The Minimalist Home
A popular minimalist blogger and author of The More of Less shows you how to methodically turn your home into a place of peace, contentment, and purposeful living. One of today's most influential minimalist advocates takes us on a decluttering tour of our own houses and apartments, showing us how to decide what to get rid of and what to keep. He both offers practical guidelines for simplifying our lifestyle at home and addresses underlying issues that contribute to over-accumulation in the first place. The purpose is not just to create a more inviting living space. It's also to turn our life's HQ--our home--into a launching pad for a more fulfilling and productive life in the world.

The Minimalist Home Details

TitleThe Minimalist Home
Author
ReleaseDec 18th, 2018
PublisherWaterbrook Press
ISBN-139781601427991
Rating
GenreNonfiction, Self Help

The Minimalist Home Review

  • j e w e l s [Books Bejeweled]
    January 1, 1970
    ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐Wow, this book helped me with a momentous move. My husband and I are newly empty-nested after decades of kids and a mother-in-law on board in a much larger house than our new 2 bedroom condo. It's not easy to scale back. That means you have to throw away things you thought you would always have. But, as Joshua Becker so effectively points out, they are just things! He made me realize that we should use things and treasure people. Not the other way around! A simple, yet revolutionary thought ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️Wow, this book helped me with a momentous move. My husband and I are newly empty-nested after decades of kids and a mother-in-law on board in a much larger house than our new 2 bedroom condo. It's not easy to scale back. That means you have to throw away things you thought you would always have. But, as Joshua Becker so effectively points out, they are just things! He made me realize that we should use things and treasure people. Not the other way around! A simple, yet revolutionary thought process. Becker has a helpful step-by-step approach to achieving the minimalist home of your dreams. He goes room by room and you better believe I used his method for cleaning out my house. We couldn't be happier in our new urban, industrial loft. It is easy to clean and entertain friends. A real breath of fresh air in the city. Becker gave me the courage to throw out/recycle up anything that wasn't earning its space in our newly small home. Oh, yes, it is hard. Your grown daughter's kindergarten coloring books? out. To be truthful, I did take a lot of pics of anything I threw away. And one day, I will edit those digital pics-haha.😊
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  • Lilithcarter
    January 1, 1970
    I received this book from Netgally in exchange for an honest review! Have never heard of the author, I thought it would ve refreshing. But sadly was not. It was a very repetitive, and I found his writing style a bit messy. He kept saying things like "in the next chapter". "We'll talk more in the coming pages" etc.. which really bother me. He talks about how to declutter your house room by room, and its mixed. With his experience and real life testimonies,he also added some data about the average I received this book from Netgally in exchange for an honest review! Have never heard of the author, I thought it would ve refreshing. But sadly was not. It was a very repetitive, and I found his writing style a bit messy. He kept saying things like "in the next chapter". "We'll talk more in the coming pages" etc.. which really bother me. He talks about how to declutter your house room by room, and its mixed. With his experience and real life testimonies,he also added some data about the average American.. so it's pretty much the same book as most of the subject. This book would benefit from having some charts and images to help the reader visualising his home office, or his house and the kids rooms, etc. I think this book is better suited for people who are a bit curious on the subject. The structure of the text is also a bit strange, at 83% we read the acknowledgements, at 85% the notes from the chapters, at 93% there are more testimonies, which could've been better suited in the main body of the book. At about 80% he starts defining what minimalism is a little more detail, which could've been better at the introduction. So I find quite ironic that the book is very messy cluttered with words that are not necessary.
