The Boy At the Back of the Class
There used to be an empty chair at the back of my class, but now a new boy called Ahmet is sitting in it.He's eight years old (just like me), but he's very strange. He never talks and never smiles and doesn't like sweets - not even lemon sherbets, which are my favourite!But the truth is, Ahmet really isn't very strange at all. He's a refugee who's run away from a War. A real one. With bombs and fires and bullies that hurt people. And the more I find out about him, the more I want to be his friend.That's where my best friends Josie, Michael and Tom come in. Because you see, together we've come up with a plan.

The Boy At the Back of the Class Details

TitleThe Boy At the Back of the Class
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 12th, 2018
PublisherHachette Children's Group
Rating
GenreChildrens, Middle Grade, Family

The Boy At the Back of the Class Review

  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    This is a very topical novel, which addresses some difficult issues in a way which will help children understand them. With the refugee crisis a virtually nightly news story and many adults, and world leaders, showing low levels of tolerance; this shows the resilience of children to make up their own minds about things. It begins, as the first chapter says, with an empty chair. It is the beginning of a new term and there is one spare place in the class – which is soon to be taken by a new boy; A This is a very topical novel, which addresses some difficult issues in a way which will help children understand them. With the refugee crisis a virtually nightly news story and many adults, and world leaders, showing low levels of tolerance; this shows the resilience of children to make up their own minds about things. It begins, as the first chapter says, with an empty chair. It is the beginning of a new term and there is one spare place in the class – which is soon to be taken by a new boy; Ahmet. Ahmet has just moved to London, the lady who picks him up after school doesn’t look like his mum, he won’t speak to anyone and the school bully has his eye on him… However, in a troubled, and unsettled world, this lonely and scared child has a group of friends, in his new class, who are determined to make him their friend too…This is a heart warming and touching novel. It is honest about characters being fearful about people they do not know and situations they do not understand. It also shows the pure openness and honesty of children, who are non-judgemental and caring. There is a little touch of the ‘BFG,’ about this, which felt a little like a nod to Dahl. This would be a wonderful book to read to a class in school, or to open up discussions about refugees. It also has a great sense of what individuals can achieve and of how a little warmth and kindness gives back so much more happiness than hate.
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  • HP Saucerer
    January 1, 1970
    A warm, eloquent and thought-provoking story, beautifully told through the eyes of a child. Not since RJ Palacio’s Wonder has there been a book filled with as much hope. I was taken on such an emotional journey with this story, but then Rauf’s characters are so compelling, I was left with little choice. The last few chapters left me completely choked with my heart clenched and blinking away tears. If you’re looking for a book to restore your faith in humanity, call off the search, and find refug A warm, eloquent and thought-provoking story, beautifully told through the eyes of a child. Not since RJ Palacio’s Wonder has there been a book filled with as much hope. I was taken on such an emotional journey with this story, but then Rauf’s characters are so compelling, I was left with little choice. The last few chapters left me completely choked with my heart clenched and blinking away tears. If you’re looking for a book to restore your faith in humanity, call off the search, and find refuge in these here pages.
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  • Mira Lee
    January 1, 1970
    My 8 year-old son enjoyed this book so much that he wanted to write a review. To be honest, I was surprised when he picked it up at the bookstore and started reading - he usually prefers graphic novels or sillier books like Captain Underpants or HiLo. But he didn’t want to put this book down and pleaded with me to buy it. When I read the description, I couldn’t say no. Here is his review:"I really liked this book because I never read a book about refugees before so that was new to me. I really l My 8 year-old son enjoyed this book so much that he wanted to write a review. To be honest, I was surprised when he picked it up at the bookstore and started reading - he usually prefers graphic novels or sillier books like Captain Underpants or HiLo. But he didn’t want to put this book down and pleaded with me to buy it. When I read the description, I couldn’t say no. Here is his review:"I really liked this book because I never read a book about refugees before so that was new to me. I really liked the characters. They are super funny! I was really worried because there is this kid from Syria named Ahmet in third grade, just like me, but he doesn’t know English, lost his dad, lost his mom, his cat is dead AND no one knows what happened to his sister!But then he made some really good friends and they protected him from Brenden the bully.One day two of his best friends, the main character (“me”) and Tom went to see the Queen to give her a letter saying that they shouldn’t close the border so that Ahmet could find his family. So the main character (“I”) stuck his hand out to give one of the guards their letter when they were changing guards -- which was really brave. I was really excited when “I” went to give the letter to the guard - because guards always carry big heavy spiky things that could’ve cut his hand really badly!One cool thing was that the author never tells you the main character’s name. I read this book in one day because it grabbed me and I was really attached to Ahmet and it’s like a cliffhanger every chapter."
