Nightwing, Vol. 7
It's a new beginning for Dick Grayson, as novelist Benjamin Percy takes the vigilante on a high-octane, adrenaline-fueled adventure in Nightwing Vol. 7, a great jumping on point for new readers!Change is on the horizon. A new technologist sets his sights on Bl�dhaven, creating a holographic, interconnected city where everyone is an individual and part of a larger network. It's the internet made physical. Gentrification on gigabyte-laced steroids. But when this new utopia encroaches on his turf, Nightwing starts to uncover a sinister plot based not on revenge...but on a reckoning.Incoming creative team of horror novelist and Green Arrow alumn Benjamin Percy and artist Chris Mooneyham (Boom Studios's Planet of the Apes) will take Nightwing on a digital nightmare that will have long-lasting ramifications for the DC Universe in NightwingVol. 7! This great new jumping-on point is perfect for readers wanting to catch up with Dick Grayson! Collects #44-49 and Annual #1.

Nightwing, Vol. 7 Details

TitleNightwing, Vol. 7
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseDec 31st, 2018
PublisherDC Comics
ISBN-139781401285593
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Superheroes, Dc Comics

Nightwing, Vol. 7 Review

  • Wing Kee
    January 1, 1970
    More Percy's Teen Titans than Green Arrow.World: The art is okay, it's not that great cause for the most part the art is trying to be Romita Jr (and they even had Romita Jr. do some alternate covers) and not doing that good of a job. Just get Romita Jr. The issue with Otto Smidt which partnered with Percy for Green Arrow is so beautiful to look at. The world building here is okay, there are moments of greatness and moments of logic leaps readers needs to take and there are moments it's slapped t More Percy's Teen Titans than Green Arrow.World: The art is okay, it's not that great cause for the most part the art is trying to be Romita Jr (and they even had Romita Jr. do some alternate covers) and not doing that good of a job. Just get Romita Jr. The issue with Otto Smidt which partnered with Percy for Green Arrow is so beautiful to look at. The world building here is okay, there are moments of greatness and moments of logic leaps readers needs to take and there are moments it's slapped together from current pop culture. The beautiful is the parts where Dick is talking about himself about being a Luddite and him reorienting himself with the new creative team on board, it's well done, the first issue paves the way well for the world at large and the characters (mainstays like Babs and Dick) are well written and portrayed. There are some characters that Percy is using which is interesting but maybe I'm not caught up in all the Bat books but I don't see where Vicky Vale suddenly showing up again and being so chummy with Dick with no previous build-up of it (did I miss something or is this choppy world building? And why Vicky? There is so much stuff with Bruce there that can be avoided with a new character). The logic leaps is of course the main crux of the story and a big part of the world building, the tech from Mirage, the idea behind it and the reasoning people would get behind it makes little sense and you just have to accept it as a reader if you want to buy into the story "because comics" is needed here. Cause how can we think that slapping AR on top of buildings and lives would satisfy people, especially the Government endorsing such as stupid idea, so "Because Comics". The slapped together pop culture stuff? It's West World (season two, you'll know what I'm talking about when you see them) and Ready Player One "Oasis" type AR and the cycle race. It's slapped together and lacks creativity and originality which I know Percy has (Green Arrow run). Story: I like the idea of Nightwing facing a techno enemy and the old school and the tech coming together. I also like the idea of fighting the "Dark Web" and it's an interesting notion and something that could be kinda cool (Babs faced something similar in the New52). The start with Dick and his monologues about himself being a Luddite were well done and sets up the readers for the conflict. However the book list me when it asked me to logic leap the tech, the idea of Wrym and data mining is interesting and relevant and frightening and can be done very well, but with the crazy AR hologram stuff that was a bit too much for me. Great in concept, not so great in the execution. The storyline kinda falls apart at the end of the arc with too many moving pieces, from Vale to Cloke and so many characters, keeping it simple like Green Arrow would have made it so great. The Annual made it even more convoluted without any true set up in the Bleeding Edge arc to set up the next stage and a bigger stage, it felt rushed and now we're heading towards a mess of a storyline with lots of lost potential.Characters: I like Dick, he's written well, his characterization is spot on, I still don't like the trainer thing but oh well (I liked him best as a cop during Dickson's run), his dialog with Babs is good and I wish there was more set up for Vicky Vale and it not being Vicky Vale so that we can get the chemistry flowing for Dick making another mistake. Vale, I don't know why Percy needs to use Vale, there is so much history there and opening that can of worms for the sake of an easter egg and a call back seems needless when we can just as well have Dick find another lass, which is his way anyways. Barely any characterization on Vale's part which is also a shame. Then there is the villain Wyrm which I like, the idea and concept of what he is and why he's evil is very modern and I like it but he needs more depth and the hologram thing makes him too over the top and ridiculous, it could have just as easy been a Madhatter kinda deal with a flashing app that does some techno babble. Overall this had potential but the overly complex and the logic leap took me out of a potentially fun and long run. I had hoped that Wyrm would open a door for Nightwing like the Ninth Circle did for Ollie on Percy's run (a sustained villain in the background) but right now, it's messy.Onward to the next book!*read individual issues*
    more
  • Eli Seibert
    January 1, 1970
    So this volume had a lot going on. Even though I don't really care for stories where the moral seems to be "technology is bad, and younger generations should feel bad", I think this plays with the idea of misinformation as a super villain really well.Towards the end it starts to get a bit more chaotic; turning into something like Speed Racer mixed with Tron mixed with Ready Player One, which is a bit outside of the realm I usually like members of the Bat family to inhabit. But over all it was st So this volume had a lot going on. Even though I don't really care for stories where the moral seems to be "technology is bad, and younger generations should feel bad", I think this plays with the idea of misinformation as a super villain really well.Towards the end it starts to get a bit more chaotic; turning into something like Speed Racer mixed with Tron mixed with Ready Player One, which is a bit outside of the realm I usually like members of the Bat family to inhabit. But over all it was still a fun and interesting story, and Dick and Babs were written really well.