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  • Carole
    January 1, 1970
    "The goal of minimalism is not just to own less stuff. The goal is to unburden our lives so we can accomplish more." This is a quote by Joshua Becker in The Minimalist Home. Minimalism in your home and life simplifies every aspect of living. The author offers room-by-room examples to streamline possessions and furniture. Objects that are not necessary can be relocated, sold, donated or recycled. This book is not for hoarders: minimalism could apply to most of our homes. Joshua Becker guides thro "The goal of minimalism is not just to own less stuff. The goal is to unburden our lives so we can accomplish more." This is a quote by Joshua Becker in The Minimalist Home. Minimalism in your home and life simplifies every aspect of living. The author offers room-by-room examples to streamline possessions and furniture. Objects that are not necessary can be relocated, sold, donated or recycled. This book is not for hoarders: minimalism could apply to most of our homes. Joshua Becker guides through the process to make life simpler and allow more time to do things that really matter. The Minimalist Home is well-explained and provides easy-to-follow suggestions on how to proceed. This is definitely an example of less is more. A useful tool. Thank you to Waterbrook & Multnomah and NetGalley for an e-ARC in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Missy
    January 1, 1970
    I thought The Minimalist Home was going to be about reducing clutter and organizing, which it is, but it's more. I was surprised at how much it got me thinking. Joshua Becker begins by having you think of your vision for your life - then think about your home and the purpose for each room. What do you envision doing there? Handle every item in the room and decide if it supports that purpose. If it doesn't, get rid of it. It's missional when you think of it that way. I didn't actually go through I thought The Minimalist Home was going to be about reducing clutter and organizing, which it is, but it's more. I was surprised at how much it got me thinking. Joshua Becker begins by having you think of your vision for your life - then think about your home and the purpose for each room. What do you envision doing there? Handle every item in the room and decide if it supports that purpose. If it doesn't, get rid of it. It's missional when you think of it that way. I didn't actually go through the process as I read the book, but I did begin to clear out old piles in various places in my home. A particular thing I appreciated is that he never encourages the reader to launch into minimizing without considering the other members of the household. It's not heavy-handed, but almost every chapter mentions our culture of materialism and consumerism. Minimalism involves both getting rid of excess as well as adopting new habits to keep it from creeping back into your life. One good quote: "a minimalist home can be a home that's always primed to say, 'Welcome.'" I was provided an advance copy for my review #PRHpartner
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  • Lorilin
    January 1, 1970
    I first heard about Joshua Becker while reading Cozy Minimalist Home. In it, Myquillin Smith talks about Becker’s first (very popular) book, The More of Less, and how it inspired her to look at her house and her possessions in a new, more minimalist, light. I’ve never read The More of Less, but when I saw that Becker was coming out with a new book, I jumped on the chance to read it.The Minimalist Home is a helpful and motivational read, though it’s not perfect. The book is divided into twelve se I first heard about Joshua Becker while reading Cozy Minimalist Home. In it, Myquillin Smith talks about Becker’s first (very popular) book, The More of Less, and how it inspired her to look at her house and her possessions in a new, more minimalist, light. I’ve never read The More of Less, but when I saw that Becker was coming out with a new book, I jumped on the chance to read it.The Minimalist Home is a helpful and motivational read, though it’s not perfect. The book is divided into twelve sections. The first two sections give an overview of minimalism, as well as advice on how to eliminate items from your house (have goals for your home’s spaces, start cleaning out the easy spaces first, involve the whole family, have fun with the process, etc.).The next eight sections go room-by-room through a typical house, covering common problems and solutions in the living room, family room, master and other bedrooms, closets, bathrooms, the laundry area, kitchen, dining room, office, storage spaces, and the garage. Becker lists questions to ask yourself as you’re deciding what to keep, what to donate, and what to toss. He also gives helpful benchmarks for knowing when you’ve decluttered enough (e.g., Is my living room now a calming space? Are my kids sleeping better in their bedrooms? Do my clothes hang freely in the closet?) The last two sections give a plan for keeping the house clean and minimized (e.g., recognize triggers for over-buying, manage gift-giving, etc.)For the most part, I enjoyed reading Becker’s advice. Some positive aspects of this book:*** He is insightful and even made some points about minimalism that I hadn’t thought of before. (I love when someone can tell me something I don’t already know, especially on a subject I am very familiar with.)*** I don’t have a craft room, but I like how he encourages hobby-enthusiasts to get rid of their “fantasy selves.” Donate the extra fishing poles, gym equipment, craft supplies, etc., to someone who will actually use them. “Be who you are, not who you wished to be.”