Salvation Day
A lethal virus is awoken on an abandoned spaceship in this incredibly fast-paced, claustrophobic thriller.They thought the ship would be their salvation.Zahra knew every detail of the plan. House of Wisdom, a massive exploration vessel, had been abandoned by the government of Earth a decade earlier, when a deadly virus broke out and killed everyone on board in a matter of hours. But now it could belong to her people if they were bold enough to take it. All they needed to do was kidnap Jaswinder Bhattacharya—the sole survivor of the tragedy, and the last person whose genetic signature would allow entry to the spaceship.But what Zahra and her crew could not know was what waited for them on the ship—a terrifying secret buried by the government. A threat to all of humanity that lay sleeping alongside the orbiting dead.And then they woke it up.

Salvation Day Details

TitleSalvation Day
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 9th, 2019
PublisherBerkley
ISBN-139781984803696
Rating
GenreScience Fiction, Horror, Thriller, Fiction

Salvation Day Review

  • Tucker
    January 1, 1970
    Many thanks to Berkely for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest reviewInstead of writing a full review, I'm going to make gif-review because my depression and OCD are being b*tchy. Sooo...On the first page:When I met the characters: When they entered the spaceship:When sh*t started happening:(Like seriously, every night I read this before bed, it was hard to fall asleep because of was buzzing with the thrill of a food book)When all was revealed:That's all I have. to be honest, I'm truly a Many thanks to Berkely for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest reviewInstead of writing a full review, I'm going to make gif-review because my depression and OCD are being b*tchy. Sooo...On the first page:When I met the characters: When they entered the spaceship:When sh*t started happening:(Like seriously, every night I read this before bed, it was hard to fall asleep because of was buzzing with the thrill of a food book)When all was revealed:That's all I have. to be honest, I'm truly ashamed of how awful this review is and I feel near tears. There is nothing more frustrating than not being able to do what I love because of mental illness. As always, all I can do is push though. I apologize and thank you guys for your understanding. ❤| Goodreads | Blog | Twitch | Pinterest | Buy this book | Reddit
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  • Steven
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for providing me with an advanced copy in exchange for an honest review.I'm going to be completely honest here... I was ambivalent about this one when I accepted the ARC. I put off reading it, fiddlefarted around, avoiding it. But I'm so glad I finally picked it up! Once I got sucked in, I couldn't put it down! I read huge chunks every sitting!It's an almost-horror sci-fi thriller novel, set in space, on an abandoned spacecraft... haunted in a science fictio Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for providing me with an advanced copy in exchange for an honest review.I'm going to be completely honest here... I was ambivalent about this one when I accepted the ARC. I put off reading it, fiddlefarted around, avoiding it. But I'm so glad I finally picked it up! Once I got sucked in, I couldn't put it down! I read huge chunks every sitting!It's an almost-horror sci-fi thriller novel, set in space, on an abandoned spacecraft... haunted in a science fiction technical kinda way. The pacing is fast, but not so fast that it blows past the story. You get depth and developed characters, but it never sits down or goes so slow that you get bored.I won't say more about the plot, because spoilers, but I definitely recommend this book to readers of sci-fi/space thrillers who like a little bit of potential horror mixed in. It wasn't really horror, but horror-adjacent, as I never found any of it SCARY. But it was on the cusp of being something terrifying, so that added stress really set a darker, higher stakes tone for the book.Overall, I really liked it. 4 stars!
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  • Mogsy (MMOGC)
    January 1, 1970
    4 of 5 star at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2019/07/18/...After reading the description for Salvation Day, I thought I had a good idea of what I was in for: a futuristic sci-fi horror, with an outbreak scenario, maybe even possibly some crossover into zombie territory. I think I was picturing something like Dead Space in my mind. Well, what the book actually turned out to be was something quite different, though the story still ended up being a thrilling and cinematic experience.A 4 of 5 star at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2019/07/18/...After reading the description for Salvation Day, I thought I had a good idea of what I was in for: a futuristic sci-fi horror, with an outbreak scenario, maybe even possibly some crossover into zombie territory. I think I was picturing something like Dead Space in my mind. Well, what the book actually turned out to be was something quite different, though the story still ended up being a thrilling and cinematic experience.Around a decade ago, the space exploration vessel House of Wisdom became abandoned after a deadly infectious virus was released on board, killing everyone on the ship. The sole survivor was a boy, Jaswinder Bhattacharya, the son of a very prominent family in the political and scientific community. Subsequently adopted by his aunt, Jas spent the next ten years pretending he could not remember what happened on the House of Wisdom and has tried to keep a low profile ever since. Meanwhile, the spaceship, which has become massive tomb, is left drifting in space guarded by drone missiles that would destroy anything that dared approach.Now older, Jas is about to embark on his first journey back into space since the incident, along with a small group of his friends and fellow students. But unbeknownst to him, he is the key to a plan hatched up by a cult who want to use his genetic signature to bypass the security measures guarding House of Wisdom, which they mean to transform into a new home for their people. Zahra is one of the members of this cult, acting upon the orders of their leader Adam. She and her team were supposed to hijack Jas’ shuttle and kidnap the young man, forcing him to help them access the ship. No one was supposed to get hurt, or at least that was Zahra’s original understanding. But not long after they took over of the shuttle, everything started going wrong. Not surprisingly, when they reach the House of Wisdom, they also find bodies. However, what Zahra finds disturbing is not the presence of the dead, but the way that they died, which does not appear consistent with what was reported by the government. She and her team had been inoculated against the virus that supposedly killed everyone, but the threat they are faced with is something else entirely.The story is told via two main perspectives—Zahra and Jas. Kali Wallace does a fantastic job balancing their POVs, giving readers enough background into her characters’ lives so we can sympathize with them and understand what drives them. Despite them being very different and having conflicting motives, I felt connected to both protagonists. It’s hard to say whose chapters I enjoyed following more, as I thought their lives were equally fascinating to read about. And once Zahra and Jas realized that they would be better off working together to survive, that’s when the character development and relationship dynamics grew even more intriguing.As I said before, the way the story is presented is also very cinematic, and there were certain scenes that made me feel like I was watching a movie. Periodically, bits and pieces of conversation and reports from the House of Wisdom passengers’ last moments are also injected into the narrative, heightening the tensions and spooky atmosphere aboard the derelict ship. In addition, the world-building helps set Salvation Day apart from other sci-fi offerings that feature similar themes. The politics of this world are complex, involving a complete restructuring of the society following an apocalyptic event. Spawned in the aftermath of the collapse are a number of different government factions, resistance organizations, displaced refugees and other outsider groups like cults and extremist movements. All these opposing forces have created uncertain conditions and unique challenges in people’s lives.Then there are the more pressing, immediate threats facing our characters once they make it aboard the House of Wisdom. Hidden agendas, betrayals, and secrets help keep the plot engaging, as if the dangers around them and the possibility of being infected with a deadly parasite weren’t enough. I honestly didn’t expect much from this book beyond the virus angle, but as the story gradually expanded in scope, I was drawn into a plot that was way more nuanced than I had originally thought, and I ended up being quite satisfied with the crux and conclusion.At the end of the day, I would recommend Salvation Day if you enjoy sci-fi thrillers with a touch of horror, and I thought Kali Wallace did an especially good job at the creating an atmosphere of suspense and claustrophobia! Glad I took the chance on this one.
