Sick Kids in Love
Isabel has one rule: no dating.It's easier--It's safer--It's better----for the other person.She's got issues. She's got secrets. She's got rheumatoid arthritis.But then she meets another sick kid.He's got a chronic illness Isabel's never heard of, something she can't even pronounce. He understands what it means to be sick. He understands her more than her healthy friends. He understands her more than her own father who's a doctor.He's gorgeous, fun, and foul-mouthed. And totally into her.Isabel has one rule: no dating.It's complicated--It's dangerous--It's never felt better----to consider breaking that rule for him.

Sick Kids in Love Details

TitleSick Kids in Love
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseNov 5th, 2019
PublisherEntangled: Teen
Rating
GenreContemporary, Young Adult, Romance

Sick Kids in Love Review

  • Hannah
    January 1, 1970
    I wrote this, and I'm so incredibly excited for people to read it. NOBODY DIES.The playlist is long and not especially diverse:If I Was Sick--Guy ForsythIt's a Pleasure to Meet You--Motion City SoundtrackHer Morning Elegance--Oren LavieDancing Through Life--Wicked Cast RecordingSister Winter--Sufjan StevensFalling Slowly--Once SoundtrackFalling for the First Time--Barenaked LadiesStrange--The FeelingDelicate--Taylor Swift I wrote this, and I'm so incredibly excited for people to read it. NOBODY DIES.The playlist is long and not especially diverse:If I Was Sick--Guy ForsythIt's a Pleasure to Meet You--Motion City SoundtrackHer Morning Elegance--Oren LavieDancing Through Life--Wicked Cast RecordingSister Winter--Sufjan StevensFalling Slowly--Once SoundtrackFalling for the First Time--Barenaked LadiesStrange--The FeelingDelicate--Taylor SwiftSame Old Stuff--The FeelingBest Worst Mistake--If/Then Cast RecordingOne Night Town--Ingrid Michaelson and Mat KearneyIf I Fell--Across the Universe soundtrackJust The Way You Are--Billy JoelKing of My Heart--Taylor SwiftNew Year's Day--Taylor SwiftDogs--Damien RiceThe Book of Love--The Magnetic FieldsCould I Be You--Matchbox 20Out of the Woods--Taylor SwiftNew Romantics--Taylor SwiftTalking in Code--Margot and the Nuclear So and So'sThe Worst Part--Motion City SoundtrackHold Me Down--Motion City SoundtrackGive up/Give in--Motion City SoundtrackBreakway--Kelly ClarksonYou Were Right--Badly Drawn BoyThe Way I Am--Ingrid MichaelsonLove Story--Taylor SwiftGet Happy--Bowling for SoupYou Are in Love--Taylor SwiftWires--AthleteTic--Loch LomondChasing Cars--Snow PatrolHere is a Heart--Jenny Owen YoungsIn My Life--The BeatlesCalendar Girl--StarsCall it What You Want--Taylor Swift
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  • Maja - BibliophiliaDK ✨
    January 1, 1970
    SERIOUS TOPIC BUT SURPRISINGLY - AND DELIGHTFULLY - LIGHT 😄Based solely on the title of this book, I was expecting something along the lines of The Fault in Our Stars. So when I set out to read it, I was actually expecting to be disappointed. I never like books that feel too much like I have read it before. However, I quickly realised that this was definitely not like TFiOS! I loved TFiOS as well, but this has the opposite feeling to it, it is light, humorous and optimistic. An easy 4 stars! SERIOUS TOPIC BUT SURPRISINGLY - AND DELIGHTFULLY - LIGHT 😄Based solely on the title of this book, I was expecting something along the lines of The Fault in Our Stars. So when I set out to read it, I was actually expecting to be disappointed. I never like books that feel too much like I have read it before. However, I quickly realised that this was definitely not like TFiOS! I loved TFiOS as well, but this has the opposite feeling to it, it is light, humorous and optimistic. An easy 4 stars! "That was beautifully distasteful."- Sasha 👍 THE THINGS I LIKED 👍Surprise!: The title let me to believe that I would be shedding some serious tears at the end of this book, possibly also throughout. However, the feeling of this book was quite the opposite, which was very refreshing.Humor: I loved how often this book made me laugh. Like, actually laugh. Out loud! "[...] I'm really just not interested in being friends with a dead baby."- Isabel Sasha and Isabel: These two were wonderfully adorable! They had the greatest chemistry because even though they had the shared experience of their illnesses, they were so different in the way they each handled it.Chronic illness: To my knowledge, very few YA books deal with the pain of having a chronic illness. I loved how it was portrayed in this book, especially to see the different ways in which Sasha and Isabel dealt with it. It was a great representation and an eyeopener. ARC provided by the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review Follow me for more book goodness: Facebook | Twitter | Instagram
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  • Kaylin (The Re-Read Queen)
    January 1, 1970
    MAIN CHARACTER WITH CHRONIC ILLNESS ! ! ! ! !I need this plz
  • The Bookavid
    January 1, 1970
    this is a gr8 book and nobody dies
  • Candace Robinson
    January 1, 1970
    I really liked the dialogue in this one and it had some cute moments. My husband has rheumatoid arthritis so it was hard for me to not compare that, though!
