The Book Artist (Hugo Marston, #8)
Hugo Marston, head of security for the U.S. Embassy in Paris, puts his life in danger when he investigates the murder of a celebrated artist, all the while fending off an assassin looking to settle an old score against him.Hugo Marston accompanies his boss, US Ambassador J. Bradford Taylor, to the first night of an art exhibition in Montmartre, Paris. Hugo is less than happy about going until he finds out that the sculptures on display are made from his favorite medium: books. Soon after the champagne starts to flow and the canapes are served, the night takes a deadly turn when one of the guests is found murdered.Hugo lingers at the scene and offers his profiling expertise to help solve the crime, but the detective in charge quickly jumps to his own conclusions. He makes an arrest, but it's someone that Hugo is certain is innocent. Meanwhile, his best friend, Tom Green, has disappeared to Amsterdam, hunting an enemy from their past, an enemy who gets the upper hand on Tom, and who then sets his sights on Hugo.With an innocent person behind bars, a murder to solve, and his own life in danger, Hugo knows he has no time to waste as one killer tries to slip away, and another gets closer and closer.

The Book Artist (Hugo Marston, #8) Details

TitleThe Book Artist (Hugo Marston, #8)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 5th, 2019
PublisherSeventh Street Books
Rating
GenreMystery, Fiction, Thriller, Mystery Thriller, Cultural, International