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  • Shannon (It Starts At Midnight)
    January 1, 1970
    You can find the full review and all the fancy and/or randomness that accompanies it at It Starts at Midnight .This was such a high energy, eerie adventure through space. Our main characters, Zahra and Jaswinder, had incredibly differing motivations for everything that happened, and it was easy to relate to both of their stances, though as the reader, it's clear to see that Zahra is being manipulated. Zahra is a member of what basically amounts to a cult which operates under the guise of "helpin You can find the full review and all the fancy and/or randomness that accompanies it at It Starts at Midnight .This was such a high energy, eerie adventure through space. Our main characters, Zahra and Jaswinder, had incredibly differing motivations for everything that happened, and it was easy to relate to both of their stances, though as the reader, it's clear to see that Zahra is being manipulated. Zahra is a member of what basically amounts to a cult which operates under the guise of "helping/saving" (don't they all?) Jas has absolutely no plans to throw himself into any sort of conflict, but when your ship is taken hostage... well, we do what we must to survive.And that is the crux of it: these people are all trying to survive, but there is so much that they don't know. Obviously a good portion of the book is devoted to uncovering the myriad of things that have been shoved under the rug, things that neither character was ever aware of. And ultimately, there are a lot of questions about who they can and can't trust.It's such an action-packed book (it would make an incredible movie, by the way, someone should get on that) that you definitely won't be bored as you try to figure out what our main characters will discover next. The entire vibe of the book really nails an eerie, creepy ambiance that fits perfectly with the world the author created. My one qualm was that I didn't feel as much of a connection with the characters as I would have liked too. The side characters especially felt a bit disposable. But overall, the plot and the unfurling secrets and discoveries were intense enough to keep me well entertained!Bottom Line: Definitely a plot driven novel, the action and mystery kept me on the edge of my seat. 
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  • Michelle Morrell
    January 1, 1970
    After purchasing my tickets for Comicon, I got an email. Would I be interested in a free book, and would I agree to come to a Book Club meeting at the con? Ummm, would I like to breathe oxygen? Heck yeah!I waited, "patiently," and two weeks before con, it arrived! A happy little package with this book and some assorted materials:I was deep in the middle of a PKD nominee, but I cracked this open and looked up again four hours later. So, readable? Definitely.While this book deals with two opposing After purchasing my tickets for Comicon, I got an email. Would I be interested in a free book, and would I agree to come to a Book Club meeting at the con? Ummm, would I like to breathe oxygen? Heck yeah!I waited, "patiently," and two weeks before con, it arrived! A happy little package with this book and some assorted materials:I was deep in the middle of a PKD nominee, but I cracked this open and looked up again four hours later. So, readable? Definitely.While this book deals with two opposing groups, it boils down to two main characters, united by a tragedy from their childhood: the mysterious and bad deaths of a space craft full of people. The ship, abandoned and untouched, now a mass grave and always a mystery, soon becomes more. To some, it's hope. To others, it's terror. At first I felt there were a LOT of similarities to the first Expanse book, to say why would be spoilers. And while I think there were definitely influences, the plot and characters moved beyond and became fully its own story. We have the female lead: terrorist? someone bucking the system just trying to find freedom for her people? broken daughter trying to clear her father's name? And the male: brilliant hero trying to save HIS people? traumatized son trying to find answers? the only person who knows what truly happened up there? They both ended up more by the time it was done. And extra special points for them NOT hooking up. This is not a YA book, for sure.I liked the blending of horror and science fiction, and the characters (for the most part) seemed very fleshed out in their actions and motivations. The only part that seemed a miss was the portrayal of the cult leader. 1) TRIGGERED from my very conservative upbringing, there's no way any sane person would buy that megalomaniac crap, right? 2) by the time we meet him, sh!t is going down and we get a very maniacal one-dimensional character which made me wonder how he got so many people to follow him.Anyway, it ended up being a lot better than I anticipated, and listening to everyone discuss at the Book Club was super fun. Also fun? The bag of swag I got at the end, woot!
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  • Theresa
    January 1, 1970
    In compliance with FTC guidelines------I received this book free from a Goodreads Giveaway in exchange for an honest review. The content of this review is not influenced by that fact. The feelings expressed are solely mine. I sincerely appreciate the chance to read and review this book.It pains me to give this book a 2.5 star rating (2 recorded) but when measuring my thoughts against recent 3 star reads it doesn't match up. I really wanted to like this book and be lost in this future world. It j In compliance with FTC guidelines------I received this book free from a Goodreads Giveaway in exchange for an honest review. The content of this review is not influenced by that fact. The feelings expressed are solely mine. I sincerely appreciate the chance to read and review this book.It pains me to give this book a 2.5 star rating (2 recorded) but when measuring my thoughts against recent 3 star reads it doesn't match up. I really wanted to like this book and be lost in this future world. It just didn't happen! The writing was not the issue entirely. Somewhere though it just went of course for me. I think the book was entirely too long for the story the author tried to tell. She probably could have wrapped it up in under 200 pages. There was too much filler and unfortunately that filler was not overly interesting or vital to the story. I also had no feelings whatsoever for any of the characters, good of bad. They were just there, nothing else. I also disliked the constant use of f-bombs throughout and coming from every character and for any reason. I'm certainly no prude and have been known to swear like a sailor in the very, very rare occasion when circumstances warrant. However, the use in this book felt off and not authentic. Bottom line it did nothing to add to building characters or plot forwarding so it was a detractor at best and a total turn off of the story at worst. 2*(2.5)/4.04*
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  • Dianne
    January 1, 1970