    more
  • Chris Lemmerman
    January 1, 1970
    [Read as single issues]It’s a new creative team and new threats for Nightwing, with Bludhaven under attack from all sides as technology runs riot, and even Batgirl’s assistance might not be enough for him to save his city. Then it’s the race from hell as Nightwing blazes trails with the lives of his newest friends hanging in the balance.Ben Percy’s Nightwing run is a weird one. It was cut short after issue 50, with Percy leaving abruptly (I assume because he didn’t want to write the story DC wan [Read as single issues]It’s a new creative team and new threats for Nightwing, with Bludhaven under attack from all sides as technology runs riot, and even Batgirl’s assistance might not be enough for him to save his city. Then it’s the race from hell as Nightwing blazes trails with the lives of his newest friends hanging in the balance.Ben Percy’s Nightwing run is a weird one. It was cut short after issue 50, with Percy leaving abruptly (I assume because he didn’t want to write the story DC wanted to tell, but more on that in the next volume). As a result, I’m not really sure what’s going to be in this trade. The solicitation implies that it collects up to issue 48, but #48-49 are a two-part story, so it could either end at #47, or continue to #49. I’m going to assume it includes #44-49 and Annual #1, since that encompasses all of Percy’s run bar issue #50, which is part 1 of a new story anyway, and having his entire run in one book seems to make the most sense to me personally. Whether DC will agree, we’ll find out when the book is actually released.So, anyway. The larger of the two arcs collected here pits Dick against the Dark Web, an organization that threatens to destroy Bludhaven with virtual reality, which is like the most 90s plot I’ve read in a long time. It’s a good idea, and it works well with the fact that Dick has really embedded himself in Bludhaven as a citizen and a crimefighter, so having his newly claimed home under threat is a good move. It does go on for a bit longer than I’d have liked, and the Annual that rounds off the story is far too long for its own good, but the main problem I have is with the art. Chris Mooneyham’s pencils combined with Klaus Janson’s inks make each issue look like they belong in the 80s, and that’s not a good look. It’s all jagged and unpolished, and I don’t like it at all. I’m not sure if it’s Janson over-inking or Mooneyham under-pencilling, but the visuals really let this arc down.The shorter two-part arc is one part Wacky Races one part Death Race as Dick and the Silencer take part in a race to the top of an enchanted island in order to win a one-off wish. This feeds right off the back of the previous arc, but it’s a lot more fun, as if Percy has finally realised what makes Nightwing the character he is – he’s Batman, but without the angst and with more flips-n-shit. This isn’t a story Batman would fit into, but it’s a perfect place for Dick, and the artwork from newcomer Amancay Nahuelpan is an enormous step-up from Mooneyham. This is my first exposure to Silencer as well, and I definitely liked what I saw.I feel like, aside from his stellar Green Arrow run, Ben Percy keeps getting the shaft at DC. His Teen Titans run was interrupted more than once, and his Nightwing run has been cut short just as it starts to get going. This volume has a decent story buried under anachronistic art, and two great issues that unfortunately don’t look like they’re going to be followed up on any time soon. Percy’s run isn’t bad, but it definitely hasn’t been able to live up to its potential, and now isn’t going to get the chance, which is a shame.
    more
  • Veronica
    January 1, 1970
    A different type of story for Nightwing.