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  • Veronika
    January 1, 1970
    I am so in love with this story. After I finished, it left huge smile on my face and my heart little bit bigger. Everything changes for a group of nine year olds, when new boy comes to their class. As they find out later, Ahmet is Syrian refugee with heart-breaking experiences. They try to befriend him and help him as much as they can. And whoa, their adventures will become legendary. It is such a nice and heartwarming story told from a perspective of 9 and 3/4 year old girl talking about very i I am so in love with this story. After I finished, it left huge smile on my face and my heart little bit bigger. Everything changes for a group of nine year olds, when new boy comes to their class. As they find out later, Ahmet is Syrian refugee with heart-breaking experiences. They try to befriend him and help him as much as they can. And whoa, their adventures will become legendary. It is such a nice and heartwarming story told from a perspective of 9 and 3/4 year old girl talking about very important issues of today. The best part is that the story is told with that beautiful uncompromised child's view of the world. They love, they cherish and they don't judge. I wish this book gets translated and children everywhere can read it with their parents. I wish I had some children to read it to, but to be honest, I would probably cry a lot while reading it to them :D Happy tears, of course :) This book really was incredible.
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  • Bookwormandtheatremouse
    January 1, 1970
    This book is beautiful - every child (and adult) in the country should read this book - it is so incredibly important! This novel really cleverly tells the story from the point of view of 9 year old Alexa - and explains some very difficult issues perfectly for all to understand and shows how innocent eyes sometimes see the world better than tired adult eyes. There are so many important lessons in this book. Please read this book - whatever your age because it is simply wonderful.
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  • Sophie Anderson
    January 1, 1970
    Heart-warming, empathy-building, and page-turning! I read this with my 12 yo & 9 yo and we all adored it. Deserves to be read far and wide!
  • Simone
    January 1, 1970
    Velmi něžné a pro děti moc pěkně napsané vyprávění o malém syrském uprchlíkovi. Moc se mi líbilo vykreslení dětského uvažování a bezelstnosti. Slza samozřejmě ukápla.
  • Katy Noyes
    January 1, 1970
    Tear-jerking KS2/3 refugee story that deserves a wide readership.We are in need of as much compassion in the world right now as we can get. We all need to be able to see the bigger picture, see the world from the eyes and situations of others... and this is as true for children as for adults. Here is a book that doesn't whitewash some fairly upsetting details but combines them with a beautifully charming story of innocence and hope.Told with heart and humour, The Boy at the Back of the Class is Tear-jerking KS2/3 refugee story that deserves a wide readership.We are in need of as much compassion in the world right now as we can get. We all need to be able to see the bigger picture, see the world from the eyes and situations of others... and this is as true for children as for adults. Here is a book that doesn't whitewash some fairly upsetting details but combines them with a beautifully charming story of innocence and hope.Told with heart and humour, The Boy at the Back of the Class is a child's perspective on the refugee crisis, highlighting the importance of friendship and kindness in a world that doesn't always make sense.The empty seat in class is one day filled by a refugee boy, Ahmet, who doesn't talk to anyone and who becomes a talking point, both in the playground and in students' homes. A group of friends tries to befriend him, find out more about him, and the more they learn, the more they decide they want to help him.But who can possibly help a group of schoolchildren with such a serious problem?What starts as a story about friendship and tolerance takes a turn and becomes a feel-good caper. I actually cried, more than once, reading this. A scene where Ahmet tells his story, a scene where the group put a Plan into action... it's understated but effective. An absolutely vital topic for schools to be discussing. A beautiful example of a funny and moving story that showcases bravery and friendship. Perfect for class reading. Deserves to win awards.For ages 8-12.