    For those who like to journey into the future to the stars and beyond, Kali Wallace has a science fiction tale filled with mystery, intrigue and the possible final demise of humanity, SALVATION DAY.After almost completely destroying Earth’s ability to maintain life, ships were sent out to explore other avenues of survival, but one exploration vessel became a tomb for its inhabitants, killed by a deadly virus, now condemned to space as so much flotsam. Now one group will discover the truth about For those who like to journey into the future to the stars and beyond, Kali Wallace has a science fiction tale filled with mystery, intrigue and the possible final demise of humanity, SALVATION DAY.After almost completely destroying Earth’s ability to maintain life, ships were sent out to explore other avenues of survival, but one exploration vessel became a tomb for its inhabitants, killed by a deadly virus, now condemned to space as so much flotsam. Now one group will discover the truth about that virus and learn the secrets buried by the government. For some it will bring redemption, for others it will bring death, but no one ever said the truth was always pretty…High octane action, emotionally charged characters and a mission never meant to succeed, who will survive the House of Wisdom’s horrors? I do love a good science fiction drama, one that unveils some of the possibilities in the future and the seemingly endless ability of humanity for destruction and deceit in the face of complete annihilation. I also love heroes who will do the right thing at any cost.I received a complimentary ARC edition from Berkley!Publisher: Berkley (July 9, 2019)Publication Date: July 9, 2019Genre: Sci-fi ThrillerPrint Length: 320 pagesAvailable from: Amazon | Barnes & NobleFor Reviews, Giveaways, Fabulous Book News, follow: http://tometender.blogspot.com
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  • Liz
    January 1, 1970
    **received an ARC for the Penguin Reader Panel at ECCC 2019**I could see that this book could be really good to a certain kind of reader. It's really not in my wheelhouse, so I enjoyed it, but don't think it's anything amazing. Positives:The plot of this book was enjoyable with lots of twists and turns. Very satisfying resolution. Fast paced. I actually got through this really quickly, which is hard for me lately. The writing is very cinematic. This is the kind of book that would make a great mo **received an ARC for the Penguin Reader Panel at ECCC 2019**I could see that this book could be really good to a certain kind of reader. It's really not in my wheelhouse, so I enjoyed it, but don't think it's anything amazing. Positives:The plot of this book was enjoyable with lots of twists and turns. Very satisfying resolution. Fast paced. I actually got through this really quickly, which is hard for me lately. The writing is very cinematic. This is the kind of book that would make a great movie. Negatives:I felt like the plot drove the characters. No one seemed to be making their own decisions but just being driven to them.The characters were pretty flat. Everyone had one motivating idea.A little randomly preachy at the end.I wanted more world building. I didn't get a good picture of what the councils were until the very end of the book. The secrets were so fragile that they couldn't stand up to having the reader have information.The title - I'm not sure it's justified. I mean they stopped the menace, but Salvation implies something very permanent and lasting.
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  • Jordan
    January 1, 1970
    Find this review at Forever Lost in Literature!At this point, it doesn't seem like I'll ever tire of reading space thrillers, and Salvation Day proved to be yet another thrilling one that kept me hooked throughout. Salvation Day is a fast-paced adventure in space following a disparate group of people with a variety of different motivations at play. The concept of violent, lethal virus existing on a spaceship and becoming a huge threat is not the most original one to exist among thrillers in spac Find this review at Forever Lost in Literature!At this point, it doesn't seem like I'll ever tire of reading space thrillers, and Salvation Day proved to be yet another thrilling one that kept me hooked throughout. Salvation Day is a fast-paced adventure in space following a disparate group of people with a variety of different motivations at play. The concept of violent, lethal virus existing on a spaceship and becoming a huge threat is not the most original one to exist among thrillers in space, but Wallace combines it with a unique hostage situation that changes things up enough to keep this book fresh.The book alternates POVs between Zahra, leader of the crew attempting to take over the House of Wisdom, and Jaswinder, or Jas, survivor of the tragedy that led to the House of Wisdom being abandoned and also whom Zahra also plans to kidnap. Sound confusing yet? Don't worry, things eventually make sense...right before they take some unexpected twists and turns to make sure you never know what to expect. Wallace did a great job with developing characters that have in-depth background and a plausible explanation for what has led them to the points they are in the present day in this novel. Something that I really liked was that the characters had a lot of morally grey aspects to them, as our "good" guys aren't necessarily all that good, and the "bad" guys aren't always that bad, either. I thought she did a great job of realistically portraying how people's backgrounds and circumstances lead them to do things and be influenced in ways they wouldn't necessarily be otherwise. There is a good amount of character in this study despite the major focus being on the more suspenseful aspect of the plot.The world-building in Salvation Day has both strong and weak points, though overall I found it steady enough to convey a believable world and current situation. There were a few specific areas that Wallace developed really well, such as the location of the House of Wisdom and other relevant space ships/ports used or mentioned in the story which really cemented the current physical world. However, outside of the settings in which the majority of the story takes place, there were only brief mentions of other areas of the world that left me feeling not quite as clear about the state of the world as I could have been. Wallace does mention, for instance, how space exploration has become a crucial investment for the world, but I would have loved to explore more about how it happened and what exactly caused it. This is mentioned briefly, but it felt a bit insufficient as well. Despite this, I didn't have any major issues with understanding the present state of events in the novel, and because of that I had no problem enjoying this book fully.As I mentioned, Salvation Day is a book that runs through its events at a breakneck speed, though not too fast to keep up, and it seems as though most of the events of the book happen within one or maybe two days total. I enjoyed this quick pace because it helped keep my attention and the intensity of the plot high, but this timeline is also where I had one of my minor issues, as it was never explicitly said how long things were taking or what the time-frame was. Even if it did only take place in one day, I felt confused because there was also never any mention of anyone need food, water, or even a restroom break, despite being stranded onboard an abandoned spaceship. This wasn't a huge problem because I'm sure everyone involved was stressed and not really thinking about necessities, but it definitely still made me wonder why people didn't seem to have any regular bodily functions to deal with. Maybe something was mentioned in passing that I missed, but this is just one of those inconsistencies in books that can frustrate me. There were a few other inconsistencies like this throughout, especially in regards to the virus, but nothing that drastically pulled me out of the story and instead only left me questioning a few things.Salvation Day isn't afraid to pull punches and readily explores the motivations and consequences of people trapped in dire, unexpected circumstances of survival. It has moments where you might be able to guess what happens, but the overall picture is entirely unpredictable and kept twisting in places I wasn't expecting it to. There are constantly secrets to uncover and new parts of the characters' and world's history to explore.Overall, I've given Salvation Day 3.75 stars! I had a few minor quibbles here and there, but in the end I sped through this book and had a great time doing it. I can't wait to see what Kali Wallace writes next!
