At the Wolf's Table
The internationally bestselling novel based on the untold true story of the women conscripted to be Hitler's food tasters."They called it the Wolfsschanze, the Wolf's Lair. 'Wolf' was his nickname. As hapless as Little Red Riding Hood, I had ended up in his belly. A legion of hunters was out looking for him, and to get him in their grips they would gladly slay me as well."Germany, 1943: Twenty-six-year-old Rosa Sauer's parents are gone, and her husband Gregor is far away, fighting on the front lines of WWII. Impoverished and alone, she makes the fateful decision to leave war-torn Berlin to live with her in-laws in the countryside, thinking she'll find refuge there. But one morning, the SS come to tell her she has been conscripted to be one of Hitler's tasters: three times a day, she and nine other women go to his secret headquarters, the Wolf's Lair, to eat his meals before he does. Forced to eat what might kill them, the tasters begin to divide into The Fanatics, those loyal to Hitler, and the women like Rosa who insist they aren't Nazis, even as they risk their lives every day for Hitler's.As secrets and resentments grow, this unlikely sisterhood reaches its own dramatic climax. What's more, one of Rosa's SS guards has become dangerously familiar, and the war is worsening outside. As the months pass, it becomes increasingly clear that Rosa and everyone she knows are on the wrong side of history.

At the Wolf's Table Details

TitleAt the Wolf's Table
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 29th, 2019
PublisherFlatiron Books
ISBN-139781250179142
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Fiction, War, World War II

At the Wolf's Table Review

  • Will Byrnes
    January 1, 1970
    Fear comes to me three times a day, always without knocking. It sits beside me and if I stand up it follows me, by now it’s practically a constant companion. World War II. Death could arrive at any moment, particularly when your city is being targeted by enemy bombers. In a way, a sudden violent end becomes the expectation. One to be avoided if at all possible, of course. Rosa Sauer flees the Allied bombing of Berlin in Autumn 1943. Though married, her husband had joined the army. She goes t Fear comes to me three times a day, always without knocking. It sits beside me and if I stand up it follows me, by now it’s practically a constant companion. World War II. Death could arrive at any moment, particularly when your city is being targeted by enemy bombers. In a way, a sudden violent end becomes the expectation. One to be avoided if at all possible, of course. Rosa Sauer flees the Allied bombing of Berlin in Autumn 1943. Though married, her husband had joined the army. She goes to stay with her in-laws in the town of East Partsch, in East Prussia. But, in a classic case of out-of-the-frying-pan-into-the-fire, she finds herself in a situation every bit as perilous as the threat she had fled. Soon after her arrival, members of the SS arrive at her in-laws’ house and inform Rosa that she has been selected to serve her country in a most unusual manner. It seems the Fuehrer’s base of operations (Wolfsschanze, aka The Wolf’s Lair, now Parcz, Poland) is only a few miles away, and, among his other psychiatric challenges, he is terrified that his food might be poisoned. (Well, maybe not so crazy about fearing assassination) She will be one of fifteen young women drafted to become Hitler’s food tasters. The upside, of course, is that she will be eating much better than most Germans. The downside is well…you know. Rosella Postorino - image from Globalist In the beginning, the story alternates between her experience as a taster and the time immediately leading up to that. We get a look at Rosa’s personal history, and some of the events in Germany. There is a dark tale of 1933 book burnings led by Goebbels that seemed even a bit much for his own followers. It is particularly chilling. Most of the story is about the interactions among the women forced into this job. (Guess all the men were too scared?) They run a gamut, with a few Hitlerian true believers among the more usual range of humanity represented there, telling dark, racist tales that the eagerly gullible relish as wantonly as fans of InfoWars do today, with about as much basis in reality. There are perils this forced sisterhood face together, including mistreatment by the guards, and being forced to remain in the facility all the time instead of being bussed back and forth between home and work, after a failed assassination attempt on you-know-who. We learn some of the tasters’ secrets, and see their relationships evolve with the impact of shared misery. Rosa becomes friends with one taster who is shielding a particularly large piece of information. When she is generous with a younger taster the others give her a hard time about it, as if generosity were somehow a sign of weakness. Their relationships with the guards get complicated. Are they on the same team? Or are they prisoners? There is considerable sexual tension, as well. During the time when the tasters are still able to live outside the compound, Rosa is befriended by a local Baroness, eager for conversation with an educated, if untitled, woman from Berlin. Attending gatherings at the Baroness’s place comes with complications of its own. And there is the ever-present need to make the most of a bad situation. Margot Wölk at 95 – image from Der SpiegelRosa is a thoughtful Virgil leading us through this particular ring of hell, offering consideration of underlying moral questions. Why, for some time now, had I found myself in places I didn’t want to be in and acquiesced and didn’t rebel and continued to survive whenever someone was taken from me? The ability to adapt is human beings’ greatest resource, but the more I adapted, the less human I felt. She must cope with the probable loss of her husband, reported MIA. Is he gone? Should she hold out hope or accede to the likelihood of his demise? When push comes to shoot will you find yourself on the flat or pointed end of the bullet? Will you be able to decide for yourself or will you leave it to others to decide for you? I could have known about the mass graves, about the Jews who lay prone, huddled together, waiting for the shot to the back of the head, could have known about the earth shoveled onto their backs, and the wood ash and calcium hypochlorite so they wouldn’t stink, about the new layer of Jews who would lie down on the corpses and offer the backs of their heads in turn. I could have known about the children picked up by the hair and shot, about the kilometer-long lines of Jews or Russians—They’re Asian, they’re not like us--ready to fall into the graves or climb onto trucks to be gassed with carbon monoxide. I could have learned about it before the end of the war. I could have asked. I but I was afraid and couldn’t speak and didn’t want to know. Pastorino offers up some darkly comical tidbits about the not-so-fearless leader, including reference to his considerable problem with flatulence, (I can only imagine what Mel Brooks would have done with that) being afraid to go to sleep, becoming a vegetarian after visiting a slaughterhouse, keeping his aides up all night regaling them with stories, the late nights rich with Hitler humiliating his staff at length, which sounds uncomfortably familiar. They appeared to enjoy being the focus of his dark attention, like sycophants today. We learn that Eva Braun hated Blondi, the singing German Shepherd that Adolph doted on. And for all you white nationalists out there, you will also learn the proper way to deliver a Nazi salute.Margot Wölk is the actual person on whom Rosa Sauer was based. Wölk was interviewed on the occasion of her 95th birthday, in 2012. (links in EXTRA STUFF). Postorino happened cross the article in 2014 and thought it ideal subject matter for a novel, throwing together issues of daily mortal terror, sacrifice, adaptation, destiny, love, survival and guilt. Trying to relate to this person, whose life was so different from her own, Postorino gave her characteristics of herself, a particular appreciation for clothes, vanity, chattiness, her hair color and her name. Margot Wölk in 1931 – image from BZ-BerlinAnother novel about Frau Wölk, by V.S Alexander, The Taster, was published in the USA in 2018, a few weeks after Postorino’s book was published in Italy. Alexander’s book was released later in the UK under the title Her Hidden Life. A weird coincidence, but it seems likely that both were inspired by the same late-life revelations by Frau Wölk.At the Wolf’s Table, originally published in 2018 in Italy, was a big hit there, winning the Premio Campiello Literary Prize. The translation by Leah Janeczko is smooth. It reads as if written by an English speaker. My only gripe about the novel is that I found the romantic element less than persuasive. The strength of this novel is in giving us a character we can feel for, trying to survive in a time and place in which one’s continued existence could not be presumed from day to day. She is an intelligent, feeling person, who considers more than just the usual externalities, but offers an awareness of larger, deeper considerations. It also gives us a look at a little-seen aspect of Nazi Germany, a rare item indeed. And finally, it presents perspective (while written by an Italian) from a regular-person German, neither Nazi nor resistor. Postorino has served up a filling and delicious meal of a novel. Bon Appetit.Review posted – February 1, 2019Publication date-----USA – January 29, 2019-----Italy – January 11, 2018=============================EXTRA STUFFLinks to the author’s GR, Twitter, Instagram and FB pagesItems of Interest-----Polpettas Magazine - In Conversation with Rosella Postorino - by Margherita Visentini - a very worthwhile interview with the author, despite a less than perfect translation from Italian-----Reading Group Guide-----Revolvy - a bio of Margot Wölk - with some detail on her pre-taster life-----Spiegel Online - Hitler’s Food Taster: One Bite Away from Death - by Fabienne Hurst-----NY Times - What if the Powerful (and Paranoid) Started Using Official Tasters Again? - by Ligaya Mishan-----Wiki on The Wolf’s Lair-----Triumph of the Will - Although I had seen clips of this, I had never seen the entire film. Have now. The tasters, among others, are made to sit through it while at the compound. Remarkable film-making. What a waste of talent in promoting such a dark cause.
