Aquaman, Volume 6
A new era for Aquaman continues here, as Arthur Curry battles the nefarious King Rath in AQUAMAN VOL. 6!“I am all aboard for Aquaman.” —Nerdist “A solid primer on Aquaman’s new status quo.” —CBR Rath, the mad king of Atlantis, is under siege from all sides. Seeking new ways to maintain his grip on the throne, Rath persuades his closest friend from childhood to provide him with access to the darkest magic Atlantis has ever known! But the result is a threat that may be beyond Rath’s—or even Aquaman’s—power to control! Rath’s ally, Kadaver, is given the power of the Atlantean vaults of magic and becomes a mindless servant of the king. Rath’s dominance seems a foregone conclusion…that is, until Aquaman and some unlikely allies storm the gates. It’s a battle royal for the future of the undersea kingdom, but as Rath pays an unexpected price for ultimate authority, he becomes a force so monstrous that no one will be unscathed by the final showdown. Writer Dan Abnett (Titans, The Silencer) is joined by artists Riccardo Federici (Dark Nights: Metal: Dark Knights Rising), Sunny Gho (Captain America, Avengers) and more in Aquaman Vol. 6: Kingslayer, collecting stories from Aquaman #34-38.

Aquaman, Volume 6 Details

TitleAquaman, Volume 6
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseDec 18th, 2018
PublisherDC Comics
ISBN-139781401285432
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Superheroes, Dc Comics

Aquaman, Volume 6 Review

  • Anne
    January 1, 1970
    It was a solid ending to the storyline, but nowhere near what I was hoping for.The last two volumes really took things to another level, and this was simply a decent Aquaman story.And without Stjepan Sejic's gorgeous visuals, the lackluster story really suffered.Kingslayer resembled Underworld & The Crown Comes Down, but something was just a bit...off.That is not to say that the art was hideous or anything. It was quite nice, to be honest. It just wasn't Sejic, and I think it would have been It was a solid ending to the storyline, but nowhere near what I was hoping for.The last two volumes really took things to another level, and this was simply a decent Aquaman story.And without Stjepan Sejic's gorgeous visuals, the lackluster story really suffered.Kingslayer resembled Underworld & The Crown Comes Down, but something was just a bit...off.That is not to say that the art was hideous or anything. It was quite nice, to be honest. It just wasn't Sejic, and I think it would have been better if they had tried to keep him for the rest of this run.Ok, so basically, Rath goes full retard and starts mucking with all the dangerous/outlawed magic that Atlantis has to offer. The results aren't pretty.Thankfully, Arthur gets a little help from friends. <--I would strongly recommend reading Mera: Queen of Atlantis to fully understand everything that happens at the end.I think most of the fans who have been following the Rebirth run will be mostly satisfied with this, even if they aren't 100% over the moon about everything.Recommended for Aquafans.
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  • James DeSantis
    January 1, 1970
    And so ends Dan's run of Aquaman (I think? I believe there's a new writer for main series, after this are crossovers) But it was missing what boosted this series up for me. Stjepan Sejic art. So of course with the new king going a little mad Aquaman has to push his plans up a little more. Murk is sent by the new king to finish off Aquaman but while he's doing that the king is evolving into a monster. No really, he has some dark energy thingy that transforms him into a fishy monster. Come on guys And so ends Dan's run of Aquaman (I think? I believe there's a new writer for main series, after this are crossovers) But it was missing what boosted this series up for me. Stjepan Sejic art. So of course with the new king going a little mad Aquaman has to push his plans up a little more. Murk is sent by the new king to finish off Aquaman but while he's doing that the king is evolving into a monster. No really, he has some dark energy thingy that transforms him into a fishy monster. Come on guys, this is Aquaman. In doing so he becomes a near unbeatable force but when Aqauman teams up with everyone else, will he having a fighting chance to end the civil war? Good: The art isn't bad, let me clear that up. It's not Stjepan Sejic, but it's still solid enough. The fights are pretty great, usually brutal in a way, and of course lots of bloody floating everywhere because they're under water. I also enjoyed the last issue because it's building up to something pretty dang interesting. Bad: Ugh the start of this is such a drag. To learn about the new king is so fucking boring. Who asked for this guys background? I also thought the pacing was all over the place. Sometimes mass amount of bubbles per page with endless exposition really slowed this one down far too much for its own good. Overall, a pretty decent ending. Was fun for the most part but didn't have the grand epic feel I was hoping for. Like most of aquaman's run, it has it's ups and downs. I'm excited to see a new team on the project though. A 3 out of 5.
