Wild Bill
The definitive true story of Wild Bill, the first lawman of the Wild West, by the #1 New York Times bestselling author of Dodge City .In July 1865, "Wild Bill" Hickok shot and killed Davis Tutt in Springfield, MO--the first quick-draw duel on the frontier. Thus began the reputation that made him a marked man to every gunslinger in the Wild West.James Butler Hickock was known across the frontier as a soldier, Union spy, scout, lawman, gunfighter, gambler, showman, and actor. He crossed paths with General Custer and Buffalo Bill Cody, as well as Ben Thompson and other young toughs gunning for the sheriff with the quickest draw west of the Mississippi.Wild Bill also fell in love--multiple times--before marrying the true love of his life, Agnes Lake, the impresario of a traveling circus. He would be buried however, next to fabled frontierswoman Calamity Jane.Even before his death, Wild Bill became a legend, with fiction sometimes supplanting fact in the stories that surfaced. Once, in a bar in Nebraska, he was confronted by four men, three of whom he killed in the ensuing gunfight. A famous Harper's Magazine article credited Hickok with slaying 10 men that day; by the 1870s, his career-long kill count was up to 100.The legend of Wild Bill has only grown since his death in 1876, when cowardly Jack McCall famously put a bullet through the back of his head during a card game. Bestselling author Tom Clavin has sifted through years of western lore to bring Hickock fully to life in this rip-roaring, spellbinding true story.

Wild Bill Details

TitleWild Bill
Author
ReleaseFeb 5th, 2019
PublisherSt. Martin's Press
ISBN-139781250173799
Rating
GenreHistory, Biography, Nonfiction, Westerns, North American Hi..., American History

Wild Bill Review

  • Paul Falk
    January 1, 1970
    Armed with contributing facts and figures based on countless hours of research, the author helped clearly debunk many of the outrageous myths that surrounded the larger-than-life figure, James Butler Hickok, the notorious, Wild Bill. Easy-to-follow, the main character became well-drawn as the storyline moved, chronologically, through his daring adventures. Springing more to life with every passing page, engrossing details were presented that added luster to his already admired persona. One fact, Armed with contributing facts and figures based on countless hours of research, the author helped clearly debunk many of the outrageous myths that surrounded the larger-than-life figure, James Butler Hickok, the notorious, Wild Bill. Easy-to-follow, the main character became well-drawn as the storyline moved, chronologically, through his daring adventures. Springing more to life with every passing page, engrossing details were presented that added luster to his already admired persona. One fact, however, that certainly carried a general consensus by all was the eagle-eyed, expertise that Wild Bill demonstrated time and again with his six shooters; he was in a class all to himself. According to all reliable witnesses, he was lightning fast on the draw with either hand and an extraordinary shot. A lawman of the Wild West, it was a deadly combination that any would-be criminal would not want to find themselves in front of the business end of one of his pistols. A legend in his own time, he was renowned for being a gunslinger, scout, spy, showman and gambler.The inherent power of the mind and its direct influence over the body was a contributing factor for the turning point in Wild Bill's life. It arrived with an unfortunate day when he mistakenly gunned down fellow peace officer and friend, Mike Williams. From that day forward, he was never the same. Every waking moment, he was haunted with that troubling memory. It was only shortly thereafter; his general health and well-being began to rapidly decline. In about a year hence, by age thirty-nine, he was a mere shell of his former self.Based on documented history, it could therefore be concluded that the killing of the Marshal produced a life-altering impact on Hickok's state of health both physically and mentally. In defiance to his dynamic personality, it was the kryptonite responsible for his ultimate demise - self-doubt. From beginning to end, this well-written narrative held me captive. For anyone in need of wanting to satisfy their curiosity about one of America's leading frontiersman, this absorbing novel would be the one of choice. I offer my thanks to NetGalley and St. Martin's Press for this ARC in exchange for an unbiased review.