    more
  • Elyse Walters
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Flatiron Books for mailing me the advance copy of “At The Wolf’s Table” by the international best selling author: *Rosella Postorino*. This book was selling like hot cakes in Italy when it was first released- and soon Postorino was one of five nominees for the literature Campiello Prize. THIS BOOK WILL BE RELEASED IN STORES IN THE U.S. in January 2019. Rosella is also an editor. She speaks Italian, French, German, and English. This is her first novel translated into English. This is Thank you to Flatiron Books for mailing me the advance copy of “At The Wolf’s Table” by the international best selling author: *Rosella Postorino*. This book was selling like hot cakes in Italy when it was first released- and soon Postorino was one of five nominees for the literature Campiello Prize. THIS BOOK WILL BE RELEASED IN STORES IN THE U.S. in January 2019. Rosella is also an editor. She speaks Italian, French, German, and English. This is her first novel translated into English. This is a story - that in ‘part’, I was familiar with from having read “The Taster”, by V.S. Alexander last year. Both books - historical fiction - are haunting - chilling - hard to image yet ‘was’ imaginable from both author’s vivid storytelling. I learned ‘more’ fascinating information from THIS BOOK than ‘The Taster’.... yet both books are absorbing and well-researched. I’ll soon explain the ‘more’ ......But first I to comment on Rosella Postorino’s writing....which is so intimate, I can almost image that she’s a painter. Her descriptions are simplistic ( I mean that in the most complementary way), so clearly visual, I can see and feel everything she writes easily. Rosella doesn’t waste any time diving into the heart of the story. Perhaps being an ‘editor’ gives her an advantage skill?...I’ve no idea...but her writing was almost invisible. Is that possible? Writers... help me out!!!!! I’m not sure what I’m talking about here — ( a reader...not a writer )....I just know - her STORY FLOWED EFFORTLESSLY!!!From the first page to the last....I was ‘in-the-zone’.....the readers ZONE!!! The pure joy of reading an interesting story. Kudos to author Postorino. 📕✏️. The ‘MORE’: .......that I learned from reading this book:The inspiration for this story came from the real person named Margot Wölk. Margot died at age 96. She was one of Hitler’s tasters......last SURVIVING taster. In 2014, she told a Berlin TV channel about her experiences - THE FIRST TIME EVER - sharing those devastating years. Later that same year - at age 96 - she died. Rosella Postorino’s story begins in Germany 1943. Rosa Saucer was 26 years old. Her parents were gone and her husband, Gregor, was fighting on the front lines of WWII. Rosa was living in the country with her in-laws. She was a German - but had never been a Nazis. Rosa was one of ten women employed to taste Fuhrer’s food to ensure it had not been poisoned, against her will. “EAT UP —-eat it all. Wait an hour - live or die”. There were constant rumors that the British were out to poison Hitler. The women had plenty of food - ( veggies with either rice or noodles- as Hitler was a vegetarian), but each bite from the women was mixed with fear. They were victims and privileged. They ate to stay alive. They were supporting keeping alive the man everyone wanted dead. Fear - guilt - shame -catatonic - unbearable grief - horror - rape - loss - hunger - secrets - remorse - survival - forgiveness - love .......are some of many reasons why Rosa couldn’t tell even her husband Gregor - when the war ended - that she worked for Hitler ... she couldn’t confessed to her husband that she had trusted and loved a Nazi Lieutenant. “ The past doesn’t go away, but there’s no need to dredge it up, you can try to let it rest, hold your peace. The one thing I’ve learned from life is survival”. ...Written with tenderness and compassion....The characters were so real....Fascinating and repugnant. ...Margot Woelk’s tells her story: Photos of her - before she died at age 96 - can be found by googling her name.
    more
  • Ilenia Zodiaco
    January 1, 1970
    Lo sfondo è quello della seconda guerra mondiale. L'ambientazione quella della Germania Nazista. La produzione letteraria basata su queste coordinate è sconfinata ma la Postorino è riuscita - furbescamente - a darne una nuova chiave di lettura grazie all'adozione di un punto di vista inedito: quello delle assaggiatrici di Hitler, un gruppo di donne assoldate con il compito di mangiare per prime i pasti destinati al Fuhrer e quindi evitargli, in caso di avvelenamento, morte certa. Un sacrificio m Lo sfondo è quello della seconda guerra mondiale. L'ambientazione quella della Germania Nazista. La produzione letteraria basata su queste coordinate è sconfinata ma la Postorino è riuscita - furbescamente - a darne una nuova chiave di lettura grazie all'adozione di un punto di vista inedito: quello delle assaggiatrici di Hitler, un gruppo di donne assoldate con il compito di mangiare per prime i pasti destinati al Fuhrer e quindi evitargli, in caso di avvelenamento, morte certa. Un sacrificio meno onorevole rispetto alla morte in battaglia ma pur sempre patriottico. Pur partendo da una posizione apparentemente privilegiata (le assaggiatrici hanno accesso a cibi prelibati, ricevono uno stipendio, sicurezza e un trattamento di riguardo), la riflessione rimane comunque la stessa quando si indaga quel periodo storico: quali conseguenze ci sono per chi è stato un connivente? Quando si raggiunge un livello di complicità con un regime accettabile? Quando la colpa è collettiva in qualche modo si stempera ma la vergogna individuale non stinge. Un regime totalitario fa questo: in nome della collettività, isola i cittadini, li rende atomi, estranei gli uni agli altri. L'intreccio è piuttosto classico, non ha svolte narrative impreviste ma d'altronde non è questo l'elemento di forza del romanzo, bensì la solida costruzione dell'impianto psicologico. Rosella Postorino è davvero dotata di un grande talento nel descrivere i sentimenti ambivalenti dell'animo umano, le sue contraddizioni e i suoi desideri. Sono tanti i momenti dove la scrittura stupisce per vividezza e precisione. "Uno spillo sotto l'unghia", basta questa semplice citazione per descrivere la prosa della Postorino. Una retorica misurata che fa intravedere alcuni "trucchi" autoriali, come l'immancabile (continua qui https://ileniazodiaco.org/2018/03/31/...)
    more
  • Gabril
    January 1, 1970
    Abbandonato a pag.60 (perché il plagio del discorso di Kundera sulla merda e Dio - vedi L’insostenibile... -mi ha definitivamente irritato).Che dire?Sciatto, inqualificabile.Eppur premiato. Bah.Completo il giudizio, dopo avere letto altre parti del libro :Questo è un romanzo furbetto e artefatto: sia per la banalizzazione del contenuto, ridotto a feuilleton, sia per la banalità dello stile (del resto contenuto e stile sono l'indivisibile connubio che identifica chi scrive come capace o incapace) Abbandonato a pag.60 (perché il plagio del discorso di Kundera sulla merda e Dio - vedi L’insostenibile... -mi ha definitivamente irritato).Che dire?Sciatto, inqualificabile.Eppur premiato. Bah.Completo il giudizio, dopo avere letto altre parti del libro :Questo è un romanzo furbetto e artefatto: sia per la banalizzazione del contenuto, ridotto a feuilleton, sia per la banalità dello stile (del resto contenuto e stile sono l'indivisibile connubio che identifica chi scrive come capace o incapace); procede con prosa piatta e convenzionale e ogni tanto cerca di accalappiare il lettore con qualche pretenzioso amo retorico. Frasi come "Le rughe le disegnavano sul lato esterno degli occhi una minuscola pinna caudale che li faceva somigliare a due pesciolini" o "I gemelli dormivano su un fianco, la guancia schiacciata contro il braccio, la bocca aperta come una O compressa, deformata", e "sulla sua faccia cremosa, il sorriso si allargò come l’impronta di un dito"...fino ad arrivare al ridicolo "La notte in cui mi avvisò della licenza invece fu come ricevere una porta in faccia" sono solo alcuni degli esempi.La Postorino, poi, ha letteralmente copiato l'argomento dell'incompatibilità della merda e Dio dall'intramontabile capolavoro di Kundera (L'insostenibile leggerezza dell'essere, capitolo sul Kitsch) mettendolo in bocca al marito ingegnere, a cui l'andar soldato sviluppa il bernoccolo del ragionamento filosofico.Ci sarebbero molti altri esempi di banalità, qualunquismo, cattivo gusto, artificio...ma per non imperversare concludo con questa perla: [Hitler] "aveva trascorso la notte a rosicchiarsi le unghie, giusto per mettere qualcosa sotto i denti"...