*** I also appreciate that he talks about living a minimalist digital life, giving tips for tidying up the computer desktop, digital files, phone apps, etc. Not everyone talks about this, but it’s important.I do have a couple small gripes with this book, though. Becker can be long-winded and repetitive, taking way too long to make a point that’s already understood. The book is also a little heavy on the self-promotion. I get that Becker wants to make his book tweetable and build a brand, but I grew tired of the #hashtagthis! suggestions and the repeated mention of his accomplishments (I REPEAT, I HAVE INTERNATIONAL CLIENTS!).The biggest drawback for me, though, is how serious the book can be. Don’t get me wrong, this is still a quick read and I appreciate with the overall message. But Becker tends to use intense change as the motivation to minimize. He repeatedly gives examples of how people’s lives are transformed from minimizing. Look at this lady: she cleaned out her house! Then became a missionary to poor countries!! Then adopted an orphan from Guatemala!!! Now she’s fulfilled and happy!!!! I agree that minimalism has the power to transform, but I also think it’s okay to go into the process with lower expectations and smaller, more realistic goals. I’m not looking to adopt a refugee from Syria. I just need to be able to find my keys, you know?Still, I enjoyed this book. It gives clear step-by-step advice that makes minimizing feel doable. I didn’t always love the seriousness of Becker’s anecdotes, but I did appreciate his message. This is an important and helpful guide to eliminating the excess in our lives so we can live more fully.Thank you to Joshua Becker, WaterBrook, and Net Galley for the ARC!See more of my reviews at www.bugbugbooks.com!
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  • Jana
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free copy from the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.After having read quite a few books on minimalism, decluttering etc., I think I can safely say that this is by far my favourite one of the kind that I have read. It goes through the home room by room, provides you with helpful checklists to find out whether you have reached a status of being comfortable with the progress you made in said room, all without coming off as preachy or promoting 100% extreme m I received a free copy from the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.After having read quite a few books on minimalism, decluttering etc., I think I can safely say that this is by far my favourite one of the kind that I have read. It goes through the home room by room, provides you with helpful checklists to find out whether you have reached a status of being comfortable with the progress you made in said room, all without coming off as preachy or promoting 100% extreme minimalism where you essentially don't own anything. It is definitely geared mostly toward families and homeowners, but as a single, couple without children or someone who lives in a rented home/apartment, you can still benefit a lot from this book by just rethinking the ideas slightly. I also think it is helpful not only for beginners but also for more experienced people in the area as well. I have been decluttering my possessions for about 4 years already and I still thought that the ideas he had gave me food for thought for my own decluttering process.
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  • Patty Smith
    January 1, 1970
    Many thanks to NetGalley, Waterbrook and Multnomah, and Joshua Becker for an ARC in exchange for an honest review. My opinions are 100% my own and independent of receiving an advanced copy.Joshua Becker has been in the “minimal” business for about 10 years. He has a website where you can get lots of tips and advice, including a newsletter sent to your inbox every so often. He has written other books but this one is sort of the culmination of his life’s work. He has been on TV, speaks all over an Many thanks to NetGalley, Waterbrook and Multnomah, and Joshua Becker for an ARC in exchange for an honest review. My opinions are 100% my own and independent of receiving an advanced copy.Joshua Becker has been in the “minimal” business for about 10 years. He has a website where you can get lots of tips and advice, including a newsletter sent to your inbox every so often. He has written other books but this one is sort of the culmination of his life’s work. He has been on TV, speaks all over and I have been following him for the past couple of years. In today’s world of massive consumerism, we can all use a dose of paring down and keeping things simple. We all have too much stuff. We are promoted, advertised, propagandized into thinking that it’s all stuff we need, what we have isn’t the right stuff and that the more stuff we have the happier we will be. This has been going on for years, I mean George Carlin had a bit about “Stuff” in the early 80’s. So I was excited to read what Becker had to say on what he promotes as a step by step, comprehensive room-by-room guide to decluttering your home and your life.Ugh - what an awful read. First I felt like his tone was so condescending. I couldn’t take it. Obviously I have a lot of stuff - that’s why I’m reading this book. He would repeat himself, ad nauseam, throughout the whole book. There wasn’t any comprehensive guide - again, he would repeat the same thing over and over for each room, literally the same steps - for each room! Why bother going through each room, listing all of the possible things you might have accumulated, telling me “get rid of what you don’t use or don’t need”. Obviously I knew that much! I don’t need a book for that. I was hoping for some insight, maybe some ideas that I hadn’t thought of to help declutter, some instructions. There was no real guidance other than “don’t do it” for lasting change. Then, don’t tell me how my life is going to change, I will become richer, have a fabulous job, help the poor, have more time, blah blah blah, just because you told me to get rid of some stuff. I didn’t buy any of it. I have decluttered before and none of those things have happened to me. The “real life” examples were ridiculous, laughable. Look, I believe in keeping a home without a lot of junk. Nobody needs piles of clothes, lots of knick knacks, and yes, you should keep those things that mean something to you. You shouldn’t get sucked into marketing ideas of having the latest, greatest and best thing out there, which will go out of date and then you need something new. I also happen to live with a (mild case) hoarder, who believes every rock, piece of junk, paper, etc. is extremely important and sentimental and will not throw out anything. So according to Becker, those are the things to keep. Not helpful. But without something new or real to add to the discussion, don’t fill up a book with one idea. My advice is don’t add one more book to your bookshelf with this one.