    more
  • Valerity (Val)
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed this book on Wild Bill Hickok very much as an updated biography. Tom Clavin does a great job of sorting between hype and facts to get to what is more likely in the real story of James Butler Hickok and his exploits. Apparently, there had been a sibling named Bill that hadn’t survived, and James and his brother Lorenzo both were fond of calling themselves ‘Bill’ at times. When James went out on his own away from the family, the name stuck, along with various descriptors like Wild Bill o I enjoyed this book on Wild Bill Hickok very much as an updated biography. Tom Clavin does a great job of sorting between hype and facts to get to what is more likely in the real story of James Butler Hickok and his exploits. Apparently, there had been a sibling named Bill that hadn’t survived, and James and his brother Lorenzo both were fond of calling themselves ‘Bill’ at times. When James went out on his own away from the family, the name stuck, along with various descriptors like Wild Bill or Shanghai Bill.The book does a good job of telling about his short but exciting and event-filled life as a farmer, gunslinger, and lawman. After serving in the Civil War, Hickok made his way to Springfield, Missouri and was enjoying a spell of gambling. He’d met and become friends for a time with Davis Tutt another gambler, but the friendship soured. .Hickok was in a duel where he shot and killed Tutt in July 1865, displaying his lightning-fast quick-draw set his reputation. Unfortunately, it also made him a target for every wannabe gunslinger in the West who thought he was faster and wanted to prove it My thanks for the advance electronic copy that was provided by NetGalley, author Tom Clavin, and the publisher for my fair review.Also on my BookZone blog:https://wordpress.com/post/bookblog20...
    more
  • Juli
    January 1, 1970
    The Old West generated many tall tales about legendary characters...Wyatt Earp, Doc Holliday, Kit Carson...all larger than life. Their stories are a mix of truth and exaggeration...and I love every single tale! But my favorite by far is Wild Bill Hickok. Lawman. Gunfighter. Gambler. Showman. He did it all. And his legendary death at a card-table just made his story more spectacular.I read Tom Clavin's bestselling book on Dodge City when it came out. And loved it. When I saw he was writing a book The Old West generated many tall tales about legendary characters...Wyatt Earp, Doc Holliday, Kit Carson...all larger than life. Their stories are a mix of truth and exaggeration...and I love every single tale! But my favorite by far is Wild Bill Hickok. Lawman. Gunfighter. Gambler. Showman. He did it all. And his legendary death at a card-table just made his story more spectacular.I read Tom Clavin's bestselling book on Dodge City when it came out. And loved it. When I saw he was writing a book on Wild Bill, I knew I had to read it. The true story....the real Wild Bill....James Butler Hickok. Yay! I read this book a little bit at time, not only to savor the experience but to give myself time to let the facts and information settle into my brain. I can binge read fiction....but non fiction about people I find interesting I have to slow down and mosey my way through it. I'm glad I took my time. This book has a lot of information in it...some that I already knew and a lot that was new to me. Clavin separates fact from legend...and presents Hickok as a person, not an exaggerated Old West character. A man...not a tale bigger than life. Awesome read! As soon as I finished my review copy, I preordered the physical book for my husband. He loves the Old West with a capital L. LOVES it. He has Clavin's earlier book on Dodge City on his western bookshelf...along with Louis L'amour books and framed photos of Marshall Dillon and Festus Haggen. Old West fiction and truth side-by-side, as it has always been. **I voluntarily read an advanced readers copy of this book from St Martin's Press via NetGalley. All opinions expressed are entirely my own.**
    more
  • Julia Simpson-Urrutia
    January 1, 1970
    Not since Prairie Fires by Caroline Fraser have I read a book on the Old West that grips me as much as Wild Bill by Tom Clavin. Wild Bill (whose real name was James) is a historical character whose story is fascinating and ultimately tragic in much the same way as Princess Diana's. For one thing, it is impossible not to like Bill Hickok. He was too chivalrous not to like, even love, as so many men and women seem to have, both close-up and at a distance. Hickok favored justice and the underdog. H Not since Prairie Fires by Caroline Fraser have I read a book on the Old West that grips me as much as Wild Bill by Tom Clavin. Wild Bill (whose real name was James) is a historical character whose story is fascinating and ultimately tragic in much the same way as Princess Diana's. For one thing, it is impossible not to like Bill Hickok. He was too chivalrous not to like, even love, as so many men and women seem to have, both close-up and at a distance. Hickok favored justice and the underdog. He cared about those in need of help. Hickok was astonishing for his courage and God's grace upon him during the Civil War. (Advice: Read slowly. Your jaw will drop.) Clavin's measured and analytical (without being negative) approach to this