The Book Artist (Hugo Marston, #8) Review

  • Carol
    January 1, 1970
    RTC
  • Cindy Burnett
    January 1, 1970
    I am a huge fan of Mark Pryor’s Hugo Marston’s series, and The Book Artist is the best book to date in the series. Marston is head of security for the U.S. Embassy in Paris, and in The Book Artist, he is tasked with protecting an artist, Alia Alsaffar, who is having her first Paris exhibition in the Dali Museum in Montmartre. Not normally an art fan, Marston is intrigued by this exhibition because Alsaffar creates beautiful art sculptures solely from books, including a huge tree at the entrance I am a huge fan of Mark Pryor’s Hugo Marston’s series, and The Book Artist is the best book to date in the series. Marston is head of security for the U.S. Embassy in Paris, and in The Book Artist, he is tasked with protecting an artist, Alia Alsaffar, who is having her first Paris exhibition in the Dali Museum in Montmartre. Not normally an art fan, Marston is intrigued by this exhibition because Alsaffar creates beautiful art sculptures solely from books, including a huge tree at the entrance to the exhibition and a book case with book titles that combine to create various mini stories. Midway through the opening night event, someone is murdered, and Hugo must help the Paris police solve the murder. Meanwhile, Hugo’s oldest friend Tom has found himself in trouble, and Hugo’s own life is in danger. My favorite parts of this book were those related to the art and the twists in the storyline related to Tom. Art created from books appears to be a growing industry, and Pryor brilliantly weaves that topic into this tale. Tom, a frequent character in this series, plays a significant role in The Book Artist, and the twists and turns in that plot line are fabulous. Pryor’s love for Paris is always evident, and his depiction of Montmartre is so vivid that I felt I was there with Hugo in the cafes and on the winding streets of that area. The combination of Paris and a mystery with books and art will delight any bibliophile. Those who love Paris will feel they have visited without ever leaving their homes.The Book Artist is a fantastic read, and I highly recommend it.
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  • Susan Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    This book sounded so interesting to me. It concerns a female artist whose medium is books. She makes sculptures out of books and is having an exhibition in Paris. What could be more intriguing to a book lover than that set up so I dived into my first Hugo Marston book. And it was okay. I thought it was just an average mystery. It was good but nothing special. Marston is a former FBI agent attached to the American embassy in Paris. He has a friend, Tom, who is investigating a character from a pr This book sounded so interesting to me. It concerns a female artist whose medium is books. She makes sculptures out of books and is having an exhibition in Paris. What could be more intriguing to a book lover than that set up so I dived into my first Hugo Marston book. And it was okay. I thought it was just an average mystery. It was good but nothing special. Marston is a former FBI agent attached to the American embassy in Paris. He has a friend, Tom, who is investigating a character from a previous book that mysteriously turns up in Amsterdam. This nefarious character is out to murder both Tom and Hugo and there is an interesting twist. The other mystery involves the murder at the art exhibition. There is a real lack of motives and suspects so the culprit was relatively easy to figure out. The only surprise is someone the French arrest and how close they are to Hugo. I thought it was a weak story line. This is an OK book that will keep you entertained if you are not too demanding. It's not a book you would carry around and tell people they absolutely must read it.
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  • Emma
    January 1, 1970
    VERDICT:  Satisfying suspenseful mystery, that would have been even better if focused on one plot only.As you could expect at the end of The Sorbonne Affair,  Hugo Marston and his friend Tom were going to have to resolve a major issue related to their past: fifteen years earlier, as they were tracking burglars in Houston, they ended up wounding a guy, Cofer, and killing his brother. At the beginning of The Book Artist, Tom is in Amsterdam, where Cofer has been seen.My full review will be live on VERDICT:  Satisfying suspenseful mystery, that would have been even better if focused on one plot only.As you could expect at the end of The Sorbonne Affair,  Hugo Marston and his friend Tom were going to have to resolve a major issue related to their past: fifteen years earlier, as they were tracking burglars in Houston, they ended up wounding a guy, Cofer, and killing his brother. At the beginning of The Book Artist, Tom is in Amsterdam, where Cofer has been seen.My full review will be live on February 5 here: https://wp.me/p164Ql-3Zf
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  • Pamela
    January 1, 1970
    This is the eighth in the Hugo Marston series. Hugo Marston is head of security for the American Embassy in Paris. He’s been asked by the Ambassador to accompany an American artist to her showing. When he gets a call from a close friend that she’s fainted on the sidewalk outside the museum, Hugo goes to her rescue. When Claudia declines the EMTs offer to transport her to the hospital, Hugo takes her inside the museum and gets her settled on a couch outside the exhibition. When he returns to the This is the eighth in the Hugo Marston series. Hugo Marston is head of security for the American Embassy in Paris. He’s been asked by the Ambassador to accompany an American artist to her showing. When he gets a call from a close friend that she’s fainted on the sidewalk outside the museum, Hugo goes to her rescue. When Claudia declines the EMTs offer to transport her to the hospital, Hugo takes her inside the museum and gets her settled on a couch outside the exhibition. When he returns to the exhibition, he finds out the guest of honor, the artist has been killed. While the detective-in-charge doesn’t want Hugo involved in the investigation, he allows him to accompany him and have input. They part ways, however, when the detective arrests a suspect who Hugo is sure is innocent.This is a complex and multilayered mystery featuring an American ex-FBI profiler. The author has created an unique character in Hugo Marston. Pryor has refused to stereotype his main character, and thus, Hugo is a highly likable, multi-faceted, and intelligent man. The author’s plot has many layers, and Pryor manages to keep them all in hand and by the end of the book has all the strings woven together without sacrificing any of them for the others. Pryor has a way of describing Paris in such a way that you can feel the cobbled streets of Montmartre beneath your feet and feel the icy cold winds coming off the Seine.While this book is the eighth in the Hugo Marston mysteries, you do not need to have read the first seven in the series to thoroughly enjoy this outing. You will, however, want to read the first seven books in this delightful series.If you like intelligent writing and characters, then this book is for you. If you like your mysteries, complex with unexpected twists, then this book is for you.
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  • Anne
    January 1, 1970
    I’m so happy to be adding this title to my collection as Mark Pryor adds to his Hugo Marston series with this eighth installment. In this book Hugo is back in Paris and has been asked by the ambassador to escort an artist to her exhibit opening. Her art consists of sculptures made out of rescued books (The Book Artist). Brilliant! During the opening reception there is a murder. Tom Green is in Amsterdam trying to find the bad guy who killed his sister. There is a murder. Getting to the resolutio I’m so happy to be adding this title to my collection as Mark Pryor adds to his Hugo Marston series with this eighth installment. In this book Hugo is back in Paris and has been asked by the ambassador to escort an artist to her exhibit opening. Her art consists of sculptures made out of rescued books (The Book Artist). Brilliant! During the opening reception there is a murder. Tom Green is in Amsterdam trying to find the bad guy who killed his sister. There is a murder. Getting to the resolution in Pryor’s mysteries is always so smart and fun. There might be red herrings, misdirection, and outright deception along with many favorite returning characters. I love this series and look forward with delight to each new book. Thank you to #edelweiss and #seventhstreetbooks for this #advancereaderscopy.
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  • Taylor Holt
    January 1, 1970
    Delving into new cases with Hugo is always a treat. I was intrigued by the premise of this novel - Hugo meets an hot new artist whose sculpture medium is books. When she has an art exhibition, attended by Hugo and the US Ambassador, a gruesome murder is also on display for the spectators. I enjoyed that Mark Pryor let us get to know the players before the murder occurred, including the victim, so I really was aggrieved by the crime. The only element of this book that I strongly disliked was havi Delving into new cases with Hugo is always a treat. I was intrigued by the premise of this novel - Hugo meets an hot new artist whose sculpture medium is books. When she has an art exhibition, attended by Hugo and the US Ambassador, a gruesome murder is also on display for the spectators. I enjoyed that Mark Pryor let us get to know the players before the murder occurred, including the victim, so I really was aggrieved by the crime. The only element of this book that I strongly disliked was having Tom so far away. His disparate storyline, I understand was necessary, but I missed the camaraderie between Tom and Hugo.This installment undoubtedly set up future books with Hugo, and his Parisian adventures. I'm looking forward to the bookish crimes that lie ahead.I received a digital copy from Edelweiss, and Seventh Street Books, in exchange for an honest review.www.thelithaven.com
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  • Kim McGee
    January 1, 1970
    Hugo Marston works in security for the U.S. Ambassador to France is seriously dating a French woman, he thinks and is once again embroiled in a murder mystery in which his girlfriend may be implicated. While we follow Hugo as he sidesteps the French Inspector who doesn't want his help, hunts down the possible suspects to get his girlfriend off the hook and attends a variety of official events, we marvel at how he never loses his cool, breaks a sweat or steps in mud - he may just be the Texas ver Hugo Marston works in security for the U.S. Ambassador to France is seriously dating a French woman, he thinks and is once again embroiled in a murder mystery in which his girlfriend may be implicated. While we follow Hugo as he sidesteps the French Inspector who doesn't want his help, hunts down the possible suspects to get his girlfriend off the hook and attends a variety of official events, we marvel at how he never loses his cool, breaks a sweat or steps in mud - he may just be the Texas version of James Bond. Always entertaining and a love letter to Paris, this series remains strong. My thanks to the publisher for the advance copy.
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  • Jessica Howard
    January 1, 1970
    A solid entry in this Parisian series. Full review coming for Shelf Awareness.
  • Martina
    January 1, 1970
    Hugo Marston #8-- The Mystery Book Group read Pryor's first Marston novel in January 2014. That was The Bookseller. I'm behind on the series, but really have enjoyed the books I've read. Want to catch up! Expected publication date of the paperback edition is February 5, 2019.
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