    more
  • Tittirossa
    January 1, 1970
    Ci stavo girando attorno da un po', a questo libro. Da un lato mi attirava l'argomento (titolo e sinossi acchiapponi, a posteriori: avrebbe potuto essere ambientato in Corea del Nord, e loro essere le Assaggiatri di Kim, il contesto nazista, Hitler, etc. non fanno realmente parte della storia), dall'altro essendo l'autrice italiana – e avendo io un fortissimo pregiudizio* sugli autori italiani – non ero convintissima. La lettura dell'ottimo La scomparsa di Josef Mengele mi ci ha portato per cont Ci stavo girando attorno da un po', a questo libro. Da un lato mi attirava l'argomento (titolo e sinossi acchiapponi, a posteriori: avrebbe potuto essere ambientato in Corea del Nord, e loro essere le Assaggiatri di Kim, il contesto nazista, Hitler, etc. non fanno realmente parte della storia), dall'altro essendo l'autrice italiana – e avendo io un fortissimo pregiudizio* sugli autori italiani – non ero convintissima. La lettura dell'ottimo La scomparsa di Josef Mengele mi ci ha portato per contiguità.La trama è ininfluente, perché è un mero pretesto per descrivere le dinamiche relazionali di un ambiente chiuso con dei forti vincoli esterni non gestibili, e le reazioni emotive-sentimentali della protagonista agli stimoli esterni.Parte bene (la descrizione di un ambiente chiuso, gli echi dittatoriali, le reazioni emotive), sbanda un po' a metà strada (la descrizione della psicologia intra-femminile un po' stereotipata, nessun tentativo di approfondimento, robe buttate lì e lasciate a caso), recupera (fascinazione sentimental/umana per il cattivo, o quantomeno per quello che esercita il potere), si riperde (la Storia entra nella narrazione come elemento decisivo) .... ma nel finale tracolla e precipita. L'ultimo capitolo sembra appiccicato lì e scritto da un'altra persona, inutile e raffazzonato. Come scrittura e come senso, e toglie forza a tutto quel che viene prima, che già soffriva di una certa discontinuità ma aveva un suo equilibrio interno. *pregiudizio che ne è uscito rafforzato
    more
  • Travel.with.a.book
    January 1, 1970
    First I want to thank the Publisher of the book Flatiron for providing me with a copy.The book is a must must read because of one of the most powerful story I have personally ever read. I didn't know what the Wolf meant before reading the book I just read the book because of the best selling author Rosella Pastorino.She is the icon of writting excellent and powerful books that stay and make you think for more than a while.The wolf is a nickname for Hitler the book starts with Margot Wölk, the bo First I want to thank the Publisher of the book Flatiron for providing me with a copy.The book is a must must read because of one of the most powerful story I have personally ever read. I didn't know what the Wolf meant before reading the book I just read the book because of the best selling author Rosella Pastorino.She is the icon of writting excellent and powerful books that stay and make you think for more than a while.The wolf is a nickname for Hitler the book starts with Margot Wölk, the book is also written on the true story based on her.I could not believe at first that this happened for real I mean yes the story was just as if someone really experienced it but who would survive such as what Margot experienced and she still had faith in living, I wish no person her fate of live but in the end she was a winner and not her keeper.A story of someone's life being not just controlled but and played with every step she has to deal about all these people who don't care if she lives or dies.It was so hard not to understand but to think and realise that this was her story, she (Margot) was a real hero in that and this time that deserves to be remembered.The author describes the story with so much passion and dosen't hesitate to write such a Masterpiece like "At The Wolf's Table".The book is a 5 star read I'm so glad to have read it even though some parts of the story were so hard to read but as I was told from the story of my mom and dad how they experienced their war time was a remarkable story.I don't want to give too much away from the book because of the unique way that the author describes the story what Margot went through.This is the sample of the book: Germany, 1943: Twenty-six-year-old Rosa Sauer's parents are gone, and her husband Gregor is far away, fighting on the front lines of WWII. Impoverished and alone, she makes the fateful decision to leave war-torn Berlin to live with her in-laws in the countryside, thinking she'll find refuge there. But one morning, the SS come to tell her she has been conscripted to be one of Hitler's tasters: three times a day, she and nine other women go to his secret headquarters, the Wolf's Lair, to eat his meals before he does. Forced to eat what might kill them, the tasters begin to divide into The Fanatics, those loyal to Hitler, and the women like Rosa who insist they aren't Nazis, even as they risk their lives every day for Hitler's.As secrets and resentments grow, this unlikely sisterhood reaches its own dramatic climax. What's more, one of Rosa's SS guards has become dangerously familiar, and the war is worsening outside. As the months pass, it becomes increasingly clear that Rosa and everyone she knows are on the wrong side of history
    more
  • Jennifer Blankfein
    January 1, 1970
    For all reviews and recommendations (and links to article and video) please follow me on Book Nation by Jen. https://booknationbyjen.wordpress.comAccording to Google, “coming together and sharing a meal is the most communal and binding thing in almost every place in the world”. Eating together, and eating at all is usually considered a good thing, but after reading Rosella Postorino’s latest novel you may just change your mind!Based on truth, At the Wolf’s Table is about a group of German women For all reviews and recommendations (and links to article and video) please follow me on Book Nation by Jen. https://booknationbyjen.wordpress.comAccording to Google, “coming together and sharing a meal is the most communal and binding thing in almost every place in the world”. Eating together, and eating at all is usually considered a good thing, but after reading Rosella Postorino’s latest novel you may just change your mind!Based on truth, At the Wolf’s Table is about a group of German women in 1943 who are recruited by the Nazis to taste Hitler’s food before each meal to ensure it to be poison-free. As food becomes scarce and people are going hungry, these women are shuttled to the “Wolf’s Lair” in the morning to have full breakfasts and early lunches under the scrutiny of armed Nazi soldiers, then returned home and brought back at the end of the day for full dinners. After forcing themselves to fully consume each course they wait for illness to kick in, eating to stay alive and at the same time fearing death.Newly married and all alone, Rosa has lost both her parents, her husband Gregor has gone off to war and she has moved to the country to live with her in laws outside of Berlin. She has been recruited as a food taster for Hitler where she “would participate in the liturgy of the lunchroom together with other young German women- an army of worshippers prepared to receive on (our) tongues a Communion that wouldn’t redeem us.” Rosa tries to make friends with the other tasters but relationships between the women are strained; some of them are Nazi supporters, some are not, and some are hiding something; Jewish roots, affairs, pregnancy, rape, abortion…nobody is sure who to trust. Rosa’s husband is declared missing, and as her loneliness intensifies, she develops a risky relationship with one of the soldiers. Will her husband ever be found? Will she escape the perils of war?At The Wolf’s Lair provides a unique setting that highlights secrets, betrayals and sorrow amidst the constant fear in everyday life during World War ll. I enjoyed this story and recommend it!Here is an article about one of the real food tasters from WWll…http://m.spiegel.de/international/ger...And a video interview…https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=MNcZyBq...