biography makes reading it a joy. It seems he wisely wants to avoid the fate of Nichols, the journalist who wrote the 1867 piece in Harper's New Monthly on Wild Bill Hickok that made the young sharpshooter an overnight national hero. (Writers and cowboys share the experience of the rough ride, even if one is more psychological.) Clavin tells how that one story changed the lives of both writer and subject.Another element that makes Clavin's book valuable is his sensitive descriptions of people whom Hickok knew or who impacted the change of the West for good or ill. Clavin has a great sense of the right touch. He fuels the reader's interest with sensitively drawn depictions (starting with the prologue) of people like Davis Tutt (friend turned foe of Hickok), James Chisholm, half Scottish and half Cherokee, a kind man who spoke 14 native American dialects, Calamity Jane (whom Old West TV fans will remember from the phenomenal series Deadwood created by David Milch)--there is a great story of Jane and a loan--General Custer, Buffalo Bill Cody and an assortment of unsavory newcomers. The reader will be glad to know about them all. Setting the stage and explaining the co-players is so important. We want to grasp Hickok by the place and people of his, after all.The way towns are described gives great pause. The ones we live in today are no way what they once were. Clavin pulls the reader back to a past full of drama and tragedy today hidden by malls and modern streets. Kansas readers of this biography may appear downtown with startled expressions.I appreciated learning from Clavin that although Hickok tried to live up to the image created (perhaps disastrously) by Nichols, he was true to himself in ways that helped shape society--in my opinion, for the better. (How do we continue to tolerate, or for that matter, produce, creatures like McCall?) I really do not want to give too much away. I got the sense that Hickok did what he did because of his values. As I was reading, I could not get the comparison with Princess Diana out of my head: both she and Hickok were beautiful, talented, graceful human beings with flaws because they were human. They were daring, loved and hunted. They touched the people of their time and they paid the price for their gifts. Thank you, Tom Clavin. You have done a marvelous job in painting a haunting and moving picture of Wild Bill Hickok and the America he lived in. Thank you, as well #NetGalley and #St. Martin's Press. This will not be the first book I purchase hardback after reading the ebook version.
    more
  • Chris Wolak
    January 1, 1970
    Tom Clavin delivered a good yarn about a man so covered in legend and tall tales I’m surprised this book isn’t 500 pages long. This was a quick, entertaining read about the man and his times.
  • Steve
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed the author's first book, Dodge City. This latest one never disappoint. A very interesting and enjoyable read, A page turner into the life and death of the legendary marshal of the Old West, Wild Bill Hickok. Hickok was known as a quick draw with his guns and kept law and order as a U.S. marshal. Before he was a U.S. marshal, He was a Union spy during the Civil War. During his time as marshal, Hickok made enemies. In the town of Deadwood, He was challenged a few times to a showdown. He I enjoyed the author's first book, Dodge City. This latest one never disappoint. A very interesting and enjoyable read, A page turner into the life and death of the legendary marshal of the Old West, Wild Bill Hickok. Hickok was known as a quick draw with his guns and kept law and order as a U.S. marshal. Before he was a U.S. marshal, He was a Union spy during the Civil War. During his time as marshal, Hickok made enemies. In the town of Deadwood, He was challenged a few times to a showdown. He was also known to play poker, In one instant in a saloon in Deadwood Hickok was shot and killed in the back of the head while playing poker.
    more
  • Marianne
    January 1, 1970
    Growing up in a town where James Butler Hickock had been sheriff, I grew up with his legend. His legend, as well as Bill Cody who slaughtered the buffalo for the expansion of the railroads and General George Custer who was in charge of the fort just south of town. Around the same period, my grandmother and her family traveled in a wagon train to homestead just north of town. It was fascinating to read the history of the establishment of the town and to get a glimpse of what life must have been l Growing up in a town where James Butler Hickock had been sheriff, I grew up with his legend. His legend, as well as Bill Cody who slaughtered the buffalo for the expansion of the railroads and General George Custer who was in charge of the fort just south of town. Around the same period, my grandmother and her family traveled in a wagon train to homestead just north of town. It was fascinating to read the history of the establishment of the town and to get a glimpse of what life must have been like. I cringed with some of the treatment of the native Americans, and the bloodshed over slavery. Life was certainly cheap in those days and guns in ready supply. I thoroughly enjoyed the book and thought the author brought the period to life. Many thanks to netgalley and St Martin’s for an ARC. All opinions are my own. Recommend.
