Girl Squads
A modern girl is nothing without her squad of besties. But don't let all the hashtags fool you: the #girlsquad goes back a long, long time. In this hilarious and heartfelt book, geek girl Sam Maggs takes you on a tour of some of history's most famous female BFFs, including: • Anne Bonny and Mary Read, the infamous lady pirates who sailed the seven seas and plundered with the best of the men • Jeanne Manon Roland and Sophie Grandchamp, Parisian socialites who landed front-row seats (from prison) to the French Revolution • Sharon and Shirley Firth, the First Nations twin sisters who would go on to become Olympic skiers and break barriers in the sport • The Edinburgh Seven, the band of pals who fought to become the first women admitted to medical school in the United Kingdom • The Zohra Orchestra, the ensemble from Afghanistan who defied laws, danger, and threats to become the nation's first all-female musical group And many more! Spanning art, science, politics, activism, and even sports, these girl squads show just how essential female friendship has been throughout history and throughout the world. Sam Maggs brings her signature wit and warmth as she pays tribute to the enduring power of the girl squad. Fun, feisty, and delightful to read—with empowering illustrations by artist Jenn Woodall—it's the perfect gift for your BFF.

Girl Squads Details

TitleGirl Squads
Author
ReleaseOct 2nd, 2018
PublisherQuirk Books
ISBN-139781683690726
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Feminism, History

Girl Squads Review

  • Ellie (faerieontheshelf)
    January 1, 1970
    This rolled up in the mail just as I finished The Lady’s Guide to Petticoats and Piracy so I dropped right into it to continue my great adventure reading about badass women. What’s super cool is that some of these stories tied back into The Lady’s Guide as Lee was inspired by some of the women featured here - the Edinburgh Seven, the female pirates, and so on.A really solidly enjoyable read about badass women, most of whom I didn’t know about before (which is sad ngl). I felt sometimes it was re This rolled up in the mail just as I finished The Lady’s Guide to Petticoats and Piracy so I dropped right into it to continue my great adventure reading about badass women. What’s super cool is that some of these stories tied back into The Lady’s Guide as Lee was inspired by some of the women featured here - the Edinburgh Seven, the female pirates, and so on.A really solidly enjoyable read about badass women, most of whom I didn’t know about before (which is sad ngl). I felt sometimes it was really colloquial and slang-y for me, but the target audience is teens so that’s a deliberate choice.
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  • Inge
    January 1, 1970
    I love reading books about awesome women. Bygone Badass Broads, Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls, I devour them all. Reading these books is fun, educational, and empowering.Girl Squads is no different. It tells twenty stories about historically amazing female friendships through five distinctive categories: sports, science, war, politics, and the arts. It's also incredibly diverse: from 90-year-old mermaids in Jeju to the first all-female orchestra in Afghanistan with a pit stop at the ladies I love reading books about awesome women. Bygone Badass Broads, Good Night Stories for Rebel Girls, I devour them all. Reading these books is fun, educational, and empowering.Girl Squads is no different. It tells twenty stories about historically amazing female friendships through five distinctive categories: sports, science, war, politics, and the arts. It's also incredibly diverse: from 90-year-old mermaids in Jeju to the first all-female orchestra in Afghanistan with a pit stop at the ladies of the US Supreme Court, this book covers it all.Even though their own stories are brilliant on their own, I can't help but feel like every single one of these would make for some seriously great novel retellings. This book was fantastically fabulous and I'll gladly recommend it.Thank you to NetGalley and Quirk Books for providing me with a copy
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  • Aria
    January 1, 1970
    ---- Disclosure: I received this book for free from Goodreads. ---- Nice cover. Bright, eye-catching, & full of activity. Great concept. Lots of potential in an idea like this. Content is full of short, easily-digestible stories, making it a nice book to digest as one's schedule allows. The 1st story about the divers totally drew me in. I was all set for this book to continue to be a winner, & I wanted it to be a success b/c books like this could potentially be gems for younger gals. Af ---- Disclosure: I received this book for free from Goodreads. ---- Nice cover. Bright, eye-catching, & full of activity. Great concept. Lots of potential in an idea like this. Content is full of short, easily-digestible stories, making it a nice book to digest as one's schedule allows. The 1st story about the divers totally drew me in. I was all set for this book to continue to be a winner, & I wanted it to be a success b/c books like this could potentially be gems for younger gals. After the initial story I had problems, though. I kept getting bored. Short tales or not, my mind was wandering before I could get through