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  • Chad
    January 1, 1970
    A very rushed end to Dan Abnett's run. The latter half of Abnett's run has been about turning Aquaman into a Game of Thrones type book, but here all of the political intrigue is gone. You could definitely feel that Abnett was told to wrap it up. All of the nuance is gone, it's just turn Rath into a monster and then lots of fighting to stop him. It felt like a letdown and just left me hurrying to the end.
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  • Jesse A
    January 1, 1970
    Strong art and strong overall end to this arc. Strong series. Will miss Abnett's work here.
  • Wing Kee
    January 1, 1970
    Sejic is sorely missed in this arc.World: The art is alright, the art has been phenomenal since Sejic came onboard this series. Before him the art was messy and inconsistent and once he came on there was a sense of calm and groundedness to the series. Atlantis started to make sense with it’s levels, the places and the people within it were more organized and fully fleshed out (I don’t know how much this is Sejic and how much it was Abnett cause before Underworld the series was getting worse and Sejic is sorely missed in this arc.World: The art is alright, the art has been phenomenal since Sejic came onboard this series. Before him the art was messy and inconsistent and once he came on there was a sense of calm and groundedness to the series. Atlantis started to make sense with it’s levels, the places and the people within it were more organized and fully fleshed out (I don’t know how much this is Sejic and how much it was Abnett cause before Underworld the series was getting worse and worse). So, that being said the new artists that pick up the series are solid, they keep the tone and the colors and design of the characters and it’s quite good, it gives us the feel that there has been a shift in the storytelling of the series since Crown of Atlantis. The world building is also solid, with two arcs of building Atlantis and all it’s pieces and characters this is the arc that brings them all together for a finale to the ‘Aquaman’ arc. The introduction of the new pieces were a bit out of left field but they were entertaining nontheless.Story: The final arc of this ‘Aquaman’ tale was done well, the pacing was good, the story was not all over the place and the well crafted world really allowed the story to pace and play out well. The villains were done well and their slow decent into what happens was good and slowly developed since Underworld and this satisfying end of the story was well done overall. I will say that some characters which I’ve grown to love did not shine as much as I’d like. The return of Dolphin to the DCU was a welcome for me and her dynamic with Arthur and later with Mera I really want explored and hopefully...eventually Tempest? But yeah I wanted more time with these characters and also the Ninth Trine but overall this was a satisfying end and the tie to Dark Nights Metal in the end is interesting, I wonder where they will end this series before DeConnick takes over.Characters: Arthur is well done, he’s consistent with the way he’s be portrayed, faults and all. The rest of the cast is also done well with many issues to slowly paint deeper pictures of them the end with this arc is a satisfying one and all the players involved makes sense. The turn of Rath and the thing that comes from the deep is also well done and looks great and this is the type of Aquaman story that I want, in the sea with their characters and away from the surface. I really like Dolphin the character mainly because of the personality that Sejic gave her with his art, I hope that we’ll see more of her before DeConnick comes along. I like this arc, it was a fun and well done read. Onward to the next book!*read individual issues*
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  • Chris Lemmerman
    January 1, 1970
