When All Is Said
A tale of a single night. The story of a lifetime.If you had to pick five people to sum up your life, who would they be? If you were to raise a glass to each of them, what would you say? And what would you learn about yourself, when all is said and done?This is the story of Maurice Hannigan, who, over the course of a Saturday night in June, orders five different drinks at the Rainford House Hotel. With each he toasts a person vital to him: his doomed older brother, his troubled sister-in-law, his daughter of fifteen minutes, his son far off in America, and his late, lamented wife. And through these people, the ones who left him behind, he tells the story of his own life, with all its regrets and feuds, loves and triumphs.Beautifully written, powerfully felt, When All Is Said promises to be the next great Irish novel.

When All Is Said Details

TitleWhen All Is Said
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseMar 5th, 2019
PublisherThomas Dunne Books
ISBN-139781250200587
Rating
GenreFiction, Contemporary

When All Is Said Review

  • Paromjit
    January 1, 1970
    This is an exceptional, undeniably Irish, debut from Anne Griffin, the prose is effortlessly engaging and it is simultaneously heartbreaking and life affirming as we get intimately acquainted with the life and times of 84 year old Maurice Hannigan. Hannigan has packed up his life, leaving no loose threads prior to booking the most exclusive suite at the Rainsford House Hotel. Early on, we cotton on to how the night will end, but before that, Maurice settles in for an evening at the hotel bar to This is an exceptional, undeniably Irish, debut from Anne Griffin, the prose is effortlessly engaging and it is simultaneously heartbreaking and life affirming as we get intimately acquainted with the life and times of 84 year old Maurice Hannigan. Hannigan has packed up his life, leaving no loose threads prior to booking the most exclusive suite at the Rainsford House Hotel. Early on, we cotton on to how the night will end, but before that, Maurice settles in for an evening at the hotel bar to raise a toast for the five most important loves of his life. They are Tony, his brother, Molly, his daughter, Noreen or Auntie No-no, his son, Kevin, who emigrated to New Jersey, USA, becoming a notable journalist, and lastly, but of the most vital importance, his wife, Sadie.As Maurice reminisces, we become aware of just how close his bond with Tony is, of how school became a tortuous experience as he became convinced of just how stupid he is. He leaves at 10 years old to work, like his mother, for the local rich family, the Dollards, where he undergoes a plethora of the most unhappiest of experiences that are to leave him scarred for life and shape him to be the most unforgiving of men. The scales shift as through the years the Dollard fortunes drop substantially whilst Maurice becomes a astute entrepreneurial farmer, buying up the land around his farm, becoming financially secure and wealthy. He falls for Sadie hook, line and sinker, and to his surprise and joy, she returns his love. Sadie's sister, Noreen, is fiercely drawn to the sparkle, and she will go to any lengths to acquire it when she sees it, not afraid of making a fuss in public. Kevin makes a ritual of providing his father with rare whiskies. To Maurice's eternal regret, he has not been an expressive man, he has never been able to articulate the depth of his love to those nearest and dearest. It becomes transparently clear that loneliness has seeped into Maurice's heart and soul.Anne Griffin has written a touchingly profound and moving novel, of the oh so very human Maurice, his joys and tragedies, the ghosts who have been there in his life, and his concerns that the one ghost he really wants to see has proved to be elusive. Maurice is a character you cannot help but get emotionally invested in, despite his obsession for business and making money, which, of course, left him open to missing the opportunities to be with his loved ones when they may have needed him. This novel hones in what is important in life, family, friends and love. Maurice is not infallible, he had a drive for vengeance, not always aware of the consequences of his actions but I loved and adored him. This is a brilliantly enthralling story of Maurice, of his dyslexia, his family, heartbreak, and the Ireland he lives through. Hugely recommended. Many thanks to Hodder and Stoughton for an ARC.