them. I skipped the last halves of the stories after the 2nd story (about the skiers), & just altogether skipped the final story in the section (the tennis one). I thought maybe I was just not connecting to the 1st section of the book, which was devoted to athletes. After all, I'm really not a sports fan. Next section: Activists. "Now we're talkin'," I thought. It didn't get any better, though. I tried putting the book down & coming back to it a few times, but it was never again interesting to me after the initial story (about the divers). I tried to figure out why this was, b/c the subject matter was rife with interesting material for story-telling. I knew I wasn't sold on the writing style, & it bothered me somewhat, but I had been trying to look past that. (I tried really hard, even when the author tried to pull off a 2-word prepositional phrase as a stand alone sentence & every cell in my being revolted. I had to put the book down at that point before I set it on fire.) It's written in an effort that seems to be trying exceptionally hard to sound as if the author is talking to you, but I feel like that effort failed. (Irionically, the book I read following this one was written very successfully in that manner, so it's not like I am against the idea of that kind of delivery.) I pressed on & found myself at pirates. Ooohhhhh. I like pirates. Wait. What's this? When discussing the motivation behind why the pirates did as they did: "But they didn't do so out of some anarchist, sociopathic love of murder and mayhem." Below, you will find a brief pictorial relating the barrage of emotions I very rapidly cycled through following the reading of that statement. So, at that point I was done w/ this thing. Besides things like starting sentences with conjunctions (see the quote above for reference), & trying to pass off prepositional phrases as sentences (we discussed this already), conflating “anarchy” with “chaos” is a serious pet peeve of mine. It is at the top of my peeve list (although, if I’m honest, it is most days tied w/ people who don’t yield for traffic). Being that I had already made great effort to overlook the (many) issues I’d had trying to keep my head in this book & read it with the spirit it was obviously intended, I absolutely lost my shit as I read that sentence. I hate that it has come down to this point, but sadly, here we are just the same. It’s pretty simple. More to the point: To put it another way: No one has to take my word for it, though. This bona fide smart person quite succinctly states the whole reason why false conflation of the two terms is such a problem. (Just F.Y.I., it existed to refer to the political philosophy long before malignant intentions began to confound it w/ the idea of chaos.) Coming across this error in a book celebrating women really got under my skin, b/c the (long) history of the political philosophy of anarchy is riddled chock-full with some of the most bad-ass women one could ever hope to find. My personal favorite, Emma Goldman, publicly said things like this, back when women were still wearing hoop skirts, & child labor was seen as an unavoidable inevitability: (She was deported for her efforts, of course.) Confusing the work of liberation so many women thanklessly devoted their lives to with the “sociopathic love of murder and mayhem” in a book that was intended to celebrate women has obviously completely set me off. I’m just disappointed in the missed opportunity, b/c this really was a good idea for a nice book. So, here we are. Now that I’ve attempted to explain myself w/o overly boring any dear reader who has stuck w/ me thus far, I will wrap this thing up. As I did not wish to be overly harsh, I waited some time to post my review. I wanted the opportunity to reassess the situation and come back to it. As stated, the premise was great, but the author’s voice was off-putting to me, regardless of content. Some of the people referenced in this book would be interesting for other authors to possibly flesh-out further into stand alone narratives. I mean, their tales are good stuff. That said, I should have enjoyed this more (before I got to the part that set me off on my above rant), so I can’t honestly say I was enjoying it at all after that initial story. It could have been great, but truthfully I just hated it…..& I hate that I hated it, but oh, well. I resented it for being so boring, for trying painfully hard to sound so chatty, & for failing to deliver interesting narratives about people who were (for the most part) actually pretty fascinating. In fairness, I can only recommend this book to people looking for possible jumping off points re: women that might be worth writing full books about. Beyond that, it may unfortunately be another great idea that just didn’t quite land. I’ve no doubt if it were rearranged somehow, & done with a different voice, it’d be great. I also have no doubt that some people will love it as is. I can’t help walking away feeling that the women chosen as subjects in this book deserved a better presentation. There you have it, though. That’s where I’m at with it. Thanks for hangin’ in there with me. I’m done, now. (Side note: The author herself seems really cool. So much so that I wanted to like this book in part just b/c I thought she seemed so interesting. Weird how things work out sometimes.)