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  • Virginia
    January 1, 1970
    This is a great thriller of a group of people uncovering a heavily covered up secret. There's government coverups, cults, terrorist organizations, obnoxiously smart teens, and a deadly alien parasite that can take over a human's basic functions. It's scary, thrilling, and fantastic. The best part? It's in space.The story follows two different perspectives: a member of a cult, and a student in the group kidnapped by the cult. They each have fascinating motives that you'll both sympathize and be a This is a great thriller of a group of people uncovering a heavily covered up secret. There's government coverups, cults, terrorist organizations, obnoxiously smart teens, and a deadly alien parasite that can take over a human's basic functions. It's scary, thrilling, and fantastic. The best part? It's in space.The story follows two different perspectives: a member of a cult, and a student in the group kidnapped by the cult. They each have fascinating motives that you'll both sympathize and be angry about. However, I found myself rooting for both of them as they tried to accomplish their goals, often coming into conflict with each other. Their character development is fun to watch as they grow with each obstacle that stands in their way. I think any action thriller reader will like this book and I'd argue it had some YA crossover as the violence isn't any more intense than other YA novels. Also, I think anyone who liked Saturn Run, Alien, and The Expanse.**Read thanks to an ARC from Berkley**
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  • Matt
    January 1, 1970
    I received an advance copy of this book through NetGalley.Salvation Day is a sci-fi adventure story that focuses on a derelict starship. It takes place in what seems to be pretty far in the future, after humanity nearly failed in "The Collapse", but was able to pull itself together and eventually get back into space. Just what happened during The Collapse is only hinted at. It's one of those things that you wish you'd get more details on, but is largely left to the imagination. Seems to be a com I received an advance copy of this book through NetGalley.Salvation Day is a sci-fi adventure story that focuses on a derelict starship. It takes place in what seems to be pretty far in the future, after humanity nearly failed in "The Collapse", but was able to pull itself together and eventually get back into space. Just what happened during The Collapse is only hinted at. It's one of those things that you wish you'd get more details on, but is largely left to the imagination. Seems to be a combination of climate change and war.In any event, post-Collapse, the ruling world government is called The Councils, and their goal is to be a kinder, gentler version of humanity that doesn't repeat the mistakes of the past. But. There are also the have-nots, non-Council citizens, who live in the desert wastelands (which seems to be most of North America). Sometimes these folks are Council cast-offs or people who try to get Council citizenship, but can't for whatever reason. A lot of the folks who live in the wasteland resent the Council for their rules.Enter a cult that lives in the wasteland led by a guy named Adam. They hatch a plan to hijack this derelict ship and use it to fly off and live free somewhere. Problem is, the ship is derelict because a deadly virus tore through it, killing all aboard except one 10 year old who was sent away before he got sick.This book is a quick read that focuses mostly on two characters, one from the cult and one from the Councils. Their points of view are both in first-person, which normally I am not a huge fan of, but it was fine in this book. There was action but also a lot of introspection that really let you see that, while the Councils sound good, the wastelanders do have a point about the way things are run.Still, any time this Adam guy opened his mouth, I couldn't help but roll my eyes at how over-the-top fanatical he was. Trying to put myself in the shoes of his followers, I guess it would be possible, given their circumstances, to pick up what he was putting down. Still, it seems like even just a little time apart from Adam led some of the culters to suddenly question why they listened to him.In the end, the central mystery of the story is brought to a fairly satisfactory conclusion. There's still more I'd like to know, but I guess that's the rule in showbiz, always leave them wanting more.
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  • Arielle
    January 1, 1970
    I got to read an advanced copy of this novel as part of the ECCC Penguin Book Club panel. I'm eager to discuss this book at the convention in a month. Until then, I'll just comment that I read it in a day.
  • susan
    January 1, 1970
    This was a free ARC that was given to a friend of mine at the Penguin/Random House booth at ECCC. I got a couple of my own and so far they've all been at the very least good and a couple of them have been great. This story includes a lot of familiar sci fi elements and tropes, but the story is fast paced and immersive and the characters aren't standard issue space thriller cliches. The story takes place in a world where, 400 years previously, humanity managed to bring themselves to the brink of This was a free ARC that was given to a friend of mine at the Penguin/Random House booth at ECCC. I got a couple of my own and so far they've all been at the very least good and a couple of them have been great. This story includes a lot of familiar sci fi elements and tropes, but the story is fast paced and immersive and the characters aren't standard issue space thriller cliches. The story takes place in a world where, 400 years previously, humanity managed to bring themselves to the brink of extinction. Like other stories, humans launched huge colony ships off into space to find new worlds. Unlike those stories, those ships disappeared, and the survivors of the near apocalypse managed to band together and bring themselves back from the brink. Now the world is divided into people who live in safety and comfort under the authority of the Councils government and people who either choose to or are forced to live outside of that safety and comfort in the desolate desert wastelands.The story centers around a group of cult members trying to access a huge spaceship that has been drifting dead in space for ten years, since the everyone on board was wiped out by what everyone said was fast-spreading and very deadly virus. The cult members kidnap the sole survivor of the disaster and force him to give them access to the ship.The farther into the ship they go the more unpleasant truths are revealed. The story has elements of Alien, the Thing, and basically any story where people are trapped aboard a spaceship and fighting against impossible odds and ever worsening circumstances. What makes it stand out is the nature of the truths that are revealed and the fact that there are no clear answers. Everyone has complicated motives and no one is entirely innocent.The two narrators are both deeply affected by the incident ten years before. Zahra, the cult member and leader of the team trying to take over the ship, is the daughter of the man who was accused of releasing the virus on board the ship. Part of her purpose is to clear him, even though everyone else believes he's guilty. Jas, Zahra's target, is the sole survivor of the tragedy that saw everyone he knew killed. they're both complicated and haunted and at various points both sympathetic and unlikable. The book has interesting things to say about things like refugees and the obligation of those who have everything to assist those who are struggling (and about punishing children and families for the sins of one family member). In the end, being desperate and rejected is why many of the cult members were drawn into their charismatic and violent leaders' orbit, and the sections where this is discussed (and where the culpability of the Councils is thrown out there) are some of the most interesting.Another great read. Whoever chooses the con ARC giveaways is doing excellent work.
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  • Anissa
    January 1, 1970
    It's probably not a surprise that a plan embarked upon by members of a cult goes irrevocably wrong almost from the start but there was a lot more here than that. The ship House of Wisdom has been under armed quarantine for ten years and she has many stories to tell and secrets to reveal. Additionally, there's information on how humanity has fared and organized itself after some near-extinction level calamity and being charitable, results have been mixed. Salvation Day lays out the collision cour It's probably not a surprise that a plan embarked upon by members of a cult goes irrevocably wrong almost from the start but there was a lot more here than that. The ship House of Wisdom has been under armed quarantine for ten years and she has many stories to tell and secrets to reveal. Additionally, there's information on how humanity has fared and organized itself after some near-extinction level calamity and being charitable, results have been mixed. Salvation Day lays out the collision course two sides are on and the shared reckoning that humans have to face.The story is told through two POV narrators, Jas and Zahra, who are both connected to the ship's original crew and the disaster that befell it. As it happened, my favourite character turned out to be Baquir. He had dual knowledge of life and death in the refugee camps while waiting for citizenship in the Councils and life in the Councils as a full citizen. The slights and successes he experienced felt fully realized and made him a memorable character though he did not have POV chapters. Adam, the supposed charismatic cult leader who read as clearly and profoundly mad, made me wonder at how vulnerable and desperate his followers had to be to see him as anything other and their surest hope to a better life. It's to the good that the story showed exactly how that happened. In book likes, there's a glorious nod to the horror that is infectious parasites under your skin from Guillermo del Toro's The Strain . And if you like the class disparity and protomolecule threads in James S.A. Corey's The Expanse, this could be your thing.I read this over a very busy week and a half so I had to keep putting it down but the great thing was it lingered in the back of my mind & I was very glad each time I could get back to it to read a bit more. This is definitely a page-turner that I'd have blown through at any other time. Recommended for fans of speculative science fiction.Many thanks to Berkley Publishing for the analog advanced reader's copy.