  • Samantha (WLABB)
    January 1, 1970
    Rating: 4.5 StarsDisclaimer: Both main characters in this book were sick, but they were not *that* kind of sick. They were chronically, but not terminally ill. So, to make a long story short, NOBODY DIES."Should Sick Girl date Sick Boy?" My answer was a resounding YES, and I was so happy Isabel took a chance on Sasha, because I adored watching them fall in love.This book enchanted me. It cast a spell on me, and didn't let go, until the very end. So, how did I Rating: 4.5 StarsDisclaimer: Both main characters in this book were sick, but they were not *that* kind of sick. They were chronically, but not terminally ill. So, to make a long story short, NOBODY DIES."Should Sick Girl date Sick Boy?" My answer was a resounding YES, and I was so happy Isabel took a chance on Sasha, because I adored watching them fall in love.This book enchanted me. It cast a spell on me, and didn't let go, until the very end. So, how did I love thee? Let me list the ways:• Sasha and Isabel were the type of characters I never fail to adore. They had an ample supply of wit, which fueled some fantastic exchanges and had me in full-on grin mode. I loved their quirks and their humor, and I adored them together. • I was excited that Moskowitz addressed what it's like to be chronically, but invisibly ill. The book was filled with scenarios, as well as with Sasha's and Isabel's thoughts and commentary on being invisibly ill, and I felt this idea was skillfully and thoughtfully explored. • Family was omnipresent in this story, and I am always a fan of that. Sasha's family were so full of life and love, and it was beautiful the way they embraced Isabel. Her dad was not a bad guy, but he worked a lot, and her mother was estranged. Therefore, I was happy she easily slipped into Sasha's world. • The romance between this two was so smile-inducing. Seriously, I am smiling so much right now, that my face hurts. Sasha's big monologue was enough to make my heart explode, but there were many other moments just like that throughout the book. Moskowitz did such a beautiful job capturing first love here. There were all these tooth-achingly sweet moments, and though Sasha and Isabel hit a few rough patches, this was a relationship built on friendship, love, trust, and honesty. • Isabel's question columns were so amazing. I really enjoyed those bits between the chapters, and also liked the way Moskowitz integrated them into the story. Overall: This was such a beautiful book about love, empathy, and self acceptance, which caused my Grinchy heart to expand, and left me with a bad case of the warm-fuzzies. *ARC provided in exchange for an honest review. BLOG | INSTAGRAM |TWITTER | BLOGLOVIN | FRIEND ME ON GOODREADS
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  • Courtney
    January 1, 1970
    I went into this book bracing myself for cliches or for it to be something similar to what I’ve read before. But I was thrilled to be mistaken. I loved this book. LOVED. IT. I’ve never had a character articulate what I had felt before as I had in this book. I cried several times while reading because this author GOT IT. I was diagnosed with lupus and rheumatoid arthritis when I was 14 years old after being misdiagnosed several times. I’ve had those friends who have unintentionally made insensiti I went into this book bracing myself for cliches or for it to be something similar to what I’ve read before. But I was thrilled to be mistaken. I loved this book. LOVED. IT. I’ve never had a character articulate what I had felt before as I had in this book. I cried several times while reading because this author GOT IT. I was diagnosed with lupus and rheumatoid arthritis when I was 14 years old after being misdiagnosed several times. I’ve had those friends who have unintentionally made insensitive comments. I’ve had undergone treatments in both of my knees so I can walk. I have had to stay in my apartment all day because i physically could not get out of bed. I hid my illness for four years until an unplanned hospitalization made me “come out” as chronically ill and it was honestly the best thing to happen. My basketball team hosted a Lupus Awareness Night and sold t-shirts. All of the proceeds went to the Lupus Foundation. My community got an education on what an invisible illness looks like. This is a book that I wish my 14 year old self could have read. But I’m so appreciative that there are teenagers today that will read this. It will help those that are chronically ill AND help educate their loved ones. Thank you Hannah Moskowitz, this is one of the greatest gifts I never thought to ask for.
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  • Abi (The Knights Who Say Book)
    January 1, 1970
    I'll never never never write a good enough review of this, but that's true of all of Hannah Moskowitz's books, so we'll just have to deal with that.This book just hit me at a time in my life when I really needed something that approaches dating and love and friendship like this. I would have loved Sasha and Isabel no matter when I read them, because they are incredibly lovable, but the way they talked about being loved is something that I needed so much right now. And then it adds in all I'll never never never write a good enough review of this, but that's true of all of Hannah Moskowitz's books, so we'll just have to deal with that.This book just hit me at a time in my life when I really needed something that approaches dating and love and friendship like this. I would have loved Sasha and Isabel no matter when I read them, because they are incredibly lovable, but the way they talked about being loved is something that I needed so much right now. And then it adds in all the banter and all the different personal and interpersonal issues Isabel is dealing with, from feeling like she's "faking" being sick and her absent mom and her clueless father and how she can't stop overthinking,, and I am drowning in emotion.And then, and this is also something Hannah Moskowitz does wonderfully, every side character has their own issues, and you just catch glimpses of them through Isabel's eyes, the way you're surrounded by other people's problems without knowing them fully your entire life. The book moves between intense realism and romance that practically drips with cotton candy and like, this is the only valid m/f romance, I'm sorry, everyone else go home.Can’t believe the entire world can't read this until November 5thpre-order it and save me some yelling
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  • Aj
    January 1, 1970
    A beautifully written story about what love means and finding your person, your home. We’re always told not to change for a boy (a girl, a person) but is that really and truly the case? Maybe love is transformative. Maybe we do change for a relationship to work. And maybe, just maybe, that’s not a bad thing. Love is... love is loving someone exactly how they are now and also holding the belief that they can be the best happiest version of themselves and supporting them in that growth. Unconditio A beautifully written story about what love means and finding your person, your home. We’re always told not to change for a boy (a girl, a person) but is that really and truly the case? Maybe love is transformative. Maybe we do change for a relationship to work. And maybe, just maybe, that’s not a bad thing. Love is... love is loving someone exactly how they are now and also holding the belief that they can be the best happiest version of themselves and supporting them in that growth. Unconditional acceptance and encouragement for growth. Both can be true. This book made my heart so happy. I adore reading books by authors whose stories have too often been told by those in the majority identity. To read about two Jewish and chronically ill main characters written by a Jewish chronically ill author is unfortunately a rare thing. It’s a gift Moskowitz has given us. She has also woven in some education about ableism for those healthy readers out there without it feeling like she’s lecturing which is a hard thing to accomplish. For anyone who has ever loved anyone who’s sick or disabled - and I include myself in that group - this is a must read. For anyone who is healthy - this is a must read. For anyone looking for a witty and smart love story - this is a must read. Just read the damn book.