    [Read as single issues](I'm assuming this is actually #34-38, rather than the quoted #34-40, since that'd be weird, and there's no such thing as Annual #2)The insanity that has gripped Atlantis has gone on far enough. With allies from the Ninth Tride, the Silent School, and even King Rath’s personal guard at his back, Aquaman is ready to reclaim his crown – but to do that, Rath must die. Strangely enough, Rath has a problem with that, and he’s prepared to do whatever it takes to keep the power h [Read as single issues](I'm assuming this is actually #34-38, rather than the quoted #34-40, since that'd be weird, and there's no such thing as Annual #2)The insanity that has gripped Atlantis has gone on far enough. With allies from the Ninth Tride, the Silent School, and even King Rath’s personal guard at his back, Aquaman is ready to reclaim his crown – but to do that, Rath must die. Strangely enough, Rath has a problem with that, and he’s prepared to do whatever it takes to keep the power he has stolen, including sell his soul to the Abyssal Dark, the most powerful, most dangerous magic in all of Atlantis. The final battle for the fate of his kingdom has begun, and if Aquaman doesn’t win, all the Seven Seas will tremble in fear…Dan Abnett’s Aquaman has been a tale of two halves – the first year or so was his Black Manta story arc, as well as a few shorter stories that resolved some plot lines from his pre-Rebirth run like Dead Water, while issues 25 onwards have been this epic Atlantis-based arc surrounding Aquaman’s fall from grace as King. That second half comes to a conclusion here, with Arthur facing off against Rath one last time with the fate of the entire city literally in the balance as Rath’s misuse of magic threatens to destroy Atlantis from within.After a short volume last time, these final five issues are full throttle right from the word go. All of the moving parts begin to pull in the same direction, with Vulko’s subplot concerning the Silent School and the defection of Murk all contributing to the final stand that Arthur takes against Rath. The return of Mera (after the events of her solo mini-series) is also a factor, and it’s a triumphant return fitting of the series co-lead.Abnett pulls off the level of escalation necessary in the plot very handily, with the fight against Rath’s forces taking a suitable amount of time before the ultimate battle finally dwindles to just Arthur and Rath themselves. It’s a personal vendetta that needs to be settled, and even with the high stakes surrounding it, it’s fitting that it boils down to the two major players, with even Mera and Arthur’s friends dropping away. The Abyssal Dark plays a bit of a Queen Metalia from Sailor Moon type role, in that it’s the final final boss that kind of comes out of nowhere, but Abnett does a decent job of seeding it in the earlier issues so it’s not a total bait-and-switch by the last confrontation.The first issue of this arc is pencilled by the indomitable Kelley Jones, who turns his distended visuals to the horrors of the deep with ease, although he struggles a little with the more human-looking characters. Robson Rocha (who will be joining the title full-time from issue 43) handles the next issue, before Ricardo Federici returns to see the arc to completion in the last three issues. I still miss Stjepan Sejic, but Federici has already proven that he’s a worthy replacement last volume, so it’s fitting that he rounds things off.This is technically the end of Dan Abnett’s Aquaman run – the next two issues are a crossover with Suicide Squad, while the following two are tie-ins to the Justice League/Aquaman: Drowned Earth crossover, and he manages to round off everything he’s set out to do way back when in this final arc, delivering a sensational conclusion to this year-plus long story.
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  • Cisz Geverink - Strasters
    January 1, 1970
    Iets minder aantrekkelijke stijl voor mij qua graphics, maar AWESOME storyline! En dat einde... kom maar op met Vol. 7 ♡
  • Robert
    January 1, 1970
    When your solution is 'magic trident', you've lost your way.