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  • Katie B
    January 1, 1970
    This is a perfect example of a book I didn't want to end. I just fell in love with the main character to the point that by the end of the story I felt like he was an old friend. Maybe this book isn't going to be special for everyone, but I found it to be incredibly touching and brilliant. 84-year-old Maurice Hannigan takes a seat at a hotel bar in a small Irish town. Before the night is over, he will toast 5 people who made an impact in his life. The thing I kept thinking about while reading is This is a perfect example of a book I didn't want to end. I just fell in love with the main character to the point that by the end of the story I felt like he was an old friend. Maybe this book isn't going to be special for everyone, but I found it to be incredibly touching and brilliant. 84-year-old Maurice Hannigan takes a seat at a hotel bar in a small Irish town. Before the night is over, he will toast 5 people who made an impact in his life. The thing I kept thinking about while reading is how there are certain moments in life that might be insignificant to others, but they end up shaping you as a person. They might be things you want to forget, but you can't deny they helped define you. And that's why I was so moved by Maurice as he revisited these moments. The premise of the book sounds so simple, but yet there is so much substance. He's a complicated man and I was incredibly moved as I learned everything about him, the good, the bad, and all the stuff in between. I'm not even joking when I say it felt like I was sitting right there with him at the bar and when the night was over, I didn't want him to leave. I love when I feel emotionally connected to a character because it's a feeling that doesn't always happen, at least not on this level. I rarely pay much attention when other authors endorse a book, but I do find it worth noting John Boyne had some good things to say about the author and her novel. If you enjoyed The Heart's Invisible Furies, consider checking this book out. I won a free advance copy of this book in a giveaway but was under no obligation to post a review. All views expressed are my honest opinion.
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  • Felicia
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 Stars 🌟I'll begin this review by explaining why I chose this book in the first place. To put it simply, the author is Irish. I have become an avid fan of the modern Irish authors of late, John Boyne (who endorsed this book), Liz Nugent and Tana French just to name a few, and this debut by Anne Griffin definitely shows promise. I don't know what they are putting in the stout over there but it's working. This story involves a night at a bar with 80+ year old Maurice as he makes a toast to the 3.5 Stars 🌟I'll begin this review by explaining why I chose this book in the first place. To put it simply, the author is Irish. I have become an avid fan of the modern Irish authors of late, John Boyne (who endorsed this book), Liz Nugent and Tana French just to name a few, and this debut by Anne Griffin definitely shows promise. I don't know what they are putting in the stout over there but it's working. This story involves a night at a bar with 80+ year old Maurice as he makes a toast to the five most important and influential people to grace his life. Between toasts he reflects on the history with each person in his head as if he is speaking to his son. Each story is an in-depth look into the life and times of Maurice but he sometimes swerves off subject and becomes a bit wordy for my liking, although, through the magic of Griffin's writing, he eventually comes back around, seamlessly connecting the dots.Anne Griffin's storytelling is incredible and up there with some of the greats. Very talented and adepth at giving each character a voice of their own despite the fact that they are all introduced through the eyes of Maurice.With all of that being said, had I not been reading this as an ARC with the promise of a review, I may have given up on this book around the 50% mark. It just wasn't for me and that fact has nothing to do with the quality of Anne Griffin's prose. I found myself bored at times, feeling like this story really had no direction, no plateau, no progression at all, especially since the reader already knows the ending from the get-go. I've no doubt that most will fall in love with this story so I certainly do not discourage any reader from adding it to their shelves. I'm in no way put off from reading a book by this author in the future. For me, this particular effort feels like a premise that has been done before and better. I was provided an ARC of this book by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Kendall
    January 1, 1970
    Woo hoo!! Just got my copy... won this in a Goodreads giveaway! :) This never happens!! EEEEK with excitement.
  • TL
    January 1, 1970
    I recieved this via goodreads giveaways ,thanks! All my opinions are my own.*****Of all the money that e'er I hadI spent it in good companyAnd all the harm I've ever doneAlas it was to none but meAnd all I've done for want of witTo mem'ry now I can't recallSo fill to me the parting glassGood night and joy be to you all----So fill to me the parting glassAnd drink a health whate’er befall,And gently rise and softly callGood night and joy be to you all----Of all the comrades that e'er I hadThey're I recieved this via goodreads giveaways ,thanks! All my opinions are my own.*****Of all the money that e'er I hadI spent it in good companyAnd all the harm I've ever doneAlas it was to none but meAnd all I've done for want of witTo mem'ry now I can't recallSo fill to me the parting glassGood night and joy be to you all----So fill to me the parting glassAnd drink a health whate’er befall,And gently rise and softly callGood night and joy be to you all----Of all the comrades that e'er I hadThey're sorry for my going awayAnd all the sweethearts that e'er I hadThey'd wish me one more day to stayBut since it fell unto my lotThat I should rise and you should notI gently rise and softly callGood night and joy be to you all----A man may drink and not be drunkA man may fight and not be slainA man may court a pretty girlAnd perhaps be welcomed back againBut since it has so ought to beBy a time to rise and a time to fallCome fill to me the parting glassGood night and joy be with you allGood night and joy be with you all This song kept running through my mind when I was reading this. Not everything is applicable but the spirit of it I think fits nicely.I don't remember who said it was the Irish that were the best storytellers (Glen Hansard maybe?) but it's definitely right here. This is one of those books that makes me so happy I am a reader.We follow Maurice through his life as he toasts each person and tells the story of why they were important to him and instrumental in his life. He tells the story at his own pace and doesn't skip the warts of it all either. Some instances I felt for him, other times I felt sad/pity for him, and sometimes I just wanted to smack him upside the head or take him aside and tell him to stop being an idiot.Through it all though, I understood him in a way and never stopped being an eager listener. It felt like I was keeping him company beside his barstool and a fly on the wall when he was back in the past. It feels precious when he opens up, this man who kept things close to the vest.I guessed what he was planning early on.. Maurice doesn't keep it a secret but he doesn't lay everything out all at once either. Another one Pop Pop would have liked methinks.The ending is sad but a little bit beautiful in that way (to me at least)... it had me gripping the book a bit tighter and reading slower.. not wanting to say goodbye. The writing is so gorgeous and atmospheric but isn't loud and in your face... it's a quiet thing, letting you come to it. Make sense?Kudos to the author, can't wait to hear more from her.. highly recommend. :)