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  • Leslie M.
    January 1, 1970
    I wasn’t sure what to expect from this book, but it’s written by a very popular minimalist blogger, so I was interested in participating in the launch team.The book begins by asking the reader to imagine a vision for their life and the purpose of each room in their house. Imagine the perfect room, in a way. The reader is asked to determine if every item in said room supports the purpose of that room. If it doesn’t, there’s no purpose for it, so it can be removed. It sounds like something that co I wasn’t sure what to expect from this book, but it’s written by a very popular minimalist blogger, so I was interested in participating in the launch team.The book begins by asking the reader to imagine a vision for their life and the purpose of each room in their house. Imagine the perfect room, in a way. The reader is asked to determine if every item in said room supports the purpose of that room. If it doesn’t, there’s no purpose for it, so it can be removed. It sounds like something that could be easier said than done, but it’s the basis for this book, which goes step by step through each room in the (average) house. The author is quite descriptive about how best to determine what to keep and what to throw out or give away. This book contains tips that would be very helpful for people looking to de-clutter or downsize their home. The Minimalist Home is a relatively short book, around 200 pages. It’s divided into three parts (You, Spaces, and Future). The chapters focus on different rooms in the house. Some information is a bit repetitive from chapter to chapter, and I found myself skipping around. Also, at times, it felt like the author was talking down to the reader (making it feel like it should be his minimalist way or no way at all), which could turn some people off and prevent them from finishing the book. There wasn’t as much of a Christian angle to it as I’d expected.The book did give me points to ponder, such as whether or not the things I’ve accumulated over the years are being used and whether or not they’re necessary. Some quotes I liked:• “Minimalism isn’t about removing things you love. It’s about removing the things that distract you from the things you love.”• “Just because you have the space doesn’t mean you have to fill it with stuff.”Disclaimer: I received a complimentary copy from the publisher as part of their book launch team. However, I wasn’t required to leave a positive review. #PRHPartner
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  • Mai
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to the publisher and Edelweiss for providing me a free copy of the book. The fact that I got it for free does not influence my review in any way.Almost 10% of the book was taken up by introductions and "why"s. I swear, I read some variation of the phrase "before we start" at least 5 times. Then I just skipped to the second chapter.... oh wait, nope, that one's also pretty much the same. So now we're a fifth into the book and haven't even started thinking about how to declutter, great.W Thank you to the publisher and Edelweiss for providing me a free copy of the book. The fact that I got it for free does not influence my review in any way.Almost 10% of the book was taken up by introductions and "why"s. I swear, I read some variation of the phrase "before we start" at least 5 times. Then I just skipped to the second chapter.... oh wait, nope, that one's also pretty much the same. So now we're a fifth into the book and haven't even started thinking about how to declutter, great.When I got to the actual part where I was supposed to do something, most of the chapter was filled by "why"s yet again. I get it, each room should have a purpose etc., but you don't have to tell me that in every damn chapter. Get to the point already.