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  • Robin Stevens
    January 1, 1970
    A warm, sweet and hugely empathetic story about children from a London school fighting to help their refugee friend. It's gently adventurous and funny and it will make you sob at the end. One of the best things I've read about the refugee crisis. (8+)*Please note: this review is meant as a recommendation only. If you use it in any marketing material, online or anywhere on a published book without asking permission from me first, I will ask you to remove that use immediately. Thank you!*
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  • Jessikah Stenson
    January 1, 1970
    EVERYONE HAS TO READ THIS!Fantastic middle grade focusing on refugees with plenty of facts mixed in with some humour. An absolute stunner.
  • Jade
    January 1, 1970
    A very worth winner of the Waterstones Children’s Book Prize. Definitely one that I’ll be recommending to children and adults both. Many tears were shed while I read this - happy and sad ones. Tackles the refugee crisis in a way that children will understand, but I also think it’s so important to see the issues from the eyes of a child. They’re so less concerned with the differences between us than what connects us as human beings - kindness, friendship, family, love. Just a lovely, inspiring, w A very worth winner of the Waterstones Children’s Book Prize. Definitely one that I’ll be recommending to children and adults both. Many tears were shed while I read this - happy and sad ones. Tackles the refugee crisis in a way that children will understand, but I also think it’s so important to see the issues from the eyes of a child. They’re so less concerned with the differences between us than what connects us as human beings - kindness, friendship, family, love. Just a lovely, inspiring, wholesome read
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  • Connie
    January 1, 1970
    What a marvellous story, I really enjoyed this. Funny and poignant, and I'm not afraid to say that I had a wee lump in my throat at the end. It's very relevant at the minute with the whole refugee crisis.
  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    My son read & loves this, he said he thought I’d like it too. Like it, I loved it. This should be compulsory reading for all 9-10yr olds IMO. Some wonderful lessons about borders, bullies, what it means to be a refugee, friendship & a big dollop of kind hearted ness. Definitely a book of our time, it’s enabled me to have some important conversations with my son about pretty big topics.
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  • Natalie
    January 1, 1970
    This was such a great book and really different to anything I've ever read there is an empty chair at the back of their class what used to have another student in but nobody sits there anymore because that student went to Wales 2 live Ahmet starts at their school and all the kids were wondering why he doesn't talk much at one point before he was deaf but that wasn't the reason why he didn't talk they overheard some teachers talking about a refugee student and that was the new Kid in there class This was such a great book and really different to anything I've ever read there is an empty chair at the back of their class what used to have another student in but nobody sits there anymore because that student went to Wales 2 live Ahmet starts at their school and all the kids were wondering why he doesn't talk much at one point before he was deaf but that wasn't the reason why he didn't talk they overheard some teachers talking about a refugee student and that was the new Kid in there class so the kids try to figure out what a refugee is and it's the reason why the new student doesn't talk because he doesn't understand the language but the four children are determined to be his friend and to try and figure out more about the new kid as the story goes on we find out that the new kid is from Syria and him and his family were running away as there was a war there but on the way his sister died in the water the cat they had died on the mountains his mum got very ill in Greece and he lost his dad in France so when the kids hear about this they go on a mission to try and reunite him with his parents a brilliant story but you need to find out what happens by reading the book
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  • Ciaran Mills
    January 1, 1970
    I read this as it was nominated for an award scheme that I am taking part of. Although I am yet to read three of the five nominees, I feel that this book has a good chance of winning.Onjali Q. Rauf's story telling isn't flawless throughout, but for a first book, it is a blooming good attempt. I loved that certain elements of the story were kept to the very end, a pleasant surprise in an ending that was predictable, though heart warming nonetheless.Certain parts of the story are unrealistic but I I read this as it was nominated for an award scheme that I am taking part of. Although I am yet to read three of the five nominees, I feel that this book has a good chance of winning.Onjali Q. Rauf's story telling isn't flawless throughout, but for a first book, it is a blooming good attempt. I loved that certain elements of the story were kept to the very end, a pleasant surprise in an ending that was predictable, though heart warming nonetheless.Certain parts of the story are unrealistic but I am sure the imagination that goes into them would capture the attention of children. The children in the story are just that, with certain phrases that adults use getting lost in translation, which makes the kids even more endearing.As a trainee teacher, I would think that this book would go down splendidly in class and is hugely topical in the world right now. I look forward to reading what Rauf puts out next after the effects of this book have been felt by more people.