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  • Ova - Excuse My Reading
    January 1, 1970
    Written so purely, the string of emotions this novel stirred in me is massive. When All is Said is the story of 84 years old Maurice and 5 toasts he makes; on a milestone of his life, he is sitting on a barstool and remembers all 5 human beings with feelings of joy, pain, anger, regret, happiness, longing. It's so beautifully written, I confess it made me shed a tear or two, but it's more heartwarming than heart breaking, I promise. Isn't life itself is like that, and this is one of the books th Written so purely, the string of emotions this novel stirred in me is massive. When All is Said is the story of 84 years old Maurice and 5 toasts he makes; on a milestone of his life, he is sitting on a barstool and remembers all 5 human beings with feelings of joy, pain, anger, regret, happiness, longing. It's so beautifully written, I confess it made me shed a tear or two, but it's more heartwarming than heart breaking, I promise. Isn't life itself is like that, and this is one of the books that tells slices of other people's life in a mesmerising way, you won't regret reading it.
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  • Louise Wilson
    January 1, 1970
    At the bar in a grand hotel in a small Irish town sits 84 year old Maurice Hannigan. He's alone as usual. So pull up a chair and charge your glass, because Maurice is finally ready to tell his story. He will raise 5 toasts to the five people who have meant the most to him. Stories of joy, regret, a secret tragedy kept hidden and a fierce love that never found its voice.What a heartwarming but also a heartbreaking story this is. A beautifully written story. An old man sits at the bar and toast th At the bar in a grand hotel in a small Irish town sits 84 year old Maurice Hannigan. He's alone as usual. So pull up a chair and charge your glass, because Maurice is finally ready to tell his story. He will raise 5 toasts to the five people who have meant the most to him. Stories of joy, regret, a secret tragedy kept hidden and a fierce love that never found its voice.What a heartwarming but also a heartbreaking story this is. A beautifully written story. An old man sits at the bar and toast the most important people that have been in his life. All but his son have passed away. This tear jerker of a story covers every emotion from joy, sadness, love, compassion and much much more. Intertwined with these toasts lies another story, a mystery that involves a once rich family that was cruel to Maurice's family. You will guess the ending but that won't make you think any less of this wonderful story, I do recommend this book.I would like to thank NetGalley, Hodder & Stoughton and the author Anne Griffin for my ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • marilyn
    January 1, 1970
    Eighty four year old Maurice Hannigan is ready to say goodbye. All his affairs are in order, property sold, dog given to new owners, money in various accounts for various people, things given away, boxes packed with names of who gets the contents, everything done and sorted so he can enter a nursing home the next day. At least that is where he tells those in the know, that he is going. There are five people whose memories he want to toast first though. One of the most poignant is the toast to hi Eighty four year old Maurice Hannigan is ready to say goodbye. All his affairs are in order, property sold, dog given to new owners, money in various accounts for various people, things given away, boxes packed with names of who gets the contents, everything done and sorted so he can enter a nursing home the next day. At least that is where he tells those in the know, that he is going. There are five people whose memories he want to toast first though. One of the most poignant is the toast to his late brother. The love between Maurice and his older brother Tony, was something most people could only hope to have. Five years older than Maurice, Tony let Maurice know he would always be there to protect Maurice. Maybe reading wasn't Maurice's thing but Tony knew that Maurice would win in life, doing other things just as big or bigger than reading. When people asked Maurice what he wanted to be when he grew up, Maurice said he wanted to be Tony...it was as simple as that, nothing was better than Tony. That last person Maurice toasted to was his late wife, Sadie, who had died two years earlier. It's Sadie's death that has broken Maurice's heart and spirit and his depression is a bottomless pit. Maurice was always faithful to Sadie, never wanted another woman, but he knows he let her down in ways that he knew he was doing at the time. Stubbornness was always strong in Maurice, he was a stubborn man, set in his ways, always after money even after he had more than enough, despite the fact that Sadie didn't like that he was so intent on earning more money. So they didn't talk about money but at the same time, Sadie knew she could never order tea with her Sunday dinner because Maurice said they could have tea at home, instead. When Sadie rebelled, Maurice realized how much he'd hurt her at times and even then, he still couldn't just let her have her way. These types of things are on Maurice's mind as he makes his toast to her. Intertwined in these toasts is another story, a mystery, that concerns a once rich family that was not only unkind but cruel to Maurice's family. A young Maurice does something that ends up hurting that family and also Maurice gets his revenge on that family as he slowly buys up all their properties when they hit hard times. His need for revenge is what drives Maurice to keep working for more money, more than they could possibly need, and this urge colors all parts of his life. I suspected how the book would end and I was right. I felt sad during the entire book and certainly at the end. Depression can take your life while you are still alive and make you do things you might not do if you could see past that depression. Thank you to St. Martin's Press and NetGalley for this ARC.