  • Dr Rashmit Mishra
    January 1, 1970
    Well that was dissapointing . since Rebirth , Aquaman was about the political battle between land and the sea kingdoms and then the political maze within the sea world , however the ending to that run came with this volume and it became your regular run of the mill Monster vs Superhero story. Characters simply turned for no reason and characters (Kadaver) disappeared for no reason , it felt very rushed . Even the art style worryingly started as very dodgy but later on came back to the usual best Well that was dissapointing . since Rebirth , Aquaman was about the political battle between land and the sea kingdoms and then the political maze within the sea world , however the ending to that run came with this volume and it became your regular run of the mill Monster vs Superhero story. Characters simply turned for no reason and characters (Kadaver) disappeared for no reason , it felt very rushed . Even the art style worryingly started as very dodgy but later on came back to the usual best . However the flaws in the story and the absurd and rushed ending felt like a let down . Still over all a very fun run :)
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  • Robert
    January 1, 1970
    An uneven but nonetheless thrilling conclusion to the Tyrant King storyline as Wyrd Magicks are unleashed and Our Hero’s mettle (and metal) is tested to the breaking point.(view spoiler)[ No Kings were slain in the making of this volume. (hide spoiler)]
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  • Dan
    January 1, 1970
    https://youtu.be/O5C-anmv9rI
  • Adam Fisher
    January 1, 1970
    WOW... been a long time since my jaw dropped with an ending like that...Returning to Atlantis (after the events of Dark Nights: Metal), Aquaman teams up with the rebels to help overthrow Corum Rath. But Rath has been very busy securing his rule.... descending to a deep place in Atlantis, Rath and his companion Kadaver (recently made head of the Silent School, Atlantis' school of magic) are seeking the power of the Abyssal Dark. Seen as the ultimate source of all magic in Atlantis, the Abyssal Da WOW... been a long time since my jaw dropped with an ending like that...Returning to Atlantis (after the events of Dark Nights: Metal), Aquaman teams up with the rebels to help overthrow Corum Rath. But Rath has been very busy securing his rule.... descending to a deep place in Atlantis, Rath and his companion Kadaver (recently made head of the Silent School, Atlantis' school of magic) are seeking the power of the Abyssal Dark. Seen as the ultimate source of all magic in Atlantis, the Abyssal Dark is actually a very powerful demon, who once released, begins to alter the bodies of Kadaver and Rath, giving them immense power, but also turning them to his will. All of Atlantis begins to band together to overthrow Rath, and Aquaman is their hero, though even he is defeated by Abyssal Rath. Coming to their rescue is Queen Mera, with all the armed forces of Xebel. With their help, Rath is defeated and the demon who controlled the Abyssal Dark is dispersed through the depths.But then, just as peace begins to be realized, Atlantis begins to shake in its foundations. The wish of a place where he could live in peace (made while clad in 10th Metal armor during the Metal event) Atlantis, seemingly at the behest of Aquaman himself, rises to the surface.My jaw dropped!I hope I don't have to wait so long to see what happens next. This should bring much of the rest of the DCU into contact with Aquaman's storyline. And what will the Atlanteans think of this?Excellent read. High recommend.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    A fitting end to the volumes-long civil war that has been raging in Atlantis. This conclusion had magic, action, a romantic reunion between Aquaman and Mera, the villain receiving a fate arguably worst than death... and Atlantis rising to the surface!?!?! What?!?!? I obviously missed something that hinted at this happening (in "Dark Nights: Metal," according to the editor's note in the comic), because that last plot point came out of nowhere for me... but I have to admit that I am beyond curious A fitting end to the volumes-long civil war that has been raging in Atlantis. This conclusion had magic, action, a romantic reunion between Aquaman and Mera, the villain receiving a fate arguably worst than death... and Atlantis rising to the surface!?!?! What?!?!? I obviously missed something that hinted at this happening (in "Dark Nights: Metal," according to the editor's note in the comic), because that last plot point came out of nowhere for me... but I have to admit that I am beyond curious as to how it will play out. I really liked the idea of Mera being queen--it just makes perfect sense--but I was a little bummed that Aquaman wouldn't be king of Atlantis anymore. That's kind of his thing. So maybe with Atlantis now being underwater-and-surface, like Arthur, he will be able to reclaim his throne. It's an interesting turn of events, and the beginning of an intriguing story arc following the aforementioned civil war epic that preceded in. Now the difficult part... waiting for volume 7.