    more
  • Dagio_maya
    January 1, 1970
    Un’autrice che non conoscevo; un titolo che ha stimolato la mia curiosità; Una storia che attinge a piene mani dalla realtà stessa. Le assaggiatrice, di fatti, sono esistite ed erano precisamente donne che furono reclutate (ovviamente senza possibilità di rifiutare) per consumare i pasti destinati al Fuhrer. Tutto ebbe inizio nell’autunno del ’43, nella Prussia orientale dove nascosto dalla foresta c’era un quartiere generale chiamato Wolfsschanze : la tana del lupo. La paranoia che gli inglesi Un’autrice che non conoscevo; un titolo che ha stimolato la mia curiosità; Una storia che attinge a piene mani dalla realtà stessa. Le assaggiatrice, di fatti, sono esistite ed erano precisamente donne che furono reclutate (ovviamente senza possibilità di rifiutare) per consumare i pasti destinati al Fuhrer. Tutto ebbe inizio nell’autunno del ’43, nella Prussia orientale dove nascosto dalla foresta c’era un quartiere generale chiamato Wolfsschanze : la tana del lupo. La paranoia che gli inglesi potessero contaminare il cibo destinato a Hitler si traduce in colazioni, pranzi e cene propinate a dieci donne che diventano cuscinetti per parare il colpo della morte destinata ad Hitler. Postorino viene a conoscenza di questa storia attraverso l’unica sopravvissuta, Margot Wolk, che dopo anni di silenzio, alla veneranda età di 96 anni, decide di parlare (http://www.spiegel.de/international/g...). L’autrice non riuscirà ad incontrala perché la Wolk morirà poco dopo; dunque il romanzo si basa su quell’unica testimonianza e tutte le informazioni che si sono potute recuperare. Del resto c’è un grande lavoro d’immedesimazione che la Postorino ha compiuto partendo dal nome stesso della protagonista che da Margot si tramuta in Rosa ricordandoci il suo stesso nome (Rosella). Da qui Storia e fantasia s’intrecciano in un ritratto narrativo verosimile che mette in scena tematiche importanti.Prima tra tutte c’è la sorellanza. Solo alcune si conoscevano in precedenza e, all’improvviso, ci si ritrova a condividere non solo il succulento cibo ma la sensazione continua della Morte. Una comunanza che si fa via via più profonda costruendo una catena di solidarietà tra donne che devono difendersi da un contesto maschile prevaricatore. C’è molta “fisicità”: ci sono corpi sottomessi, corpi che si ribellano ma anche corpi che desiderano come è naturale che sia. Tutto ciò consente di dare uno spessore umano ai protagonisti e, soprattutto, alle protagoniste di questo romanzo.Quello che mi è parso essere un tema centrale è quello della colpa e della vergogna:” La colpa collettiva è informe, la vergogna è un sentimento individuale.”Tutti insieme si vive come sonnambuli che non accettano l’abominevole realtà.Rosa stessa, che nella sua solitudine ritorna spesso al passato, ricorda le parole del padre di fronte a quel suo lavarsi le mani nei confronti di ciò che stava accadendo in Germania:” Sei responsabile del regime che tolleri, avrebbe gridato mio padre. L’esistenza di chiunque è consentita dall’ordinamento dello Stato in cui vive, pure quella di un eremita, lo capisci o no? Non sei immune da nessuna colpa politica, Rosa!Le sue riflessioni diventano, allora, quelle, di un popolo che deve, prima o poi, rendere conto di aver fatto o non fatto determinate scelte:” Abbiamo vissuto dodici anni sotto una dittatura, e non ce ne siamo quasi accorti. Che cosa permette agli esseri umani di vivere sotto una dittatura?Non c’era alternativa, questo è il nostro alibi. Ero responsabile soltanto del cibo che ingerivo, un gesto innocuo, mangiare: come può essere una colpa? Si vergognavano, le altre, di vendersi per duecento marchi al mese, ottimo salario e vitto senza paragoni? Di credere, come avevo creduto io, che immorale fosse sacrificare la propria vita, se il sacrificio non serviva a nulla? Io mi vergognavo davanti a mio padre, sebbene mio padre fosse morto, perché la vergogna ha bisogno di un censore per manifestarsi. Non c’era alternativa, dicevamo.”” Ad ascoltarlo con gli occhi chiusi, il suono della mensa sarebbe stato un suono buono. Il tinnire delle forchette sui piatti, il fruscio dell’acqua versata, il rintocco del vetro sul legno, il ruminare delle bocche, l’acciottolio di passi sul pavimento, l’accavallarsi di voci e versi di uccelli e cani che abbaiano, il rugghio distante di un trattore colto dalle finestre aperte. Sarebbe stato nient’altro che il tempo del convivio; fa tenerezza il bisogno umano di cibarsi per non morire.Ma se riaprivo gli occhi li vedevo, i guardiani in divisa, le armi cariche, i confini della nostra gabbia, e il rumore di stoviglie tornava a riecheggiare scarno, il suono compresso di qualcosa che sta per esplodere.”Probabilmente la storia è un pochino troppo edulcorata ma rimane un’interessante lettura.---------------------------------------------Incipit” Entrammo una alla volta. Dopo ore di attesa, in piedi nel corridoio, avevamo bisogno di sederci. La stanza era grande, le pareti bianche. Al centro, un lungo tavolo di legno su cui avevano già apparecchiato per noi. Ci fecero cenno di prendere posto.Mi sedetti e rimasi così, le mani intrecciate sulla pancia. Davanti a me, un piatto di ceramica bianca. Avevo fame. Le altre donne si erano sistemate senza far rumore. Eravamo in dieci. Alcune stavano dritte e compite, i capelli tirati in uno chignon. Altre si guardavano intorno. La ragazza di fronte a me strappava pellicine con i denti e le triturava sotto gli incisivi. Aveva guance morbide chiazzate di couperose. Aveva fame.Alle undici del mattino eravamo già affamate. Non dipendeva dall’aria di campagna, dal viaggio in pulmino. Quel buco nello stomaco era paura. Da anni avevamo fame e paura. E quando il profumo delle portate fu sotto il nostro naso, il battito cardiaco picchiò sulle tempie, la bocca si riempì di saliva. Guardai la ragazza con la couperose. Aveva la mia stessa voglia.I fagiolini erano conditi con il burro fuso. Non mangiavo burro dal giorno del mio matrimonio. L’odore dei peperoni arrostiti mi pizzicava le narici, il mio piatto traboccava, non facevo che fissarlo. In quello della ragazza di fronte a me, invece, c’erano riso e piselli.“Mangiate,” dissero dall’angolo della sala, ed era poco più che un invito, meno di un ordine. La vedevano, la voglia nei nostri occhi. Bocche dischiuse, respiro accelerato. Esitammo. Nessuno ci aveva augurato buon appetito, e allora forse potevo ancora alzarmi e dire grazie, le galline stamattina sono state generose, per oggi un uovo mi basterà.Contai di nuovo le convitate. Eravamo in dieci, non era l’ultima cena.”
    more
  • The Frahorus
    January 1, 1970
    Ho letto questo romanzo della Postorino perché scelto nel gruppo di lettura del mio paese, quindi non è stata una mia spontanea scelta averlo fra le mani. L'autrice ci narra le vicende di una ragazza, Rosa, che è stata scelta come assaggiatrice di Hitler: praticamente erano un gruppo di donne che dovevano assaggiare tutto il cibo destinato al dittatore tedesco per evitare che venisse avvelenato, quindi queste donne rischiavano di morire ogni volta che aprivano bocca in poche parole. Durante la n Ho letto questo romanzo della Postorino perché scelto nel gruppo di lettura del mio paese, quindi non è stata una mia spontanea scelta averlo fra le mani. L'autrice ci narra le vicende di una ragazza, Rosa, che è stata scelta come assaggiatrice di Hitler: praticamente erano un gruppo di donne che dovevano assaggiare tutto il cibo destinato al dittatore tedesco per evitare che venisse avvelenato, quindi queste donne rischiavano di morire ogni volta che aprivano bocca in poche parole. Durante la narrazione conosceremo le altre sue compagne di sventura e una storia d'amore che sboccerà (più o meno) tra Rosa e una SS. Se devo essere sincero mi sarei aspettato molto di più da questo romanzo, mi è parso che dopo un certo punto la storia avesse perso di mordente e di interesse, tramutandosi in una sorta di harmony. Questo mi ha fatto abbassare il voto, altrimenti avrei anche dato tre stelline senza problemi. Il finale è incommentabile.
    more
  • Acompassforbooks
    January 1, 1970
    At the Wolf's Table: A Novel by Rosella Postorino is the internationally bestselling novel based on the true story of Margot Wölk (1917-2014). She was a German secretary, who in 1942 was selected with other 14 women to taste Adolf Hitler’s food in case it were poisoned. Only many years later Margot Wölk, sole survivor of the group of tasters after the Second World War decides to publicly tell her story. She is 95 years old, and she reveals her truth only two years before dying in 2014. Hers is i At the Wolf's Table: A Novel by Rosella Postorino is the internationally bestselling novel based on the true story of Margot Wölk (1917-2014). She was a German secretary, who in 1942 was selected with other 14 women to taste Adolf Hitler’s food in case it were poisoned. Only many years later Margot Wölk, sole survivor of the group of tasters after the Second World War decides to publicly tell her story. She is 95 years old, and she reveals her truth only two years before dying in 2014. Hers is indeed an extremely hard story to tell and to live.