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  • Anna Luce
    January 1, 1970
    ★★✰✰✰ 2 stars Salvation Day is yet another book whose good idea/premise is hampered by its poor execution. As the title suggest, much of this novel takes place in one day...this timeline alone makes for a rather restrictive narrative. The story and its characters too are hindered by the fact that most of the events narrated by our respective protagonist take place on the same day. Because of this the scope of this book is quite limited and what had the potential to be an interesting world is nar ★★✰✰✰ 2 stars Salvation Day is yet another book whose good idea/premise is hampered by its poor execution. As the title suggest, much of this novel takes place in one day...this timeline alone makes for a rather restrictive narrative. The story and its characters too are hindered by the fact that most of the events narrated by our respective protagonist take place on the same day. Because of this the scope of this book is quite limited and what had the potential to be an interesting world is narrowed down, so much so that we never truly get the bigger picture of this speculative future. The range of emotions shows by the various characters is also limited by this one-day setting. They feel different variations of panic and fear, which soon grew tiresome and never allowed for us to see these characters as something other than panicked and not in control of their circumstances.The story also takes its time to define its setting, that is of providing a solid world-building. Although I am certainly not a fan of 'info-dumps', this novel would have benefited from a clearer depiction of its universe as well as the dynamics between this future society.Overall I found that this book didn't know what it wanted to be. A story of a rebellion or of a cult or a story in the vein of Event Horizon with dynamics a la Panic Room. The two narrators blended with one another, which didn't really make them all that believable as they technically grew up in very differentiating environments and should not share the same vocabulary and or way of thinking. Perhaps those who haven't read much speculative fiction might be able to enjoy this more than I did.
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  • Scott Whitmore
    January 1, 1970
    It is wholly appropriate that Salvation Day is slated for a July release as it is akin to a Summer Blockbuster popcorn movie: fast-paced with plenty of action, plot twists and surprise reveals. But unlike so many of those movies, author Kali Wallace’s lead characters are fleshed-out and subject to complex feelings and motivations. It was a captivating and wholly enjoyable read. This review is based on an advance copy provided by the publisher through NetGalley for that purpose. The book will be It is wholly appropriate that Salvation Day is slated for a July release as it is akin to a Summer Blockbuster popcorn movie: fast-paced with plenty of action, plot twists and surprise reveals. But unlike so many of those movies, author Kali Wallace’s lead characters are fleshed-out and subject to complex feelings and motivations. It was a captivating and wholly enjoyable read. This review is based on an advance copy provided by the publisher through NetGalley for that purpose. The book will be available on July 9, 2019.For ten years, the research and exploration ship House of Wisdom had silently moved through space on a fixed course, orbiting the Earth. The great ship was unapproachable, protected by an automated security screen that was most likely activated by one of the last living people onboard before that person joined everyone else in death. In all the ship carried nearly five hundred corpses as it circled the Earth; just one boy survived what was described in frantic messages as the sudden outbreak of a deadly virus. The official story put out by the authoritarian United Councils of Earth is that a disgraced scientist out for revenge had loosed the virus on the ship. But while many see a charnel house floating in space, others see opportunity. A cult of dissident exiles decides House of Wisdom can be the instrument of their freedom from the oppressive Councils, and they devise a plan to use the lone survivor, now a young man of science, to crack the security screen. As someone once said, plans are made to be changed, and when the cult’s boarding party gets to the ship they discover what really happened onboard House of Wisdom. Told from the alternating perspectives of Zahra, leader of the cult’s boarding party, and Jas, the sole survivor of the viral outbreak, to say more would spoil the great fun as the layers of this puzzle-box of a story are peeled back.
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  • Maureen Gianinio
    January 1, 1970
    An edge of your seat, what really happened, science fiction thriller. A futuristic read that hits home many societal themes. It pulled me in and told me a fabulous story. It's been awhile since I read a science fiction novel. So when I saw the 24 hour giveaway I went for it. And I won. For a return to the science fiction genre this book does an amazing job. Chapters alternate between 1st person point of view of the two main protagonists. And it’s not a sit back and relax story but an edge of you An edge of your seat, what really happened, science fiction thriller. A futuristic read that hits home many societal themes. It pulled me in and told me a fabulous story. It's been awhile since I read a science fiction novel. So when I saw the 24 hour giveaway I went for it. And I won. For a return to the science fiction genre this book does an amazing job. Chapters alternate between 1st person point of view of the two main protagonists. And it’s not a sit back and relax story but an edge of your seat “who has it right” ”who has it wrong” thriller in deep space with a blood chilling enemy to be discovered. It leaves you with a nail-biting “do we really want to know if there’s life out there” vibe perfect for science fiction. The journey you are thrust into brings to mind the “there are three sides to every story” adage. You become part of a breath catching, how do they survive, chain of events. Characters face their inner conflicts, learn the answers they need, and work to overcome their different understanding of past events as facts are revealed. They come to understand themselves and each other and learn to work together to triumph over the external conflicts they are all facing. All done in a way that has you empathizing with the protagonists and feeling for the secondary characters, even those you'd thought you’d cheer about when they got theirs. The journey ends with the ultimate sacrifice and determination for the truth to be told to correct history and move society in the right direction.
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  • Cheryl
    January 1, 1970
    Future politics and rebellionMaybe it's because I'm so sick of all politics right now and that colored my opinion of this book but I had a hard time being excited by it.Earth went through the Collapse four hundred years ago and what's left is the haves and the have-nots - the people living under the umbrella of the United Councils of Earth and then the people not allowed into their elite group who live in the wastelands.One of the groups, actually a cult, led by an insane zealot somehow gets an Future politics and rebellionMaybe it's because I'm so sick of all politics right now and that colored my opinion of this book but I had a hard time being excited by it.Earth went through the Collapse four hundred years ago and what's left is the haves and the have-nots - the people living under the umbrella of the United Councils of Earth and then the people not allowed into their elite group who live in the wastelands.One of the groups, actually a cult, led by an insane zealot somehow gets an airship and launches to meet with a huge exploration vessel that's been quarantined for years, sending ahead a small vanguard to enter and take over the vessel.The story is told from two viewpoints - Jaswinder "Jas" Bhattacharya, the nephew of a council member and the only survivor rescued originally from the quarantined vessel and then Zahra Dove Lago, one of the vanguard members whose father died on the vessel and was blamed for the virus that supposedly killed the original crew.The book felt bloated to me. It could have been probably a hundred pages shorter and tightened up and been much better. I did like the two protagonists of the story and felt they were fleshed out but there was a dearth of details about other characters and a lack of details about the different settings the book occurs in.So, it was okay. Not terrible but not outstanding either. It's a sci fi/horror tale that could have used beefing up on both genres.
