators were great, because they are amazing narrators, but they sounded stilted with the material. Will I read another Lamar Giles? Of course!
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  • Engel Dreizehn
    January 1, 1970
    Highly suggestible for the music/hip-hop lovers and the crime drama mystery types. I did like yes we are getting a murder mystery with its twists and turns but set against the backdrop of the music industry in all its shades of its high and its ugly sides...the humble-private life of Paris would be one and the rabid Dark Nation fandom. I like (and oh my goodness thank you!) the narrative for being realistic in its approach to music industry portrayal especially the social media-fandom side. I li Highly suggestible for the music/hip-hop lovers and the crime drama mystery types. I did like yes we are getting a murder mystery with its twists and turns but set against the backdrop of the music industry in all its shades of its high and its ugly sides...the humble-private life of Paris would be one and the rabid Dark Nation fandom. I like (and oh my goodness thank you!) the narrative for being realistic in its approach to music industry portrayal especially the social media-fandom side. I like the interplay of personalities between Fuse + Kaya...its represents different sides of a musician's network...the fandom-groupie angle and the "private life" point.
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