Odd One Out
From the New York Times bestselling author of Dear Martin comes this illuminating exploration of old friendships, new crushes, and the path to self-discovery.Courtney "Coop" CooperDumped. Again. And normally I wouldn't mind. But right now, my best friend and source of solace, Jupiter Sanchez, is ignoring me to text some girl. Rae Evelyn ChinI assumed "new girl" would be synonymous with "pariah," but Jupiter and Courtney make me feel like I'm right where I belong. I also want to kiss him. And her. Which is . . . perplexing.Jupiter Charity-SanchezThe only thing worse than losing the girl you love to a boy is losing her to your boy. That means losing him, too. I have to make a move. . . .One story.Three sides.No easy answers.

Odd One Out Details

TitleOdd One Out
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 9th, 2018
PublisherCrown Books for Young Readers
ISBN-139781101939536
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Contemporary, Lgbt, Romance

Odd One Out Review

  • Korrina (OwlCrate)
    January 1, 1970
    Wow, do I ever wish I had this book during high school. It was so relatable to something similar I went through, and which I’ve never seen represented in YA before. It was funny and real. And oh gosh, Coop is a precious cinnamon roll! I wanted to be friends with these characters so badly; they were all so funny and warm.
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  • Ava
    January 1, 1970
    ARCs are out in the world, so I can finally talk about this book - and believe me when I say Nic really has outdone herself with ODD ONE OUT. It's one of the best books I read in 2017, and I can't express how perfect it is and how the representation of both sexuality and race is going to change lives when it releases. It's unique, funny, heartwarming, heartbreaking, and most of all, just like DEAR MARTIN, it's so achingly real. I loved every page of it. I just reread the ARC, so now I've read th ARCs are out in the world, so I can finally talk about this book - and believe me when I say Nic really has outdone herself with ODD ONE OUT. It's one of the best books I read in 2017, and I can't express how perfect it is and how the representation of both sexuality and race is going to change lives when it releases. It's unique, funny, heartwarming, heartbreaking, and most of all, just like DEAR MARTIN, it's so achingly real. I loved every page of it. I just reread the ARC, so now I've read the book twice, and I know I'll read it again many times in the future, just like I do with DEAR MARTIN. It's perfect.
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  • ellie
    January 1, 1970
    legend says i am more likely to read a book featuring love triangles if it's gay somehow. it's me. i'm the legend.
  • Rachel Strolle
    January 1, 1970
    W O W uhWOW
  • Ashley
    January 1, 1970
    This book would have changed my life if I'd had it when I was 16. It's about figuring out who it's okay to love and the thin lines between friendship and romance and sex. It's about how messy love can be, and about how it's okay to be unsure about everything. And it is damn good.Oh how I love it so. I can't wait for you all to read it.
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  • Natasha
    January 1, 1970
    A book about queer teens of colour!
  • Fadwa (Word Wonders)
    January 1, 1970
    Actual rating: 4.5 starsTHIS BOOK IS SO MESSY IN THE BEST OF WAYS AND IT STRESSED ME OUT AND I LOVED IT! If you want a sum up of my coherent thoughts, I loved the way sexuality is explored here, it's fluid, it's messy, it's confusing. As well as relationships especially between people who form deep emotional connections. The ending was NOTHING like i expected or wanted it to be but it was real and worked just as well!Review coming closer to release date!
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  • Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    Three teens of color. Three sexualities. . . but maybe more. This is a fabulous YA novel about what identity means and how sexual identity is a fluid thing and sometimes hard to define. The story itself follows Coop and Jupiter, who are best friends that have always felt something a little bit more. When a new friend joins the trio, things become more challenging as the dynamics change. Jupiter is falling for Rae while Rae is falling for Coop and Coop doesn't know exactly what he wants except to Three teens of color. Three sexualities. . . but maybe more. This is a fabulous YA novel about what identity means and how sexual identity is a fluid thing and sometimes hard to define. The story itself follows Coop and Jupiter, who are best friends that have always felt something a little bit more. When a new friend joins the trio, things become more challenging as the dynamics change. Jupiter is falling for Rae while Rae is falling for Coop and Coop doesn't know exactly what he wants except to not continue falling for Jupiter (she is, his friends agree, what holds him back from going head in in other relationships). Stone has a knack for writing teens who sound like teens. The dialog is authentic and honest, as are the struggles all three have when it comes to their feelings and desires.