  • Richard Choate
    January 1, 1970
    Nightwing Vol 7 is fine. It wears its flaws on it sleeve with its poor characterization of Dick Grayson and its, frankly bizarre for 2018, anti technology vibe. The opening pages of the first issue have Dick lament how technology is everywhere and he's the kinda guy who would use a landline instead of a cell. To my knowledge, this has never been a trait applied to Dick and doesn't make a whole lot of sense. In previous stories by different writers, Dick has used advanced technology a number of t Nightwing Vol 7 is fine. It wears its flaws on it sleeve with its poor characterization of Dick Grayson and its, frankly bizarre for 2018, anti technology vibe. The opening pages of the first issue have Dick lament how technology is everywhere and he's the kinda guy who would use a landline instead of a cell. To my knowledge, this has never been a trait applied to Dick and doesn't make a whole lot of sense. In previous stories by different writers, Dick has used advanced technology a number of times. He was part of a high tech spy agency for Christ's sake. Saying he hates technology simply doesn't track with the character as he exists in the current day. The entire story orbits around this concept of technology=bad with the subtlety of the mid 90's. It has modern references to be sure (people getting doxed) but the story dwells on how scary VR is and has several exploding cell phones. Exploding electronics is a personal pet peeve of mine. Some writers will act like any electronic device is filled with sticks of dynamite for some reason. The book tries to go out of its way to explain the phones and lampshade Dick's 70 year old man viewpoint. Which brings me to an odd point, Ben Percy's story may be bad but his storytelling is fine. The book flows from scene to scene and issue to issue just fine. I could have used a little more time getting to know Willem Cloke for his twist to really hit me, but that's my biggest complaint structurally. The only time the plot jumps awkwardly is when Dick wakes up with Babs and that's supposed to feel weird. The art, while not the best in my opinion, clearly displayed what was going on and never failed to tell the story that was happening. The result is a dumb story with and easy breezy read. Unoffensive might be the word I'm looking for. Oh yeah, I forgot! The last two issues are a hilariously silly motorcycle death race guest starring The Silencer! That story was great. No complaints from me. There is a difference between a story that has no idea its stupid, and takes itself really seriously, and one that know its ridiculous and leans into it. Motorcycle death race is the latter. I can only applaud a story for being over the top if that's what the story is shooting for. The book as a whole reads well enough but at the end of the day I'm pleased to know that the next volume of Nightwing is going in a completely different direction.
    more
  • Ben Truong
    January 1, 1970
    Nightwing: The Bleeding Edge picks up where the previous volume left off, collecting six issues (44–49) of the 2016 on-going series and Nightwing Annual #1. This trade paperback has three stories: the four-part story "The Bleeding Edge", the two-part story "Harm's Way" and the one-shot Annual serves as a bridge between the two stories.Blüdhaven is on a verge of change, after the fall of the casino industry, a new technologist sets his sights on the city, creating a holographic, interconnected ci Nightwing: The Bleeding Edge picks up where the previous volume left off, collecting six issues (44–49) of the 2016 on-going series and Nightwing Annual #1. This trade paperback has three stories: the four-part story "The Bleeding Edge", the two-part story "Harm's Way" and the one-shot Annual serves as a bridge between the two stories.Blüdhaven is on a verge of change, after the fall of the casino industry, a new technologist sets his sights on the city, creating a holographic, interconnected city where everyone is an individual and part of a larger network – in sort the personification of the internet. However, under the layer of technology, a sinister undercurrent is brewing and it is up to Nightwing to handle.Benjamin Percy wrote this trade paperback. It is an interesting premise, having Nightwing deal with a technological based villain that is seemingly omnipresent. I like that Dick Grayson teamed up with Barbara Gordon as Batgirl, but I am not sure how Percy depicted Dick Grayson as a technophobe – granted that compared to Barbara Gordon and Tim Drake he may be lacking, but he is not a total newbie when it comes to technology.Nightwing: The Bleeding Edge had four pencilers: Chris Mooneyham penciled four issues (Nightwing #44–47), Amancay Nahuelpan penciled two issues (Nightwing #48–49), while Lalit Kumar Sharma and Otto Schmidt penciled one issue each (Nightwing #46 and Nightwing Annual #1 respectively).Artistically, it flowed somewhat well. Mooneyham, Nahuelpan, and Schmidt penciled a story each, so it was not too disruptive in the artistic flow of the trade paperback. I just wished I liked Mooneyham's art more – it is a tad too blocky and unrefined for my taste.All in all, Nightwing: The Bleeding Edge was a well-written and depicted trade paperback and I cannot wait to read what happens next to our favorite bluebird.