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  • Miriam Smith
    January 1, 1970
    I'm always emotional at Christmas and reading this exceedingly powerful book, "When All Is Said" by Anne Griffin, over the Christmas holidays had me brimming with tears from the start.Although a very poignant, thoughtful and emotional book there are times you find yourself smiling through the tears and I absolutely adored reading this book.This is the story of 84 year old Maurice Hannigan, who, over the course of a Saturday night in June, orders five different drinks at the Rainford House Hotel I'm always emotional at Christmas and reading this exceedingly powerful book, "When All Is Said" by Anne Griffin, over the Christmas holidays had me brimming with tears from the start.Although a very poignant, thoughtful and emotional book there are times you find yourself smiling through the tears and I absolutely adored reading this book.This is the story of 84 year old Maurice Hannigan, who, over the course of a Saturday night in June, orders five different drinks at the Rainford House Hotel in Ireland. With each drink, he toasts a person vital to him and who made an impact and through these people, he tells the story of his own life, with all its regrets and feuds, loves and triumphs. 'A tale of a single night. The story of a lifetime.'The author has written from the heart and soul to create something very special in this unique and compelling and utterly engrossing story of a man reflecting on his life, his achievement, failures and loves lost and found, each recounter had me captivated and I felt lovingly connected to Maurice personally, touched by how he was now finally expressing his true feelings. I imagine a lot of people will have very similar thoughts towards the end of their lives and it made the story all the more thought provoking and emotionally compelling knowing the feelings of Maurice to be so obviously true to life. I really enjoyed this wholeheartedly Irish tale, I would happily recommend to anyone who enjoys Irish or family sagas, you shouldn't be disappointed and I would definitely read more by this talented author again. 4.5 stars rounded up to 5.
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  • Kristy K
    January 1, 1970
    When All is Said is a poignant and heartfelt novel. It is slow, flawed, and beautiful and I got emotional many times while reading it. Maurice sits at a bar alone looking back over his life and makes a toast to five people who influenced and changed his life: his brother, his daughter, his sister-in-law, his son, and his wife. He’s a cantankerous old man, in some ways reminiscent of Ove (A Man Called Ove), but where that book had dry humor this one is steeped in nostalgia. Early on you can see w When All is Said is a poignant and heartfelt novel. It is slow, flawed, and beautiful and I got emotional many times while reading it. Maurice sits at a bar alone looking back over his life and makes a toast to five people who influenced and changed his life: his brother, his daughter, his sister-in-law, his son, and his wife. He’s a cantankerous old man, in some ways reminiscent of Ove (A Man Called Ove), but where that book had dry humor this one is steeped in nostalgia. Early on you can see where it’s heading but when you get there, you’re still gutted. The writing is that of a seasoned author, yet I believe this is Griffin's debut book. I'm eagerly awaiting her next novel where I hope she can mend the broken heart she left me with.TW: (view spoiler)[ suicide (hide spoiler)]
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  • ʚϊɞ Shelley ʚϊɞ
    January 1, 1970
    If you had to pick five people to sum up your life and raise a glass to each of them, who would they be and what would you say? This is a book with great depth and interest, the pace of which is kept alive by subtle humour of what is potentially a mostly sad story of the protagonist, Maurice, who suffers so deeply from the loss of his wife. There are bits of Maurice within us all everywhere. Whether you find this book hilarious, sad, moving, comforting or bewildering will depend on you. What If you had to pick five people to sum up your life and raise a glass to each of them, who would they be and what would you say? This is a book with great depth and interest, the pace of which is kept alive by subtle humour of what is potentially a mostly sad story of the protagonist, Maurice, who suffers so deeply from the loss of his wife. There are bits of Maurice within us all everywhere. Whether you find this book hilarious, sad, moving, comforting or bewildering will depend on you. What is certain is that you will not be unaffected by the many characters and events in it. It’s