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  • Rachel Solomon
    January 1, 1970
    I absolutely loved this. Official blurb: "Romantic, refreshing, and brimming with empathy. Isabel and Sasha captured my heart."
  • Elke
    January 1, 1970
    I have been excited for this since i first saw Hannah talking about it on twitter. A chronically ill main character? I'm crying already, 2019 can't come soon enough
  • michelle (magical reads)
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 starsread on my blog I don’t think you know that you’re destined for a life full of love that is…that is big, and that is sweeping, and that is without penalties or expectations, it’s just there, and…and I think you should know that you are, and I know that because it’s already started. You are going to be loved purely and happily your entire life by people who/> 4.5 starsread on my blog I don’t think you know that you’re destined for a life full of love that is…that is big, and that is sweeping, and that is without penalties or expectations, it’s just there, and…and I think you should know that you are, and I know that because it’s already started. You are going to be loved purely and happily your entire life by people who are just fucking delighted to do it. And if you don’t think you’re the kind of person that happens for, then you’re my best friend and I need you to know this about yourself, because this is a lot bigger than you and me, and you are loved, Isabel. You will always be loved. And it will be so good. I’m not sure what I was expecting from Sick Kids in Love when I requested it, but I’m so glad I did. I’m absolutely in love with this book! Sick Kids in Love is a heartfelt tale of two sick kids in love.Isabel and Sasha are both Jewish-American, something they bond over. They also have another thing in common: living with a chronic illness. Isabel has rheumatoid arthritis, and Sasha has Gaucher disease.I don’t live with a chronic illness, so I don’t want to overstep when I talk about this. I liked that the book showed how they’re living “normal” lives; they’re teenagers! They’re going through typical teen stuff! Just with an illness on top of that. You either have to be overcoming [your illness] or you have to be completely disconnected from it. God forbid it be an important part of your identity that you’re just living with. I found this book similar to To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before, in that it deals with a lot of little moments in life, rather than an overarching plot. This is actually one of my favorite parts of TATBILB, so Sick Kids in Love having this was a plus in my book. Little moments are the best! That’s life, babey! There’s ups and there’s downs; it’s not an easy life, but it’s their lives.I love that Isabel and Sasha help each other grow as well. Sasha helps Isabel realize that she doesn’t have to pretend like she’s healthy and that her healthy friends shouldn’t treat her like she is. Meanwhile, Isabel helps him realize that, just because some parts of his life are changing, he still has a good one. I love that you exist in this world. I mean, I love the world even more because people like you exist in it. And I don’t even know how people live as long as they do without having someone like you in their life, or how I’ve done it for this long. Sick Kids in Love was so cute and also very emotionally investing, so naturally I loved it. It’s a book of two teenagers in love, and who happen to be sick. Life isn’t a monolithic experience, but there are universal ones, and reading about their family and friend struggles felt so real. I definitely recommend Sick Kids in Love if you want a devastatingly adorable love story!original review:I’m!! in love!!
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  • PinkAmy loves books, cats and naps
    January 1, 1970
    *** I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own.***3.5 STARSIsabel, who has RA, has a rule against dating until she meets Sasha, a boy with Gauches Disease, a genetic illness.Like Isabel, I have a chronic, invisible illness. Hannah Moskowitz either has personal experience or has done impeccable research because she hits all the nuances about living with pain and illness. I wasn’t ill as a teen, though I c *** I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own.***3.5 STARSIsabel, who has RA, has a rule against dating until she meets Sasha, a boy with Gauches Disease, a genetic illness.Like Isabel, I have a chronic, invisible illness. Hannah Moskowitz either has personal experience or has done impeccable research because she hits all the nuances about living with pain and illness. I wasn’t ill as a teen, though I could picture myself being a combination of both Isabel and Sasha if my condition hit earlier. Moscowitz avoids most of the cliches about characters with illnesses like med noncompliance and risk taking behavior, which made me love SICK KIDS IN LOVE even more.Isabel is complex and at times maddening young woman who isn’t always easy to embrace. Most of the time I liked Sasha, except when he was manipulative and didn’t respect Isabel’s boundaries. I loved his family too.I did not like the ending of SICK KIDS IN LOVE because so many issues were left unaddressed. If SICK KIDS IN LOVE has a planned sequel, I’d understand Isabel never looking at her unhealthy, black and white thinking regarding relationships and up my review to four full stars. I also don’t appreciate expecting another chapter and poof, the story is over. I don’t need endings wrapped in shiny bows, but feel like I should know when the book is over.SICK KIDS IN LOVE will appeal to readers who enjoy realistic fiction.
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  • USOM
    January 1, 1970
    (Disclaimer: I received this book from the publisher. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) Sick Kids in Love is one of those books I devoured in one day. And I don't even have coherent words for how much I loved this book. Sick Kids in Love is full of heart, vulnerability, love, and soft boys. Sick Kids in Love is one of those books I instantly fell in love with. It's been on my radar ever since I read Salt by Moskowitz, so I already knew Moskowitz has a knack for chara (Disclaimer: I received this book from the publisher. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.) Sick Kids in Love is one of those books I devoured in one day. And I don't even have coherent words for how much I loved this book. Sick Kids in Love is full of heart, vulnerability, love, and soft boys. Sick Kids in Love is one of those books I instantly fell in love with. It's been on my radar ever since I read Salt by Moskowitz, so I already knew Moskowitz has a knack for characters who are dimensional and emotional, but Sick Kids in Love is on a whole other level of love for me. Then when I heard about the main characters not only being Jewish but both having a chronic illness (rheumatoid arthritis and Gaucher disease if you're wondering), I knew I had to get my hands on Sick Kids in Love. The characters in Sick Kids in Love fly off the pages. Whether it be Isabel's steadfast belief in not dating, or Sasha's contagious humor, their scenes are pure delightful. How they discuss their illnesses, the ways their family can tiptoe around their illness or how people treat them in public. Sick Kids in Love is complex offering discussions about chronic illness while balancing fractured families, fear of love, and the decisions to speak up for ourselves.full review: https://utopia-state-of-mind.com/revi...