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  • Stephen Connor
    January 1, 1970
    A wonderfully told story inspired by the death of Alan Kurdi, the three year old boy whose image was so tragically captured on a Greek beach a few years ago. Ahmet arrives at school as a refugee, unable to speak English and with no family or friends. The narrator is one of his classmates, and it is from her point of view that we see the inherent goodness of people as she, with three friends, attempts to highlight Ahmet’s difficulties as he settles into life in England without his family. The con A wonderfully told story inspired by the death of Alan Kurdi, the three year old boy whose image was so tragically captured on a Greek beach a few years ago. Ahmet arrives at school as a refugee, unable to speak English and with no family or friends. The narrator is one of his classmates, and it is from her point of view that we see the inherent goodness of people as she, with three friends, attempts to highlight Ahmet’s difficulties as he settles into life in England without his family. The contrast between the innocence of children and cynicism of adults is starkly portrayed. The majority of the children want Ahmet to be happy, simply because he is, like them, a child. However, bitter and bigoted voices of some adults, including, sadly, a teacher, show that the world can be unfair and unforgiving. A must-share story that would be suitable for Y4+; bringing the refugee crisis to classrooms is so important and this book does it in an accessible and understandable way. I loved it, and found myself welling up at different points.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    A beautifully written novel, helping children explore and understand the refugee crisis in an honest but accessible way. If you need something to promote empathy and compassion, then this is the one. A wonderful way to combat the prejudice and ignorance that we know influence many of our children, one way or another.
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  • Lorraine
    January 1, 1970
    This book really brings to life the issues faced by refugees and in a world where children hear one side, it's a very important book. I also loved the fact that I completely missed the fact the main character was female
  • Frances
    January 1, 1970
    Loved this children's book. It is moving but full of humour as well. Great characters. The issues in the book are really well handed so they are just part of what is a very good story rather than feeling they are the main thing. You feel you have understood them in a very accessible way.
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  • Keira
    January 1, 1970
    I finished this book yesterday and it was sooooo good. I read it in 3 days and it was very topical about refuges all around the world today. It was in first person from a nine year old and it was written in a way a nine year old would speak. Amazing book! I’m not surprised that it has won so many awards! I highly recommend this book to anyone.
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  • Kate Wyver
    January 1, 1970
    adults are shits (apart from her mum, who is The Best) and kids are great (apart from Brendan the Bully who needs to stop)well deserving of all the praise + prizes. grandma wept at it
  • Katie Fellows
    January 1, 1970
    One of the best children's books I've ever had the pleasure of reading, the message at the heart of the story is so important to the world we live in! Hoping this book gains the recognition and support it thoroughly deserves!
  • Sarah Driver
    January 1, 1970
    A gift of a book that I couldn't put down! This is a beautiful, truthful, heart-warming story of the power of friendship and community. The voice is distinctive and incredibly realistic as that of a child. The book radiates kindness, justice and hope. It shows how love and empathy can move someone to great acts of courage, and that anyone, no matter how small, can change the world for the better -- especially when they join with their friends to do it. It also reminded me, like a punch to the gu A gift of a book that I couldn't put down! This is a beautiful, truthful, heart-warming story of the power of friendship and community. The voice is distinctive and incredibly realistic as that of a child. The book radiates kindness, justice and hope. It shows how love and empathy can move someone to great acts of courage, and that anyone, no matter how small, can change the world for the better -- especially when they join with their friends to do it. It also reminded me, like a punch to the gut, that it is everyone's responsibility to provide a world of dignity and safety to those who are vulnerable. This book shows how life-affirming helping others can be. Recommend +++
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  • Aisha
    January 1, 1970
    After reading this book I really want to help refugees more than I ever have.
