The Lost Girls of Paris
From the author of the runaway bestseller The Orphan’s Tale comes a remarkable story of friendship and courage centered around three women and a ring of female spies during World War II.1946, ManhattanGrace Healey is rebuilding her life after losing her husband during the war. One morning while passing through Grand Central Terminal on her way to work, she finds an abandoned suitcase tucked beneath a bench. Unable to resist her own curiosity, Grace opens the suitcase, where she discovers a dozen photographs—each of a different woman. In a moment of impulse, Grace takes the photographs and quickly leaves the station.Grace soon learns that the suitcase belonged to a woman named Eleanor Trigg, leader of a ring of female secret agents who were deployed out of London during the war. Twelve of these women were sent to Occupied Europe as couriers and radio operators to aid the resistance, but they never returned home, their fates a mystery. Setting out to learn the truth behind the women in the photographs, Grace finds herself drawn to a young mother turned agent named Marie, whose daring mission overseas reveals a remarkable story of friendship, valor and betrayal.Vividly rendered and inspired by true events, New York Times bestselling author Pam Jenoff shines a light on the incredible heroics of the brave women of the war, and weaves a mesmerizing tale of courage, sisterhood and the great strength of women to survive in the hardest of circumstances

The Lost Girls of Paris Details

TitleThe Lost Girls of Paris
Author
ReleaseJan 29th, 2019
PublisherPark Row
ISBN-139780778330271
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Fiction, War, World War II

The Lost Girls of Paris Review

  • Angela M
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars I wasn’t planning on reading this book. I had previously read two books by Pam Jenoff, and while I thought they were important books on the Holocaust, I just didn’t connect with the characters. I was offered an advanced digital copy by the publisher but didn’t immediately accept it. Then a lovely Goodreads friend sent me a paper version of the advanced copy. Then I saw some rave reviews by some of my trusted Goodreads friends. Those were enough things to convince me to read it and I’m 4.5 stars I wasn’t planning on reading this book. I had previously read two books by Pam Jenoff, and while I thought they were important books on the Holocaust, I just didn’t connect with the characters. I was offered an advanced digital copy by the publisher but didn’t immediately accept it. Then a lovely Goodreads friend sent me a paper version of the advanced copy. Then I saw some rave reviews by some of my trusted Goodreads friends. Those were enough things to convince me to read it and I’m really very glad I did. If I hadn’t read it I would have missed learning about such admirable women, courageous women who played an active and important role during WWII. I found this to be a fast paced, tension filled story that had me hooked enough to read it in two days because I came to care about the characters.The focus of the story is on three women, spanning from England to France to the US from 1943 to 1946. Grace Healey, finds a suitcase in Grand Central Station that leads her on a search to find out about the women whose pictures she has taken from the suitcase. Eleanor Trigg works for the Special Operations Executive in England and her job is to run the top secret program placing women in France as radio operators, but who actually play a variety of roles to sabotage the Nazis. Marie Roux is one of the women recruited by Eleanor, selected because of her perfect French. There were other women, too, most notably Josie who befriends Marie on her first day of the arduous training. There are lesser characters, one of whom I fell in love with , the little boy Sammy, a Jewish refugee who comes to Grace’s attorney boss because he needs a place to live. To say more about the plot would be giving the story away, so I’ll just say that it was harrowing and poignant. It was about brave characters who wonderfully represent the real brave women who took on these dangerous missions. It was about friendship and about women realizing their worth and strength in these endeavors, previously reserved for men. There have been a number of books over the last few years about women who played a role in WWII, the unsung heroes who acted as spies, decoders, mathematicians and in the case of this book, their mission was sabotage against Hitler and the Nazis. Pam Jenoff is among the writers deserving of praise for bringing to our attention the bravery and the contributions of the women of the SOE. While Jenoff makes a point of telling us in an ending note, that this story was inspired by some real people and events, this is a work of fiction. She made it feel very realistic, created characters who could easily have been the brave women of the SOE. I received an advanced copy of this book from Park Row/Harlequin through NetGalley.
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  • Meredith
    January 1, 1970
    Historical novel that tells the story of fierce women who served as British secret agents during WWII. This is a story about friendship, love, and tenacity. The plot is intriguing: British women are recruited to assist the military during WWII. They are trained to serve on the ground as operatives in France. Not only was this an extremely dangerous and risky mission, but it also is one that was filled with betrayal. The reader experiences the plan to recruit and train the women through Eleanor T Historical novel that tells the story of fierce women who served as British secret agents during WWII. This is a story about friendship, love, and tenacity. The plot is intriguing: British women are recruited to assist the military during WWII. They are trained to serve on the ground as operatives in France. Not only was this an extremely dangerous and risky mission, but it also is one that was filled with betrayal. The reader experiences the plan to recruit and train the women through Eleanor Trigg’s character--the woman responsible for thinking up the idea to bring women into the operation. Through Marie’s character, we learn of the danger and excitement of serving as an agent. With Grace, the reader comes to discover not only what happened to the women who served, but also what led to their downfall. Inspired by true events, The Lost Girls of Paris made me want to learn more about the women who served in the SOE, especially those who lost their lives for their country. Marie’s story was most intriguing. Being on the ground with her character helped me get a sense of the fear and sacrifice of being an operative. Oftentimes when reading historical fiction, I find myself shaking my head at elements that feel contrived. Thankfully, I didn’t experience any moments like this while reading The Lost Girls of Paris! It is clear that Jenoff did her research and her attention to detail captures another time. The Lost Girls of Paris has a good amount of tension and suspense. It is fast-paced and easy to read. However, some moments are hard to witness, especially closer to the end.While I was most interested in Marie’s story, Eleanor’s and Grace’s chapters held my attention for the most part--but I was always anxious to return to Marie’s character. Overall, I would definitely recommend to those who enjoy historical fiction and WWII novels. Thank you to Kim at Park Row Books for providing me with an ARC of The Lost Girls of Paris!
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  • Larry H
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars.C'est magnifique!!In 1946, shortly after World War II ended, Grace Healey is living in New York, fleeing for an anonymous life in the city after the tragic death of her husband. One morning on her way to work she takes a detour through Grand Central Station, where she trips over a suitcase hidden beneath a bench.She can't resist opening the suitcase, and when she finds a group of photographs, each of a different woman, she can't seem to explain why she has this powerful need to keep th 4.5 stars.C'est magnifique!!In 1946, shortly after World War II ended, Grace Healey is living in New York, fleeing for an anonymous life in the city after the tragic death of her husband. One morning on her way to work she takes a detour through Grand Central Station, where she trips over a suitcase hidden beneath a bench.She can't resist opening the suitcase, and when she finds a group of photographs, each of a different woman, she can't seem to explain why she has this powerful need to keep them. Grace soon finds out that the suitcase belonged to Eleanor Trigg, a British woman who ran operations for a group of female spies during the war. These women were deployed throughout Europe, given missions as radio operators, couriers, and other necessary positions to help defeat the Nazis. Twelve of these women—the women in the photographs Grace found—never returned home. This motivates Grace to try and figure out what happened to them, and what Eleanor Trigg was looking for in New York City.Grace's quest to uncover the truth is juxtaposed with the story of two other women. We follow Eleanor as she is tapped to create this program that brought women into the war as special agents, then tries to understand what is going wrong as her agents are being captured and messages are being compromised, and then, after the war, she, too, wants to understand what happened to the women under her supervision. The book also follows Marie Roux, one of Eleanor's special agents, a young mother who wasn't really sure she was cut out for this type of mission, yet found her bravery and strength just when she needed it most. The Lost Girls of Paris is inspired by true events. It really does a great job putting a human face on those courageous people, particularly young women, who risked everything to help defeat those seeking to destroy the world.I am not one who typically reads historical fiction—in fact, I think I've read one other work of historical fiction this year. But when I was offered a chance to read a pre-publication copy of The Lost Girls of Paris , something about the book intrigued me. I thought it was an excellent book, full of rich characters, suspense, emotion, and historical details, all of which made it a tremendously fast read. (I read the entire book in one miserably rainy day.)I'm new to Pam Jenoff's books, but I was really impressed with her storytelling ability and the evocative imagery she used. I felt the different conditions Marie found herself in, I heard the noises of the city as Grace encountered the suitcase at Grand Central Station. The book took a little bit to build up momentum, but it really hooked me, as I hoped I'd get answers to all of the questions the characters raised.If you're not a fan of historical fiction, don't be dissuaded from reading The Lost Girls of Paris . It's an excellent novel, a great character study, and even has some suspense, as you wonder how everything will be resolved. If you are a fan of this genre, you probably already want to read it! (And if not, you should!)Park Row Books provided me an advance copy of the book in exchange for an unbiased review. Thanks for making this available! See all of my reviews at itseithersadnessoreuphoria.blogspot.com.