    more
  • Casey Wheeler
    January 1, 1970
    This book is well researched and written. The author has a writing style that makes the subject engaging and read less like a history rescitation and more like a story. While covering the life of Wild Bill Hickcock the author has a tendency to drift off to side stories, while interesting, they add little to the main subject. That aside, it is a very good biography.I recommend this book for anyone who has an interest in the life of Wild Bill Hickcock.I received a free Kindle copy of Wild Bill by This book is well researched and written. The author has a writing style that makes the subject engaging and read less like a history rescitation and more like a story. While covering the life of Wild Bill Hickcock the author has a tendency to drift off to side stories, while interesting, they add little to the main subject. That aside, it is a very good biography.I recommend this book for anyone who has an interest in the life of Wild Bill Hickcock.I received a free Kindle copy of Wild Bill by Tom Clavin courtesy of Net Galley  and St. Martins Press, the publisher. It was with the understanding that I would post a review on Net Galley, Goodreads, Amazon and my fiction book review blog. I also posted it to my Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google Plus pages.I requested this book as I have read a great deal about the West, but not about Wild Bill Hickcock in particular. This is the second book by the author that I have read.
    more
  • Bonnye Reed
    January 1, 1970
    GNab This was an excellent biography of James Butler Hickok, an actual exploration of the life of the man without the wild forays into yellow journalism we are more familiar with. I found very interesting the effects the Pottawatomie Massacre had on the decisions made by the Hickok family concerning their move from Homer, Oklahoma, westward to where land was cheaper and more productive. I liked that many of the facts about the man and his family were garnered from the letters that passed between GNab This was an excellent biography of James Butler Hickok, an actual exploration of the life of the man without the wild forays into yellow journalism we are more familiar with. I found very interesting the effects the Pottawatomie Massacre had on the decisions made by the Hickok family concerning their move from Homer, Oklahoma, westward to where land was cheaper and more productive. I liked that many of the facts about the man and his family were garnered from the letters that passed between them, rather than rumor and legend. I have not seen a better picture of this man's life and contributions to the growth of the west. I can highly recommend to friends and family. This was a very good read. I received a free electronic copy of this biography from Netgalley, Tom Clavin, and St. Martin's Press in exchange for an honest review. Thank you all for sharing your hard work with me. pub date Feb 5, 2019St Martin's Press
    more
  • Bookreporter.com Biography & Memoir
    January 1, 1970
    Bestselling author Tom Clavin (THE HEART OF EVERYTHING THAT IS, DODGE CITY) has turned his attention to one of the frontier’s best known characters: a heroic gunslinger whose exploits became fodder for news, legends and movies, his name almost synonymous with the West he grew up with.James Butler Hickok was a farm boy, barely out of his teens but fully able to wield a rifle, when the Civil War drew him into service for the Union Army, his father having run a spur of the Underground Railroad and Bestselling author Tom Clavin (THE HEART OF EVERYTHING THAT IS, DODGE CITY) has turned his attention to one of the frontier’s best known characters: a heroic gunslinger whose exploits became fodder for news, legends and movies, his name almost synonymous with the West he grew up with.James Butler Hickok was a farm boy, barely out of his teens but fully able to wield a rifle, when the Civil War drew him into service for the Union Army, his father having run a spur of the Underground Railroad and his loyalties to abolitionism quite clear. But as James warred, he wandered, heading to rumors of gold. A gambling dispute resulted in a gunfight worthy of Hollywood, and Hickok, now known as Wild Bill (William had been his father’s name), soon gained a reputation. A journalist recalling Wild Bill’s prowess wrote that “Hickok handled a pistol with the speed of lightning.” The young man, who was a fair writer himself, once wrote home, “I will tell you a few lyes,” avowing that he had quit