  • Amy (Golden Books Girl)
    January 1, 1970
    This is the story of a group of children as a new boy appears in a seat at the back of their classroom, who they discover is a Syrian refugee with an incredibly tough past and they decide to not only befriend Ahmet, but also attempt to find the family that he lost during his journey to the UK. The narrator of the story, and their friends Josie, Michael and Tom were all such lovely characters, and the amount of compassion and care they put into helping Ahmet begin his new life was so heart-warmin This is the story of a group of children as a new boy appears in a seat at the back of their classroom, who they discover is a Syrian refugee with an incredibly tough past and they decide to not only befriend Ahmet, but also attempt to find the family that he lost during his journey to the UK. The narrator of the story, and their friends Josie, Michael and Tom were all such lovely characters, and the amount of compassion and care they put into helping Ahmet begin his new life was so heart-warming to read, especially given the far less accepting reception that Ahmet receives from more judgemental pupils, staff and parents. I was so glad, however, that the majority of the adults in the book provided them with advice and information and showed them that it`s not right to make false assumptions about people. Another thing I enjoyed and found interesting as a technique was the way that while the narrator is very much a character, their identity wasn`t revealed till almost the end, which meant I ended up picturing myself in that situation. Finally, I thought the subtle humour throughout was fantastic and it made smile a lot as I was reading, but there were also scenes, such as when we gradually learn the extent of what Ahmet has been through that were so emotional I was crying. The narrator and their friends` friendship with Ahmet also made me shed happy tears and the ending was especially touching, so what I`m really trying to say is that you should be prepared for lots of emotional ups and downs, similar to books like the Fox Girl and the White Gazelle (which tackles a similar theme) and Boy Underwater (which has a similarly sweet narrator and sense of humour). 4.5/5
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  • Fliss
    January 1, 1970
    Reading the blurb alone gave me all the feels, and now I’ve finished, it’s easy to define ‘The Boy at the Back of the Class’ as one of those brilliant stories that fills your heart with all the best stuff. The wonderful simplicity of a child’s perspective to explore the plight of child refugees helps to remind us what is truly important in an ever-changing, and sometimes frightening world: friendship, equality and standing up for what you believe in. Emotional and heart-warming, it really is the Reading the blurb alone gave me all the feels, and now I’ve finished, it’s easy to define ‘The Boy at the Back of the Class’ as one of those brilliant stories that fills your heart with all the best stuff. The wonderful simplicity of a child’s perspective to explore the plight of child refugees helps to remind us what is truly important in an ever-changing, and sometimes frightening world: friendship, equality and standing up for what you believe in. Emotional and heart-warming, it really is the most lovely YA book sharing the most beautiful of messages ❤️.
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  • Lesley
    January 1, 1970
    I read this darling, wonderful novel that deals with important issues—diversity, bullying, intolerance, and refugee children—in one day because I didn’t want to stop reading. I fell in love with the narrator right away, a British 9-year-old upstander.A new student joins Alexa’s class, but he doesn’t talk to anyone, he disappears during every recess, and he has a woman who helps him with his work. And even though she has what some might term a challenging life herself—her father died when she was I read this darling, wonderful novel that deals with important issues—diversity, bullying, intolerance, and refugee children—in one day because I didn’t want to stop reading. I fell in love with the narrator right away, a British 9-year-old upstander.A new student joins Alexa’s class, but he doesn’t talk to anyone, he disappears during every recess, and he has a woman who helps him with his work. And even though she has what some might term a challenging life herself—her father died when she was younger, her mum works two jobs to make ends meet and isn’t at home very much, and they have to be really careful about spending money, Alexa never sounds like she is complaining. Alexa and her three best friends, Josie, Tom, and Michael, a very diverse group of 9-year-olds, make it their mission to become friends with Ahmet. They give him gifts and then invite him to play soccer, where he excels, and they try to keep him safe from Bernard the Bully and his racist remarks and threats, which, it turns out, Ahmet can handle.When they learn that Ahmet is a refugee from Syria, escaping on foot and in a lifeboat from bad people and bombs, the four friends are concerned. But when Alexa learns that his little sister died on the crossing and Ahmet does not know where his parents are and then learns from the news that the border is closing to refugees the next week, she puts a plan, the Greatest Idea in the World, in motion. She will ask the Queen to find Ahmet’s parents and keep the border open for them. When that plan seems to fail, the friends move on to the Emergency Plan.I found it amazing that a novel on such a complicated subject could be handled so well and so thoroughly in a book for readers age 8-13. This book indeed will generate important conversations—and maybe some research and news article reading.