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  • Lindsay - Traveling Sister
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 stars! Another outstanding novel by Pam Jenoff!This fascinating and unforgettable story, inspired by true events, revolves around a handpicked group of British female spies sent to France by a top secret government division during WWII. Weeks of rigorous training aim to prepare these young women to venture into unknown territory, planting themselves as everyday French citizens, intending to smoothly transition into society. Putting their lives largely at risk, they plan to connect with the l 4.5 stars! Another outstanding novel by Pam Jenoff!This fascinating and unforgettable story, inspired by true events, revolves around a handpicked group of British female spies sent to France by a top secret government division during WWII. Weeks of rigorous training aim to prepare these young women to venture into unknown territory, planting themselves as everyday French citizens, intending to smoothly transition into society. Putting their lives largely at risk, they plan to connect with the local resistance members, send back critical information and complete various goals of sabotage. This book was exceptional! Extremely engrossing storyline. Beautiful and brilliant writing. Endearing and unforgettable characters. Smooth and seamlines timeline transitions. Suspense surrounding every chapter. The presentation, pace and flow of the story was perfection.It is a deeply affecting novel that explores a shocking and largely unknown piece of wartime history, bringing to light the immense bravery and determination these women had in being able to step up and immerse themselves in this opportunity. As always, the fact that this was based on true events made the book even more powerful for me. If you enjoy historical fiction, you do not want to miss this! My one tiny critique was that I could have done without the romance. This was a Traveling Sister read. Thank you to Edelweiss, Park Row Books and Pam Jenoff for providing me with an ARC to read and review!Expected date of publication: February 5, 2019.
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  • Diane S ☔
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 Women operatives during WWII, and the dangers they faced. I just adored these characters, become very invested in their welfare, wanted them to succeed where the men had failed. When the OSE realized their male agents were being captured, so many men were gone fighting, they stood out like sore thumbs. It is suggested by a woman named Twigg, that females would more easily blend in, and accomplish what they needed to accomplish. She is given control of this very secret program.The book follow 3.5 Women operatives during WWII, and the dangers they faced. I just adored these characters, become very invested in their welfare, wanted them to succeed where the men had failed. When the OSE realized their male agents were being captured, so many men were gone fighting, they stood out like sore thumbs. It is suggested by a woman named Twigg, that females would more easily blend in, and accomplish what they needed to accomplish. She is given control of this very secret program.The book follows the women as they train, friendships are made, stories are shared. Once deployed to Paris, a few find each other, working for the same circuit. Josie and Marie, one fearless, the other determined to complete her mission. Two timelines, a few years apart, picked up a year after the war has ended, when a young woman finds a suitcase, abandoned in Grand CentrAl Station. Inside, a group of pictures, that will lead her on a trail to putting some erongs, right.A fast paced story, told well. That is except for the romantic bits, which seemed almost thrown in as an aside. Those didn't work for me, found them a little too obvious snd well corny. Still a interesting read, with some great characters.ARC from Park Row books.
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  • Dorie - Traveling Sister :)
    January 1, 1970
    I read a lot of historical fiction and I had read “The Orphans Tale” by Pam Jenoff and really enjoyed it. I most recently read “The Light Over London” by Julia Kelly which was about the Brtitish “gunner girls” who worked atop London’s rooftops calculating the firing of anti-aircraft guns. This novel drew me in from the beginning, it was a quick, satisfying read with characters that I could root for. The story starts in 1946 Manhattan when a young woman, Grace, comes across a suitcase in Grand Ce I read a lot of historical fiction and I had read “The Orphans Tale” by Pam Jenoff and really enjoyed it. I most recently read “The Light Over London” by Julia Kelly which was about the Brtitish “gunner girls” who worked atop London’s rooftops calculating the firing of anti-aircraft guns. This novel drew me in from the beginning, it was a quick, satisfying read with characters that I could root for. The story starts in 1946 Manhattan when a young woman, Grace, comes across a suitcase in Grand Central Station. She is running late for work but looking inside the suitcase she sees the photographs of 12 young women with their names on the back and on a whim takes them with her. When she returns the next day for the suitcase, it is gone. She decides to try and learn who these women are and their fate. She is a recent widow, her husband killed while in training for the Army, the war is still a very real part of her life, even though it is officially over. Eleanor Tripp was working closely as a secretary for the Secret Operations Unit (SOE) an agency in London which was created to sabotage German efforts in France, all presumably for the invasion of Normandy within a few months. Eleanor convinces the Director that women would be the most useful as they could blend in with French women, particularly if they spoke French fluently. Soon a plan was formulated to train the women that were hand picked for this job, they were dropped into France, expected to find a safe house and transmit information back and forth from London to their locations within France, they were extensively trained in radio transmissions. Ms. Tripp was in charge of the entire women’s corp of volunteers and cared deeply about the girls. Marie is one of the group of women dropped into French territory, alone, with little to go on besides her instincts and a map. She makes it to a safe house with the help of the leader of the entire operation in France, known as Vesper (his real name is Julian). Marie begins her work of transmitting messages until she starts noticing messages that seem inconsistent and incorrect to her. Within weeks she will find out the reason. Julian and his cousin Will tell her that there is something very wrong about the operation, someone has betrayed them, but who? Is it one of the girls, someone back in London? Marie is told to get out of France, but her pilot, Will, never shows up for the planned extraction.The story is told from the POV of Eleanor, Grace and Marie and they are all equally interesting. The more I read, the more I enjoyed the book. I don’t want to reveal any more of the plot for fear of spoilers but it was definitely a great story. The author’s note doesn’t tell us how much of the book is based on fact, perhaps that will come out when the book is published in January 2019. I found a lot of interesting information on the following website, if you care to explore more:http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/worldwar...I think most fans of historical fiction will enjoy this book with yet another example of how much women contributed to the war effort.I received an ARC of this novel from the publisher through NetGalley.
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  • Holly B
    January 1, 1970
    I loved it!Once I started reading and became invested in these wonderful characters and the suspenseful plot, I simply had to  keep on reading... This took over my day and I set aside chores, appointments and anything else that was causing me to have to put this book down.  It did take a few chapters to get settled into it, then it was easy sailing all the way to the end.  A week later, I'm still thinking of these "girls".The author does a wonderful job of characterization and I felt that I almo I loved it!Once I started reading and became invested in these wonderful characters and the suspenseful plot, I simply had to  keep on reading... This took over my day and I set aside chores, appointments and anything else that was causing me to have to put this book down.  It did take a few chapters to get settled into it, then it was easy sailing all the way to the end.  A week later, I'm still thinking of these "girls".The author does a wonderful job of characterization and I felt that I almost knew some of these women. It is a well researched fictional story, although some events were based on fact.  She includes some fascinating notes at the end of the novel.Two timelines alternate between New York in 1946 and France in 1944 to tell the story of some women who were recruited and trained to help the resistance in WWII.  There were moments that I was  on the edge of my seat and holding my breath with worry.  There are some surprises and some nail biting moments.  The SS Nazi police literally made my heart race. Just the mention of them lurking around gave me chills.Full of heart, surprise, love, friendship and betrayal. I adored this book.  Fans of historical fiction with some depth, won't want to miss this gem!Big thank you to Park Row for my arc!