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  • Scott Lee
    January 1, 1970
    Abnett continues to show he can handle a far wider variety of funny books than Marvel's space guys. A more than solid continuation of the current Aquaman storyline, where Rath has replaced both Arthur and Mera as ruler of Atlantis. Abnett continues to effectively and entertainingly explore the internal workings of Atlantis and the various factions within the DC world's largest, most powerful nation, which is certainly different from any take on Aquaman in recent years, and allows for some fascin Abnett continues to show he can handle a far wider variety of funny books than Marvel's space guys. A more than solid continuation of the current Aquaman storyline, where Rath has replaced both Arthur and Mera as ruler of Atlantis. Abnett continues to effectively and entertainingly explore the internal workings of Atlantis and the various factions within the DC world's largest, most powerful nation, which is certainly different from any take on Aquaman in recent years, and allows for some fascinating superhero/fantasy work not often seen at DC.
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  • Sesana
    January 1, 1970
    Well, it did end the storyline, and I did like where it ended up. Rath's fate is indeed fitting and satisfactory, and the potential long-term consequences for Atlantis are indeed interesting. But this particular volume was kind of a drag. I think maybe this whole storyline just went on for a little too long.
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  • Derek Newman-Stille
    January 1, 1970
    I didn’t think I would encounter an Aquaman comic with a bit of a Lovecraftian flavour to it, but Kingslayer evokes those things that lurk in the deep dark of the ocean and it adds a darker flavour to Aquaman comics
  • Lukas Holmes
    January 1, 1970
    I am really starting to think Dan Abnett is the best writer in comics. This story was just wonderful. Great monsters, great action, a great fluid story that's been building for years. A really terrific way to end this arc.
  • Adam Spanos
    January 1, 1970
    Wow, It took a lot of volumes to finally finish but the main story is all wrapped up and now, Aquaman is onto the next phase of his adventure. It was great to finally see him face a quality villain for once and the ending made me excited for more.
  • José
    January 1, 1970
    80/100.Me gusta cómo va. Se nota que la etapa de Abnett está llegando a su fin y me apena bastante. Espero que siga la línea hasta el final, que promete ser todo lo que la serie necesita.
  • Sean Goh
    January 1, 1970
    Wraps things up and sets them up for the next arc, but only satisfactorily.
  • Will Robinson Jr.
    January 1, 1970
    Alls Wells that Ends Well. Dan Abnett's run on Aquaman has been truly epic. It was probably one of the best books being published by DC Comics for the Rebirth initiative. This volume ends the battle between King Rath and Aquaman. The artwork is amazing in most of the issues for this story. Abnett has added a much needed Shakespearean flavor to the saga of Aquaman. Atlantis is as much a character in this book as our hero. It will be interesting to see where the story goes with such an unexpected Alls Wells that Ends Well. Dan Abnett's run on Aquaman has been truly epic. It was probably one of the best books being published by DC Comics for the Rebirth initiative. This volume ends the battle between King Rath and Aquaman. The artwork is amazing in most of the issues for this story. Abnett has added a much needed Shakespearean flavor to the saga of Aquaman. Atlantis is as much a character in this book as our hero. It will be interesting to see where the story goes with such an unexpected cliffhanger. This volume leads in nicely to the Suicide Squad and Aquaman crossover, Aquaman/Suicide Squad: Sink Atlantis. What's most amazing is how if you started reading Aquaman since the New 52 Geoff Johns era to now you have probably witness one of the greatest adventure epics to date. I think it is astonishing that DC Comics has maintain the quality on this book. This is perfect time to mention my favorite arcs and I hope with all the buzz the movie is getting that readers old & new will give the following volumes a read: Aquaman, Volume 1: The Trench, Aquaman, Volume 3: Throne of Atlantis, Justice League, Volume 3: Throne of Atlantis, Aquaman, Volume 5: Sea of Storms, Aquaman, Volume 6: Maelstrom, Aquaman, Volume 1: The Drowning, Aquaman, Volume 2: Black Manta Rising, Aquaman, Volume 3: Crown of AtlantisAquaman, Volume 4: Underworld, Aquaman, Vol. 5: The Crown Comes Down & Aquaman: Sub Diego.
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