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  • Madalyn (Novel Ink)
    January 1, 1970
    *4.5 stars*I feel so seen and so validated after finishing this book. Odd One Out deals heavily with identity and the process of questioning the things you thought were certain about yourself. I wish I could go back in time and throw this book at my teen self who was grappling with her attractions to women.
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  • Sylvia (Serial Bibliophile)
    January 1, 1970
    If anyone is interested, I’m trading my soul for Nic Stone’s new masterpiece. I CAN’T WAIT FOR THIS ONE!!!
  • Elise (TheBookishActress)
    January 1, 1970
    I would die for this book already
  • Kayla Brunson
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't love this like I thought that I would. To be honest my thoughts are still all over the place. So much of this could have been cleared up with communication. This book is told in three parts. We get the POV of each character. We have Coop, Rae, and Jupiter. Coop has been in love with his best friend Jupiter (who happens to be a lesbian) forever. Rae moves to town and is attracted to both Coop and Jupiter. Jupiter has feelings for Rae. As you can see this is was set up to be a bumpy ride. I didn't love this like I thought that I would. To be honest my thoughts are still all over the place. So much of this could have been cleared up with communication. This book is told in three parts. We get the POV of each character. We have Coop, Rae, and Jupiter. Coop has been in love with his best friend Jupiter (who happens to be a lesbian) forever. Rae moves to town and is attracted to both Coop and Jupiter. Jupiter has feelings for Rae. As you can see this is was set up to be a bumpy ride.Like I said before, so much of this could have been cleared up with communication. There were quite a bit of hidden feelings here and actions based on those feelings that kind of pissed me off. I struggled to get through Rae's POV. I really didn't like her character and thought things would have been so much better if she never came around. But at the same time, I can also see her as a catalyst. her being around set things in motion. My favorite people of this whole novel were Britain and Golly. Those two characters were awesome and I loved every part of the book that they were in. I feel like actual teens will really love this and it can bring some things to light for them. This book does tackle self-identity and that's a big thing for teens. Well, it was for me. Younger me would have loved this book!Overall I can appreciate what the author was trying to do here, but it was a bit all over the place for me. To top it all off, the end wasn't what I would have expected it to be and it ended kind of open instead of actually giving an ending note. While I do think this book would be helpful for some, it just didn't stand out for me. Blog | Instagram | Twitter
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  • Annalee
    January 1, 1970
    Another book that I read at camp.This book took my heart and ripped it into pieces. Tiny little pieces that will never be put back together again. It was so beautiful and powerful and it taught such an important message!!!! Everything about this book was perfect and I fell in love with it from the very first page!!! I cannot wait to see what Ms. Stone will write next.
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  • Ricky
    January 1, 1970
    "Love is hard, sex is easy."-Arcade Fire, "Signs of Life"Welcome to the third in my series of ARC reviews for books I received on Twitter's very own #arcsfortrade this August 2018. We're at the halfway point now, surrounded by two books on either side of Nic Stone's latest: the already-read Girls of Paper and Fire and Light Years on one side, and my forthcoming reads For a Muse of Fire and A Blade So Black on the other.And I can tell you that this is my favorite of the three I've read thus far, "Love is hard, sex is easy."-Arcade Fire, "Signs of Life"Welcome to the third in my series of ARC reviews for books I received on Twitter's very own #arcsfortrade this August 2018. We're at the halfway point now, surrounded by two books on either side of Nic Stone's latest: the already-read Girls of Paper and Fire and Light Years on one side, and my forthcoming reads For a Muse of Fire and A Blade So Black on the other.And I can tell you that this is my favorite of the three I've read thus far, simply because it gave me a little something that's still quite lacking in the YA world - questioning rep. Nic Stone's candid author's note talks about how much she needed this book at various points in her life from questioning her sexuality, and I agree with her 100% re: my own queer experience. I questioned for years after high school, and while I've spent just as many years since then self-labeling as bi, I fully embrace the possibility that said label may not stick over the years because I'm still not 100% sure about anything when it comes to sex.Maybe it would help if I knew a Coop or a Rae or a Jupe in my life.These three protagonists - here listed in the order of their POV segments; they each get an act of the book all to themselves - are a pretty special lot. Not only because of the diversity they all bring to the table, but also because each of them reflects me in their own way. Coop, that guy who wants someone to love and have sex with, but can't be with the one he wants (okay, maybe I haven't been crushed