an awful thing, to witness your mother cry. You cannot cure nor mend nor stick a plaster on. Ms. Griffin's stories, in their simplicity and honesty, are an exercise in pleasure. Exploring the most ordinary concepts, she creates profound understanding, and even with the most difficult subjects, like life and death, she manages to make the tale uplifting. This is a story about love and life, simply and elegantly told. The same things matter the world over: saving face and money. I found this book to be absolutely delightful, even though the theme isn't. There is sadness and heartbreak, happiness and many laugh out loud moments. It is extremely profound and deeply moving. This is a debut novel by Irish author Anne Griffin, and one I have no hesitation in recommending extremely highly. Overall I found the book a thoroughly enjoyable read. Thank you NetGalley, St. Martin's Press, Thomas Dunne Books and Anne Griffin for the opportunity to read this book in exchange for an impartial review; all opinions are my own.#WhenAllIsSaid #NetGalleyAll my reviews can be found on my blog:https://shelleyann01.blogspot.com
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  • Maria Hill AKA MH Books
    January 1, 1970
    Waitress just caught me crying 😢 in the restaurant finishing this - how embarrassing:)
  • Emily May
    January 1, 1970
    ARC provided in exchange for honest review 📚
  • Fiona
    January 1, 1970
    A heartbreaking and heartwarming story, beautifully told. Maurice, an old man now, sits at the bar toasting the most important people in his life, all of whom have passed away bar his son. He visits his past life through his memories of each of them, regretting words not said and often those he did say. Maurice is a flawed human being - difficult, grumpy, tight-fisted - all by his own admission. We learn through his retelling of his life how loved he was, however. His parents, brother and sister A heartbreaking and heartwarming story, beautifully told. Maurice, an old man now, sits at the bar toasting the most important people in his life, all of whom have passed away bar his son. He visits his past life through his memories of each of them, regretting words not said and often those he did say. Maurice is a flawed human being - difficult, grumpy, tight-fisted - all by his own admission. We learn through his retelling of his life how loved he was, however. His parents, brother and sisters, wife and son, loved him and cared about him. His problem was that he found it difficult to show them he felt the same way. We learn why he is the way he is and why he couldn’t change himself.Beautifully written in the way only the Irish can write, this story tugged at my heartstrings the whole way through. From his childhood, Maurice remembers his mother laughing when she saw a banana for the first time.My mother looked at it and laughed. Clear and melodious it was, like a song thrush. As each member of the family arrived to see the peculiar-looking fruit, my mother’s laugh started up once more. I willed others to come so she wouldn’t stop. I moved as close to her as I could, to taste and feel her happiness. I remember my head pushed in against the material of her apron, closing my eyes to hear her joy and feel her body vibrate. Irresistible.An easy 5 stars from me and I look forward to reading more by Anne Griffin. With thanks to Hodder & Stoughton/Sceptre and NetGalley for a free review copy.
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  • Anni
    January 1, 1970
    This is storytelling as in the oral tradition, with our elderly narrator reflecting on his life and the changing times in rural Ireland, before and after the Celtic Tiger boom. As he relates his story in a letter to his absent son, we relive all the highs and lows with him.It is a timeless tale, where 'a poor lad makes good’ as in folklore - and one that could have been written by H E Bates or even Thomas Hardy, but written as if spoken in the lyrical Irish vernacular that you can ‘hear’ as you This is storytelling as in the oral tradition, with our elderly narrator reflecting on his life and the changing times in rural Ireland, before and after the Celtic Tiger boom. As he relates his story in a letter to his absent son, we relive all the highs and lows with him.It is a timeless tale, where 'a poor lad makes good’ as in folklore - and one that could have been written by H E Bates or even Thomas Hardy, but written as if spoken in the lyrical Irish vernacular that you can ‘hear’ as you read. The characters are so well-written (especially the beloved older brother) that the story held my interest throughout, despite the often heartbreaking events and inevitable conclusion. Have your box of tissues handy.