It is the story of a group of women in an ambiguous situation: on the one hand they have the privilege to eat delightful and abundant dishes in a period of food shortage but, on the other hand, they are forced to risk their life every day feeling guilty as they were indirectly fostering Hitler hence Nazism. The book explores some of the author’s favourite themes: the ambiguity of human instincts, the thin border between the victim and the perpetrator, coercion, the effects of totalitarian organisations on people.
However setting the story during the Holocaust - one of the darkest period in human history that caused 17 million of people, among which 6 million of Jews - that shook profoundly the pillars of collective unconscious, makes the words of the book go deeply down to the subconscious. They echo in that confuse zone where the emotional and instinctual drives of human experience are released from personality and consequences to enter a dark place like a black hole: a singularity of evil.
Rosela Postorino tries to go there, though always keeping a tight control over darkness. She tells the story by the tasters’ perspective which is original yet dangerous as it is that of the perpetrators, or better of those who join them in order to survive. Therefore, at the beginning of the reading one is struck by a particular and almost uncomfortable impression; a kind of disturbing guilt mixed with indignation so that one may be willing to yell at Postorino’s antiheroine: “Rosa please do something, run away, rebel to this! How can you stand tasting food to safeguard the evil man the rest of the world is trying to kill?”
Then the moment she starts a love affair with an SS capitan, it seems way too much and one wonders how such a conduct may get along with the sensitivity and humanity Postorino endowed  her main character with. We may take into consideration the effects of the Stockholm syndrome, a condition that causes victims to develop a psychological and affective alliance with their perpetrators, but this does not offer an exhausting explanation for a morbid love affair. This personality discrepancy creates a tension that makes the novel a page-turner as one is eager to find a reason for these contrasts. However, we do know that once the borders of morals are crossed, people’s motivations are hardly explicable through logic. They instead result soaked in an emotional promiscuity that weighs them down just before make them elusively disappear.
Then we may turn to the work of Hanna Arendt, the German philosopher naturalised as American citizen and in particular to her 1963 book Eichmann in Jerusalem: A Report on the Banality of Evil. It reports on Adolf Eichmann's trial for The New Yorker. He was a German Nazi SS lieutenant colonel and one of the major organizers of the Holocaust. The book offers an insightful reflection on the nature of evil. She underlines how one of the most frightening aspects of the Nazism was the banality of evil, namely the evil becoming part of everyday life, widely accepted as a normal aspect of daily routine. This was achieved by the ruling power taking advantage of human primordial drives and in particular of the instinct for survival.
Postorino’s At the Wolf's Table, telling a story that turns the ordinary and nurturing experience of eating into a potentially deathly one, seems to take part into the philosophical research about the nature of evil. It shows how human affective and instinctual complexities may be manipulated, transforming people silently and progressively into intentionally unaware assets for the power to use for its means, even when they are opposite to people ethics. And it is indeed this distortion that explain Rosa’s flush of love for a perpetrator.
Passing down the memory of Hitler’s tasters in order to reveal and raise awareness about the nature of evil and its traps seems to be the most original and key aspect that makes this novel worth reading.
    more
  • Natasha Niezgoda
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars, rounded down. Didn't follow-through with what was promised. Let’s talk about the pace of this book first. It was a slow start. It took me 140 pages (all of Part 1 and the beginning of Part 2) to emotionally connect with Rosa. Given that the book is only 275 pages, that’s a significant amount of time spent on building Rosa’s moral struggle without being exposed to it. I’m not sure how to describe the content of this book. It narrates the victimhood of members within the Third Reich, bu 3.5 stars, rounded down. Didn't follow-through with what was promised. Let’s talk about the pace of this book first. It was a slow start. It took me 140 pages (all of Part 1 and the beginning of Part 2) to emotionally connect with Rosa. Given that the book is only 275 pages, that’s a significant amount of time spent on building Rosa’s moral struggle without being exposed to it. I’m not sure how to describe the content of this book. It narrates the victimhood of members within the Third Reich, but never truly exposes the darkness of it. Maybe that’s what’s bothersome - the fear and isolation of being caught in this profound moral dilemma are held at arm’s length. Postorino never fully delves into it. And though her writing is so lyrical and vivid that you can quite literally picture the scene she’s depicting, you can’t attune your emotions to match. Rosa struggles with her disassociation from humanity. She’s too fearful to stand up for what is right, and then condemns those who do the same. It’s a horrible paradox - that choosing the right thing is basically choosing death. And yet, to continue living is, in fact, a death of its own. Because one must live with the deep consequence of not making the right decision. Which leads me to the end of the book. I found it a cop-out. It followed the very behavior of Rosa’s cowardice, which was to run away. Part 3 seemed written as an afterthought or by an entirely different author. It didn’t even have the same rhythm as parts 1 and 2. And it lacked any form of wisdom. In fact, it was petty in nature. This is hard. This subject is so pivotal within human history that anything stemming from it can’t be taken casually. I think the perspective was fresh (and I remain respectful to Margot Wolk, whom this was loosely based off of), but the thoroughness lacked.Thank you to Flatiron for the advanced copy.
    more
  • Michela De Bartolo
    January 1, 1970
    Questa è davvero una storia incredibile. Il cibo dovrebbe essere sempre gioia , vita , allegria, amore e passione ed invece in questo libro si trasforma in morte e paura . La nostra protagonista Rosa Sauer rappresenta nella realtà Margot Wolk . A 24 anni è sposata e lavora a Berlino come segretaria , scoppia la guerra e il marito viene chiamato al fronte , la sua casa viene bombardata e lei è costretta a trasferirsi in campagna dai suoceri . Li a soli 3 km viene stabilito il quartiere generale d Questa è davvero una storia incredibile. Il cibo dovrebbe essere sempre gioia , vita , allegria, amore e passione ed invece in questo libro si trasforma in morte e paura . La nostra protagonista Rosa Sauer rappresenta nella realtà Margot Wolk . A 24 anni è sposata e lavora a Berlino come segretaria , scoppia la guerra e il marito viene chiamato al fronte , la sua casa viene bombardata e lei è costretta a trasferirsi in campagna dai suoceri . Li a soli 3 km viene stabilito il quartiere generale di Hitler. Appena trasferita viene condotta dalle SS “ la stanza era grande le pareti bianche . Al centro un lungo tavolo di legno su cui avevano già apparecchiato per noi. Ci fecero segno di prendere posto” è così Rosa si ritrova insieme ad altre donne a far parte di un corpo speciale quello delle Assaggiatrici di Hitler. Scopriranno così che Hitler è vegetariano, ma ogni giorno davanti quei piatti squisiti combatteranno tra la fame e la paura di morire . Dopo un tentativo di uccidere Hitler le assaggiatrici verranno rinchiuse e sorvegliate notte e giorno , qui subiranno violenze dalle SS . Sedute nella mensa forzata, nasceranno amicizie e rivalità tra queste donne . Vittima e carnefice sono sempre a confronto in questo libro , rosa diventerà l’ amante del tenente Ziegler che riuscita a farla scappare prima dell’arrivo dei Russi . Ritroverà suo marito alla fine della guerra , si occuperà di lui , ma entrambi vittime dei fantasmi del passato così da distruggere il loro amore . Le sorprese che riserva questo capitolo della storia dell’umanità , non finisce di stupirmi .
    more
  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    Non pensavo fosse una storia di questo tipo, mi ero immaginata che il contesto storico fosse ben argomentato ed invece è solo un flebile pretesto per parlare di altro.L'ho letto senza coinvolgimento e ho trovato alcuni passaggi sconnessi con il resto della storia. Anche il finale non mi ha convinta. Non so...
    more
  • Carol - Reading Writing and Riesling
    January 1, 1970
    My View:Brilliant! A narrative that authentically involves you in the war time Germany where the impossible to accept, the dangerous, the unthinkable… is normalised. This is a study of group behaviour; of how social isolation, separation from family support, societal and military control, of how war affects those actively involved in the warfare and those who remain at home. It is also a story of love – in many forms, of violence, of living in perpetual/potential danger and a story of survival.T My View:Brilliant! A narrative that authentically involves you in the war time Germany where the impossible to accept, the dangerous, the unthinkable… is normalised. This is a study of group behaviour; of how social isolation, separation from family support, societal and military control, of how war affects those actively involved in the warfare and those who remain at home. It is also a story of love – in many forms, of violence, of living in perpetual/potential danger and a story of survival.This is, at times, an intense and emotional read. I was disappointed when I read the last page - I was hungry for more. Brilliantly written, sensitively translated, this is a great read.
    more
  • Giovanna Tomai
    January 1, 1970
    Una storia di notevole intensità.Una scrittura matura, un crescendo, un vortice emotivo che mi ha sconquassata.Molto bello.