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  • Beatrizmallow
    January 1, 1970
    There's plenty of books about the forgotten women of history that are being published lately and this book is a part of that movement. It tells the stories of fantastic and heroic pioneer women in many fields: sports, science, arts...The main difference between this book and all other is that this doesn't focus on individual women but in what we would now call "squads", groups of women being awesome, breaking boundaries and helping each other. That was probably my favourite part of it was, in a There's plenty of books about the forgotten women of history that are being published lately and this book is a part of that movement. It tells the stories of fantastic and heroic pioneer women in many fields: sports, science, arts...The main difference between this book and all other is that this doesn't focus on individual women but in what we would now call "squads", groups of women being awesome, breaking boundaries and helping each other. That was probably my favourite part of it was, in a world that keeps telling stories about women hating women it was a nice refreshment to see all those women lifting each other up. The book is written in an easy and fun tone and the reading experience is fun while formative. The illustrations are really great and fit the style of the book perfectly.I received a fee ecopy of this book in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.
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  • Julie
    January 1, 1970
    This was fascinating. I'd heard of a few of them - there's a chapter about the women from Hidden Figures, with some details the movie missed - but most were new to me and they spanned all over history, from BCE to modern day. It was also a really diverse collection and an inspiring one, telling facts with occasional funny commentary and lots of mocking of the men who didn't believe in these women. It's voice-y, without being overpoweringly so, and informative, and it makes me think a lot about m This was fascinating. I'd heard of a few of them - there's a chapter about the women from Hidden Figures, with some details the movie missed - but most were new to me and they spanned all over history, from BCE to modern day. It was also a really diverse collection and an inspiring one, telling facts with occasional funny commentary and lots of mocking of the men who didn't believe in these women. It's voice-y, without being overpoweringly so, and informative, and it makes me think a lot about my own girl squads and what they mean and how we impact others. I read this pretty much in one sitting and it's one I can't wait to see teens fall in love with.
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  • Kirstin (gryffindorkwinchester)
    January 1, 1970
    I have had the opportunity to meet and see Sam Maggs speak a few times, and have loved her books in the past! Sam truly is the epitome of a cool, feminist, nerd! She speaks inclusively and her books are validating and empowering and Girl Squads was no exception! This book focused on exactly how much is possible, when women come together to accomplish something! And it really showed how powerful we can be when women support women. Not to mention, the illustrations were totally adorable. I will su I have had the opportunity to meet and see Sam Maggs speak a few times, and have loved her books in the past! Sam truly is the epitome of a cool, feminist, nerd! She speaks inclusively and her books are validating and empowering and Girl Squads was no exception! This book focused on exactly how much is possible, when women come together to accomplish something! And it really showed how powerful we can be when women support women. Not to mention, the illustrations were totally adorable. I will surely be adding this intersectional collection to my shelves and would highly suggest it to anyone looking to learn a little bit about feminism and girl friendships.
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  • cenninsbookreviews aka Book Dragon Queen🐉🐉🐉&#
    January 1, 1970
    Great, interesting, strong characters, fantastic variety of girl squads. Highly recommended.Thank you to both NetGalley and Quitk Books for giving me the opportunity to read ’Girl Squads’ in exchange for my honest unbiased review.
  • Shannon the Book Dragon
    January 1, 1970
    A lovely collection of tales of beautiful friendships of real life women. I adore picking and choosing between sections I don't know much on and being able to learn about some amazing women I didn't know about before! It's a really inspiring read!
  • Kerri
    January 1, 1970
    I’m obsessed with these stories, this writing and this book in general 😍😍😍😍😍😍😍
  • Angharad (Two Book Thieves)
    January 1, 1970
    Full review here!