out on a gay girl, but I have felt, too many times, that kind of sad longing for people who just aren't interested in me) - and also wrestles a lot with how to approach love and sex without upholding the patriarchy. Rae, who has feelings for two people at once and is very confused about it (me watching The Amazing Spider-Man back in 2012 and being unable to decide whose shoes I'd rather be in, Peter's or Gwen's, during that one scene where Gwen and Peter kiss while she cleans his battle wounds.) And Jupe, who thinks she knows herself and her identity but oh, how life can still throw curveballs her way (me going weeks at a time feeling more towards the gay end of the Kinsey scale until I meet a woman in class, get to talking to her, and want to ask her out.)Again, I can't say there's been a lot of questioning rep in the YA world - or any other literary age group, for that matter. To be frank, the best example I can think of is More Happy Than Not - naturally, Adam Silvera gives the glowing blurb that tops this book's cover. Maybe Ramona Blue too, though I haven't read that one yet. On that subject, I sincerely hope that this book doesn't get Ramona Blue'd to death, if you know what I mean. It's pretty good on depicting questioning and/or fluid sexuality, and draws attention to the potential harm certain scenarios can cause, but I still can't help but think that there are those out there who would probably try and drag this book and author to hell and not come back.Don't.Seriously, just don't.Because while a lot of the scenarios Nic Stone presents are messy as hell and I found myself staring in stunned surprise at the pages very often (like, "holy crap, did they really just do that? THEY DID OH MY GOD"), that's the gorram point.Not everything is neatly tied up in a bow with easy answers. And if you read Stone's debut, Dear Martin, last year, you know this is going to be a pretty well-recurring theme in her work.
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  • joey (thoughts and afterthoughts)
    January 1, 1970
    Odd One Out has the closest representation of a Love Triangle I've ever read in YA lit. Truly. The story engages the complexities of sexual identity and fluidity, intersectionalism, and non-traditional families through three separate "novellas" -- each novella being a different character POV but all of which feeds back into the linearity of the story itself. And to top it all off, it has Nic's signature dialogue and humour.Problems? Yeah, I've got some. But that'll come with the full review.Rati Odd One Out has the closest representation of a Love Triangle I've ever read in YA lit. Truly. The story engages the complexities of sexual identity and fluidity, intersectionalism, and non-traditional families through three separate "novellas" -- each novella being a different character POV but all of which feeds back into the linearity of the story itself. And to top it all off, it has Nic's signature dialogue and humour.Problems? Yeah, I've got some. But that'll come with the full review.Rating probably a 4.13/5 ish.
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  • Alicia
    January 1, 1970
    While the characters are dynamic with plenty of voice, it doesn't seem realistic to teenagers and I think it has more to do with Stone's writing style and approach rather than it being inauthentic. There's so much to connect with between romance and relationships and life that teens to relate to in their gossipy self-centeredness (all in a good way!). As Stone mentions in her afterward, this is a book she would have wanted growing up, but didn't have.I think it needs a good edit and tightening u While the characters are dynamic with plenty of voice, it doesn't seem realistic to teenagers and I think it has more to do with Stone's writing style and approach rather than it being inauthentic. There's so much to connect with between romance and relationships and life that teens to relate to in their gossipy self-centeredness (all in a good way!). As Stone mentions in her afterward, this is a book she would have wanted growing up, but didn't have.I think it needs a good edit and tightening up. Where Dear Martin was underdeveloped, this one seems to compensate for it and is unnecessarily verbose.
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  • Melissapalmer404
    January 1, 1970
    Book #64 Read in 2018Odd One Out by Nic StoneThis is a well written, coming-of-age young adult fiction book. Jupiter and Coop have been friends since they were kids. Jupiter is gay and she makes no bones about it. Cooper happens to be in love with her, even though that is not likely to work out well for him. They become friends with Rae, and the friendship Rae and Coop begin affects Jupiter in surprising ways. Will the friendship survive all of this? High school girls will love this book. Boys m Book #64 Read in 2018Odd One Out by Nic StoneThis is a well written, coming-of-age young adult fiction book. Jupiter and Coop have been friends since they were kids. Jupiter is gay and she makes no bones about it. Cooper happens to be in love with her, even though that is not likely to work out well for him. They become friends with Rae, and the friendship Rae and Coop begin affects Jupiter in surprising ways. Will the friendship survive all of this? High school girls will love this book. Boys might be surprised by it as it is pretty different than her book Dear Martin. I received this book from Amazon Vine in exchange for a honest review.