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  • Kathleen
    January 1, 1970
    So I am not sure where to land my rating on this. I don't read science fiction. I enjoy certain science fiction and I really, really dislike most science fiction. My problem being that I'm never sure how to determine which I will like or dislike before I invest my time. I don't enjoy reading when I have to think too hard and sometimes the world building in science fiction is too complicated for me. So, generally, I stay away from it. But when this came available to me (free) I thought I would gi So I am not sure where to land my rating on this. I don't read science fiction. I enjoy certain science fiction and I really, really dislike most science fiction. My problem being that I'm never sure how to determine which I will like or dislike before I invest my time. I don't enjoy reading when I have to think too hard and sometimes the world building in science fiction is too complicated for me. So, generally, I stay away from it. But when this came available to me (free) I thought I would give it a try. And I really enjoyed it. This was a future world where there is massive space exploration going on (of course because we have ruined our planet) and some immigrant-like issues happening on earth. Was this a bit preachy with current events? Maybe a little. But I was able to wrap my head around the story and understand with little effort. It kept a really good pace and had me turning pages pretty fast at some points. So for me it's a 4 star read. But in terms of the science fiction genre - I have no idea where it lands, I just don't have enough experience for that. Thanks to the publisher for providing me with an advanced copy; this review is my personal opinion.
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  • Karen Parisot
    January 1, 1970
    Salvation Day is an awesome Sci-fi thriller. Most of the story takes place on an abandoned space vessel. It was quarantined years ago when a virus killed all its inhabitants save one. When a group of cultists kidnap that survivor in order to gain access to “House of Wisdom,” they set off a horrifying chain of events. Forced to face hard truths as secrets are uncovered, the two main protagonists face a daunting task as they fight for their lives and the lives of all mankind. There are multiple an Salvation Day is an awesome Sci-fi thriller. Most of the story takes place on an abandoned space vessel. It was quarantined years ago when a virus killed all its inhabitants save one. When a group of cultists kidnap that survivor in order to gain access to “House of Wisdom,” they set off a horrifying chain of events. Forced to face hard truths as secrets are uncovered, the two main protagonists face a daunting task as they fight for their lives and the lives of all mankind. There are multiple antagonists all of which are scary in their own way, but one is absolutely terrifying. A rip-roaring, edge of your seats story for all Sci-fi fans. Totally loved it!
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  • Kal ★ Reader Voracious
    January 1, 1970
    ARC sent by Berkley Pub for my honest review!What a lovely surprise on my doorstep today, and I can't wait to dive into this one! Blog | Twitter | Pinterest
  • Camie Bailey
    January 1, 1970
    Received an ARC for ECCC book club. I will admit, it took me several attempts to get through the first 30 pages, the conversations read more like a screenplay and it took me awhile to warm up to some of the characters. Overall the author was great at keeping the voices of the interwoven stories separate. A few characters and the political history left me wanting to know more. It’s surprising how much was covered in so little pages, I would have loved another 100 or more pages to tie up a few loo Received an ARC for ECCC book club. I will admit, it took me several attempts to get through the first 30 pages, the conversations read more like a screenplay and it took me awhile to warm up to some of the characters. Overall the author was great at keeping the voices of the interwoven stories separate. A few characters and the political history left me wanting to know more. It’s surprising how much was covered in so little pages, I would have loved another 100 or more pages to tie up a few loose ends. Otherwise it was a great book and storyline, I am hoping for a sequel or prequel for some closure on a few story lines that really would make for a great read.
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  • Kristiana
    January 1, 1970
    This was a really great book! Wallace does an excellent job creating the world in a nuanced and artful world. By the end of the book I had a full picture of the scope of the world and it was fully formed and three dimensional. The story was compelling and well written. The characters and points of view were well balanced.I really enjoyed it.
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  • Tanya Procknow
    January 1, 1970
    I received an ARC from Netgalley. In a future world a group decides to take over a space exploration vessel that was abandoned after a virus leaves only one survivor. As they attempt to take control of the ship they find the truth is very different. It had some good twists and an ending that caught me by surprise. I enjoyed it and will recommend it to sci-fi/suspense/adventure readers.