  • Fefs Messina
    January 1, 1970
    Do due stelle ma sarebbe una e mezza.Dimenticabile. Un approccio commerciale a un episodio storico altrimenti molto interessante e sconosciuto.Per una recensione molto più dettagliata.
  • angelareadsbooks
    January 1, 1970
    I was greatly disappointed by this one. I ended up abandoning the book at 50%. Just was not engaged with the writing or the characters. I recommend The Taster if you are looking for another book about this topic.
  • Amy (my_bibliophilia)
    January 1, 1970
    *****3 stars.***** Review in my account bookstagram Basada en hechos reales, esta es la historia de Rosa Sauer, una joven alemana que junto a otras 9 mujeres, se aseguran de probar la comida de Hitler y asegurarse de que no esté envenenada. Desayuno, almuerzo y cena, cada día, y son conscientes de que cada bocado podría ser el último. Aunque este motivo sea suficiente para hacer de su vida un infierno, Rosa también debe enfrentarse a la convivencia con las otras catadoras, de los soldado *****3 stars.***** Review in my account bookstagram Basada en hechos reales, esta es la historia de Rosa Sauer, una joven alemana que junto a otras 9 mujeres, se aseguran de probar la comida de Hitler y asegurarse de que no esté envenenada. Desayuno, almuerzo y cena, cada día, y son conscientes de que cada bocado podría ser el último. Aunque este motivo sea suficiente para hacer de su vida un infierno, Rosa también debe enfrentarse a la convivencia con las otras catadoras, de los soldados de las SS, y a la angustiosa espera del regreso de su marido, que lucha en la guerra, con la incertidumbre de si volverá a verlo con vida o no.Ésta es la historia de un grupo de mujeres que sin haberlo pedido se juegan la vida 3 veces al día. Para algunas es horrible, para otras es un honor servir al Führer; una historia llena de conflictos internos y supervivencia, porque aunque no lo parezca, algunas de esas mujeres están ahí para intentar sobrevivir.Un relato duro que hace estremecer al lector en ciertos momentos. Está bien narrado e históricamente es un buen reflejo de la Alemania del final de la guerra, cuando el pueblo Alemán aún tenía esperanzas de ganar una guerra, sin saber que el Tercer Reich tenía los días contados. El argumento del libro es bastante bueno y en algunos capítulos me tuvo enganchada pero me habría gustado conocer más cosas del resto de los personajes.Aunque avanza de manera un poco lenta y al final la historia resulte ser un poco floja, es un libro interesante y distinto está enfocado desde otro punto de vista que no se está acostumbrado a leer de la Segunda Guerra Mundial.
    more
  • Elisa Valenti
    January 1, 1970
    Cara Rosella Postorino, perdonami la schiettezza, ma la prossima volta che dovessi imbatterti in una storia vera che merita di essere raccontata e romanzata, lascia che a farlo sia qualcun altro. Una protagonista con una storia carica di drammaticità è stata trasformata in una donnetta insulsa. Posso solo allietarmi del fatto che la donna a cui questa storia si è ispirata non abbia mai avuto modo di leggere questo romanzo. Se almeno avessi voluto scrivere un romanzetto rosa o uno di quei libri i Cara Rosella Postorino, perdonami la schiettezza, ma la prossima volta che dovessi imbatterti in una storia vera che merita di essere raccontata e romanzata, lascia che a farlo sia qualcun altro. Una protagonista con una storia carica di drammaticità è stata trasformata in una donnetta insulsa. Posso solo allietarmi del fatto che la donna a cui questa storia si è ispirata non abbia mai avuto modo di leggere questo romanzo. Se almeno avessi voluto scrivere un romanzetto rosa o uno di quei libri in cui le protagoniste sono delle disadattate sessodipendenti con la sindrome di Stoccolma! Se almeno avessi avuto questa dichiarata intenzione, avrei potuto capire l'amore di Rosa (la protagonista) con un nazista psicotico stalker... me ne sarei fatta una ragione! E il furto del latte? Quanto è dannatamente stupido e poco credibile? E l'ebrea infiltrata? Mi sembra quanto meno una scelta banale e prevedibile..La copertina era bella, però.
    more
  • Gauss74
    January 1, 1970
    Nella costante ricerca di titoli interessanti da leggere/ascoltare tra quelli proposti da Audible (da ascoltare mentre faccio esercizio fisico: la mancanza di tempo mi ha ridotto a questo), questo "Le assaggiatrici" mi è saltato subito all'occhio.E non solo per aver vinto (meritatamente, devo dire) il premio Campiello, ma per l'ambizione di ritrarre la Wolffschanze: vale a dire uno dei peggiori incubi della storia recente.Che cosa voleva dire lavorare alle dirette dipendenze di Adolf Hitler, in Nella costante ricerca di titoli interessanti da leggere/ascoltare tra quelli proposti da Audible (da ascoltare mentre faccio esercizio fisico: la mancanza di tempo mi ha ridotto a questo), questo "Le assaggiatrici" mi è saltato subito all'occhio.E non solo per aver vinto (meritatamente, devo dire) il premio Campiello, ma per l'ambizione di ritrarre la Wolffschanze: vale a dire uno dei peggiori incubi della storia recente.Che cosa voleva dire lavorare alle dirette dipendenze di Adolf Hitler, in un ambiente dalla logica folle eppure organizzatissimo (viene in mente l' Inferno dantesco), impiegata in una mansione così senza senso come quella di assaggiatrice, che solo la ossessionata mente della bestia nazista poteva partorire?Pagate per mangiare in un mondo dominato dall'orrore e dalla morte anche e soprattutto per fame, e sempre con il volto della stessa morte davanti: ogni singolo boccone poteva essere l'ultimo. Il tutto nella consapevolezza della guerra, dell'olocausto, del pericolo dell'amore lontano. Come si poteva restare uomini nel delirante reich millenario al termine dei suoi tredici anni di vita?Il grande merito di Rosella Postorino è di averci dato un ritratto profondamente umano delle dieci assaggiatrici, e csì facendo averci offerto una chiave interpretativa di cosa ha voluto dire essere nazisti nel 1944, in piena guerra ed in pieno olocausto.L'uomo nazista è dominato da una rabbia feroce, discendente dalla miseria ma soprattutto dall'umiliazione del 1918 (che brutta pace quella di Versailles! Quanto danno ha fatto!); ha una istintiva sfiducia verso tutto ciò che è complesso, specifico, raccontato: a cosa serve la ragionevolezza dell'economista di turno quando tu hai fame?L'uomo nazista è dominato da una paura terribile: e quanto più ha paura tanto più è una bestia. Non stupisce che l'olocausto abbia raggiunto il suo culmine proprio nel 1944, quando l'ineluttabilità della fine cominciava a trapelare dalla ccortina della propaganda. Hanno paura tutti, in questo romanzo. Tremano i civili stipati nei rifugi antiaerei come in una bolgia dantesca, nella speranza di non restare seppelliti dalle bombe; tremano le assaggiatrici al pensiero della crudeltà delle SS e delle loro orrende punizioni, ed in nome di quella paura mentono e si tradiscono in continuazione (sentendosene pure giustificate! Bisogna pure sopravvivere); trema di quotidiana paura il terribile Albert Ziegler, l'ufficiale delle SS responsabile del servizio. Crudele e spietato, tanto più malvagio quanto più consapevole della propria debolezza, l'ex-assassino delle Einsazgruppen Ziegler cerca nella superiorità della razza, nel potere assoluto sui suoi subordinati, nella violenza gratuita la maniera per mascherare la sua debolezza che pure viene sempre fuori. Ed è da questa tensione continua che nascono le spaventose efferatezze della SS media. Rabbiosa, paurosa, debole, solipsista all'estremo è la gloriosa umanità nazista.Come? Vi ricorda qualcuno? Qualcuno di FAMILIARE forse?Quando ho finito "Le assaggiatrici" il eprsonaggio di Rosa mi suscitava istintiva simpatia, pure se ci riflettevo sopra con freddezza non potevo non concludere che fosse una cattiva persona. Il che è la dimostrazione definitiva che il libro è davvero molto ben scritto e raggiunge il suo obiettivo.Come molto raramente accade inoltre, questa umanità piegata e pervertita ma anche molto profonda (non c'è NIENTE di superficiale, qui) viene rappresentata dal punto di vista femminile: come spesso accade in un sistema di potere che fa dell'ignoranza un valore nel mondo nazista il ruolo della donna è subalterno e quasi accessorio, pure tutto il mondo femminile del Terzo Reich ha dovuto imparare ad essere donna, e donna nazista. In modo totale e profondo, con responsabilità. E ci è riuscito.Se l'atmosfera infernale della Wolffschanze è decritta molto bene, la guerra resta, volutamente sullo sfondo. In parte perchè era davvero così, molte sono le testimonianze che raccontano quanto fosse alienata dalla realtà l dirigenza nazista degli ultimi anni, ma in parte anche perchè questo non è un romanzo storico, si vuole raccontare altro. Pure è chiaro anche in questo libro che semplicemente non si poteva non sapere. Era impossibile stendere un velo di ignoranza completo su fatti tanto grandi come il fronte orientale e l'olocausto, persino per il dottor Goebbels. Tutti sapevano. E nessuno ha fatto nulla. E si sentivano pure giustificati. Brutta gente.Le ultime pagine, in cui si narra l'incontro di Rosa con il suo compagno Georg prigioniero di guerra dopo l'internamento in Russia, nonchè il loro ultimo saluto alle soglie degli anni novanta davvero non ho capito a cosa servano. Il romanzo aveva già detto quello che aveva da dire, e la parte finale non è altro che una lunga, sentimentale e malinconica chiusura.Sufficiente la lettura d Valentina Mari, che rende bene l'opprimante atmosfera della tana del Lupo ma che mi è sembrata un po' troppo ritmica, scandita quasi come un orologia, senza cambi di passo.