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  • Maria
    January 1, 1970
    Received an Advance Reader Copy in exchange for a fair review4.5 stars.A quote (from ARC):“[…] God, I’m tired… You know what will be fun?”“What?”“When we can stop pretending that we’re interesting people who go out and do things and instead we can hang out and just do nothing.”An amazing story, with two teenage characters as leads, about young love and living with a chronic disease, “Sic Kids in Love”, by Hannah Moskowitz (Entangled: Teen), features a dr Received an Advance Reader Copy in exchange for a fair review4.5 stars.A quote (from ARC):“[…] God, I’m tired… You know what will be fun?”“What?”“When we can stop pretending that we’re interesting people who go out and do things and instead we can hang out and just do nothing.”An amazing story, with two teenage characters as leads, about young love and living with a chronic disease, “Sic Kids in Love”, by Hannah Moskowitz (Entangled: Teen), features a dreamy, marvelous Beta hero, all depth, intensity and pain.Sasha and Isabel are both mature beyond their ages, but the heroine’s constant questioning makes her character a bit frustrating, while the hero is swoon-worthy, devoted and full of stoicism and a little bit of sarcasm when dealing with his illness.They’re young, playful, and so fragile; but so strong when dealing with their bodies’ treacherous conditions, yet still wanting to keep a good image of themselves:“You either have to be overcoming it [your illness] or you have to be completely disconnected from it. God forbid it be an important part of your identity that you’re just living with.” (Sasha)The insight on two chronic illnesses – Gaucher Disease and Rheumatoid Arthritis – and the setting (New York) are great, too.
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  • Michelle (Love, Stars and Books)
    January 1, 1970
    (I received a free eARC from Edelweiss for a voluntary and honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own)Book review: Sick Kids in love by Hannah Moskowitz (3 stars)Sick Kids in love by Hannah Moskowitz Genre: YA, Contemporary, RomanceRating: 3/5 stars(Synopsis from Goodreads) Isabel has one rule: no dating.It's easier--It's safer--It's better----for the other person.She's got issues. She's got secrets. She's got rheumatoid arthri (I received a free eARC from Edelweiss for a voluntary and honest review. All thoughts and opinions are my own)

Book review: Sick Kids in love by Hannah Moskowitz (3 stars)Sick Kids in love by Hannah Moskowitz Genre: YA, Contemporary, RomanceRating: 3/5 stars(Synopsis from Goodreads) 
Isabel has one rule: no dating.It's easier--It's safer--It's better----for the other person.She's got issues. She's got secrets. She's got rheumatoid arthritis.But then she meets another sick kid.He's got a chronic illness Isabel's never heard of, something she can't even pronounce. He understands what it means to be sick. He understands her more than her healthy friends. He understands her more than her own father who's a doctor.He's gorgeous, fun, and foul-mouthed. And totally into her.Isabel has one rule: no dating.It's complicated--It's dangerous--It's never felt better----to consider breaking that rule for him.(Review)(DISCLAIMER: All thoughts and opinions are my own.)I love that this book didn’t romanticise sickness and I really liked Isabel and Sasha’s chemistry. I also really liked that their romance didn’t feel insta-y at all. We also get to see the details of Sasha and Isabel’s sickness and how it affects the both of them throughout the story.I’m not sure why, although I did love the story at the start, as it progressed I ended up liking it less and less. I really wanted to love this book, but maybe my attention dwindled. I really liked the story and Sasha, but in the end, wasn’t a big fan of Isabel.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    This is a beautiful book about two teenagers who are living their lives, falling in love, oh and they have illnesses that they live with, but don't define them as people. The empathy this book evokes is just wonderful and the characters are well written. I loved the way this book made me think and feel I have a friend who is just learning about RA as it was a recent diagnosis for her and this book truly gave me a lot to think about. Thank you netgalley for this arc, it is definitely a book I wil This is a beautiful book about two teenagers who are living their lives, falling in love, oh and they have illnesses that they live with, but don't define them as people. The empathy this book evokes is just wonderful and the characters are well written. I loved the way this book made me think and feel I have a friend who is just learning about RA as it was a recent diagnosis for her and this book truly gave me a lot to think about. Thank you netgalley for this arc, it is definitely a book I will share with my students.