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  • Nathan Albright
    January 1, 1970
    [Note:  This book was provided free of charge by Multnomah/Waterbrook Press.  All thoughts and opinions are my own.]No one who knows my habits of book collecting would figure me to be someone who could argue for a minimalist home, and the only thing that keeps my clutter from being worse is a simple absence of space to fill with things rather than any sort of minimalist view towards the acquisition of possessions.  At times, my dutiful collection of a massive library [1] has led to entertaining [Note:  This book was provided free of charge by Multnomah/Waterbrook Press.  All thoughts and opinions are my own.]No one who knows my habits of book collecting would figure me to be someone who could argue for a minimalist home, and the only thing that keeps my clutter from being worse is a simple absence of space to fill with things rather than any sort of minimalist view towards the acquisition of possessions.  At times, my dutiful collection of a massive library [1] has led to entertaining situations to wonder about the sort of possessions that we are most likely to hoard.  There are ironies in the fact that a book about decluttering and reducing possessions is likely to be a part of increasing clutter relating to the possession of books that continually increases [2] despite my own occasional and generally half-hearted efforts to arrest this increase.  Like many people, I struggle with the issue of clutter, and like many people this clutter leads to unnecessary duplication of items and the waste of significant effort in trying to find things that I am looking for, as well as the concern that exists over the preservation of my mountain of stuff.This book of a bit more than 200 pages is divided into three parts and twelve chapters.  The author begins with a look at the reader, starting with an appeal for the reader to engage in a minimalist makeover (1) along with a discussion of the Becker method at removing clutter from one's life (2), something that is repeated often with varying degrees of emphasis throughout the book.  The second part of the book takes a systematic look at places in one's house where clutter can be removed, starting with the living room and family room (3), moving to bedrooms and guest rooms (4), seeking a simple and iconic look by cleaning one's closets and "mudroom" (5), making a clean sweep of the bathrooms and laundry rooms (6), decluttering the kitchen and dining rooms by removing specialized items and taking control of surfaces (7), freeing the mind by cleaning the home office (8), unburdening oneself from past hobbies and too many toys (9), and clearing out the garage and yard (10).  After a special section for maintaining one's minimalistic approach, the author closes with a look at the future with chapters on advising people to get a smaller house than one can afford to reduce various costs (11) and a discussion on how changing one's lifestyle to a more minimalistic one has implications and repercussions in other aspects of our lives (12).To be sure, the author engages in a slight bit of overselling his point.  It is natural and human for writers to think that what they are talking about is something of pivotal and even universal importance that is being ignored or neglected, and at times the author seems like an evangelist for decluttering rather than a minister for Christ who happens to urge believers to live in a more simplified manner.  Given that the author has written multiple volumes on this subject, that impression seems to be an accurate one.  Even so, the author is correct that far too many of us have far too many things and that our things own us as much as or more than we own them.  Likewise, our ability to show hospitality and generosity is often hindered by our clutter, both over our shame and concern about being judged as hoarders as well as in the fact that our acquisition of things and stuff hinders our ability to be open-hearted to those who go without.  Even if I think the author is guilty of some excess in trying to make his point, it must be conceded that the author's advice is timely and wise and should be taken by a lot more people.  [1] See, for example:https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2011...https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2014...https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2011...[2] See, for example:https://edgeinducedcohesion.blog/2017...