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  • Shayna
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book! I read it in one sitting basically. I had no patience to wait to see how the relationships of this trio would unravel.Nic Stone has PERFECTED the art of creating insanely realistic characters with dialogue that really makes you feel like you're there, overhearing real people talking. I don't think I can name characters who felt more real to me than hers.Despite that, they ARE confused teenagers who don't make the best decisions and I constantly want to smack them and tell them I loved this book! I read it in one sitting basically. I had no patience to wait to see how the relationships of this trio would unravel.Nic Stone has PERFECTED the art of creating insanely realistic characters with dialogue that really makes you feel like you're there, overhearing real people talking. I don't think I can name characters who felt more real to me than hers.Despite that, they ARE confused teenagers who don't make the best decisions and I constantly want to smack them and tell them they are being idiots. But that's where the nostalgia's at -- brings me back to the high school days.
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  • Mary Thomas
    January 1, 1970
    WOW. If I hadn’t met Nic Stone and figured out first hand that she is an incredible magic human, I might hate her a little. Her personality and voice leaps from the page in one of the best realistic fiction YA books I’ve read all year. Her ability to craft teenage characters that act and sound like teenagers is uncanny! This is probably due in some part to how much Nic loves teens, and truly writes with her audience in mind. This is an extremely important book for representation and I think stud WOW. If I hadn’t met Nic Stone and figured out first hand that she is an incredible magic human, I might hate her a little. Her personality and voice leaps from the page in one of the best realistic fiction YA books I’ve read all year. Her ability to craft teenage characters that act and sound like teenagers is uncanny! This is probably due in some part to how much Nic loves teens, and truly writes with her audience in mind. This is an extremely important book for representation and I think students are going to LOVE IT. So happy this book exists in the world, can’t wait to share with kids. THANK YOU, NIC ❤️❤️❤️
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  • Lori Anketell
    January 1, 1970
    I am just as pleased with this second book by Nic Stone, as I was with her first book! (Dear Martin)This three-character-narrative is an excellent contemporary look at crushes, love, sexual identity, and various elements of the coming-of-age theme. Very easily absorbed, and so much to discuss! Highly recommend!
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  • Gretal
    January 1, 1970
    I don't even know what to say. shit.
  • Becky R.
    January 1, 1970
    In this second novel by Nic Stone, we are introduced to a trio of characters: Courtney, Jupiter, and Rae. Each character takes a turn narrating the story by thirds in the book, starting with the only male of the three, Courtney, who is harboring a bit of a crush on his female best friend, Jupiter. The only issue there is that not only is she his best friend, but she is also an acknowledged lesbian. Courtney finds this situation frustrating, but not worth losing his best friend over. In the middl In this second novel by Nic Stone, we are introduced to a trio of characters: Courtney, Jupiter, and Rae. Each character takes a turn narrating the story by thirds in the book, starting with the only male of the three, Courtney, who is harboring a bit of a crush on his female best friend, Jupiter. The only issue there is that not only is she his best friend, but she is also an acknowledged lesbian. Courtney finds this situation frustrating, but not worth losing his best friend over. In the middle of the story, Rae comes along to become part of their friendship. Rae has a crush on both Courtney and Jupiter, feeling uncertain about her sexuality.To say this novel leaves your head spinning is putting it mildly. I've never struggled with my sexual identity, so I struggled to relate to the frustration the teen characters in this novel struggled with. Having said that, I appreciate having characters that address this issue head on. Although I think this topic is probably long overdue, I felt frustrated by the constant state of turmoil between these three characters. Because both female characters are uncertain about their attraction to males and females, we're left feeling almost as if they simply can't make up their mind and end up hurting a lot of people along the way. I wasn't sure if that was an intended message? I really felt for Courtney and thought he must be about the most patient boy in the entire world.As for addressing sexual orientation, I think this novel takes us there but fails to maybe draw out the cultural conversations and issues for these teens. There is a bit of a conversation about it near the end of the novel, but I wished more of these had been addressed earlier. My frustrations could all be related to my lack of real knowledge, but this novel does open up the conversation and made me think about teens and this frustrating journey to discovery.