  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    This book was so empowering and exciting. It was really cool to learn about different friendships around the world and across time. I’ve been really loving the female friendship trend out there lately so this book was perfect. Definitely recommend! Thanks NetGalley for the advanced copy!
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  • Jayni
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this! it was so uplifting and empowering and something I think everyone, regardless of gender, should read because it follows the stories of so many women from so many different places all over the world during so many different time periods that literally everyone has the chance to gain some new perspective :-)4.5/5 🌟
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  • Jenn
    January 1, 1970
    DNF. The language here is too cutesy. Evidently this is written for preteens. Not for me.
  • Samantha Puc
    January 1, 1970
    I received an advanced egalley of Girl Squads through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. You can read that review in full on my blog, or read an excerpt below.***Give me a book that explores historical figures in short, illustrated essay format, and I’m so there. There are a number of books that do this really poorly, it’s true, but the ones that get it right get it really, really right. Luckily, Sam Maggs’ new book, Girl Squads: 20 Female Friendships That Changed History, illustrated b I received an advanced egalley of Girl Squads through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. You can read that review in full on my blog, or read an excerpt below.***Give me a book that explores historical figures in short, illustrated essay format, and I’m so there. There are a number of books that do this really poorly, it’s true, but the ones that get it right get it really, really right. Luckily, Sam Maggs’ new book, Girl Squads: 20 Female Friendships That Changed History, illustrated by the incomparable Jenn Woodall, is one of the latter.As someone who isn’t a particularly dedicated student of history, I enjoy books like Girl Squads because they present historical figures in a digestible way that holds my interest. In this case, Girl Squads starts with “Athlete Squads”, a section I didn’t expect to love nearly as much as I did (because Sports are generally Not My Thing), then jumped into “Political & Activist Squads,” followed by “Warrior Squads, then “Scientist Squads,” then my personal favorite, “Artist Squads.” Each section features essays written in Maggs’ informative-but-approachable style, showcasing the contributions of various women in history—and their teammates, siblings, friends, or any combination thereof—to their various areas of expertise....I most enjoyed the essays about individual friendships, I think, but the historical research in this book has sparked my interest in a big way. I love how Maggs explores the connection between women who were actively friends and women who teamed up to fight for a common cause, even if their individual relationships weren’t necessarily publicized or well-known. The balance of these different stories is great, and it makes the book flow really well.The pacing of this book is absolutely fabulous; Maggs writes as if she’s telling you a really interesting story at a party. I didn’t want to put this book down and neither, I think, will you. Whether you’re interested in history or just stories about badass women, check out Girl Squads: 20 Female Friendships That Changed History. I think you’ll enjoy the read.
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  • Rachel
    January 1, 1970
    This book was absolutely phenomenal. I love books that bright light to the women who have impacted history, because they are so often left out of history books. Women have always been active participants and change makers in our world, but their contributions have often been actively overlooked, erased, or ignored. Books like Girl Squads show us that all we have to do to discover the amazing women changing the world is to look. Girl Squads tells the stories of twenty groups of women from ancient This book was absolutely phenomenal. I love books that bright light to the women who have impacted history, because they are so often left out of history books. Women have always been active participants and change makers in our world, but their contributions have often been actively overlooked, erased, or ignored. Books like Girl Squads show us that all we have to do to discover the amazing women changing the world is to look. Girl Squads tells the stories of twenty groups of women from ancient times up to modern day whose friendships and contributions have profoundly impacted their community, culture, or the world. From female athletes paving the way for future generations and artists breaking barriers to politicians fighting for equality and scientists making incredible breakthroughs. Of all the incredible groups of women in this book, there were only a few I was familiar with beforehand. But each and every one of them led fascinating and incredible lives that deserve to be told. I'm so glad that Sam Maggs is telling their stories. In addition to telling the stories of these important women, and celebrating the incredible power of female friendship, this book is also just so much dang fun. Sam Maggs' writing style is casual and conversational, often breaking into asides and peppering in slang in a way that really brings the stories to life. I loved that this book could make me laugh even while recounting some tough women facing tough times. This is the kind of feminist book I want-- not glossing over the realities of the past, the sexism or the racism, while still feeling like a celebration of women working together to make change happen in the past and in the present. Highly, highly recommend for anyone who feels female friendships deserve better representation in the media, wants to read more fun, feminist nonfiction, or just feels like reading a really great book about some incredible women.