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    Love, LOVE, LOOOOOOVE this book!!!!Author Hannah Moskowitz brings snarky, realistic teenagers to life while accurately representing chronic illness, physical disability, and family interactions in a way that is a joy to read, and kept me wanting to know what happens next.This tale of sick kids being allowed to be sick, versus having to hide it and pretend things are fine, really resonated with me. This is something everyone should read and be aware of; everyone who has so Love, LOVE, LOOOOOOVE this book!!!!Author Hannah Moskowitz brings snarky, realistic teenagers to life while accurately representing chronic illness, physical disability, and family interactions in a way that is a joy to read, and kept me wanting to know what happens next.This tale of sick kids being allowed to be sick, versus having to hide it and pretend things are fine, really resonated with me. This is something everyone should read and be aware of; everyone who has someone in their life who is chronically ill or disabled to some degree. The whole idea that well-meaning acquaintances, or even close family members, may affect the way a chronically ill person views themselves and their abilities. Those around us may wield unknown influence over a person’s way of thinking; disappointment when they can’t do something; often or all the time, or ever, versus it’s okay to not be able to do that thing sometimes, or often, or ever. These are really important concepts and Moskowitz completely gets it, and portrays it accurately, in a fun way.#SickKidsInLove #NetGalley - I voluntarily read a Review Copy of this book. All opinions stated are solely my own and no one else’s. Read more reviews! http://dreamerjbookreviews.blogspot.com
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  • alex
    January 1, 1970
    let’s fuckin gooooo
  • Trisha
    January 1, 1970
    Loved it. RTC
  • Nicole
    January 1, 1970
    “You either have to be overcoming it or you have to be completely disconnected from it. God forbid it be an important part of your identity that you’re just living with. Why is that?”Baby’s first Hannah Moskowitz book! I’ve had a bunch of them on my TBR for a while now, but this one in particular caught my eye when I saw the ARC in Edelweiss, because Sick Kids in Love.There are so many Sick Kid books in the world, and some of them are really good, but this one is probably my very favorite. My “You either have to be overcoming it or you have to be completely disconnected from it. God forbid it be an important part of your identity that you’re just living with. Why is that?”Baby’s first Hannah Moskowitz book! I’ve had a bunch of them on my TBR for a while now, but this one in particular caught my eye when I saw the ARC in Edelweiss, because Sick Kids in Love.There are so many Sick Kid books in the world, and some of them are really good, but this one is probably my very favorite. My reasons are thus:1) There is (well-written!) romance.2) The writing is clever and descriptive and the dialogue is witty and poignant.3) All the characters (and their struggles) feel real.4) LGBTQ+ representation! Chronic illness representation!5) NO ONE DIES.It is impossible for me to separate my personal feelings from this book because I also suffer from a chronic invisible illness, and so much of what Sasha and Isabel go through is therefore So. Damn. Relatable. The way they deal with the expectations of the healthy people in their lives, the way Isabel doesn’t consider herself sick enough to take advantage of certain resources, not being taken seriously by medical professionals, the frustration of wanting a friend or family member to take your illness seriously and balancing that with the need to walk them through some things—all of this is stuff I’ve experienced.It is not exclusively a Sick Kid book, because Sick Kids do more than just sit around being sick all the time. It is also about love and heartbreak, growing up and moving forward. But these illnesses do play an important part in Sick People’s lives, and they are chronic and sometime mysterious and there are good days and bad days. Hannah Moskowitz does an amazing job portraying all of that.
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  • Lucsbooks
    January 1, 1970
    This...was amazing!The only I would change about this book is the synopsis: this is about so much more than dating or not dating a boy.This story is told in two different ways: the normal chapters told through Isabel’s pov followed and a question from Isabel’s newspaper column. I loved the column so much because more than being a part of Isabel’s life, the opinions she published and the people she interviewed (or not) revealed a lot of what was going inside her mind, even This...was amazing!The only I would change about this book is the synopsis: this is about so much more than dating or not dating a boy.This story is told in two different ways: the normal chapters told through Isabel’s pov followed and a question from Isabel’s newspaper column. I loved the column so much because more than being a part of Isabel’s life, the opinions she published and the people she interviewed (or not) revealed a lot of what was going inside her mind, even when she was not aware of it and as a reader, uncovering those little pieces of information was really fun.Going into it, I was afraid this was gonna be another of those “cancer stories” but this is not a story about dying, but about living, living with a decease.Isabel has rheumatoid arthritis and the way that she sees and lives with her condition really changes throughout the book. Isabel’s condition is invisible so she was afraid of looking like she was taking advantage. Even when in pain, she felt like she couldn’t behave any differently from someone that was able because a lot of people had it much worse than her and they still lived “normal” lives. It was through meeting Sasha, the first friend she ever got that also lived with a decease, that she started not only to surround herself with people that understood her but that she started to realize that invisible did not mean non-existent.I loved both Isabel and Sasha, the first because of how intense and sensible she was, sometimes to a fault and Sasha because, well I actually have a list:1. Badass Russian name and I’m a sucker for those.2. He has game3. He is not macho: he knits and cooks and he is good at it.4. He and Isabel have the most amazing conversations (and discussions) and he really listens to her instead of trying to placate her.5. He is a boy and he is body-conscious because boys are allowed to feel insecure about their looks as well as show emotions and look for comfort.6. He is really funny7. I could go on, I seriously could but I got to finish this review before the end of the year.Although I enjoyed this book in its entirety from the writing to the plot, the structure of the story, the rhythm at which it developed, the Jewish and LGBTQ rep, mental health, the female friendships and just how real it feels I’ll focus on two of the themes that Isabel and Sasha discussed that I was really enthralled by.The first was how ableist the world in which we live is and how badly we are as a society not only to build but adapt our surroundings to people that might have physical impairings but also how we are taught to think of disability or sickness in general. Throughout the book, we see how Sasha and Isabel’s needs are ignored or talked over, often by those closest to them because “different” is still seen as “bad”. Sasha prefers not to have healthy friends not to deal with that kind of ignorance but Isabel is surrounded by only able-bodied people and it was really educational from a reader's point of view to see how not to behave.The fact that this book focused on “invisible deceases” also allowed the author to delve into another theme that has only recently started to be talked about: sexism when it comes to medical care. People often joke about how a man with a cold is the worst thing ever because they cannot stop complaining but the truth is that despite complaining a lot less when it comes to pain, women are often ignored when they go to their doctors with a complaint and instead of being taken seriously, they get a five minute diagnosis of “it’s all in your head” and “have you tried to exercise?”. Much of this book is spent with Isabel’s being frustrated over the doctors around her, including her father, not taking her seriously and comparing the standard of care that she gets to Sasha’s, that does not hesitate in telling everyone in the hospital when they are being lazy or incompetent.I absolutely loved Isabel’s and Sasha’s relationship and how respectful it was. This book felt like the out of wedlock child of “Full Disclosure” by Tamryn Garrett and “The Fault in Our Stars” by John Green that I did not know I needed.Thank you to Entangled Teen and NetGalley for this DRC.