    more
  • lise.charmel
    January 1, 1970
    Le assaggiatrici è la stroria di un gruppo di donne che vennero ingaggiate nel 1944 per assaggiare i cibi di Hitler e verificare che non fossero avvelenati, prima che li mangiasse lui. Nel gruppo, aggregato forzatamente, si formeranno legami, amicizie, litigi, incomprensioni. Il tutto nello sfondo storico della Germania in guerra, con gli uomini lontani, le relazioni con i soldati, Ho trovato certe svolte narrative un po' scontate, ma penso che l'autrice le abbia impiegate per veicolare certi co Le assaggiatrici è la stroria di un gruppo di donne che vennero ingaggiate nel 1944 per assaggiare i cibi di Hitler e verificare che non fossero avvelenati, prima che li mangiasse lui. Nel gruppo, aggregato forzatamente, si formeranno legami, amicizie, litigi, incomprensioni. Il tutto nello sfondo storico della Germania in guerra, con gli uomini lontani, le relazioni con i soldati, Ho trovato certe svolte narrative un po' scontate, ma penso che l'autrice le abbia impiegate per veicolare certi concetti ai lettori. Tutto sommato una lettura valida, che mi sento di consigliare.
    more
  • Cristina Lee
    January 1, 1970
    Ebbene sì. La storia che Hitler faceva “assaggiare” il suo cibo prima di toccarlo per paura di essere avvelenato credo l’abbiano sentita tutti. L’originalità di riportare il mestiere di “assaggiatrici di Hitler” mi ha avvicinata al libro della Postorino, autrice che io personalmente non conoscevo. La prime pagine si divorano facilmente, fino a scemare pian piano in una sorta di “Embè? Allora? E quindi?”. Stile piacevole, peccato che la storia di per sé sia stata sviluppata in maniera lenta e poc Ebbene sì. La storia che Hitler faceva “assaggiare” il suo cibo prima di toccarlo per paura di essere avvelenato credo l’abbiano sentita tutti. L’originalità di riportare il mestiere di “assaggiatrici di Hitler” mi ha avvicinata al libro della Postorino, autrice che io personalmente non conoscevo. La prime pagine si divorano facilmente, fino a scemare pian piano in una sorta di “Embè? Allora? E quindi?”. Stile piacevole, peccato che la storia di per sé sia stata sviluppata in maniera lenta e poco avvincente. Noiosa o scontata a volte. Piatta. Manca quel pizzico di intensità che incolla il lettore alle pagine.
    more
  • Kalen
    January 1, 1970
    This seems to be getting a lot of mixed reviews (Thanks, Google Translate!) but I really liked it. The criticisms are that this isn't serious enough historical fiction and that Rosa isn't very sympathetic. For me, I think the only real stumbling block for me was her relationship with Ziegler which didn't feel believable. But what do I know? The Shelf Awareness review of this one provides the best summary I have seen so far: >Postorino's narrative is unusual among World War II novels. Rather t This seems to be getting a lot of mixed reviews (Thanks, Google Translate!) but I really liked it. The criticisms are that this isn't serious enough historical fiction and that Rosa isn't very sympathetic. For me, I think the only real stumbling block for me was her relationship with Ziegler which didn't feel believable. But what do I know? The Shelf Awareness review of this one provides the best summary I have seen so far: >Postorino's narrative is unusual among World War II novels. Rather than a story of stubborn resistance or unquestioning devotion to the Nazi cause, Rosa and her colleagues live in the gray area between. Rosa knows, as do they all, that their actions are tantamount to collaboration, but they also realize the privilege afforded them by a steady paycheck and three filling meals a day. Rosa, in particular, seems to find herself swept along by circumstance, though she gradually realizes that she must reckon with the implications not only of her actions, but of her willingness to go along with a cruel and corrupt system. This will be a great book for book groups because there is so much to think and talk about.
    more
  • Antonio Parrilla
    January 1, 1970
    Mi aspettavo, sinceramente, un livello ben diverso. Intendiamoci, ha tutto per essere un successo editoriale alla stregua dei libri di Volo o di Moccia, ma l'ambito in cui si muove è all'incirca quello. Una sorta di Harmony travestito da narrativa, in cui il contesto storico vien fuori da citazioni di curiosità rintracciate su Wikipedia, il senso etico e morale dell'epoca si perde tra gli amorazzi di questa frivola e smignotteggiante protagonista, il linguaggio stesso usato per il libro non è pe Mi aspettavo, sinceramente, un livello ben diverso. Intendiamoci, ha tutto per essere un successo editoriale alla stregua dei libri di Volo o di Moccia, ma l'ambito in cui si muove è all'incirca quello. Una sorta di Harmony travestito da narrativa, in cui il contesto storico vien fuori da citazioni di curiosità rintracciate su Wikipedia, il senso etico e morale dell'epoca si perde tra gli amorazzi di questa frivola e smignotteggiante protagonista, il linguaggio stesso usato per il libro non è per niente credibile se si tenta di farlo passare per le memorie di una donna degli anni '40. Eppure il libro venderà, per una serie di ragioni contingenti. E spero che, almeno, possa avere il merito di consentire a qualche nuovo lettore di avvicinarsi al mondo della narrativa (e poi, in una galassia molto lontana, al mondo della letteratura). Non è questo il compito dei Fabivolo di tutto il mondo?
    more
  • Jennifer (JC-S)
    January 1, 1970
    ‘The Führer needs you.’Adolf Hitler was afraid of being poisoned. Even in his heavily guarded headquarters, the Wolfsschanze (‘the Wolf’s Lair’), in East Prussia (now part of Poland) he feared that the British would poison him. In this novel, inspired by Margot Woelk’s account of her time as one of Hitler’s food tasters, Ms Postorino imagines the experiences of the women who were food tasters.Rosa Sauer, our narrator in this novel, is one of ten women from the nearby village of Gross-Partsch con ‘The Führer needs you.’Adolf Hitler was afraid of being poisoned. Even in his heavily guarded headquarters, the Wolfsschanze (‘the Wolf’s Lair’), in East Prussia (now part of Poland) he feared that the British would poison him. In this novel, inspired by Margot Woelk’s account of her time as one of Hitler’s food tasters, Ms Postorino imagines the experiences of the women who were food tasters.Rosa Sauer, our narrator in this novel, is one of ten women from the nearby village of Gross-Partsch conscripted to act as one of the food tastes. The women were driven to the Wolfsschanze twice each day, were made to eat the vegetarian meals prepared for Hitler. They then had to wait for an hour under guard, to ensure that the Führer’s food was safe for him to eat. And while sampling Hitler’s food had some advantages: many Germans were contending with food shortages; how could the women relax knowing that each meal could be their last?‘We had no alternative—that was our alibi. I was responsible only for the food I ingested. A harmless gesture, eating.’Rosa is something of an outsider in this group. Her mother was killed in a bombing raid in Berlin. She is staying with her parents-in-law in Gross-Partsch. Her husband, Gregor, is fighting at the front. Rosa’s life is in turmoil when she is conscripted as a food taster and Gregor is reported missing in action.Rosa is in limbo. She does not know whether her husband is alive, she does not know whether each meal will be her last. She travels to Wolfsschanze on a bus each morning, and then home to help her mother-in-law with domestic chores. Gradually she becomes acquainted with the other women conscripted as food tasters, but there is little prospect of friendship here. The atmosphere is tense: the tension compounded by mutual distrust, the need to work together and the indifference or cruelty of the SS officers. The novel explores several difficult issues: should Rosa (and the other women) feel guilty about surviving? Do they really have any choice but to co-operate? Are they victims or collaborators? And, in thinking about possible answers to those questions, a reader must wonder exactly what they might do in the same circumstances.I found this novel unsettling. There are no simple answers to these questions. And, returning to Margot Woelk, I was not surprised to learn that she did not speak of her experiences until she was past her 95th birthday.Jennifer Cameron-Smith
    more
  • tasha
    January 1, 1970
    After about 3/4 of the way through, I'm pulling a DNF. Not sure if it's the translation but the writing is not all that great, the story is not grabbing me and I have no interest in these characters who are not dimensional at all. It all feels a bit clunky and unfortunately I have no desire to know how it all ends.