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  • Gemma McGee
    January 1, 1970
    Girl Squad: 20 female friendships that changed history was a surprised book mail from Quirk Books. Once I pulled it out of the envelope I was looking forward to reading it. I love History and I have study Feminism so this book is right up my alley. Girl Squad is split into 5 groups;Athlete SquadsPolitical & Activist SquadsWarrior SquadsScientist SquadsArtist SquadsAll the Squads span all different period of history even up to 21st century. The stories tell you about the women but also the wo 
Girl Squad: 20 female friendships that changed history was a surprised book mail from Quirk Books. Once I pulled it out of the envelope I was looking forward to reading it. I love History and I have study Feminism so this book is right up my alley. 
Girl Squad is split into 5 groups;
Athlete Squads
Political & Activist Squads
Warrior Squads
Scientist Squads
Artist Squads
All the Squads span all different period of history even up to 21st century. The stories tell you about the women but also the world that surround them, and how they friendships gave them strength. 
I found all the stories fascinating and what they had to put up with engrossing. Below I have list some of my favourite stories.
The Edinburgh Seven - Because of them we have female doctors in the UK. They continued with their education even when they had to deal with awful treatment from Male students and male teachers. 
The Dahomey Amazons -  There are a couple of stories about strong female warriors, but the Dahomey Amazons are true Badasses. I love the fact that the women would not / or would surrender after the men. 
The Zohra Orchestra - These young women are an inspiration, they create music to heal Afghanistan's, while deal with death threats. 
Ruth Bader Ginsbury, Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan The Ladies of the U.S Supreme Court. - The individual stories are incredible and the way they support each other is heart warming. 
The writing style is perfect, me and my friends like telling each other stories like this, and this book is like just listening to a friend telling me the stories. 
Girl Squad is prefect read for anyone that like Badass women, friendships and history. 
My rating for Girl Squad is 5 out of 5.


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  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    So much of history as it is written revolves around dudes. Men who did things, applauded because they did things or found things or what-have-you. But women, well...they've been pretty effectively scrubbed from so much of history, for so many reasons. It wasn't "proper" or "how dare she" or "not good enough"...so much nonsense. This book, however, aims to change at least some of that. Women have been doing awesome things for a long time, and quite often, they were doing them together - in Girl S So much of history as it is written revolves around dudes. Men who did things, applauded because they did things or found things or what-have-you. But women, well...they've been pretty effectively scrubbed from so much of history, for so many reasons. It wasn't "proper" or "how dare she" or "not good enough"...so much nonsense. This book, however, aims to change at least some of that. Women have been doing awesome things for a long time, and quite often, they were doing them together - in Girl Squads. I picked this up for my daughter, originally. I ended up reading it myself. I love the varied countries and people and categories. I like that the stories about these women are shorter, but with enough history that those interested could certainly take their research further. Frankly, I also like the traces of snark directed at the dudes within the stories who were all "Pshaw. Women.". To me, this is suitable for YA, though adults will like it as well.This is a great book for classrooms and libraries - again, enough to get someone interested to pursue further research for papers, or even just to read to feel a bit more empowered.
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  • Paige
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Sam Maggs has put together a wonderful book that details the lives and feats of some of histories greatest Girl Squads. The reader is taken through warrior squads, artist squads, scientist squads and many more, there are 20 stories within this book and while Maggs can't give every story huge amounts of detail what Maggs does give you is a great outline of each group, where you can go off and add even more detail yourself if you wis I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Sam Maggs has put together a wonderful book that details the lives and feats of some of histories greatest Girl Squads. The reader is taken through warrior squads, artist squads, scientist squads and many more, there are 20 stories within this book and while Maggs can't give every story huge amounts of detail what Maggs does give you is a great outline of each group, where you can go off and add even more detail yourself if you wish to. But that's not to say that the content in this book isn't enough, it's a really, really great starting point and provides inspiration for everyone who reads it. I love Maggs' writing style. It's chatty, and casual while also being informative. The little comments that Maggs puts in every now and again gives the author a voice, and stops the book from just being your average non-fiction, fact book. It gave Maggs a personality and allowed her to comment on things without interrupting the flow of the book. If you need to feel empowered, this is the book for you.