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  • Monica
    January 1, 1970
    For the past several years, I have been following Joshua Becker's blog. I have also read all of his books through this one. His new book, The Minimalist Home is full of great information for anyone wanting to declutter and re-focus their life.When I read Becker's first books, we were getting ready to move and I knew I needed to get rid of stuff. His encouraging books and blogs helped us pare down and make that move. What we didn't know then was that we would make 3 more moves in a short time spa For the past several years, I have been following Joshua Becker's blog. I have also read all of his books through this one. His new book, The Minimalist Home is full of great information for anyone wanting to declutter and re-focus their life.When I read Becker's first books, we were getting ready to move and I knew I needed to get rid of stuff. His encouraging books and blogs helped us pare down and make that move. What we didn't know then was that we would make 3 more moves in a short time span. Each time, we pared down a little more. We have now been in this house for three years. . .and we were starting to pick up some clutter again after family members passed away. We knew we needed to once again declutter, which is why I wanted to read The Minimalist Home. Becker is so encouraging and clear in his method of walking you through decluttering your house that I think he makes the process enjoyable. Besides his how-to information, at the end of each chapter, Becker has a checklist to work through. Besides his own minimizing story, each chapter also includes a lot of testimonials from other people who have decluttered. I find it especially encouraging to read stories of others who have done this successfully and how much more joy their life has since doing it.I enjoyed The Minimalist Home so much. Becker is conversational in his writing in that I can almost feel him coaching me on. I find the methods easy to follow. I worked through much of the book and just have my office and the basement to finish decluttering after Christmas. I would encourage anyone who wants to live a simpler life with less stuff to give The Minimalist Home a try. It may seem overwhelming but when decluttering is broken down into the chunks that Becker suggests, it is so much more doable. I highly recommend it, not just to eliminate the excess stuff. . .but to head towards the life that you were created to live with time to do more activities that you want to do.
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  • Book Chick (Tori)
    January 1, 1970
    I am a fan of Joshua Becker. One of my favorite books of his, that I re-read often, is Simplify: 7 Guiding Principles to Help Anyone Declutter Their Home and Life. I've also read The More of Less: Finding the Life You Want Under Everything You Own & Inside-Out Simplicity- both great books.This book focused specifically on decluttering and minimizing in each individual room of one's home. I can see how this could be a fabulous reference guide for someone new to the minimalist lifestyle or som I am a fan of Joshua Becker. One of my favorite books of his, that I re-read often, is Simplify: 7 Guiding Principles to Help Anyone Declutter Their Home and Life. I've also read The More of Less: Finding the Life You Want Under Everything You Own & Inside-Out Simplicity- both great books.This book focused specifically on decluttering and minimizing in each individual room of one's home. I can see how this could be a fabulous reference guide for someone new to the minimalist lifestyle or someone who is overwhelmed and doesn't know where to start. I appreciated how he went from room to room with step-by-step instructions/suggestions on where to start in each room. At the end of each room chapter he gave a "Minimizing Checklist"- much like a summary checklist of what he had gone through in the chapter. I thought that was helpful. Overall the book was exactly what the title says - A Room-by-Room Guide to a Decluttered, Refocused Life. Having read several of his other books, this book seemed to repeat a lot of what I've already read and have put into play in my own life, but that is understandable when it comes to teaching about minimalism. He had a lot of quotes that I highlighted because they spoke to me. If you are thinking of minimizing or need help decluttering your home, this book can help. He has it set up in a easy method to follow and he doesn't force anything. A person can minimize as much or as little as they feel comfortable with during that specific season in their life.A few quotes I liked:"Ask yourself what is really important and then have the courage to build your home and life around that answer.""Just because you have the space doesn't mean you have to fill it with stuff." "Never organize what you can discard.""A home that is filled with only the things you use and love will be a home that you love to use." Source: Netgalley
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  • Mollie
    January 1, 1970
    An upbeat, comprehensive, step-by-step guide to creating a more fulfilling life by minimizing. Success stories, lists, and room by room suggestions enable the reader to feel inspired and not overwhelmed by what could otherwise be a daunting project..
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  • Megan Ericson
    January 1, 1970
    Joshua Becker took his 10+ years of experience writing about minimalism and packed it all into these 200 pages. I have never read a more practical, step-by-step guide to decluttering your home. I would recommend this book to anyone but especially to moms and dads who want to get a handle on their stuff so they can spend more time on what really matters.Some of my favorite quotes from the book:- Minimalism isn't about removing the things you love. It's about removing the things that distract you Joshua Becker took his 10+ years of experience writing about minimalism and packed it all into these 200 pages. I have never read a more practical, step-by-step guide to decluttering your home. I would recommend this book to anyone but especially to moms and dads who want to get a handle on their stuff so they can spend more time on what really matters.Some of my favorite quotes from the book:- Minimalism isn't about removing the things you love. It's about removing the things that distract you from the things you love.- If there is one secret formula to living simply and clutter-free, it is this: believe it is possible and take the next step.- We minimize not out of guilt but because of our goals. It's a positive process.