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  • Ruthsic
    January 1, 1970
    Warnings: medical emergency, ableism (called out in text) Rep: Jewish main character with chronic illness (rheumatoid arthritis); love interest is bisexual, Jewish and chronically ill (Gaucher's); diverse secondary characters, including queer characters and WoCThis beautifully written romance between two sick kids is emotional, engaging and informative. Told from the perspective of Isabel and starting from the time she meets a boy, Sasha, the story goes through the initial stages of their Warnings: medical emergency, ableism (called out in text) Rep: Jewish main character with chronic illness (rheumatoid arthritis); love interest is bisexual, Jewish and chronically ill (Gaucher's); diverse secondary characters, including queer characters and WoCThis beautifully written romance between two sick kids is emotional, engaging and informative. Told from the perspective of Isabel and starting from the time she meets a boy, Sasha, the story goes through the initial stages of their relationship, from when they become friends and then fall in love. It is mainly a story of change, or more precisely adapting to change, and about finding someone who understands you at the most basic level. Isabel's circle of people are mostly all healthy people, which is why she has complicated feelings about her illness and how much accommodations she can ask for. When she meets Sasha, she realizes how much more freeing it would be to ask (nay, demand) for what she needs, instead of making herself uncomfortable to keep others in their blissful bubble. “I’m sick,” I say. “And I don’t wish that I wasn’t. And I don’t really care how uncomfortable that makes you anymore.” Isabel writes a column for her school newspaper, wherein she asks people around her a question, and each chapter is bookended by a relevant questionnaire, which gives insight into both Isabel and the characters she is asking questions to. She has a supportive father and friends, but the problem is that while they are supportive, they don't understand how the problem isn't her illness, its the lack of accessibility. She has to constantly weigh plans with her friends against how much pain she might be in later, because they might guilt her into doing stuff that she feels too tired for, or too tired to explain. On the other hand, hanging out with Sasha is simpler - he understands her needs and vice versa, constantly checks on whether she is comfortable and both of them have an understanding about the others' energy levels. Also there's the fact that they can sympathize with each other how much healthy people frustrate them. “Yes! You either have to be overcoming it or you have to be completely disconnected from it. God forbid it be an important part of your identity that you’re just living with. Why is that?”“They think it’s completely ridiculous that a person can just…have a sick life and be fine with it. So they have to build this story around you kicking the illness’s ass. You can’t coexist with it. You can’t incorporate it into yourself. Because they don’t. So you can’t.” Their romance develops from their friendship quite naturally, but Isabel is hesitant over whether she would be good enough in a relationship (and no, it isn't because of her illness or his). They do have their share of relationship troubles - like their differing stances on school, her hesitance to use accessibility aids, the fact that their diagnoses were approached differently because of their gender - and they learn to communicate with each other about that. There's also discussion about the adage that you shouldn't change for someone else, there's discussion about for a chronically ill person it is a part of their identity, there's discussion about healthcare and the medical system (this one didn't feel as organic as the others, though) and more, like ableism from the people you love and visible vs invisible illness. Also, bonus: it avoids so much cliches from other books about sick kids. Finally, I feel this book would be a good resource for both sick and healthy teens, and also has a sweet romance to boot!Received an advance reader copy in exchange for a fair review from Entangled Teen, via Edelweiss.
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  • Shaelene (aGirlWithBookss)
    January 1, 1970
    This book is a bit difficult for me to review. I have a Chronic Illness myself and have been waiting for the day Chronic Illness would be accurately represented in a book. However, I have some opinions and thoughts.—Isabel is a 16-year-old Jewish girl with Rheumatoid Arthritis. While at the hospital receiving an infusion, she meets Sasha, a boy around her age who also has a chronic illness, only one she’s never heard of- Gow-Shay Disease. Isabel is enamored with Sasha, soon the two a This book is a bit difficult for me to review. I have a Chronic Illness myself and have been waiting for the day Chronic Illness would be accurately represented in a book. However, I have some opinions and thoughts.—Isabel is a 16-year-old Jewish girl with Rheumatoid Arthritis. While at the hospital receiving an infusion, she meets Sasha, a boy around her age who also has a chronic illness, only one she’s never heard of- Gow-Shay Disease. Isabel is enamored with Sasha, soon the two are hanging out, sharing anecdotes surrounding illness, and learning from the other's experience. But, Isabel is struggling to let herself find love, she has a rule- no dating.—Looking strictly at this story without focusing on the Chronic Illness aspect- it’s boring. I found Isabel and Sasha’s relationship to be a bit annoying, I didn’t connect with either of them. The storyline in which the characters follow also felt very mundane. Not much drama except relationship and friendship drama happens. If there wasn’t the Chronic Illness aspect I would’ve rated this book very low or DNF’d. Needless to say, I was bored with the storyline and characters. However, I believe this is an important book for Chronic Illness representation as a whole.Many topics related to Chronic Illness is explored.Isabel experiences Chronic Pain and has dealt with medical sexism and some dismissive attitudes from doctors and even her own father (who is a doctor). She is still high to medium functioning, meaning her illness hasn’t sidelined her completely but she does experience quite a few physical limitations that stop her from living life to the fullest. There are many things that I as a sick person could connect with-The physical pain of illness, the worry that you don’t ‘look sick enough’ when at an appointment. The talk of the everyday sick experience. The experience of having family members not understanding what it is you're going through, thinking you can just push through it, and just overall how healthy people view us and we view them. Discussions about if your Illness defines you or not. The feeling of not even knowing what to do with yourself when you're going through a rough patch. Missing out of fun things with your friends because you're physically unable to do them. The experience of having doctors tell you there is nothing wrong with you or you're faking your illness. Pushing yourself to do something fun and paying the price in the pain you will experience the next day. And the defeat you feel when you realize that you finally need to have mobility assistance with either a cane or a wheelchair, and not thinking you are ‘disabled enough’ for either and fearing the ridicule these devices may bring from a young seemingly healthy person using them. So many important conversations around illness and disability occur in this book and it’s something I wish I had access to when I was sick as a teenager and feeling so alone in it all. These conversations are the best part of the novel and the thing that I most enjoyed.Just based on these conversations on its own I would recommend the book to anyone who is possibly trying to understand a friend who has an illness or someone who themselves has an illness and want to be seen and heard.But, because I didn't like the characters much or their story arc, I was left feeling bored and felt like much more could possibly have been done with these characters. 3 star. **I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own**ACR provided by Entangled Teen Publishing via NetGalley