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  • Tammy
    January 1, 1970
    I have rolled my eyes as many times as I have heard, “This is the next Nightingale”. To be fair, I didn’t hear this regarding The Lost Girls of Paris. Instead, this book is being compared to Lilac Girls and The Alice Network but this one comes very close to Nightingale. I never expected it. It’s a fictionalized account of Vera Atkins and her “girls” who were dropped into France to work with the resistance as saboteurs and radio operators. Another storyline takes place shortly after the war that I have rolled my eyes as many times as I have heard, “This is the next Nightingale”. To be fair, I didn’t hear this regarding The Lost Girls of Paris. Instead, this book is being compared to Lilac Girls and The Alice Network but this one comes very close to Nightingale. I never expected it. It’s a fictionalized account of Vera Atkins and her “girls” who were dropped into France to work with the resistance as saboteurs and radio operators. Another storyline takes place shortly after the war that puts together all of the pieces. This is exciting, believable, eloquent and arresting.
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  • Liz
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 starsNow this is what historical fiction is meant to be! A wonderful story that draws you in quickly and completely while teaching you about something you knew nothing about. As is typically the case, this one is told through two storylines. Right after WWII, Grace finds an abandoned suitcase in Grand Central which contains the photos of a dozen young women. The women turn out to be agents of SOE, couriers and saboteurs sent behind enemy lines into France. It turns out the suitcase belonged 4.5 starsNow this is what historical fiction is meant to be! A wonderful story that draws you in quickly and completely while teaching you about something you knew nothing about. As is typically the case, this one is told through two storylines. Right after WWII, Grace finds an abandoned suitcase in Grand Central which contains the photos of a dozen young women. The women turn out to be agents of SOE, couriers and saboteurs sent behind enemy lines into France. It turns out the suitcase belonged to Eleanor Trigg, the woman who ran the operation and was killed in a car accident that morning outside the station. The second story details what happened with those women during 1944. They are part of the prep team ahead of the Normandy invasion. So often, with dual storylines, I feel myself drawn to one much more than the other. But not here. There is a good amount of suspense to both and I was equally invested in the characters of both stories. We know from the book’s blurb that these women never make it home, but how did things end for them and who was to blame? That’s what first Eleanor and then Grace seeks to discover. The book is not without its flaws. It would have been better for chapters to include months in addition to years to more firmly cement the time period. One scene near the end of the book was definitely unbelievable. I would have also appreciated an author’s note telling me how much of the book and which characters were based on real people and events. But I read an advance copy, so maybe this has been rectified in the actual book. My thanks to Park Row Books for an advance copy of this novel.
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  • Felicia
    January 1, 1970
    Loosely based on real events involving female spies in 1942 war-torn France.I mean, seriously, what is there not to love about that? Even before starting this book I was fascinated with the plot so it didn't take me long to become totally enamored.The story begins in 1946 following Grace after she finds a set of photographs of women in an abandoned suitcase. Her curiosity gets the best of her and she goes about trying to find the identity of these women.Honestly, I could have done without Grace' Loosely based on real events involving female spies in 1942 war-torn France.I mean, seriously, what is there not to love about that? Even before starting this book I was fascinated with the plot so it didn't take me long to become totally enamored.The story begins in 1946 following Grace after she finds a set of photographs of women in an abandoned suitcase. Her curiosity gets the best of her and she goes about trying to find the identity of these women.Honestly, I could have done without Grace's entire storyline. The only purpose she really serves is...well, I don't really know. I would have much rathered this story been told exclusively through the actual women who lived it. The narrative surrounding Grace seemed like an unnecessary distraction from the real heart of the story. Unlike the majority of historical fiction, this book isn't bogged down with a lot of extraneous details that turn what should be a 300 page story into a 500 page paperweight. This is a super fast read compared to most others in this genre. I have to say that the first half of the book was more compelling than the second but overall it was a very enjoyable read.Thank you Kim with Harlequin Books for sending me an ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Christine
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 (rounded to 5) starsWow, this one was a real surprise. I had never read this author before, but was struck by the blurb as well as the title of this novel, and just look at that cover. These factors, plus the fact that several of my Goodreads friends gave it 4 or 5 stars, moved me to give this book a go. I was most impressed!This WWII historical fiction novel is darker and a bit grittier than many of the other books of this subgenre. It revolves around a small organization of young women wil 4.5 (rounded to 5) starsWow, this one was a real surprise. I had never read this author before, but was struck by the blurb as well as the title of this novel, and just look at that cover. These factors, plus the fact that several of my Goodreads friends gave it 4 or 5 stars, moved me to give this book a go. I was most impressed!This WWII historical fiction novel is darker and a bit grittier than many of the other books of this subgenre. It revolves around a small organization of young women willing to risk their lives by being deployed to the war zones of France as radio transmitters. This is a facet of the war that I was unfamiliar with, and I appreciated the opportunity to learn more about these brave women and what they did. There are three narrators of this story, all women. My favorite was Eleanor Trigg, stationed in London, who is the (fictional) founder of this agency of women as part of Churchill’s SOE (Special Operations Executive). The mission of the SOE, which by the way was composed of nonmilitary volunteers, was to sabotage and subvert the Germans in any way possible. The other voices are those of Marie, one of the transmitters out in the field in 1944; and Grace, a young woman who found photographs of twelve of Eleanor’s “girls” in an abandoned suitcase in New York City’s Grand Central Station in 1946. As we follow Grace’s mission to figure out the significance of these photographs, we flash back to 1944 through the eyes of Marie and Eleanor. This story is laden with tension. These women truly laid their lives on the line for the Allies. The plotline is gripping and emotive; my heart was in my throat on multiple occasions. There is a thread involving romance, but this is minor and not intrusive. There is deception, lies, betrayal, and treachery. We witness the strong bonds women form with each other. We see the true essence of individual human beings unmasked by war. I was glued to this compelling novel. At night I laid in bed thinking about the characters and trying to figure out how all the pieces could possibly come together. I highly recommend The Lost Girls of Paris to all readers of wartime historical fiction, especially those who love the darker tales such as The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah.My thanks go to Net Galley, Harlequin - Trade Publishing/Park Row, and Ms. Pam Jenoff for an advanced review copy of this novel. Opinions are mine alone and are not biased in any way.
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  • Katie B
    January 1, 1970
    I hadn't even read the synopsis yet when I realized I wanted to read this book. This is one of the rare instances when a book cover completely sold me. The use of the clock just really stood out to me. Thankfully, this turned out to be a compelling historical fiction read which was worthy of a good cover.It's 1946 and Grace Healey is working in Manhattan after losing her husband during the war. While at Grand Central terminal she discovers a suitcase containing photographs. She soon learns the s I hadn't even read the synopsis yet when I realized I wanted to read this book. This is one of the rare instances when a book cover completely sold me. The use of the clock just really stood out to me. Thankfully, this turned out to be a compelling historical fiction read which was worthy of a good cover.It's 1946 and Grace Healey is working in Manhattan after losing her husband during the war. While at Grand Central terminal she discovers a suitcase containing photographs. She soon learns the suitcase belongs to Eleanor Trigg, the leader of a group of female secret agents in London who were sent out on missions as radio operators and couriers during World War 2. Twelve of the women never returned home and what happened to them remains a mystery until Grace decides to go looking for answers. This is a story inspired by real life events and courageous women.I read one of the author's other books, The Orphan's Tale, recently and while I did enjoy it I struggled at times connecting with the characters. With this book I found it much easier to feel for the characters because the story line during the war is so high stakes and intense it's hard not to feel like you are right there with them. And Grace is also someone to root for as she is trying to make it on her own after the death of her husband. I thought the back and forth timelines during and after the war provided a nice balance to the story. For me the real heart of the story was the importance of not letting these brave women be forgotten. While the book might not be among my all time favorites for World War 2 historical fiction it is definitely a solid read and worthy of your time if you enjoy the genre.Thank you to BookishFirst and the publisher for sending me a free advance copy! I was under no obligation to post a review here and all views expressed are my honest opinion.