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  • Helen (TBC)
    January 1, 1970
    phenomenal debut .. 5 whopping starsTo say I adored this book is an understatement, it's a breathtaking debut, told as the rambling narrative of an 84 year old man, one who recognises his flaws, one who doesn't try to hide or excuse them, one who is brutally honest about himself, and one who I fell a little bit in love with!From the humblest of beginnings Maurice tells his life story so vividly whilst raising a glass to the 5 people who impacted his life; the shame, heartbreak and hatred of his phenomenal debut .. 5 whopping starsTo say I adored this book is an understatement, it's a breathtaking debut, told as the rambling narrative of an 84 year old man, one who recognises his flaws, one who doesn't try to hide or excuse them, one who is brutally honest about himself, and one who I fell a little bit in love with!From the humblest of beginnings Maurice tells his life story so vividly whilst raising a glass to the 5 people who impacted his life; the shame, heartbreak and hatred of his early days, his love and regrets, the drive to succeed and the cost of that determination and the loneliness, bewilderment and desolation of bereavement. The writing is sublime, I was transported to the settings, shared in the emotions and truly didn't want this wonderful story to end .... ever!There are no big reveals, no twists to look out for, no OMG moments just a wonderful story, beautifully told. I will be recommending this gem of a book to anyone who will listen. Many thanks to NetGalley and Hodder & Stoughton for the opportunity to read this book. My honest thoughts and opinion are expressed in this review.
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  • Katie Lumsden
    January 1, 1970
    I really liked this novel. It's a powerful look at one man's life, the mistakes he's made and his bond with his family. It reminded me in tone of Tin Man. Beautifully written and one I'd definitely recommend!
  • Mary McBride
    January 1, 1970
    It seems that I have found a talented new Irish author thanks to the endorsement of John Boyne! And our trustworthy MacMillan rep:)I loved the story of 80+ year old Maurice and his life told in 5 toasts to the people that had a major impact on his life and love. Be prepared for a few tears...But do not miss when this is released in early 2019.5++
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  • Adele Shea
    January 1, 1970
    84 year old Maurice has had enough of life as he knows it and so decides to do something about it.Before his final act he goes to a hotel bar and toasts the lives of five people who changed his life and made him the man he is today.Heartwarming read.
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  • Donna Hines
    January 1, 1970
    If you could forget about earning a living and focus on making a life who would you choose to be by your side?Knowing your legacy is more important than wealth or career how would you go about living? What message would you wish to send long after you are gone?Wow!More than just a love story here as this new powerful story is written with poise and clarity by Anne Griffin.It's time to raise a glass. Lets toast to those we love...shall we?!Rainford House Hotel is the set location but I'll tell yo If you could forget about earning a living and focus on making a life who would you choose to be by your side?Knowing your legacy is more important than wealth or career how would you go about living? What message would you wish to send long after you are gone?Wow!More than just a love story here as this new powerful story is written with poise and clarity by Anne Griffin.It's time to raise a glass. Lets toast to those we love...shall we?!Rainford House Hotel is the set location but I'll tell you more goes on than meets the eye.Much is felt not heard, not visited, not necessarily even understood.What is left is a man who is remorseful for what and should have been but perhaps was never told by him so in a last ditch effort he tells his story that means so much to those who only wish it was spoken sooner.The stories told center upon those closest to him and those he had the deepest emotional connection with but it's so powerful and heartfelt that you simply cannot stop reading .A note to the wise-grab the Kleenex now as you'll be needing it!Amazing!Thank you Anne, her publisher, NetGalley, and Aldiko for this ARC in exchange for this honest review.
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  • SueLucie
    January 1, 1970
    Gruff old Irish farmer, widowed for a couple of years, contemplates his life, its highs and lows, the people he loves and has loved, events that have shaped his and others’ lives, and it makes for an absorbing read. Regrets? He has a few and thinks about trying to put things right where he can. I enjoyed this story and came to care about the characters very much indeed, especially Maurice himself who is self-aware but not self-pitying, and is really just a wise old man, content with his lot but Gruff old Irish farmer, widowed for a couple of years, contemplates his life, its highs and lows, the people he loves and has loved, events that have shaped his and others’ lives, and it makes for an absorbing read. Regrets? He has a few and thinks about trying to put things right where he can. I enjoyed this story and came to care about the characters very much indeed, especially Maurice himself who is self-aware but not self-pitying, and is really just a wise old man, content with his lot but bereft of the love of his life. It is emotionally engaging without being overly sentimental and I find that unusual these days. Superb writing in that beautiful Irish way I admire so much. This review seems a little thin but I’d hate to give anything away and urge you to immerse yourself in Maurice’s story. I can’t fault this book and would recommend it without hesitation.With thanks to Hodder & Stoughton via NetGalley for the opportunity to read an ARC.