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  • Emmie (Oncemorewithreading)
    January 1, 1970
    I thought that this book was going to be a lot like The Fault in Our Stars or Five Feet Apart so I was ready to be an emotional wreck when I finished this book. I was pleasantly surprised when I didn’t end up feeling this way because this book is so much different. While the book focuses on two teenagers who are both ill in their own way, this isn’t a book that ends in a traumatic way. This is a book about two people figuring how to continue living their lives to the best of their ability, figur I thought that this book was going to be a lot like The Fault in Our Stars or Five Feet Apart so I was ready to be an emotional wreck when I finished this book. I was pleasantly surprised when I didn’t end up feeling this way because this book is so much different. While the book focuses on two teenagers who are both ill in their own way, this isn’t a book that ends in a traumatic way. This is a book about two people figuring how to continue living their lives to the best of their ability, figuring out how to fall in love and function in a world that makes it so hard for people who are ill, even if they don’t look it. I found myself connecting with Isabel on a very unique level. Whilst I haven’t been diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), I have lived with the insane doubt that you’re making these feelings up in your own head. I’ve suffered from depression clinically since I was 18. Now 9 years down the line I still wonder if I’ve made it all up in my own head, that from my years of studying psychology have led me to believe that I have these symptoms. I know that this isn’t true, the same way Isabel is truly suffering from RA. The fear is still there, and this is the first time that I’ve read a book where those thoughts have come to the forefront in our main character. This is a book about chronic illness but it’s so much more than that. This is a heartfelt, honest, funny and emotional story about two teenagers who are just trying to live their normal lives. They’re trying to balance school, love, family and friendships alongside of chronic illnesses that most people can’t even pretend to understand. This is a book that I found impossible to put down and one I found myself loving. I ended this book feeling warm inside and as I mentioned before this was not the emotion I expected to feel after reading this book. This book is going to educate a lot of people and I’m honestly so happy that teenagers have the opportunity to learn more about chronic illness and how badly it can affect people, even if it doesn’t show on the outside. Sick Kids in Love is a quick but refreshing and impactful book with love and self-acceptance at its core. It is definitely one of my favourite books of 2019.Thank you to NetGalley and Entangled Publishing for providing me with a copy of the book in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Suz Jay
    January 1, 1970
    “Here was someone who was just going to deal with the everyday slog of being sick for the rest of his normal-length life until he died of something completely unrelated, just like me. That’s a weird and special and boring kind of existence that you don’t get to share with a lot of people. If he has some illness he’s dying of, he’s not part of the Long Slog Club anymore. He’s in the Shiny Dying People Club, and he’s all important and significant and not just…this. Waiting. And also, you know. I’d “Here was someone who was just going to deal with the everyday slog of being sick for the rest of his normal-length life until he died of something completely unrelated, just like me. That’s a weird and special and boring kind of existence that you don’t get to share with a lot of people. If he has some illness he’s dying of, he’s not part of the Long Slog Club anymore. He’s in the Shiny Dying People Club, and he’s all important and significant and not just…this. Waiting. And also, you know. I’d rather people weren’t dying.”*I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own. High school newspaper columnist Isabel manages her rheumatoid arthritis the best she can, getting periodic drug infusions and dealing with the chronic pain. Her hospital administrator dad can’t bear the thought of having a sick kid, not understanding that despite her recent favorable test results, she sometimes needs accommodations, and sometimes she’s in severe pain. He hates the fact she’s sweet on fellow sick kid Sasha, because he doesn’t want her to define herself by her illness. Sasha suffers from Gaucher disease, which while not fatal makes him fragile and constantly immunocompromised. Isabel and Sasha may not dying, yet they struggle to manage their illnesses. They tend to butt heads, since the way the approach care is so different. Sasha has no problem asking for help, but Isabel, who was diagnosed later, constantly pushes herself too hard. Their romance is heartwarming. They understand each other’s situation, unlike Isabel’s circle of friends. Sasha invites Isabel to spend time with his siblings and dad, while her own workaholic father focuses on hospital issues. The New York setting is a delight, as are the numerous LGBT characters. Isabel’s newspaper column provides a fun interlude between chapters. The author does a fantastic job of making the couple’s illnesses realistic and relatable, without making the book a downer. Isabel and Sasha make a great couple. Thanks to NetGalley and Entangled Teen for providing an Advance Reader Copy.*Please note that my review is based on uncorrected text.
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  • Ashley
    January 1, 1970
    I don't know how well words can describe this book for me. Not only was it sweet and romantic, in that 'let's just chill on the couch and be together' kind of way, but it warmed my heart because it was real. While I'm a huge lover of romance books, many of them can be out-of-this-world unrealistic and utterly predictable. But sometimes that's why I like them. Anyways, as I was saying...Ibby and Sasha are different. They're... real. Adorable. Different. Quirky. Teenagers. Isabel suffe I don't know how well words can describe this book for me. Not only was it sweet and romantic, in that 'let's just chill on the couch and be together' kind of way, but it warmed my heart because it was real. While I'm a huge lover of romance books, many of them can be out-of-this-world unrealistic and utterly predictable. But sometimes that's why I like them. Anyways, as I was saying...Ibby and Sasha are different. They're... real. Adorable. Different. Quirky. Teenagers. Isabel suffers from rheumatoid arthritis and Sasha suffers from Gaucher disease. They are 16 years old and meet during a drip infusion at the hospital. Neither of them have ever really met someone they were attracted to that ALSO completely understood how exhausting life is with chronic illness. How their perfect date might be taking a nap, or a hot bath to relieve joint pain, or just cooking at home and watching a movie.Isabel is usually trying to hide her joint pain suffering and be "normal" with her healthy friends. Her best friend doesn't even really understand what makes Isabel so different, because she never talks about it. Sasha is used to people treating him differently; he usually looks kind of sick but his life is spent between school, hospitals and at home sleeping because his body is always so tired. So when they meet each other and realize that instead of trying to be normal healthy people, they can just lay around home together and watch movies and take naps, it seems like the most perfect thing ever!Except... Ibby has some issues. She's hiding her own secrets and she's afraid of who she might be to Sasha. Will she hurt him? Will she follow the same patterns and mistakes that have been repeated in her family? Enjoy this sweet, sometimes sad, but all around feel good story about two young people just enjoying being in love and finding someone that "gets" them. I can't rave enough about this story and I hope you will love it as well!