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  • jv poore
    January 1, 1970
    One simple statement changed the course of Eleanor’s life forever. It was 1943 when the infuriated Director of Special Operations Executive called a meeting. As his secretary, Eleanor was present. As his metaphorical right-hand, she understood the operations better than anyone else in the room. The SOE, created three years prior to light Europe up with sabotage and subversion, had run smoothly and successfully until now. Too many agents were being caught, and the captures seemed to quickly follo One simple statement changed the course of Eleanor’s life forever. It was 1943 when the infuriated Director of Special Operations Executive called a meeting. As his secretary, Eleanor was present. As his metaphorical right-hand, she understood the operations better than anyone else in the room. The SOE, created three years prior to light Europe up with sabotage and subversion, had run smoothly and successfully until now. Too many agents were being caught, and the captures seemed to quickly follow infiltration. The Director demanded to know why. The answer so apparent, it exploded from Eleanor, “It’s that they are men.” After her outburst, albeit an accurate assessment, Eleanor was tasked with recruiting and training female spies. Working harder and longer than she ever imagined, she did everything in her power to ensure the safety and success of ‘her girls’; but she never considered the possibility of a saboteur within the SOE.This historical-fiction magnificently manages to demonstrate how we’ve come so very far, while simultaneously showing a stubborn stagnation—but in an oh-so-subtle way. The improbable intermingling of three ladies’ lives, over three tumultuous years, spanning several countries, certainly takes center stage. I was buoyed by the strength, drive and determination of those in training and totally intrigued with the spy techniques. Easily invested in the characters, many emotions were evoked as they worked diligently—both independently and collectively—to identify the traitor in the ranks.I am psyched to submit this copy to my favorite classroom library. It brings me great joy to introduce historical fiction highlighting how much harder it is for the person breaking through barriers built from determined ignorance and I know the students will love Ms. Jenoff’s entertaining and engaging writing.This review was written for Buried Under Books by jv poore with gratitude to Park Row Books for providing an ARC that I can pass on to my favorite classroom library.
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  • Matt
    January 1, 1970
    “And now go set Europe ablaze!”- Winston Churchill to Hugh Dalton, first director of the Special Operations ExecutiveIt has been awhile since I read a book with a wider gap between idea and execution. The concept of Pam Jenoff’s The Lost Girls of Paris is excellent: a World War II thriller based on the missions of the real-life women of the Special Operations Executive. Unfortunately, this great idea is squandered in a book of such mediocrity I hesitate to say anything further. But I will, with “And now go set Europe ablaze!”- Winston Churchill to Hugh Dalton, first director of the Special Operations ExecutiveIt has been awhile since I read a book with a wider gap between idea and execution. The concept of Pam Jenoff’s The Lost Girls of Paris is excellent: a World War II thriller based on the missions of the real-life women of the Special Operations Executive. Unfortunately, this great idea is squandered in a book of such mediocrity I hesitate to say anything further. But I will, with regrets. The Lost Girls of Paris is focused on three women operating in two different timelines, a needless convolution that insistently strips what little drama emerges organically from the narrative. These three women are “characters” in only the loosest sense of the word. They all have names, and each are given exactly two attributes, with one of those attributes the fact that they are women. Eleanor is in charge of the female operatives, and aside from being a woman, she is outspoken. Maria is one of her agents, and her secondary attribute is – and there is really no other word for it – stupidity. Eleanor and Maria share the same timeline, operating mostly in 1944, in the weeks leading up to the D-Day landings in Normandy. Grace exists in 1946. Her secondary attribute is widow, a circumstance that defines her. Things begin with Grace in postwar New York City. She is on her way to work and is very flustered because she has just slept with her dead husband’s best friend. In fact, she cannot get the “delicious-but-wrong-smell of Mark’s aftershave” out of her head. Typically, when I read a line like that, on literally the second page of the book, I usually quit reading. I probably should have followed that instinct.Anyway, Grace wanders into Grand Central Station and sees an abandoned suitcase. For inexplicable reasons, she opens up the suitcase and finds some pictures of women in uniform. For inexplicable reasons, she takes those pictures. For further inexplicable reasons, she embarks on a crusade to find out who those women are. The ridiculous absence of motivation for any of these actions is a hallmark of The Lost Girls of Paris. Grace has no good reason for doing any of the things that she does; her actions are dictated by plot mechanics, which is too bad, because Grace’s plot is entirely needless. More than that, it is a lame distraction. Eleanor and Marie are in London and Occupied France respectively, in a life and death situation. That is drama (or at least it would be, in a better book). Grace is in postwar New York, getting the vapors every time she thinks about Mark. That is boring. This is not to say that the chapters concerning Eleanor and Marie are any better (the book is split into viewpoint chapters shared between the three women), because they certainly are not. They share the same slapdash plotting and reason-free decision-making that mar our time with Grace.The problem is the central conceit that Eleanor would be put in charge of secret agents, and that Marie would be allowed to be one of those agents.None of it makes sense. Eleanor recruits Marie to be an agent. Why? Good question. Apparently she speaks excellent French. Beyond that, she is nothing more than a vessel of impulsive and bizarre decisions. To paraphrase the movie Home Alone, Marie “is what the French call les incompeténts.” At almost every inflection point in the novel, she does something so baffling, that it utterly destroys any sympathy you might have for her. For example: (view spoiler)[While in Occupied Europe, with the Nazis closing in, she is supposed to destroy her radio and leave her safe house. Instead, she does not destroy her radio. Then she leaves the safe house, with the radio in it. And just to make sure that we have no lingering doubts about her complete lack of instinct, she returns to the safe house. You will not be surprised how that bit of inspired genius turns out. (hide spoiler)]It is hard to know who to blame. Eleanor, for her lack of perception. Marie, for her inability to ever be right, even by accident. Me, for expecting some internal logic that is not at odds with an ordinary understanding of the universe.Of course, it would be unfair to make Marie carry the entire burden of unfathomable judgment. Indeed, she apparently exists in a world in which common sense and reason have been banished. At one point, Eleanor becomes frustrated with Marie during training, because Marie is terrible at being a secret agent. In a fit of temper, Eleanor destroys Marie’s radio, and then orders her to put it back together. Subsequently, despite Marie’s total lack of fitness for the job, Eleanor taps her for insertion into Occupied France. What’s more, she sends Marie to France with the exact same radio she destroyed, and forced Marie to put back together! This has repercussions. Jenoff has an extensive and laudable resume, including a master’s in history from Cambridge, a juris doctorate, and experience working with the State Department. Yet, in spite of this, nothing in The Lost Girls of Paris feels the least bit realistic or authentic.For example, even though the SOE operates in the shadows, in putative confidentiality, no one knows the first thing about secrecy (which is not to tell everyone everything the first time you are asked). When Marie gets to training, she starts asking questions. A woman named Josie tells her to stop, since their mission is classified. It’s good advice. However, after a couple seconds have elapsed, Josie immediately answers all of Marie’s questions. The same thing happens with Eleanor, who tells Marie to stay in her lane, and then proceeds to fill her head with operational intelligence. When Marie gets to France, she meets with her circuit (led by a man who does not speak French!), and again, is told everything about the