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  • Shruti Ramanujam
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. You can find my original review =here.Maurice Hannigan is a man of few words. He prefers being alone, he’s a farmer with great business sense, and feelings just aren’t for him. One evening, he settles down at a bar in his town’s hotel and raises toasts to five people who were the most important characters in his life. Through these toasts, we learn of the man Maurice was and the man he presents himself to be.Griffin I received a copy of this book from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. You can find my original review =here.Maurice Hannigan is a man of few words. He prefers being alone, he’s a farmer with great business sense, and feelings just aren’t for him. One evening, he settles down at a bar in his town’s hotel and raises toasts to five people who were the most important characters in his life. Through these toasts, we learn of the man Maurice was and the man he presents himself to be.Griffin spins a story that, on the surface, seems to be about the five people Maurice is toasting, but really they’re about the man himself. And therein lies the beauty of this novel. This tear-inducing story lays bare every emotion Maurice has felt–joy, love, sadness, compassion–and can make a reader feel real invested in the story.While the book is short at 330 pages, you need to take your time reading it. It, after all, is the story of 84 years of things left unsaid. Take your time and settle in for the ride.I was a little thrown off by the ending. You’ll see it coming and yet you wouldn’t want to believe it. But there’s no other way such a poignant story could’ve ended.Read this book if you like literary fiction, stories about families and their secrets, and character-driven novels.
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  • michelle
    January 1, 1970
    84-year-old Maurice Hannigan is sitting at the bar in the Rainsford House Hotel, Rainsford Co Meath Ireland. Toasting five people that over the years has been the most important and influential people in his life. With each toast it tells the story of each person. Starting from when he was a little boy on a farm in rural Ireland, to present day. From the tragedy of his brother dying to regretting some of the things he has done in his life and also the joy of some of the events that has happened. 84-year-old Maurice Hannigan is sitting at the bar in the Rainsford House Hotel, Rainsford Co Meath Ireland. Toasting five people that over the years has been the most important and influential people in his life. With each toast it tells the story of each person. Starting from when he was a little boy on a farm in rural Ireland, to present day. From the tragedy of his brother dying to regretting some of the things he has done in his life and also the joy of some of the events that has happened.This is a heart-warming tale set in Ireland, that most of you will love. At first I didn’t warm to the character of Maurice. I thought he was quite selfish in his actions but, as the story went on you get to realise what a lonely individual he is and all he wants to do is correct the wrongs he has done in his life. This is a beautifully written novel for those that loves stories in an Irish setting.Thank you NetGalley and Hodder and Stoughton for a copy of this book.
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  • Aoife
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 starsI received an e-copy of this book from the publishers via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Maurice Hannigan is 84-year-olds and raising a toast to some of the most important people in his life. From his brother to his son, Hannigan tells the story of his life during five different drinks, and eventually will come to rest on the reason he's decided to finally share his stories by the end of the night.This book is very much sitting beside a lonely old man in a country pub and ac 3.5 starsI received an e-copy of this book from the publishers via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.Maurice Hannigan is 84-year-olds and raising a toast to some of the most important people in his life. From his brother to his son, Hannigan tells the story of his life during five different drinks, and eventually will come to rest on the reason he's decided to finally share his stories by the end of the night.This book is very much sitting beside a lonely old man in a country pub and accidentally becoming the ear for all of his tongue wagging. At first, you're a bit disgruntled as you'd rather just enjoy your pint rather than have to listen to him but eventually, before you know i,t, you're completely invested in his story and you want to know how everything ends (imagine as well, the people sitting at Forrest Gump's bus stop).Maurice was a character I had to warm up to. At first I did find him a grumpy, slightly selfish oul sod but the more I read, I could see the good parts of him as well - how much he loved and cherished his wife, and how he behaved with Noreen. I do think the storyline around the gold coin was a bit of a non-story, and one that seemed to take a way a bit from the main storyline of Maurice's life tales. I honestly didn't care about the coin and the ending result of it all was disappointing and an anti-climax to say the least.I did end up enjoying this story though, and people like a good chinwag then you may just enjoy Maurice's voice.