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  • Celia McMahon
    January 1, 1970
    THIS IS THE BOOK I NEEDED THIS MONTH!!!So, I was doing this thing where I read nothing but spooky stuff for October, and let me tell you something. Reading nothing but horror and thrillers can make your brain all weird. So, I needed a break. This book checked off everything I loved in a romance, so here's my glowing review.Isabel has rheumatoid arthritis, and she meets Sasha, who has Gauchers disease. Together, they form Sick Girl and Sick Boy, and they are the best coupl THIS IS THE BOOK I NEEDED THIS MONTH!!!So, I was doing this thing where I read nothing but spooky stuff for October, and let me tell you something. Reading nothing but horror and thrillers can make your brain all weird. So, I needed a break. This book checked off everything I loved in a romance, so here's my glowing review.Isabel has rheumatoid arthritis, and she meets Sasha, who has Gauchers disease. Together, they form Sick Girl and Sick Boy, and they are the best couple in the entire universe. Seriously, the way their romance bloomed was so incredible that when there were those bouts of bad tension between them, I seriously feared for how much I would cry if anything happened to these cinnamon rolls. Isabel has questions column in her school's newspaper, and these breaks in the story were a delight to read. I found myself laughing out loud at Isabel's humor. She is seriously one of the best protagonists not only for her strength but because she feels so deeply about the abandonment of her mother and the absence of her hardworking father. And SASHA! AHHHHH He is a total book boyfriend material. He is stoic yet unafraid to show his feelings. I mean, the boy naps like a cat and he WILL NAP WITH YOU ALL DAY and lie around and do nothing but be near you and if that isn't just the perfect relationship, I don't know what is. I learned a ton about these two diseases and how debilitating it can be. I had thyroid cancer and had to have mine removed in 2005 so I can relate to Isabel's fears of people seeing her "faking" her illness, just because people aren't able to see how she suffers on the outside. You constantly look at others who are way sicker and feel as though you have no right to feel the way you do, and sometimes these emotions drown you. Isabel and Sasha navigate these feelings together and learn to support each other without trying to change each other. This book was an absolute breath of fresh air from all those sick kid books. I wish I could succumb to amnesia just for a day so I could read this book all over again.
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  • Ashley *Booksbrewsandbarks*
    January 1, 1970
    I went into reading this book with zero expectations and would up being extremely pleasantly surprised. While the title pokes fun of the "sick kid" YA genre that has grown so prevalent over the past few years, the story it holds is actually very sweet and very realistic. Dealing with two lesser addressed diseases, Gaucher syndrome and Rheumatoid Arthritis, this book chooses to instead focus on the two main characters, Sasha and Isabel, living successfully with their diseases and embracing being I went into reading this book with zero expectations and would up being extremely pleasantly surprised. While the title pokes fun of the "sick kid" YA genre that has grown so prevalent over the past few years, the story it holds is actually very sweet and very realistic. Dealing with two lesser addressed diseases, Gaucher syndrome and Rheumatoid Arthritis, this book chooses to instead focus on the two main characters, Sasha and Isabel, living successfully with their diseases and embracing being young and dealing with everything that comes along with growing up. I absolutely loved how relatable both these characters were. Aside from the chronic illness, I could totally see my 17 year old self in Isabel, dealing with friendships and family problems and just trying to make it to the next day in hopes that it will be better. Sasha becomes the light in her world, allowing her to be herself without any apologies, but also forcing her to question the mysteries of life we all go through, especially in relationships.I wish there was some more closure in Isabel's relationship with her mother as well as some additional growth in the bond between she and her father. I also wish we had more Dmitri, simply because I feel like he could have been the wise adult when needed. All in all though, I loved the characters in this book and the story overall was just a breath of fresh air in the Young Adult genre. The writing was done extremely well and I am very much looking forward to reading more from Hannah Moskowitz. Thank you to Entangled Teen for my gifted copy of this book in exchange for my honest review!
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  • Sabrina Roy
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free e-ARC from the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.Sasha and Isabel were such nice characters to get to know. I was terrified something bad would happen at the end but luckily no overly snotty tissues for me. This was fun to get to see two different sides of sick kids getting together. Like one who for the most part leads a normal life with normal friends and then the other who is in the hospital way more and relatively secluded to himself. I wi I received a free e-ARC from the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.Sasha and Isabel were such nice characters to get to know. I was terrified something bad would happen at the end but luckily no overly snotty tissues for me. This was fun to get to see two different sides of sick kids getting together. Like one who for the most part leads a normal life with normal friends and then the other who is in the hospital way more and relatively secluded to himself. I wish Isabel would have spoken out sooner and so weird for me to think she didn't complain more as a kid apparently she was better than me lol. Also my heart hopes her and her friends manage to keep in touch when life take them to different places as I imagined in my head they do.Overall well written and a good read! Would recommend, my only caveat is that I wish they went into her health issues in a little more details even like two paragraphs because unfortunately I was sorta in her friends boat with not understanding how much pain she was truly in.
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