operation. This is nuts, and not how intelligence operations actually work. You don’t allow a person to fill their head with secrets, and then put them in a position where they can be captured and tortured. This basic field-craft is ignored by everyone. Marie’s purpose in going to France is to bomb a nameless bridge for vague reasons. This should have been the narrative focus, since this is supposed to be a thriller (and as tired as it is, I'm always up for the old we-gotta-bomb-a-bridge mission). Unfortunately, it is treated as an afterthought. Almost immediately, Marie is sidetracked by a man. Frankly, I found this insulting, and part of a larger problem with The Lost Girls of Paris. You have three major female characters, and two-thirds of them can’t think straight in the presence of a male. When Marie meets Julian, the non-French-speaking leader of a French-based circuit of saboteurs, she immediately reverts to a twelve year-old. Her literal thoughts: “Some might call [Julian] good looking, including herself, if she hadn’t disliked him from the start.” Like any good romantic comedy, Marie instantly gets over her dislike (Julian made her sleep in a shed, which is apparently a privation that Eleanor’s training failed to prepare her for) and falls instantly, implausibly in love with him. There is no reason for these feelings, as the two do not share any chemistry or exchange any meaningful thoughts or words. Nevertheless, Marie is entirely ready to betray her mission, her country, and her comrades for this puddle-shallow relationship. Her lack of agency in this regard is astounding. Apparently, she can’t be in Occupied France five minutes before getting knock-kneed over the first cute boy she meets. It would have been nice to have one female character who was brave, clever, and goal oriented. Instead, in a book full of women who are caricatured as impulsive, shortsighted, and lacking in accountability, Marie stands out. The portrait Jenoff paints is disappointing. The Lost Girls of Paris is filled with leaden dialogue, tired clichés, and sloppy writing. Several examples stood out, and I made note of them, but I feel like I'm already a step past belaboring my point. However, I would be remiss if I did not offer this: (view spoiler)[A character is shot in the head with a bullet “fired with deadly accuracy.” Despite having a bullet in the head (fired with deadly accuracy, remember), this character is able to say: “I love you…We should have been together…” This combination of sub-soapy dialogue with an absence of any realization of what a well-fired bullet actually does to the human skull, is so bad as to be almost parodic (hide spoiler)]I never pick up a book expecting it to be bad (except when I occasionally hate-read Norman Mailer). This was no exception. I picked it up with high hopes. Whenever I dislike something this intensely, I try to ask myself: Am I the problem? There are times when, yes, I can admit I am probably not the target audience. Here, though, we are dealing with a historical thriller set during one of my favorite time periods. More than that, I think it's a fantastic idea to find different voices (in this case women) to tell well-worn stories. Yet, this did not work. Indeed, it has left me searching for something nice to say. Recently, my wife and I been looking for a new house. During one visit, our realtor – who dabbles in house flipping – kept excusing the various cosmetic deficiencies by assuring us that “the house has good bones.” The Lost Girls of Paris has good bones. It is based on a really good idea, one that is bursting with possibilities. Moreover, it shines a light on a mostly-forgotten sacrifice by a small group of women, a sacrifice that gets lost in general histories of World War II. There really were women who gave the last full measure for a cause in which they believed. For instance, Noor Inayat Khan (upon whom Josie seems based) was captured and executed at Dachau with a bullet to the back of her head, her last word reportedly Liberté. Unfortunately, this novel does no credit to the women of the SOE. About the only thing I got out of it was a desire to know more of the actual history, and a hope that someday better use will be made of this material.
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  • Erin
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to NetGalley and Harlequin- Trade Publishing for an e-ARC in exchange for an honest review. I was so EXCITED when I was approved for this title because Pam Jenoff is one of my favorite WWII era writers and I have devoured each of her titlesThe Orphan's Tale,The Winter Guest, and The Kommandant's Girl just to name a few. So it would be an understatement to say The Lost Girls of Paris is one of my most anticipated reads of 2019. It certainly lived up to my expectations. Based on the true Thanks to NetGalley and Harlequin- Trade Publishing for an e-ARC in exchange for an honest review. I was so EXCITED when I was approved for this title because Pam Jenoff is one of my favorite WWII era writers and I have devoured each of her titlesThe Orphan's Tale,The Winter Guest, and The Kommandant's Girl just to name a few. So it would be an understatement to say The Lost Girls of Paris is one of my most anticipated reads of 2019. It certainly lived up to my expectations. Based on the true story of Vera Atkins ( seeSpymistress: The Life of Vera Atkins, the Greatest Female Secret Agent of World War II and the many women that served as agents in France, Jenoff focuses her fictional narrative on Eleanor Trigg, leader of the operations network, Marie, one of the many agents Eleanor sends to France, and Grace Healey, an American woman, who in 1946 discovers a suitcase belonging to Eleanor in Grand Central station with photographs of different women. This sets Grace on a mission to find out who these women were and why Eleanor's suitcase was not with its owner. Above all, this book is an emotional tale of friendship,betrayal, and making sure these types of stories are never forgotten. May all of us be little more like Grace Healey- searching for the truth and never giving up. Review posted on Goodreads 26/01/19Publication Date: 29/01/19
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  • Marialyce
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 starsWe will never know many of the stories of bravery, courage, and fortitude that occurred during World War 2. Many of these stories are lost to time, but that doesn't make the people within these stories any less brave, any less, courageous, or any less gallant because their stories have never been told. In the book, The Lost Girls of Paris, we meet three women who risked everything to be spies. These young girls were secreted into Paris under the nose of the Nazis, to help do what they c 4.5 starsWe will never know many of the stories of bravery, courage, and fortitude that occurred during World War 2. Many of these stories are lost to time, but that doesn't make the people within these stories any less brave, any less, courageous, or any less gallant because their stories have never been told. In the book, The Lost Girls of Paris, we meet three women who risked everything to be spies. These young girls were secreted into Paris under the nose of the Nazis, to help do what they could to see that Germany did not succeed in their quest to conquer Europe.The book begins in 1946 when one of the characters, Grace, finds a suitcase containing pictures of young women. This seemingly innocuous event sets the scene for a journey that takes Grace on a quest to not only find the owner of the suitcase, but who these young women were. Her journey leads Grace into the world of spies, into a world where women were not considered able to do the job that these women were asked to do. We meet Eleanor, the leader of the group, so willing to take on the onerous task of training these girls knowing that a simple mistake will cost them their lives. The girls knew this too, they knew that their mission placed them in terrible danger and yet, each and every one of them accepted that challenge with a valiant and stalwart determination. They were ready to serve, to die, to become something no other women had been before. They knew they were looking constantly into the face of death and yet, they persevered, knowing their lives could end at any moment. Based on true events, Pam Jenoff has created a mesmerizing story, a tale of incredible daring, of heroic proportions, and one in which these young girls become a beacon for strength, resilience, and bravery beyond compare. This book is a tribute to all those unsung heroes, who risked everything in order for us today to live in freedom. Their sacrifices should always be remembered. Thank you to Pam Jenoff, Harlequin-Park Row Publishing, and NetGalley for a copy of this awe inspiring book. This book is due to be published on January 20,2019My reviews can also be found here: http://yayareadslotsofbooks.wordpress...