swearing, drinking, dancing, chewing tobacco, “and I don’t speak to girls at all.”They were indeed “lyes,” as Wild Bill was ever enamored of shady ladies and strong drink. He dressed like a frontier fop with a wide hat, long mustache and rakish buckskins. His short life was remarkable for his direct contact with the movers and shakers of the day --- Buffalo Bill Cody, Kit Carson, General Custer, the James brothers, and Calamity Jane, with whom he was presumed to have been romantically involved (though some said otherwise). He may have married Jane, who wound up buried beside him (some said as a twisted prank) and certainly wed Agnes Lake, who was distinguished not just for being his wife but also for being the first and one of the only female circus owners at a time when that business was in its heyday.It’s clear that Clavin was taken with his subject, a man bigger than the tales spun about him, who lived within and occasionally outside the law, who managed to make a living as a skilled gambler, an indifferent actor, a fierce and feared lawman. Wild Bill’s rather short life ended in a tragic mishap, a gambling disagreement not unlike the one that incited his original reputation. His murder at a card table was probably facilitated by his rapidly failing eyesight, a disability that certainly dropped the curtain on his fame as a shootist. Clavin believes that Wild Bill “sensed that the American West was passing him by” and “died with his era.”Since much of Hickok’s life is layered in unsubstantiated lore, Clavin has done a masterful job of organizing the bits and pieces into a comprehensible, credible biography, as charming in its way as the man himself.Reviewed by Barbara Bamberger Scott
    more
  • Taylor Hensel
    January 1, 1970
    I don't know how much research Tom Clavin did for this trainwreck, but it certainly couldn't have been much. Despite being initially very engaging, Clavin plays way too fast and loose with the facts for me to be comfortable with. Among his more unforgivable errors are claiming that Hickok, whose career took place predominantly in the late 1860s and early 1870s, carried double-action .44 Colt revolvers. Any historian wanting their book on a figure as well-known as Wild Bill to be taken seriously I don't know how much research Tom Clavin did for this trainwreck, but it certainly couldn't have been much. Despite being initially very engaging, Clavin plays way too fast and loose with the facts for me to be comfortable with. Among his more unforgivable errors are claiming that Hickok, whose career took place predominantly in the late 1860s and early 1870s, carried double-action .44 Colt revolvers. Any historian wanting their book on a figure as well-known as Wild Bill to be taken seriously should know that the first double-action Colt revolver wasn't minted until 1877, one year after Hickok was assassinated. Secondly, despite including a ton of events that can't be proven, such as Hickok's romance with Susannah Moore, the Jefferson County, Nebraska gunfight, and various other tall-tales about Hickok's firearm prowess, Clavin completely leaves out one of the most famous and well-documented events of Hickok's life: his July 1870 brawl/gunfight with two 7th Cavalry troopers, Jeremy Lonergan and John Kyle. Even the mostly BS 1995 Walter Hill film "Wild Bill" made sure to include that. It'd be like writing a biography of Freddy Mercury and forgetting to mention the Live Aid concert. I think what upsets me the most about this book is that despite these errors, the book is very well-written. Clavin certainly knows how to tell a story, but life is too short to spend time on a book that displays this amount of piss-poor scholarship. If you want solid biographical material on Hickok check out anything written by Joseph G. Rosa, but especially his 1974 biography, "They Called Him Wild Bill." Bob Boze Bell's 2017 "The Illustrated Life and Times of Wild Bill Hickok" is also fun if you want a breezy, accessible, but still factual accounting of Hickok's life. As far as fiction goes, check out Pete Dexter's phenomenal 1986 novel, "Deadwood." Hell, just for Esses and Gees, read "The White Buffalo" by Richard Sale. At least it isn't claiming to be the final say on the matter. Do actual historical accounts a favor and leave Tom Clavin's factual dumpster fire on the new release shelf.
    more
  • Amy
    January 1, 1970
    Wild Bill: The True Story of the American Frontier's First Gunfighter is a fascinating read. I highly recommend it for history buffs. Five stars.