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  • Cheyenne
    January 1, 1970
    I had won an ARC of this book from a giveaway and hadn’t known anything about what it would be about except for the title. Well let me just tell you this is a very very well written book even for it being an uncorrected proof. Maurice is sitting in the bar of the rainsford hotel in Ireland. The rainsford has ties to his past years of which you will be told about throughout the 5 toasts he makes. As he sits in the bar drinking each choice drink he toasts a different person to sum up his life unti I had won an ARC of this book from a giveaway and hadn’t known anything about what it would be about except for the title. Well let me just tell you this is a very very well written book even for it being an uncorrected proof. Maurice is sitting in the bar of the rainsford hotel in Ireland. The rainsford has ties to his past years of which you will be told about throughout the 5 toasts he makes. As he sits in the bar drinking each choice drink he toasts a different person to sum up his life until he gets to the last roast and finally decides it’s time to rejoin his beloved wife Sadie. You’re reading the book as if it is written to you as he is talking to his son Kevin throughout the entire novel. You’re on an emotional roller coaster with Maurice throughout the love, hate, friendships, wrong doings etc etc. This book was by far better then I expected and I am privileged I was able to read this book before it goes on sale in the US.
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  • Christine Cheripka
    January 1, 1970
    I love the Irish people, their ways and their minds and their literature. When All Is Said is a fascinating story of Maurice Hannigan and his whole live , high points and low points ...It all takes place on one Saturday evening through reflections, memories and present day intermingling to sum up the 84 years of his life....We all have loves, regrets and memories that make up the sum of us...I won this book on Good Reads and enjoyed the journey it took me on.
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  • Kasa Cotugno
    January 1, 1970
    Maurice Hannigan sits at the end of a bar in the town near Dublin where he has lived all of his 84 years. He lifts five glasses to those who helped form his character, his life, over that time, and in doing so, tells his story. In the Irish tradition, there are family ties and respect for the land, but none of the famous influence of political upheaval that must have been going on in Greater Ireland at the time. As with Alice MacDermott, Anne Griffin is more interested in the look back interpret Maurice Hannigan sits at the end of a bar in the town near Dublin where he has lived all of his 84 years. He lifts five glasses to those who helped form his character, his life, over that time, and in doing so, tells his story. In the Irish tradition, there are family ties and respect for the land, but none of the famous influence of political upheaval that must have been going on in Greater Ireland at the time. As with Alice MacDermott, Anne Griffin is more interested in the look back interpretation of a life as the final flag approaches. She does this beautifully, nostalgically, and with clear introspection.
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  • Gloria Zak
    January 1, 1970
    WOW!!First I want to thank the author and publisher for an opportunity to read this book through the Goodreads giveaway program.I don't know what I expected. I normally only read thrillers, police procedurals, mysteries. But I wanted to expand my own horizons to see what I might be missing. And I surely did not want to miss this story.I had a difficult time at the beginning of the book getting used to the jargon and style of writing, but I didn't give up. I kept reading. And was soon engrossed i WOW!!First I want to thank the author and publisher for an opportunity to read this book through the Goodreads giveaway program.I don't know what I expected. I normally only read thrillers, police procedurals, mysteries. But I wanted to expand my own horizons to see what I might be missing. And I surely did not want to miss this story.I had a difficult time at the beginning of the book getting used to the jargon and style of writing, but I didn't give up. I kept reading. And was soon engrossed in the story of the Hannigans and the Dollards. And there is mystery to be found within the pages. This story has twists and turns as it develops. Satisfies a mystery lover like me.I love the process of telling the story through the 5 people that touched Maurice Hannigans life. I even shed a tear or two on an airplane as I read part of this story. I cannot say more without giving key elements away.All I will add is read this book and look for more from this author.I typically pass on my books so that others can read them and enjoy them too. This one I think I will keep. I may want to go back to it again, it was that good
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    Disclaimer: I received a free advanced copy of this book through Goodreads Giveaways. This book ... I loved this book. It’s not a grand, sweeping novel or a book with a twisty turning, edge of your seat plot, but my gosh I couldn’t put it down. This book takes you on a journey through one man’s life and the people in it as he toasts those who meant the most to him. The way this story is written, you feel as though you are sitting at the bar with him, listening with rapt attention, getting to kno Disclaimer: I received a free advanced copy of this book through Goodreads Giveaways. This book ... I loved this book. It’s not a grand, sweeping novel or a book with a twisty turning, edge of your seat plot, but my gosh I couldn’t put it down. This book takes you on a journey through one man’s life and the people in it as he toasts those who meant the most to him. The way this story is written, you feel as though you are sitting at the bar with him, listening with rapt attention, getting to know everything this man is through his story. This book will hit you right in the feels and I cried at the end. This book was a privilege to read. Oh, and FYI, this book must be read in an Irish accent. It makes it 159% better and real.
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  • Jeanne
    January 1, 1970
    Just beautiful. In its writing which touched your soul and characters who you only meet through the eyes of the elderly irishman. Nothing earth shattering in the actual story but written to stay with you
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