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  • Mellie Antoinette
    January 1, 1970
    ***#earc thanks to #netgalley and @pamjenoff***Here it comes! The inevitable backlash Party on Wayne, Party on Garth style!Garth: ❤THIS WAS BETTER THAN KRISTIN HANNAH’S THE NIGHTINGALE!!! ❤Wayne: No way!Garth: Double Way! ... Like way way!Wayne: Like way, way, pizza, way?Garth: .... Way! While I love Kristin Hannah, I was expecting brilliance from The Nightingale. But this was hearts and hugs and halos beautiful!Following three women on the tail end of WWII through the bureaucracy of London to t ***#earc thanks to #netgalley and @pamjenoff***Here it comes! The inevitable backlash Party on Wayne, Party on Garth style!Garth: ❤️THIS WAS BETTER THAN KRISTIN HANNAH’S THE NIGHTINGALE!!! ❤️Wayne: No way!Garth: Double Way! ... Like way way!Wayne: Like way, way, pizza, way?Garth: .... Way! While I love Kristin Hannah, I was expecting brilliance from The Nightingale. But this was hearts and hugs and halos beautiful!Following three women on the tail end of WWII through the bureaucracy of London to the battlefields of France and finally to the camps of Germany, I triple heart love that Jenoff highlighted each woman’s strength. I love that she added just enough atmospherics to paint pictures, create movement, incite the imagination. But mostly, I love the reminder that I don’t read enough Jenoff! Must remedy asap, Wayne! Party on, Garth!! 5 whole 🌟🌟🌟🌟🌟
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  • Krista
    January 1, 1970
    Rating: 5 bright shining starsThis new book by Pam Jenoff, author of “The Orphan's Tale”, is a winner! I was impressed by how masterfully she pulled together all the various aspects of this work of historical fiction. Per the author, the book’s germination was based on little known facts about a group of women who were dropped into France towards the end of WWII to work with the French Resistance to help defeat the Germans. It’s told from three perspectives. Grace Healey is the main protagonist Rating: 5 bright shining starsThis new book by Pam Jenoff, author of “The Orphan's Tale”, is a winner! I was impressed by how masterfully she pulled together all the various aspects of this work of historical fiction. Per the author, the book’s germination was based on little known facts about a group of women who were dropped into France towards the end of WWII to work with the French Resistance to help defeat the Germans. It’s told from three perspectives. Grace Healey is the main protagonist of the post-WWII storyline. She is a war widow who is trying to build a life for herself in 1946 era New York City. She comes across an abandoned suitcase in Grand Central Station, and finds a packet of photos of about a dozen women which for some inexplicable reason she keeps. This kicks off her quest to find out more about the women. Eleanor Trigg is a no-nonsense assistant to the SOE (Special Operations) commander in embattled London during WWII. In 1944, He grudgingly gives her permission to train and place a team of female agents in the field in France. From there we meet some of her recruits at their Scottish training camp, and follow them on their assignments behind enemy lines in France. Marie is the secret agent whose story is most extensively detailed in the book as the third main narrator of the book. The timeline shifts between Grace, to Eleanor (both during and after WWII), and then Marie. The storylines are deftly woven together to form a colorful tapestry of a world torn asunder, and the lengths some of these unsung heroines were willing to go to try to help knit it back together. The emotions displayed by all the characters were in keeping with their situations. There was not a wrong step in this book. It showed the very real precipice that the world was on in the midst of WWII, and the extraordinary lengths ordinary women were willing to go to in order to help pull it back from the brink. There was suspense and pathos; sadness and a fight for survival. Ultimately I cared about every single woman in this book. I think that we owe a debt of gratitude to the women who died unreported and unacknowledged during the war. They should now be brought out of the shadows of history. Thank-you to the author for bringing them to my attention in such a relatable fashion! ‘Thank-You’ to NetGalley; the publisher, Harlequin; and the author, Pam Jenoff; for providing a free e-ARC copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. (Any quotes shown above were taken from an ARC and are subject to change upon publication.)
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  • Elizabeth of Silver's Reviews
    January 1, 1970
    With most of the men at war and definitely more obvious than women if left at home, the best people for special war operations were women.1943 - Eleanor was the woman in charge of the recruiting and placement of the women.Eleanor knew it was very dangerous for the women to be doing these covert deeds as well as knowing that they are not as strong or physically equipped as men, but the women were definitely less easy to spot or were they? She had to prove to the men in charge that the women she With most of the men at war and definitely more obvious than women if left at home, the best people for special war operations were women.1943 - Eleanor was the woman in charge of the recruiting and placement of the women.Eleanor knew it was very dangerous for the women to be doing these covert deeds as well as knowing that they are not as strong or physically equipped as men, but the women were definitely less easy to spot or were they? She had to prove to the men in charge that the women she chose were the right ones, and the women could carry out the operations.1944 - Marie was recruited for one of the dangerous jobs in France since she spoke fluent French.Marie went through training with Eleanor who was strict and difficult but with Marie knowing she really wasn't. When Marie was sent on her first mission. she was terrified as each woman had been, but the job needed to be completed.1946 - Grace found a suitcase in Grand Central that had an envelope with photographs of women. This was after the war, and these photographs made Grace curious about who these women were and why that specific suitcase had been abandoned.Grace needed to find out why the photos were in this abandoned suitcase, who these women in the photos were, and what the connection was to the past and to the war. Grace was also avoiding or was she unconsciously enjoying the company and attention of her dead husband's best friend, Mark. We follow the lives of these three women in alternating time periods as Pam Jenoff does her magic of detailing and informing us about their private lives, their roles in history, and the situations they were in and had been involved in.Historical fiction fans as well as women's fiction fans will devour this marvelous book.THE LOST GIRLS OF PARIS is another beautiful, well-researched Pam Jenoff creation. DO NOT miss reading this book. 5/5This book was given to me via NetGalley by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Tami
    January 1, 1970
    I love reading books about brave women and Pam Jenoff deftly delivers an exciting historical fiction novel about women working with the SOE as spies during World War II. Eleanor Trigg, the woman who recruited and ran the ring of female agents, is one of three voices in the story. Eleanor was a woman ahead of her time and very organized and dedicated regarding her work. Marie, one of the women recruited by Eleanor, was a young mother on her own who was attracted to the job by the money it paid. M I love reading books about brave women and Pam Jenoff deftly delivers an exciting historical fiction novel about women working with the SOE as spies during World War II. Eleanor Trigg, the woman who recruited and ran the ring of female agents, is one of three voices in the story. Eleanor was a woman ahead of her time and very organized and dedicated regarding her work. Marie, one of the women recruited by Eleanor, was a young mother on her own who was attracted to the job by the money it paid. Marie was not fully aware of the danger involved when she signed on, but soon proved herself worthy of the task required.Grace, a widow who stumbles upon an abandoned suitcase while on her way to work, becomes involved with the lives of Eleanor and Marie through her attempts to locate the owner of the suitcase.This is a fascinating story and while it’s not the first WWII female spy novel I have read, it was interesting and new and kept me engaged throughout. Historical fiction readers and those that enjoy stories set in World War II will not want to miss this latest novel by Pam Jenoff.Many thanks to NetGalley and Park Row/Harlequin Trade Publishing for allowing me to read and advance copy and give my honest review.
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  • Dennis
    January 1, 1970
    Pam Jenoff, I just want to let you know that I love you and I'm in love with The Lost Girls of Paris ! This was the most successful attempt at me enjoying a historical fiction novel, ever, and now I've gotten a craving for more. Set during the 1940s, The Lost Girls of Paris alternates two time periods—one being during World War II, in London and then in Paris; while the other being right after the end of the war in New York City. Setting the story in New York, Grace Healey is running late for Pam Jenoff, I just want to let you know that I love you and I'm in love with The Lost Girls of Paris ! This was the most successful attempt at me enjoying a historical fiction novel, ever, and now I've gotten a craving for more. Set during the 1940s, The Lost Girls of Paris alternates two time periods—one being during World War II, in London and then in Paris; while the other being right after the end of the war in New York City. Setting the story in New York, Grace Healey is running late for work and witnesses a car accident that ends up adding time to her commute. After the accident, Grace ends up stumbling across a suitcase that contains photographs of women, a dozen of them to be exact. Grace's inquisitive nature sets in and she decides that she needs to know more about this suitcase. And alas, we dive into who the lost girls of Paris really are. Eleanor Trigg and the British government started their own operative of secret agents, assembled by women who can hide in the shadows. Women who can speak French without an accent, and women who would appear to the Germans as weak and timid were chosen for this endeavor. This operative of women were sent to occupied Paris, in order to delay or weaken the Germans when the Allied troops decided to take back France. I don't want to give out any further information about The Lost Girls of Paris , besides telling you that you must read it! This action-packed adventure will take you on a journey that will have you appreciating how far as a society we have come, but also note that we have more work to do! Stories like The Lost Girls of Paris resonate with me because they not only entertain and intrigue its audience, but it also educates them as well (without it being like a history lesson). The Lost Girls of Paris is written beautifully, in fact I think that the story is remarkable. It's definitely a contender of one of my favorite books that I've read in awhile, and I know Pam Jenoff will be very successfully with this novel's release. My only question left is, when is the movie coming out? Thank you Park Row for my advanced copy in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for breaking me out of my reading slump, and routing me to a new genre to enjoy. The Lost Girls of Paris will be released February 9, 2019!