  • Kristine
    January 1, 1970
    Wild Bill by Tom Clavin is a free NetGalley ebook that I read in late December.Clavin writes about James Butler Hickok, a man of many hats, who had been proclaimed as one of the first quick-draw duelists/shootists, as well as a wagon teamster, Union scout, deputy marshal, umpire for Kansas baseball games, prospector in the Black Hills, briefly in a Wild West show, and a theatre actor. Every person he runs into seems to be given their own mini biography, like circus owner Agnes Lake, Martha ‘Cala Wild Bill by Tom Clavin is a free NetGalley ebook that I read in late December.Clavin writes about James Butler Hickok, a man of many hats, who had been proclaimed as one of the first quick-draw duelists/shootists, as well as a wagon teamster, Union scout, deputy marshal, umpire for Kansas baseball games, prospector in the Black Hills, briefly in a Wild West show, and a theatre actor. Every person he runs into seems to be given their own mini biography, like circus owner Agnes Lake, Martha ‘Calamity Jane’ Canary, Charles H. Utter, and Jack McCall, before going into the epilogue of the trial against McCall and the outcomes of his many compatriots.
    more
  • Jen Juenke
    January 1, 1970
    I learned so much from this book. I thought that I knew the story of Wild Bill Hickok....I did not. The author was very descriptive, honest (would tell the reader whether or not a fact was true or maybe fabricated), and I just enjoyed the story. It was a refreshing look at the time period right after the Civil War. The dying breed of man killers, justices, and marshalls in the wild west.Overall, I would definitely recommend this book to anyone interested in the Wild West, American History, or ju I learned so much from this book. I thought that I knew the story of Wild Bill Hickok....I did not. The author was very descriptive, honest (would tell the reader whether or not a fact was true or maybe fabricated), and I just enjoyed the story. It was a refreshing look at the time period right after the Civil War. The dying breed of man killers, justices, and marshalls in the wild west.Overall, I would definitely recommend this book to anyone interested in the Wild West, American History, or just to know more about Wild Bill.
    more
  • Lori
    January 1, 1970
    This is an interesting and entertaining look at the life of Wild Bill Hickok. Well researched and documented, Will Bill is written in a very engaging manner, and includes much history of the American West in general. Hickok was friends or compatriots with many legends of the west, so you see some of their stories as well. Many thanks to NetGalley and St. Martin's Press for the e-arc. I found it fascinating - highly recommend! 4.5 stars - rounded up because I laughed out loud several times, even This is an interesting and entertaining look at the life of Wild Bill Hickok. Well researched and documented, Will Bill is written in a very engaging manner, and includes much history of the American West in general. Hickok was friends or compatriots with many legends of the west, so you see some of their stories as well. Many thanks to NetGalley and St. Martin's Press for the e-arc. I found it fascinating - highly recommend! 4.5 stars - rounded up because I laughed out loud several times, even though parts of this story are tragic.
    more
  • John
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to St. Martin's Press and NetGalley for allowing me to read a prerelease digital copy of this book in exchange for a fair review. I enjoyed Tom Clavin's earlier Dodge City and was excited to see that he had done a biography of Wild Bill Hickok. The book did not disappoint. The story of James Butler Hickok, aka Will Bill, was well researched and well written. The author has a very easy to read writing style that while conveying all the facts never feels like a textbook. From the story of h Thanks to St. Martin's Press and NetGalley for allowing me to read a prerelease digital copy of this book in exchange for a fair review. I enjoyed Tom Clavin's earlier Dodge City and was excited to see that he had done a biography of Wild Bill Hickok. The book did not disappoint. The story of James Butler Hickok, aka Will Bill, was well researched and well written. The author has a very easy to read writing style that while conveying all the facts never feels like a textbook. From the story of his childhood to his later days as soldier, spy, scout, teamster, gunfighter, gambler, lawman and showman Wild Bill was a hard man not to like. With his long blonde locks and fringed outfits he was our first rock star, the subject of countless dime novels. But Clavin does a masterful job of cutting through the legend to the true story, and the true story was every bit as exciting as the legend. It is hard to imagine anyone leading a more colorful life. And through him we get to meet other colorful western characters like Buffalo Bill Cody, General James Armstrong Custer, John Wesley Hardin, Ben Thompson, and Calamity Jane. I highly recommend this book to anyone with an interest in the true story of the old west.