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  • Tammy
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book for free from the Publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.The nitty-gritty: A thrilling story set in space with elements of horror and mystery, well-drawn characters, and even a cautionary message or two.Kali Wallace, where have you been hiding? Salvation Day is Wallace’s adult debut, if I’m not mistaken. She’s written for middle grade and YA audiences in the past, which might be the reason I haven I received this book for free from the Publisher in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.The nitty-gritty: A thrilling story set in space with elements of horror and mystery, well-drawn characters, and even a cautionary message or two.Kali Wallace, where have you been hiding? Salvation Day is Wallace’s adult debut, if I’m not mistaken. She’s written for middle grade and YA audiences in the past, which might be the reason I haven’t read any of her previous books. But wow, I am certainly going to check out her backlist after absolutely loving Salvation Day ! This book has it all: a fascinating take on alien invasion, well drawn and developed characters, perfect pacing, a tense and horrific idea that kept me on the edge of my seat, and stellar writing. All these elements together make this one of my favorite recent science fiction stories.The story takes place in the future after an event called the Collapse, when humans were forced into space exploration. We’re introduced to two main characters, and the chapters alternate between the two points of view. First is Zahra, a young woman who has been drawn into the circle of a psychopath named Adam, a man who has gathered several hundred people together to form a community of followers. Adam speaks out against the Councils, who—he says—ignore the plight of refugees unable to become citizens. Adam has hatched a bold and dangerous plan: he wants to take control of an abandoned spaceship called the House of Wisdom which is big enough for his “family” to live out their lives in peace. The only drawback? Ten years ago, the entire crew of the ship died from an unidentified viral outbreak, and the ship has been under quarantine ever since. Adam has put Zahra in charge of a small crew who will board the ship and make sure the virus is contained, preparing it for the arrival of Adam’s flock, who are headed toward the House of Wisdom aboard a ship called the Homestead. The other point of view is a young man named Jaswinder Bhattacharya, the only survivor of the House of Wisdom outbreak. Forced into an evac ship by his mother before she died, Jas lived to tell the tale, but he lost both his parents on the ship. Part of Zahra’s plan involves taking Jas hostage in order to gain access to the ship, since he’s the only person alive with the necessary genetic signature to get past the security drones.But when they arrive with Jas and a few other hostages in tow, things do not go as smoothly as they expected. The ship is still littered with the bodies of the dead, and even worse, the virus turns out to be much more malevolent than anyone realized—and it’s still on the ship.I’m going to stop my recap there, even though there is a whole lot more going on in this story. Wallace creates a spectacularly creepy atmosphere, from the hundreds of dead bodies floating throughout the House of Wisdom , to the discovery of what the virus really is, to the snippets at the start of each chapter of recordings from the House of Wisdom as the virus started to break out, as well as an older ship called the Mournful Evening Song, which might have been responsible for the outbreak in the first place. Stories set in deep space are already terrifying to me, but when you add in elements like a deadly virus that no one understands, as well as a bunch of characters who are using each other and hiding secrets, that terror multiplies quickly.The author puts her characters through a lot , and this is one of those stories where you need to be careful who you grow attached to, because there is no guarantee that person will survive. Salvation Day isn’t just about the action and the fast-paced plot, it’s also about the emotional angst and growth of the characters. Jas and Zahra start out on opposing sides, but what they find on the House of Wisdom forces them to work together to solve the mystery of what happened to the crew. They each have poignant family stories as well. Zahra is anxiously awaiting the arrival of her fifteen-year-old twin siblings, Anwar and Nadra, who are also caught up in Adam’s web. In fact everyone on the Homestead is in grave danger, it turns out, so the fact that Zahra has loved ones who find themselves in a life or death situation through no fault of their own, makes her decisions even more stressful. And Jas confronts his terrible past on board the House of Wisdom , which I won’t go into because I don’t want to spoil anything for you.For me, the weakest part of the story—and trust me when I say this is a very minor complaint—was the character and story arc of Adam. Adam grated on me the moment he opened his mouth, which in retrospect was probably what the author intended. He’s a classic example of an volatile cult leader, charismatic when he needs to be, but full of rage and hatred when his followers try to defy him. I thought his dialog was ridiculous and over the top, and as a villain he wasn’t very nuanced. But he does serve his purpose, because ultimately Zahra needs a reason to grow a backbone and make her own decisions, and when she finally opens her eyes and sees what Adam really is, it’s a wonderful moment of character growth for her.Several big events converge at the end of the story, which made the last twenty-five percent even more thrilling. You think the stakes are already high for our characters, but then Wallace raises them even more. She deftly handles a complicated and thrilling ending and wraps everything up fairly neatly, ending on a contemplative note that deals with whether telling the truth about the events on the ship is the right thing to do. Salvation Day surprised me again and again, and I can hardly wait to see what Kali Wallace does next.Big thanks to the publisher for supplying a review copy.This review originally appeared on Books, Bones & Buffy
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  • Authentikate
    January 1, 1970
    A tight-knit yarn you will enjoy unspooling! You get: deep-space/earth politics; a cult; a whackadoo cult leader; a kidnapping and hostage situation; inter-family drama; conspiracy theory vs. truth; aliens; a “pathogen” that makes people shred themselves to ribbons; a ghost ship infected by said “pathogen”; some cool characters (LGTB friendly too); and a lot of F-bombs (and hey, this girl isn’t complaining). It makes for a cool book folks!Thanks to publisher and NetGalley for giveaway ARC.
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  • Sontaranpr
    January 1, 1970
    Disclaimer - I received an ARC of this book to read prior to a review event at Emerald City Comic Con. I was unable to make the event due to last minute complications and waited till after the con to post this. Proposed book subtitle - The *one* time a self destruct mechanism would have been helpful. A while back we nearly rendered Earth uninhabitable. Colony ships were sent out to different interstellar locations the slow way to find a new home while others stayed to clean up our mess. It worke Disclaimer - I received an ARC of this book to read prior to a review event at Emerald City Comic Con. I was unable to make the event due to last minute complications and waited till after the con to post this. Proposed book subtitle - The *one* time a self destruct mechanism would have been helpful. A while back we nearly rendered Earth uninhabitable. Colony ships were sent out to different interstellar locations the slow way to find a new home while others stayed to clean up our mess. It worked, mostly. Now Earth is beginning to prosper again. We don't have FTL but we do have drives capable of interplanetary journeys within reasonable time frames. If you're one of the prosperous you live in a clean advanced society. If not, you're out in the wastes locked out from many technologies and struggling to get through each day without succumbing to illness or starvation. Then - we detect a probe entering the solar system. Dispatched to intercept the probe is an advanced multi-discipline research vessel. Due to the long travel times entire families are onboard along side the scientists. The probe is recovered and found to be from one of the long ago colony ships. They'd sent a message back. Unfortunately the long travel times and dangers between the systems meant the probe is badly scrambled and so the scientists begin to work while returning back to Earth. When close to Earth one of the scientists is accused of withholding information from the probe and is fired and sent back to Earth in disgust/disgrace. A few days later a horribly effective hemorrhaging virus is released on the ship swiftly killing many. Only one survivor is picked up, a child, who'd been packed into an experimental engine test bed and ejected from the ship. As data feeds become corrupted and messages stop being exchanged the ship enters a parking orbit and deploys a prototype drone based defence system. No one can approach without the drones attacking their ship. Years pass. That's how the story starts.Now a group of outcasts want to gain access to the ship and use it as a means of getting away. They have a plan that's sure to work. *Spoilers Below*Of course the plan doesn't work. After managing to gain access to the vessel they discover that the background they'd been briefed on about the ship wasn't the entire truth. The virus not only killed but also caused some to become enraged and destructive. A path of murder and bloodshed are discovered. However, there were also pockets of people who seemed to just lay down and die where they were or had gathered. As our new crew begin to awaken the ships systems they find nothing like what they'd be told. Especially disturbing is when the virus still appears to be active and that some of the dead refuse to stay down. A few minor quibbles about the book (ARC so some may have been corrected already) - There seems to be a disconnect in places where the security lock down onboard has both been disengaged and yet still active. Near the end one of our beaten up protagonists seems to have little issue moving about, including carrying someone else, as the ship engines are accelerating from 1 to 5 Gs. A good book with interesting twists. Would like to read more.