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  • Hollis
    January 1, 1970
    THE LOST GIRLS OF PARIS is a story I wanted to love. It's an excellent premise, with multiple POV and some overlapping timelines, of three women during and after the second world war. One a spy, another her commander, and a civilian who is compelled to pursue the truth of their story after piecing together their identities. It sounds amazing, right? If only.Not only was the writing slow, dull, halting and unpolished (not something I think is to blame from an ARC format perspective), but the char THE LOST GIRLS OF PARIS is a story I wanted to love. It's an excellent premise, with multiple POV and some overlapping timelines, of three women during and after the second world war. One a spy, another her commander, and a civilian who is compelled to pursue the truth of their story after piecing together their identities. It sounds amazing, right? If only.Not only was the writing slow, dull, halting and unpolished (not something I think is to blame from an ARC format perspective), but the characters were.. kind of tossed about. They either felt completely out of their depth (the spy) or were compelled to move the plot forward for reasons that aren't very clear (the civilian) while both (well, all three, actually) drag around a bunch of backstory that is littered with hardships as if that was the only she could actually make them interesting. Despite the fact that one of them was a spy and should've been awesome because lady spy in WWII. But as a result of their lack of personalities, and abilities, I suppose I can see why the author made a point to give us something to distinguish them. Which, if you're curious, are the following : widower, survivor, and single mother. Don't even get me started on the frustrations of sending someone to do a job that you don't fully believe they can do (which we get to witness when, as an example, the spy leaves her radio at the safe house, in Nazi occupied France, despite protocol saying she is to destroy it, and then actually returns to the safe house that she's fairly sure has been compromised to collect the radio because she left it behind. facepalm emoji), drag them all over the place and throw them into situations where they have little to no information, and then have a male character get mad at them for asking questions.. only for these two people to fall in love.But it isn't restricted to just one POV/plotline, oh no. To make matters worse, there are multiple of these shoehorned in pseudo-love stories that seem to blossom over the course of, like, days, and take away even more credibility from the whole story. The characters are painfully one dimensional, we have time-waster romances, and everything ends up reading really hyper dramatic or just completely unbelievable. Which I feel is a total disservice to this story and the real women, and true events, it is inspired by. I felt no emotional connection, no grief, no relief, no nothing. I was just bored or frustrated by the whole thing.I thought this was probably going to be a two-star "well you tried" kind of read but in writing this review I've just annoyed myself beyond reason by thinking over all these bits I disliked so much, or was just mystified by, so, yeah. Here we are. This was my first read by Jenoff and while I have THE ORPHAN'S TALE on my bookshelf I'm definitely going to be reluctant to prioritize it after this experience.** I received an ARC from NetGalley and the publisher (thank you!) in exchange for an honest review. **
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  • Tammy
    January 1, 1970
    When I heard that Pam Jenoff had a new book, I didn't even read the synopsis. I just KNEW it was going to be great and The Lost Girls of Paris truly is! Pam's beautiful writing and meticulous research shines through in this story! The Lost Girls of Paris is a must read!!
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  • Kyra Leseberg (Roots & Reads)
    January 1, 1970
    I've heard wonderful things about Pam Jenoff's books, especially The Orphan's Tale, which has been on my TBR for quite a while.  I noticed the beautiful cover for The Lost Girls of Paris on NetGalley a couple months ago and after reading the description, I was ready to read the entire book immediately!  Thankfully, Park Row granted my request and while I was ready to jump right in, I decided to save it for the holidays. Is it weird that I get all excited to devour a book and then save it for a s I've heard wonderful things about Pam Jenoff's books, especially The Orphan's Tale, which has been on my TBR for quite a while.  I noticed the beautiful cover for The Lost Girls of Paris on NetGalley a couple months ago and after reading the description, I was ready to read the entire book immediately!  Thankfully, Park Row granted my request and while I was ready to jump right in, I decided to save it for the holidays. Is it weird that I get all excited to devour a book and then save it for a special occasion?  I know I can't be the only avid reader who does this!After the chaos of Thanksgiving dinner (which is an all day event in our household where we eat early in the day, followed by a nap, followed by another plate of food) I started this book and couldn't put it down!  I should've been in a food coma but I was too engrossed in this story to sleep.The story starts in 1946 Manhattan with the story of Grace, a woman who lost her husband in a tragic car accident during the war.  She's already late for work and finds her route blocked by an accident; a woman has died aftering being hit by a car.  Grace takes a shortcut through Grand Central Station where she trips over an abandoned suitcase under a bench with the word Trigg written in chalk.  She opens the suitcase to search for identification and finds photographs of twelve different women, which she takes on an unexplained impulse.Throughout her day she looks at the women and finds their names written on the back of each photo.  Grace feels compelled to learn the story of these women and finds herself drawn in to their story when she discovers the woman who died in the accident that morning was a British citizen named Eleanor Trigg.  The suitcase -- the photographs -- had belonged to Eleanor.Eleanor Trigg worked as a secretary for Special Operations Executive (SOE), an agency created to sabotage the Germans by sending agents in to the field to collect information and set up special operations.Trigg has earned the trust of the Director with the skills and knowledge she has displayed and gained the role of an advisor, though most of the men seated at the table with her are skeptical.She makes the bold suggestion of recruiting and training female agents to deploy because the Germans would not expect female spies.  To her surprise, Trigg's suggestion is not only approved but she is placed in charge of recruitment and training.One of the women recruited is Marie, a single mother who has left her daughter in the care of an aunt as the dangers of air raids rages on too close to home.  Marie is approached by a man impressed by her French and he leaves her with a card for Eleanor Trigg, promising important work and excellent compensation.Marie not only immediately respects Eleanor but trusts her too, leading Marie to say yes to the offer.  She finds herself one of several women under Eleanor's leadership to be deployed to Paris as a radio operator.In alternating chapters from the perspectives of Grace, Eleanor and Marie, we learn the fate of the women in the photographs Grace found in the suitcase.  The Lost Girls of Paris is an incredible tale inspired by the true story of Vera Atkins and the female SOE agents during World War II.  Jenoff did a fantastic job of finding a balance between fact and historical fiction, creating a sense of urgency for readers and delivering a captivating story of bravery and betrayal!Thanks to Park Row and NetGalley for providing me with an ARC in exchange for my honest review.  The Lost Girls of Paris is scheduled for release on February 5, 2019.For more full reviews, visit www.rootsandreads.wordpress.com
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  • Basic B's Guide
    January 1, 1970
    All of my favorite things wrapped up into one book. I loved the blend of action, history and romance. This book has it all.Fans of The Alice Network will enjoy this one. I was a little worried it would be too similar and I would be bored but that was definitely not the case with this story. I actually think I enjoyed this one even more. It was full steam ahead from page one and I was on the edge of my seat the whole way through. This can easily be read in one or two sittings if your time permits All of my favorite things wrapped up into one book. I loved the blend of action, history and romance. This book has it all.Fans of The Alice Network will enjoy this one. I was a little worried it would be too similar and I would be bored but that was definitely not the case with this story. I actually think I enjoyed this one even more. It was full steam ahead from page one and I was on the edge of my seat the whole way through. This can easily be read in one or two sittings if your time permits.This is not just for fans of historical fiction. This really has something for everyone. I sincerely hope you give it a chance. This book is available February 5th. Thank you Harlequin Books for my free copy. All opinions are my own.