    more
  • David
    January 1, 1970
    A well researched account of the life of the western legend. The author spends a great deal of time debunking myths about Wild Bill Hickok. At times the book seems a bit academic, but it moves quickly and is a captivating read. The book takes many side paths into the lives of characters that came into Hickok’s life. At first this was distracting, but I came to appreciate the depth of the book. The writer went to great lengths to accurately portray the life and times of the often mythical charact A well researched account of the life of the western legend. The author spends a great deal of time debunking myths about Wild Bill Hickok. At times the book seems a bit academic, but it moves quickly and is a captivating read. The book takes many side paths into the lives of characters that came into Hickok’s life. At first this was distracting, but I came to appreciate the depth of the book. The writer went to great lengths to accurately portray the life and times of the often mythical character known as Wild Bill. Thanks to the publisher and NetGalley for providing a prerelease copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
    more
  • Missy Block
    January 1, 1970
    A well detailed true story of the first American Gunfighter James Butler Hickok better known as Wild Bill. A detailed summary of his well lived life from his birth to his assassination. His titles included spy, soldier, gunman, lawman and of course gambler and ladies man. This kept me intrigued and hooked from the first page. I loved the photography included along with personal letters. Tom Clavin took us beyond the myths and showed us the entire life that became a legend. The descriptive writin A well detailed true story of the first American Gunfighter James Butler Hickok better known as Wild Bill. A detailed summary of his well lived life from his birth to his assassination. His titles included spy, soldier, gunman, lawman and of course gambler and ladies man. This kept me intrigued and hooked from the first page. I loved the photography included along with personal letters. Tom Clavin took us beyond the myths and showed us the entire life that became a legend. The descriptive writing took us on a trip back in time. Cannot wait to get a copy of Dodge City as well.
    more
  • Claire
    January 1, 1970
    I learned a lot about the “ Wild West” and the characters who live there. I had heard, of course, the names and a little bit about some of the people, but was able to learn a lot from this well researched book. I listened to it as an audiobook, and it was engaging and well done. I recommend it for anyone who wants to know the facts about Wild Bill and The interesting characters who surrounded him.
    more
  • Mike
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed the book. There were things about the life of Wild Bill that I was unfamiliar with from other books I have read. Especially interesting were his lifelong friendship with Buffalo Bill and is time in the Union Army. I do feel that Mr. Clavin thoroughly researched the book. My basic problem with the book is that it was Chatty. References to pop culture and films is something I can do without in a serious book about this time period. All in all it was an enjoyable and informative read and I enjoyed the book. There were things about the life of Wild Bill that I was unfamiliar with from other books I have read. Especially interesting were his lifelong friendship with Buffalo Bill and is time in the Union Army. I do feel that Mr. Clavin thoroughly researched the book. My basic problem with the book is that it was Chatty. References to pop culture and films is something I can do without in a serious book about this time period. All in all it was an enjoyable and informative read and I would recommend to anyone interested in Wild Bill or the Wild West.
    more
  • Michelle Wyche
    January 1, 1970
    I have heard of Wild Bill prior to reading this book by Tom Clavin, but I did not really know who he was. It was interesting reading about his connections with other famous wild west men. It was also interesting to learn the life of Wild Bill. If you are a person who is into history, I recommend 'Wild Bill" by Tom Clavin.
    more
  • Joe Slavinsky
    January 1, 1970
    This is a rather engaging, and interesting book. It seems extremely well-researched, and dispels some of the back-story, and wild rumors in the life of "Wild Bill". It was reminiscent of Mary Doria Russell's "Doc", in that it was well-written, and made me feel like I learned something. I am going to dig up a copy of Clavin's "Dodge City", to learn more about that part of America's history.
    more
  • Sandi
    January 1, 1970
    I have not read about the west so wild Bill was a good subject
  • Mary Jo
    January 1, 1970
    I always enjoy reading about the legendary figures of the American West. This was a good one!
Write a review