    more
  • wutheringhheights_
    January 1, 1970
    Da studentessa e amante della storia la prospettiva che il libro indaga mi ha subito interessato.E' affascinante e deprimente insieme scoprire che Hitler utilizzava "assaggiatrici" per evitare di essere avvelenato.La prima domanda che mi è venuta spontanea, anche prima di leggere il libro, è stata: Come mai erano solo donne a fare da assaggiatrici? La risposta è venuta durante la presentazione del libro a cui ho assistito. E' stata l'autrice stessa a rimarcare quanto il regime nazista fosse masc Da studentessa e amante della storia la prospettiva che il libro indaga mi ha subito interessato.E' affascinante e deprimente insieme scoprire che Hitler utilizzava "assaggiatrici" per evitare di essere avvelenato.La prima domanda che mi è venuta spontanea, anche prima di leggere il libro, è stata: Come mai erano solo donne a fare da assaggiatrici? La risposta è venuta durante la presentazione del libro a cui ho assistito. E' stata l'autrice stessa a rimarcare quanto il regime nazista fosse maschilista. E poi, nel libro, viene spesso ripetuta una frase che fa drizzare le orecchie. Le donne sono come la massa; la massa è come le donne. Abbandonate, cieche, da guidare forse.Rosella Postorino, come ha raccontato durante la presentazione, ha tratto ispirazione da un articolo che parlava di una delle ultime assaggiatrici di Hitler. Il suo libro è una libera interpretazione della vita di quella donna che visse sul suo corpo la guerra, in un modo particolare. Ma non meno intenso.Cosa ho apprezzato del libro: innanzitutto la prosa. Rosella Postorino conosce senz'altro tutti gli artifici del mestiere. Usa le parole in modo accurato, spesso tagliente, e riesce a descrivere il mondo sensoriale della protagonista in modo ottimo. Basta una frase, qualche parola, e riusciamo a figurarci il corpo di lei, il dolore, le tenebre che la avvolgono. Ma anche il piacere, un piacere colpevole.In secondo luogo, il mondo metaforico che c'è nel libro. Il cibo diventa una metafora esattamente come il corpo, e queste metafore sono scandite alla perfezione. Corpo e cibo possono rappresentare uno strumento di piacere e uno strumento di dolore; attraverso il cibo il corpo cambia, vive o muore."Il cibo è un pericolo" dice la madre di Rosa ( la protagonista ) "Mangiare è pericoloso." Ma è solo quando Rosa diviene a tutti gli effetti una assaggiatrice che si rende conto di quanto il cibo sia pericoloso. Ogni boccone potrebbe essere l'ultimo.Mangiare significa vivere, per lei e le sue compagne, ma potrebbe significare morte.Il corpo è l'altra metafora affascinante. Durante la guerra, come ci insegnano libri ben più famosi di questo, libri che abbiamo studiato anche a scuola, il corpo di un uomo viene sempre fatto oggetto di mortificazione. I corpi sono dimenticati, maltrattati, violentati in ogni modo.E se un corpo volesse sopravvivere, invece? Se ai desideri morali si sovrapponesse il richiamo della vita? Questo è un tema davvero molto importante, perché non dobbiamo mai dimenticare di essere fatti di carne. Il corpo che cambia, che brama. Che cerca di sopravvivere. Che ha bisogno anche solo di un abbraccio. Oggi ci potrebbe sembrare assurdo - la mancanza di un abbraccio - perché ne riceviamo tanti. Ma in tempo di guerra non era affatto scontato dovere aspettare mesi, anni, una vita. Perché si rimaneva soli.Le cose che ho apprezzato di meno: l'insistenza della storia d'amore di Rosa con un tenente delle SS. Penso che sia stato un elemento importante, della trama, ma mi sarebbe piaciuto leggere di meno dei loro incontri. Io, forse perché amo molti i fatti storici, avrei preferito uno sguardo più ampio sul lato della guerra. Però mi rendo conto che questo è un romanzo che si basa su una prospettiva più intima, non voglio dire "femminile" ma certamente posso dire "umana". E' un libro intimo.Ci sono molti spunti, nel libro, da cui trarre argomenti di riflessione, e per questo motivo va sicuramente promosso. Io direi tre stelle.
    more
  • Francesca Maccani
    January 1, 1970
    Finalmente anch'io ho letto questo romanzo. Non lo recensisco perché in rete ne trovate mille di pezzi in merito.Devo dire che nonostante il tema e il periodo storico solitamente mi facciano fuggire a gambe levate, non è stato così per questo libro.L'ho letto d'un fiato. Tra ieri sera e oggi a pranzo.Notevole. Prosa curatissima e vicende intense, coinvolgentiLo consiglio proprio.(Avrei sfrondato un poco alcune parti ma io sono ermetica).
    more
  • Mary McBride
    January 1, 1970
    I really liked this novel about a group of women whom were forced to be food tasters for Hitler. A different perspective of the encroaching war and how it played into the lives, loves and beliefs of all involved.
  • Chiyo Chan
    January 1, 1970
    Mi aspettavo davvero molto di più. Dopo tutte le interviste e le promozioni a questo libro forse mi sono illusa di poter leggere un historical fiction degno di questo nome. Per tutto il tempo durante la lettura avevo la sensazione di tenere tra le mani un romanzetto rosa (neanche dei migliori tra l'altro). Tutta la trama era come distaccata dal contesto storico dell'epoca, troppi pochi dettagli sui luoghi non mi hanno permesso di contestualizzare a dovere.Solo il lavoro della protagonista ricor Mi aspettavo davvero molto di più. Dopo tutte le interviste e le promozioni a questo libro forse mi sono illusa di poter leggere un historical fiction degno di questo nome. Per tutto il tempo durante la lettura avevo la sensazione di tenere tra le mani un romanzetto rosa (neanche dei migliori tra l'altro). Tutta la trama era come distaccata dal contesto storico dell'epoca, troppi pochi dettagli sui luoghi non mi hanno permesso di contestualizzare a dovere.Solo il lavoro della protagonista ricorda che ci si trova durante la seconda guerra mondiale. I salti temporali usati per creare l'intreccio hanno del potenziale, ma purtroppo non sono stati gestiti bene e nel complesso creano un po' di confusione. In modo particolare quando la protagonista riflette e si ricorda di qualcosa, successivamente si perde completamente il filo del discorso.La protagonista non mi è piaciuta, è insulsa. Non ha coraggio ed è la tipica persona che invece di combattere si lascia trascinare dalla corrente senza avere un comportamento che rispecchia ciò che pensa davvero. Per non parlare dei capitoli interi sui suoi dilemmi interiori: se non ti senti a tuo agio con ciò che fai, fai in modo che cambi qualcosa. Ma lei niente, testarda com'è arriva alla fine del libro senza una vera e propria evoluzione.Insomma, troppa introspezione e trama che non si regge in piedi se si esclude il lavoro di assaggiatrice. Contesto poco sviluppato, a parte i ricordi delle bombe a Berlino della protagonista non c'è altro che faccia dedurre che ci si trova in stato di guerra.Non consigliato, anzi evitatelo proprio se siete in cerca di un buon historical fiction.
    more
Write a review