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  • Liesl
    January 1, 1970
    I have been loving the trend of anthologies celebrating influential women which have been coming out lately, and this is one of the best of the bunch. Decent length descriptions of a variety of women from a range of countries and fields, several of whom I had heard of, but plenty that I hadn't. A light-hearted narrative voice and humorous asides make sure it doesn't get too heavy, but at the same time leaves the reader in no doubt just how amazing the women's accomplishments were. Particular fav I have been loving the trend of anthologies celebrating influential women which have been coming out lately, and this is one of the best of the bunch. Decent length descriptions of a variety of women from a range of countries and fields, several of whom I had heard of, but plenty that I hadn't. A light-hearted narrative voice and humorous asides make sure it doesn't get too heavy, but at the same time leaves the reader in no doubt just how amazing the women's accomplishments were. Particular favourites included the Blue Stockings group who were fabulous literary socialites and the Japanese women's volleyball team who helped restore some of their country's pride after WW2, but honestly all of the women here were equally inspiring. I will definitely be recommending this to the kids at my school.Thank you Netgalley for giving me an ARC copy in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Kayla
    January 1, 1970
    I absolutely loved this book! It was incredibly empowering and funny. I found myself laughing out loud quite a few times while reading it. Even in today’s world I often find women are descriminafed against and every once in a while I need a kick to remind me how badass women can be. I should never forget my potential but even so this book was such an eye opener and was also entertaining! As a female scientist, that portion of the book was obviously my favorite and some of the stories weren’t as I absolutely loved this book! It was incredibly empowering and funny. I found myself laughing out loud quite a few times while reading it. Even in today’s world I often find women are descriminafed against and every once in a while I need a kick to remind me how badass women can be. I should never forget my potential but even so this book was such an eye opener and was also entertaining! As a female scientist, that portion of the book was obviously my favorite and some of the stories weren’t as interesting as others but I still loved learning about all these amazing women. I won this book in a goodreads giveaway so thank you to Sam Maggs and the publisher for my copy of Girl Squads.
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  • Andrea
    January 1, 1970
    *I received this book from NetGalley in return for a honest review*There have been a lot of women/girls biography books come out in the past few years and I have read most of them, but this book brings something new to the genre for a few reasons.1. It focuses on groups of women. Women are so often pitted against each other but this book shows how friendships made these women great.2. The stories are longer. Instead of just short intros into a person, these stories are much longer, which means t *I received this book from NetGalley in return for a honest review*There have been a lot of women/girls biography books come out in the past few years and I have read most of them, but this book brings something new to the genre for a few reasons.1. It focuses on groups of women. Women are so often pitted against each other but this book shows how friendships made these women great.2. The stories are longer. Instead of just short intros into a person, these stories are much longer, which means that you can get into more of their lives and who they really are.Overall I really enjoyed reading this book and I think that it will be a great book especially for tween and teens, but even I learned a lot about women that I had never heard of before.