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  • Nicole
    January 1, 1970
    loved this story so much. Not only has it got some very trying words for KS2 children to be looking up, like 'seclusion' but it has a very real look at todays attitude to people who are 'not like us'. However, this story is about 4 friends who want to try and befriend the new boy who has a lady that collects him after school, then he has a helper in class. Finding out he came from Syria the child asks their Mum to help them find some kind of treat. Learning that a 'pomegranate' is ripe in Leban loved this story so much. Not only has it got some very trying words for KS2 children to be looking up, like 'seclusion' but it has a very real look at todays attitude to people who are 'not like us'. However, this story is about 4 friends who want to try and befriend the new boy who has a lady that collects him after school, then he has a helper in class. Finding out he came from Syria the child asks their Mum to help them find some kind of treat. Learning that a 'pomegranate' is ripe in Lebanon an adventure to get the elusive fruit is undertaken. Ahmet, the boy, is happy to get something he recognises and realises the 4 children are trying to befriend him, however a bully takes it off him and there is a fight. This is a rare find of a book which has a man with the heart of a king and small kindnesses making the difference. Prejudice and racism can have the wrong effect on young children and some adults in the story are not very nice. However, there is a fantastic idea that leads to an adventure to help Ahmet find his family by getting the Queen involved! This book did have me in tears and throughout I was wondering at the main child telling the story as you never know their name and there was no description of what they looked like at the beginning. I wonder what you will make of them? A beautifully told tale with extras at the back informing of the difference between immigrants, migrants and refugees. Also questions a child might like to ask themselves. Please pick this up as your KS2 challenge reading books it is a wonderful read.
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  • Mary Esther
    January 1, 1970
    Told in a genuine childlike voice, this topical story reaches out in a way which children aged 9+ years will find easy to relate and understand. It covers many difficult issues (bullying, diversity, racism), but of course, at the heart is Ahmets' story. Empathetic and compassionate, it is also honest and direct as his new friends uncover, piece by piece, the complex set of circumstances that led Ahmet to where he is now. There is an earnest depiction of being uncertain of people you don't know, Told in a genuine childlike voice, this topical story reaches out in a way which children aged 9+ years will find easy to relate and understand. It covers many difficult issues (bullying, diversity, racism), but of course, at the heart is Ahmets' story. Empathetic and compassionate, it is also honest and direct as his new friends uncover, piece by piece, the complex set of circumstances that led Ahmet to where he is now. There is an earnest depiction of being uncertain of people you don't know, the difficulties children face when approaching an adult for information and of the openness and curiosity of children in that non-judgemental, concerned way they have. There are so many things to love about this book. But I think my favourite is simply the way it's told. Frank, humourous and sincere writing, the belief that we can do what is needed, and if we don't, the children will. There is an inbuilt sense of inclusiveness and diversity in the story that flows easily, in almost a matter-of-fact way. The characters are well-drawn and come to life in the mind of the reader. The voice of the narrator is that of a nine-year-old; real and textural, full of thoughts, wonderings and energy. You don't find out if the narrator is a boy or girl until much later in the story, and it works with great effectiveness. Warm, expressive, funny and thought-provoking, more great books like this please.
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  • Georgie
    January 1, 1970
    I picked this up at work because I remembered Robin Stevens (author of the ‘Wells and Wong’ series) mentioning it on her Twitter feed. I just read the first couple of pages and was instantly drawn into the world of the main character, Alexa, and her best friends Josie, Tom and Michael. They are all 9 years old. One day, a new boy, Ahmet, joins their class. Alexa is intrigued by him, and determined to become his friend, along with Tom, Josie, and Michael. As their friendship with Ahmet grows, the I picked this up at work because I remembered Robin Stevens (author of the ‘Wells and Wong’ series) mentioning it on her Twitter feed. I just read the first couple of pages and was instantly drawn into the world of the main character, Alexa, and her best friends Josie, Tom and Michael. They are all 9 years old. One day, a new boy, Ahmet, joins their class. Alexa is intrigued by him, and determined to become his friend, along with Tom, Josie, and Michael. As their friendship with Ahmet grows, they learn he is a refugee from Syria. He has been separated from his family. Ahmet’s arrival will change all of their lives in a very big way. This story made me smile and laugh out loud. Alexa’s perceptions of the world were the perfect combination of innocence (funny mistakes over words she heard) and astute and often hilarious observations about the idiosyncrasies of the adult world.It made me angry, like Alexa, at the things characters said about refugees, and their attitude towards Ahmet.It made me want to cry at some really sad moments and at some beautiful moments.Everyone needs to read this book. I would recommend it to anyone aged 9-99+ who wants a good book to read, or who wants to learn more about the refugee crises that are so often in the news these days.I suspect and hope that this book will be up for the Carnegie and Amnesty awards next year.
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