    more
  • Chris
    January 1, 1970
    The concept of technology-taking-over-the-world isn't a new one, but that's not to say it's a bad idea to incorporate into Nightwing's story. What is jarring is the way it's written, like all of a sudden a guy who grew up surrounded by state of the art technology, who ended up working for a highly technological spy agency AND continues to use said technology is suddenly a luddite.A token attempt at explaning his fear of technology is given while he's talking on his landline phone, but it just co The concept of technology-taking-over-the-world isn't a new one, but that's not to say it's a bad idea to incorporate into Nightwing's story. What is jarring is the way it's written, like all of a sudden a guy who grew up surrounded by state of the art technology, who ended up working for a highly technological spy agency AND continues to use said technology is suddenly a luddite.A token attempt at explaning his fear of technology is given while he's talking on his landline phone, but it just comes out of nowhere. It doesn't gel with the post-Crisis Dick Grayson or the Rebirth Dick Grayson, it's just weird.So we're left with a tired old "technology is bad, why does everyone always look at their phone?" scenario. Dick even says he got rid of his mp3 player in exchange for a record player. Too bad you can't take that on the train with you, Dick.Oh, and there's a throwaway line where Dick quips that he wants to hire Silencer to use her cone-of-silence power to follow Damian around. If he'd said it in front of Damian it would come across as brotherly ribbing. Doing it behind his back gives it a sense of truth, which doesn't ring true for Dick and Damian's relationship at all.So, what did I like? Well, somewhat ironically the technologically minded Barbara Gordon is all over this book and it reminds me of the old Nightwing days where Dick and Babs were constantly in that flirty almost-hooking-up phase that never seemed to go anywhere. Like me, Percy seems to be a DickBabs shipper, and it's nice. I also like the overall concept of an augmented reality, tech focused villain, just not the way Dick's sudden, inexplicable technophobia.I'm not sure I like the direction Percy is taking Nightwing.
    more
  • Beelzefuzz
    January 1, 1970
    There are two wildly different stories here. Neither feels like a Nightwing story.The first is about a living internet virus type guy and only Nightwing can stop him because Nightwing hates cellphones. There are many logical flaws in the story that make it seem not well thought out, and it ends with a joke about finally getting to punch technology in its stupid face. This whole arc was probably only written for that joke and it all failed.Next there is an insane story that is a lot of fun where There are two wildly different stories here. Neither feels like a Nightwing story.The first is about a living internet virus type guy and only Nightwing can stop him because Nightwing hates cellphones. There are many logical flaws in the story that make it seem not well thought out, and it ends with a joke about finally getting to punch technology in its stupid face. This whole arc was probably only written for that joke and it all failed.Next there is an insane story that is a lot of fun where Nightwing participates in a magical Mad Max meets Tron and Wacky Racers type thing. It is crazy and way over the top and would have been great except it does not feel like a Nightwing story. Putting him into it immediately drags you back down to earth and makes a lot of the over the top magic stuff unpalatable.This is bad, but better than Percy's Green Arrow.
    more
  • robinnette
    January 1, 1970
    3/5Dick is one of my favourite DC characters and so far Rebirth wasn't treating him right – the only volume I enjoyed so far was the one written by Humphries. I had high hopes for Percy as I liked his Green Arrow run but unfortunately his Nightwing didn't rock my world. It wasn't that bad but it never gave me the thrill that my favourite Nightwing comics do. I wasn't really that much into grandpa Dick who's so against technology, I never really perceived him as such so it didn't resonate with me 3/5Dick is one of my favourite DC characters and so far Rebirth wasn't treating him right – the only volume I enjoyed so far was the one written by Humphries. I had high hopes for Percy as I liked his Green Arrow run but unfortunately his Nightwing didn't rock my world. It wasn't that bad but it never gave me the thrill that my favourite Nightwing comics do. I wasn't really that much into grandpa Dick who's so against technology, I never really perceived him as such so it didn't resonate with me here. Babs and Dick's team ups are always a pleasure but that was the only highlight of this volume for me. It wasn't as painful to read as what Seeley was doing by the end of his run on Rebirth Nightwing but I couldn't really get into this volume either.
    more
  • Lindsey
    January 1, 1970
    Not a lot happened in this volume. It felt more like filler than anything.
  • José
    January 1, 1970
    65/100.Al menos, es mejor que los volúmenes anteriores. Me ha gustado el cambio y es una buena introducción a la narrativa de Percy, que no me ha disgustado. Veremos cómo continúa.
  • Yas
    January 1, 1970
    Read in issues.That was a solid read. Not the best arc, but not the worst either.
  • Kurt Lorenz
    January 1, 1970
    44-47, The Bleeding Edge, ☆☆☆Annual 1 ☆☆☆48-49, Harm's Way, ☆☆☆
Write a review