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  • Slaa!!!
    January 1, 1970
    I loooovvveee Nic Stone soooo mucccchhhh is the first thing you should know. Her characters are SO lovable and real and LOVABLE and just Nic’s writing style and personality and humor - there are so many LOL moments. I don’t know how to even. I love this book. I love these characters. I didn’t know WHAT to think since I was basically shipping every character with every other character simultaneously. It was a lot of feelings and I didn’t totally know how this could be wrapped up with a happy endi I loooovvveee Nic Stone soooo mucccchhhh is the first thing you should know. Her characters are SO lovable and real and LOVABLE and just Nic’s writing style and personality and humor - there are so many LOL moments. I don’t know how to even. I love this book. I love these characters. I didn’t know WHAT to think since I was basically shipping every character with every other character simultaneously. It was a lot of feelings and I didn’t totally know how this could be wrapped up with a happy ending, but it was an ending that I was definitely happy with. I also love how Nic’s characters always have such VARIETY - not only in terms of sexuality, as was a big theme here, but race (including different biracial mixes), body types, personalities, looks. Something I liked here in particular was how different Jupiter and Rae were, yet both were so well loved by so many people - I think it’s helpful when readers can see themselves in certain characters and get a bit of a boost or some assurance that they too can be loved and don’t have to be like the *other* kind of person that they might feel like is “better” or how they “SHOULD” be. I’m glad this book was written - there are some really important messages about self discovery and questioning and learning that you can love whoever you want to love and you don’t necessarily need to put a label on yourself, unless you want to. Love!!
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  • Elora Cook
    January 1, 1970
    Unfortunately, I'm calling this one a DNF just under 100 pages. This was my first Nic Stone book and an ARC at that, which I was very excited to get into, but my biggest and almost sole issue is that there's no plot pushing the story forward. Others who like LGBTQ+ stories regardless of what the plot or conflict is will probably still enjoy this one and may even find a strong connection to the characters, but alas I wasn't one of them. I hope between now and publication, Stone speeds up the stor Unfortunately, I'm calling this one a DNF just under 100 pages. This was my first Nic Stone book and an ARC at that, which I was very excited to get into, but my biggest and almost sole issue is that there's no plot pushing the story forward. Others who like LGBTQ+ stories regardless of what the plot or conflict is will probably still enjoy this one and may even find a strong connection to the characters, but alas I wasn't one of them. I hope between now and publication, Stone speeds up the story and adds more conflict around the love triangle so readers can be gripping the book wondering how the dynamic will work out. Thank you to Penguin Teen for sending me an ARC to review
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  • Eri
    January 1, 1970
    Review will be posted on my blog closer to release date, but, I will tell you that this book is so good. It's a book I definitely would have appreciated in my younger years. If you ever questioned yourself on who to love, read this. This book is for everybody and is so worth it. PREORDER IT NOW! LIKE RIGHT NOW!
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  • Lauren
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 Stars overall.
  • Elisa
    January 1, 1970
    The book I needed both growing up and now.
  • Acqua
    January 1, 1970
    If you're European, this is up on netgalley.co.uk as "read now". Not sure whether it will appear that way outside of Europe.
  • Michele Knott
    January 1, 1970
    Nic Stone knows how to write books that teens want to read because they are RELEVANT.
  • Teresa
    January 1, 1970
    Nic Stone is pretty damn amazing and this latest venture from her does not disappoint. I can't even put into words how this book made me feel....all I want to do is shout from the rooftops that everyone should be reading her....seriously, everyone!!Grab a copy of this book at your local indie bookstore on 10/9/2018!!! (I know that is sooo far away but trust me you will want to read this. Honestly, I don't know how I am going to wait until that date to sell it to everyone I know!)Thanks to Random Nic Stone is pretty damn amazing and this latest venture from her does not disappoint. I can't even put into words how this book made me feel....all I want to do is shout from the rooftops that everyone should be reading her....seriously, everyone!!Grab a copy of this book at your local indie bookstore on 10/9/2018!!! (I know that is sooo far away but trust me you will want to read this. Honestly, I don't know how I am going to wait until that date to sell it to everyone I know!)Thanks to Random House for the ARC!
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