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  • Kend
    January 1, 1970
    Depending on what time zone you're in, it's either this book's birthday ... or it isn't ... and I'm OKAY WITH SQUISHY TIME PARADOXES ALRIGHT?Now that that's out of the way, I thought I ought to celebrate this book the way it deserves to be celebrated, which is a lot, and possibly with a late-night binge-watch of the remaining Stranger Things episodes in my queue. I mean, claustrophobic body horror in space isn't all that different from claustrophobic body horror in a 1980s basement, is it?This b Depending on what time zone you're in, it's either this book's birthday ... or it isn't ... and I'm OKAY WITH SQUISHY TIME PARADOXES ALRIGHT?Now that that's out of the way, I thought I ought to celebrate this book the way it deserves to be celebrated, which is a lot, and possibly with a late-night binge-watch of the remaining Stranger Things episodes in my queue. I mean, claustrophobic body horror in space isn't all that different from claustrophobic body horror in a 1980s basement, is it?This book went down my gullet in a blaze of textual glory, a damn fine evening spent camping in the Idaho woods while a bachelorette party on one side, made up of totally sloshed femmes with opinions about other femmes, just kept on talking about whether or not it's okay to kiss your parents on the mouth until three in the morning––and a pack of weird competitive belchers set up camp on the other side with their five-hundred-pound growly direwolf, Hannibal. Okay, so I was a little pissed that one of my Netflix downloads that I'd specifically downloaded to drown out weird campers didn't finish downloading, leaving me marooned with nothing but the sweet swan song of eight drunk campers for a soundtrack, but this book was a more than fair substitute.Lots of brain matter! On walls! In space! Lots of bodies! And suspiciously cold spaceships! And relatable hijackers! In space!Okay, so maybe the initial reading conditions weren't perfect. But being kept up until three DID mean that I got to finish this book and pass it on to a friend the next morning over New Orleansian brunch at an Alice's Adventures in Wonderland -themed Coeur D'Alenian restaurant. And while I wouldn't quite say this is "a fun romp! the perfect beach read! timely and resonant! a light read for a weekend in the woods!" it is compelling and packed with the kind of details that matter to me, a queer person who happens to love the occasional body-horror-in-space kind of book. I'm waffling on a fifth star mostly because I'm still sleep-deprived and those campers have ruined at least a week of sleep hygiene, which more or less turns me into a walking horror show of bitterness, but also because I think there was some more character development that I'd like to see from future books. And I will be reading future books from Kali Wallace, that's for sure.A competent read and perfect for throwing into backlit rings of drunk partiers while screaming "LEARN SOME CAMPING ETIQUETTE, BIATCH"
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  • Courts
    January 1, 1970
    I've read one of Kali Wallace's previous YA books, Shallow Graves, about a teenage girl who wakes up after being murdered and discovers she can see auras around bad people, leading her into a paranormal world she never knew existed. I thought it was great so when I saw that this book was coming out I was totally willing to give it a chance, perhaps even eager.Salvation Day is Wallace's first adult novel and boy, is it a ride. Set many centuries in Earth's future, it takes a lot of my favourite s I've read one of Kali Wallace's previous YA books, Shallow Graves, about a teenage girl who wakes up after being murdered and discovers she can see auras around bad people, leading her into a paranormal world she never knew existed. I thought it was great so when I saw that this book was coming out I was totally willing to give it a chance, perhaps even eager.Salvation Day is Wallace's first adult novel and boy, is it a ride. Set many centuries in Earth's future, it takes a lot of my favourite science-fiction tropes and uses them all with aplomb. The blending of action and politics elevated the story beyond a simple 'abandoned spaceship is more dangerous than it appears' plot; it gives depth to the characters and their motivations, and creates an imaginable future as a result.The book alternates perspectives between Zahra Dove Lago, a disenfranchised young woman angry at how her father was scapegoated after a massacre, and Jaswinder Battacharya, a post-graduate student and only survivor of the aforementioned massacre. Zahra is part of a desert cult that believes the site of the massacre, an abandoned ship floating in space, is perfect for their family of exiles and refugees - they just need Jaswinder to open the ship. Everything starts to go wrong from there, as hostages never behave themselves and neither do the long-dead corpses of the massacre. To start with there's no romance, it's far more of a sci-fi action-horror story, but Jas' unrequited love for his best friend, Baqir, is a driving force for him. So there's a tiny bit of gay content. Jaswinder is a great character, thoughtful and full of compassion, but deeply haunted by the violence he's seen and the losses he's endured. Likewise Zahra is another interesting character. She's determined and desperate to prove herself to the leader of her group, she thinks well on her feet and is also driven by the pain of the losses she's endured.I just really enjoyed it. I even teared up a bit at the end. Despite taking place hundreds of years in the future, the characters are very human and recognizable, easy to sympathize with and connect to, which is essential to me as a reader.
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  • The Captain
    January 1, 1970
    Ahoy there me mateys! I have been meaning to read some of Kali Wallace’s work for quite some time but always seem to forget to do so. Then I was reminded of this book’s existence from Mogsy @ thebibliosanctum’s awesome reviewMogsy @ thebibliosanctum’s awesome review which led me to this fun read. She said:the way the story is presented is also very cinematic, and there were certain scenes that made me feel like I was watching a movie. Periodically, bits and pieces of conversation and reports fro Ahoy there me mateys! I have been meaning to read some of Kali Wallace’s work for quite some time but always seem to forget to do so. Then I was reminded of this book’s existence from Mogsy @ thebibliosanctum’s awesome reviewMogsy @ thebibliosanctum’s awesome review which led me to this fun read. She said:the way the story is presented is also very cinematic, and there were certain scenes that made me feel like I was watching a movie. Periodically, bits and pieces of conversation and reports from the House of Wisdom passengers’ last moments are also injected into the narrative, heightening the tensions and spooky atmosphere aboard the derelict ship. In addition, the world-building helps set Salvation Day apart from other sci-fi offerings that feature similar themes.Aye, ye heard it correctly, an abandoned derelict ship filled with dead bodies . . . in space! This read was certainly spooky. The book starts with a group from a fringe colony taking a passenger vessel hostage with the goal of stealing a massive abandoned generation ship. The generation ship’s crew was previously killed in a viral outbreak where there was only one survivor. But when the kidnappers get to the ship, the dead bodies’ cause of death doesn’t seem to match the official story.Of course that be all ye get from me because of spoilers. The story is told from the perspective of two people, the original virus survivor, Jas, and one of the kidnappers, Zahara. I actually thought the back-and-forth between the two helped add to the suspense and mystery of the plot. With each shift, the reader is given new pieces of the current puzzle and also insight into the past. And there is no romance here. Hooray!The world-building is what sets this apart from other sci-fi tales. The story is nuanced with conflicting politics from multiple factions, problems with intrapersonal relationships, and atmospheric ship details. This was a quick read that I devoured in one sitting. The couple chapters of what happened politically at the very end weren’t completely to me taste but overall this was a fantastic read that I highly recommend. Arrrr!Check out me other reviews at https://thecaptainsquartersblog.wordp...
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