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  • Terry ~ Huntress of Erudition
    January 1, 1970
    I work on Madison Ave, about 2 blocks from Grand Central Station in NYC and started reading this book on my way to work and felt as if I was walking right past our protagonist on her way to work as well!It is a captivating story that ties in some little known historical facts about women involved with the resistance movement during WWII in Europe and is a very personable account of two women on either side of the Atlantic.However, the personalities of Grace in New York and Marie in France are so I work on Madison Ave, about 2 blocks from Grand Central Station in NYC and started reading this book on my way to work and felt as if I was walking right past our protagonist on her way to work as well!It is a captivating story that ties in some little known historical facts about women involved with the resistance movement during WWII in Europe and is a very personable account of two women on either side of the Atlantic.However, the personalities of Grace in New York and Marie in France are so similar that I kept mixing them up when reading their sections - I think they should at least speak differently. I mean, they both speak English, but they live in two different countries.I think it would have moved the story along better if the two protagonists were more sharp and worldly, as Josie, but I understand that more readers would be able to relate better to Grace or Marie, as it would be fascinating to imagine yourself in their situations.About 60 % in, the plot finally started to move along with the action in France.I could have done without the romance in France and in New York - it kind of made the story more trite.I would have preferred to have some sexual tension between the comrades in France, but not an actual love story, where they sacrifice themselves for the other person - the drama should come from a person sacrificing their own comfort and safety for the greater good for all the people in the mission. Overall, I thought the story was great and was an exciting novel that really takes the reader back in time.The following I a quote the author added - it signifies the feeling of togetherness felt by the characters in the book and how people feel when united by one cause:From this day to the ending of the world, But we in it shall be remember’d; We few, we happy few, we band of brothers; For he to-day that sheds his blood with me Shall be my brother; be he ne’er so vile, This day shall gentle his condition: And gentlemen in England now a-bed Shall think themselves accursed that they were not here, And hold their manhoods cheap whiles any speaks That fought with us upon Saint Crispin’s day."Shakespeare
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  • The Just-About-Cocky Ms M
    January 1, 1970
    I didn't read The Orphan's Tale or anything else by this author, but courtesy of NetGalley, decided to give this novel a try. And for those who go squeeeeeee!!!!!!!!!!!!!! and compare it to The Nightingale, let me say right up front that I absolutely loathed The Nightingale.I nearly quit when Grace Healey spent an interminable number of pages deciding whether to pick up, open, look at the contents, agonize over the contents, close it again, and take this “abandoned suitcase” half-hidden in Grand I didn't read The Orphan's Tale or anything else by this author, but courtesy of NetGalley, decided to give this novel a try. And for those who go squeeeeeee!!!!!!!!!!!!!! and compare it to The Nightingale, let me say right up front that I absolutely loathed The Nightingale.I nearly quit when Grace Healey spent an interminable number of pages deciding whether to pick up, open, look at the contents, agonize over the contents, close it again, and take this “abandoned suitcase” half-hidden in Grand Central Station away with her. So much for killing any opening suspense with a surfeit of useless prose.I was then tempted to toss this when I encountered the Polish—or half-Polish woman—whose first name is Eleanor. Don’t writers do even basic research with regard to proper names for a specific era, nationality, and so forth? Apparently not.The almost-but-not-quite “abandon hope all ye who enter here” moment came with the tale of Marie, the idiotic, inane, and utterly foolish—not to mention far-fetched—radio girl literally dropped into the middle of a small French village to begin her dangerous work. She does so without a legitimate, even slightly plausible cover story. Obviously, this author is clueless about the insular and definitely suspicious-of-strangers characteristics of small French villages that exist today in many areas, and were absolutely present during the highly dangerous and often fatal atmosphere of the occupation in the north and in Vichy France. Therefore, I thought Marie’s tale was not only unbelievable in the historic sense but also ridiculous in the ways in which she allegedly carried out her alleged “spy duties.” She should have been called out by the villagers or shot by Germans by the fourth paragraph after her “landing.”The depressing lack of research is evident here: no grasp of how MI5 trained spies—see the movie “Charlotte Grey” for that aspect, or read the book, which is over-full of details; and no idea of the geography, customs, and atmosphere of small-town France. As a result, this read like a novice’s attempt to write a riveting spy novel full of danger and peril and betrayal and all sorts of related issues.None of these characters stand out, from Grace who finds the suitcase and then apparently spends every waking hour trying to find out about the twelve women; no mention is made of what she does about her job with that nice immigration attorney. Allegedly Polish Eleanor is also a cipher—no discernible personality, but she manages to switch at lightning speed from what the author thinks is the cold detachment de rigueur for spymasters and the smothering concern of a den mother. Marie is also a bundle of ridiculous clichés, none of which serve to explain why she volunteered to be a spy, or how she behaved in France. For that matter, none of the other women are more than afterthoughts, and the men are straight out of WWII central casting.I was underwhelmed from the beginning and throughout this book, wherein almost nothing happened until the halfway mark, and even then I found not much to like or much to engage my interest. I definitely had the feeling the author was jumping on the WWII bandwagon in rather a hurry, hoping to capitalize on the popularity of some recent WWII novels. The haste shows.Still waiting for a really good, accurate, gripping, and gritty WWII novel with real characters, some of whom actually die rather than fall in love, and settings bearing some semblance to real geography, culture, and sensibilities. If y’all know of one, please let me know.
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  • Jen
    January 1, 1970
    I’m not a fan of the current trend in thrillers to feature unreliable female alcoholics with man issues. This trend in historical fiction to showcase strong female bada** women I am LOVING though! Fans of The Alice Network, The Nightingale, or Lilac Girls this upcoming book is for you!***I have enjoyed other books by Pam Jenoff so I was thrilled to get my hands on her newest, The Lost Girls of Paris. I think this is her best yet! I was mesmerized by this tale of female spies and their courage du I’m not a fan of the current trend in thrillers to feature unreliable female alcoholics with man issues. This trend in historical fiction to showcase strong female bada** women I am LOVING though! Fans of The Alice Network, The Nightingale, or Lilac Girls this upcoming book is for you!***I have enjoyed other books by Pam Jenoff so I was thrilled to get my hands on her newest, The Lost Girls of Paris. I think this is her best yet! I was mesmerized by this tale of female spies and their courage during the war.***Newly widowed Grace is passing through Grand Central Station when she comes across an abandoned suitcase. Curious, she opens it up to find an envelope of photographs. Each photograph features a different woman. On impulse she grabs the photographs and leaves, embarking on a mission to find out the story behind these women. Told in dual storylines, we weave seamlessly between Grace and young mother turned spy, Marie, until their stories collide. This tale of bravery and sisterhood was fantastic and I never wanted it to end. For me, The Lost Girls of Paris was ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️/5 stars. Thank you @harlequinbooks for this advance reader in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    After reading and enjoying Pam Jenoff's previous two novels, I was excited to dig into this one. Pam has once again delivered a captivating story about World War II. At the same time I was reading The Lost Girls of Paris, I also happened to be reading The Alice Network. While one was about spies and the other about saboteurs and they took place during two different wars (for the most part), they balanced each other out well. Funny enough, both novels mentioned Baudelaire's Fleurs du Mal. I learn After reading and enjoying Pam Jenoff's previous two novels, I was excited to dig into this one. Pam has once again delivered a captivating story about World War II. At the same time I was reading The Lost Girls of Paris, I also happened to be reading The Alice Network. While one was about spies and the other about saboteurs and they took place during two different wars (for the most part), they balanced each other out well. Funny enough, both novels mentioned Baudelaire's Fleurs du Mal. I learned some new things about World War II from this novel. I liked the voices of the three women, but felt like Eleanor's narrative took a while to get into. Once the story took off, it was worthwhile. It was hard to get a grasp of her age though, but I guessed early forties. I also liked how Grace got caught up in the mystery of what happened to all the women. The situation that Marie was in was scary and I couldn't even imagine taking such risks. Some things that happened throughout the story surprised me, as I didn't see them coming. I kept turning the pages, wanting to know what would happen next. While the ending felt a bit anticlimactic after everything that went on, I was also satisfied by how much information was given. I recommend adding this novel to your TBR when it publishes in early 2019.Movie casting suggestions:Marie: Wallis DayGrace: Allison MillerEleanor: Keeley HawesMark: James WolkVesper: Alex Pettyfer
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  • Nita
    January 1, 1970
    I can not wait for this lovely book! I am eating the beautiful cover!
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