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  • Victoria
    January 1, 1970
    Sam Maggs writes great books about women in history, and Girl Squads continues that greatness as she writes about teams of women who have worked together to make history.Representing a great range of people from the skiing sisters, Shirley and Sharon Frith to the Patriotic Women’s League Of Iran to The Red Lanterns Shining in China, this book covers a variety of squads that worked together to create and do things and does it well. With funny moments and poignant thoughts this book delivers some Sam Maggs writes great books about women in history, and Girl Squads continues that greatness as she writes about teams of women who have worked together to make history.Representing a great range of people from the skiing sisters, Shirley and Sharon Frith to the Patriotic Women’s League Of Iran to The Red Lanterns Shining in China, this book covers a variety of squads that worked together to create and do things and does it well. With funny moments and poignant thoughts this book delivers some incredible stories about incredible people. This book has a great layout with different sections for different areas and if the cover is anything to go by the illustrations to come to go with these chapters are going to look incredible. The stories are told beautifully and cover everything you would need to know - and makes you want to know so much more about these squadss and make your own to go save the world with. A fantastic read I highly recommend to anyone who wants to know about the power and strength of women or wants to share it. (I received an ARC from Netgalley for a honest review)
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  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    ** I received an advance reader copy of this book for free through a Goodreads giveaway. **This is a well-written, easy to read and fun exploration of various female friendships/teams throughout history that changed the world in one way or another. From the female volleyball team from Japan that changed both the sport and gave the Japanese people a reason to be proud again after WWII to the women in Finland who fought for equal rights in the early 1900s, there is plenty of information to be gain ** I received an advance reader copy of this book for free through a Goodreads giveaway. **This is a well-written, easy to read and fun exploration of various female friendships/teams throughout history that changed the world in one way or another. From the female volleyball team from Japan that changed both the sport and gave the Japanese people a reason to be proud again after WWII to the women in Finland who fought for equal rights in the early 1900s, there is plenty of information to be gained. I truly enjoyed reading this book and have to admit that I learned quite a bit, there were several groups that I had never heard of before. Definitely recommended.
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  • Tabby Shiflett
    January 1, 1970
    A good introduction to some amazing women and their contributions to women's equality, specifically for a younger audience. Although the writing is witty at times, sometimes it's just a little annoying. However, that being said, the mini bios included in this collection are stories that should be shared. A good start for anyone wanting to read more detailed biographies of these women. The women portrayed are from different cultures, locations, and eras, so kudos for that. I was especially moved A good introduction to some amazing women and their contributions to women's equality, specifically for a younger audience. Although the writing is witty at times, sometimes it's just a little annoying. However, that being said, the mini bios included in this collection are stories that should be shared. A good start for anyone wanting to read more detailed biographies of these women. The women portrayed are from different cultures, locations, and eras, so kudos for that. I was especially moved by the Afghan music one.Net Galley Feedback
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  • Cat
    January 1, 1970
    Must have must read book for all females! I had never heard of most of these amazing women before this book and I now makes me wonder who else did history miss?? From divers to pirates, to princesses! Everyone who's done anything to advance our cause is in it! Why aren't these women revered as much as men?? Good and interesting read! Well researched!I received an ARC from the publisher in exchange for a fair review.
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  • Diane
    January 1, 1970
    Very well written book that I thoroughly enjoyed reading. The book gave some great examples of what is possible when strong women band together to change their environment & the world. I wasn't aware of most of these examples, so I got peak into history too. The stories are great examples of what women are able to accomplish when they work together instead of trying to tear each other down, which unfortunately happens way too often.
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  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    There have been quite a few titles published in the last few years that give short essays on women (and their accomplishments) that history seems to have forgotten. Girl Squads is the first one I've seen about women supporting women and the accomplishments that were made as a result of that support. The short entries span recorded history and are divided into sections devoted to the arts, science, sports, politics/activism, and warriors. The squads discussed in each section were a mix of known a There have been quite a few titles published in the last few years that give short essays on women (and their accomplishments) that history seems to have forgotten. Girl Squads is the first one I've seen about women supporting women and the accomplishments that were made as a result of that support. The short entries span recorded history and are divided into sections devoted to the arts, science, sports, politics/activism, and warriors. The squads discussed in each section were a mix of known and unknown, and all were fascinating. The title is well-written and the short essays are very readable. I highly recommend it.
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  • lisa
    January 1, 1970
    Yet another book about the forgotten women of history, and how amazing they were, but this one has a unique view as it focuses on groups of women, or female friendships. As always, I hated the flippant tone of the book, and the weird asides that made references to Netflix and Wonder Woman, but what female wouldn't love a book that focused on the empowering female friendships throughout history? I would recommend this for any girl of any age.
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  • Markie
    January 1, 1970
    This is a great educational read for teens and up about some amazingly awesome women throughout history that changed the future for women. The author also has some pretty hilarious notations throughout the book that cracked me up and are very "girl power" positive. I learned a lot about these different groups that I hadn't known before. Worth the read and a fun learning experience.
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  • Lynne
    January 1, 1970
    RTC
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