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  • Theresa
    January 1, 1970
    This book caught my eye because about 8 years ago, I was a homeschool mom blogger and I came across a 40 Bags in 40 Days Lenten challenge.  Each day for the forty days of Lent, you fill one bag with stuff to donate.  It changed my life!  Having less stuff was very liberating!  It was easier to keep my house clean which meant I had more time for other interests.A few years later, the Kon Marie Simple Art of Tidying Up came out and I spent hours picking up my things and deciding if I loved them or This book caught my eye because about 8 years ago, I was a homeschool mom blogger and I came across a 40 Bags in 40 Days Lenten challenge.  Each day for the forty days of Lent, you fill one bag with stuff to donate.  It changed my life!  Having less stuff was very liberating!  It was easier to keep my house clean which meant I had more time for other interests.A few years later, the Kon Marie Simple Art of Tidying Up came out and I spent hours picking up my things and deciding if I loved them or not.  The biggest change this brought is that my husband embraced the idea of rolling his t-shirts which allowed him to see ALL of them when he opened his drawer - he was so excited about this that he has actually brought other men (who wanted to see) his rolled t-shirt drawer and they all exclaimed about how it must make packing a breeze and eliminate wrinkles when traveling.  Joshua Becker has written the newest book that will encourage Americans to have less stuff.  Joshua encourages us to realize that having less stuff will allow us more time to pursue other interests.  What I liked most about this book was that he encourages you to get the whole family involved and talk about what to get rid of and why it's important.  His advice on talking about it as a family was very helpful and his method of looking at stuff as Benefit or Burden was insightful.  The Minimalist Home sets up a plan to tackle your home room by room or space by space.  There are checklists and action plans for each room that I found really helpful.  After having done the 40 Bags in 40 Days and reading about the Kon Marie method, I thought I had decluttered, but this book actually made me take a closer look, which I greatly appreciate and I feel much lighter as I scheduled a pickup of goods I will donate.
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  • Sarabi
    January 1, 1970
    Before reviewing The Minimalist Home, I must admit that I have already made up my mind to minimalize my life. I'd lived in 6 different places in the last 5 years and each move was absolutely painful in terms of trying to get my stuff to fit into suitcases. I often left kitchenware, linens and other such things behind because I couldn't take it all. A few months ago, I decided it was time to get rid of all non-essential goods prior to my next move.****I saw in another review that The Minimalist H Before reviewing The Minimalist Home, I must admit that I have already made up my mind to minimalize my life. I'd lived in 6 different places in the last 5 years and each move was absolutely painful in terms of trying to get my stuff to fit into suitcases. I often left kitchenware, linens and other such things behind because I couldn't take it all. A few months ago, I decided it was time to get rid of all non-essential goods prior to my next move.****I saw in another review that The Minimalist Home is poorly organized, despite being a book about home organization. Either the publisher saw the feedback and rearranged the book before I received the ARC, or the other person was personally having an issue following the logic (it happens to the best of us). I found The Minimalist home easily to follow and relatively well-written. It's not a literary masterpiece, but the "what", "why" and "how" come through clearly. ****According to this book, you don't necessarily need to become an extreme minimalist. Although the thread certainly is "less is more," Becker acknowledges that there are a variety of reasons why someone may end up with "more." He knows that people with families may not be able to simply dump everything they don't find value in, because those things are valuable to other family members. We can, however, attempt to guide our families. In short, I recommend The Minimalist Home not only for people who want the simplest life possible, but also for people who simply feel they have far too much stuff and would like to part with some of it. **** Thank you, NetGalley and Waterbrook & Multnoman (publishing) for this advanced reader copy.
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  • Yvette
    January 1, 1970
    Whether you are ready to dive into the deep end or merely looking for inspiration, what Joshua Becker provides in The Minimalist Home is a practical approach to applying a minimalist's approach to your home. This is an evidence-based guide, applicable to a variety of homes and living situations, with practical lists, testimonials, and a great deal of the author's own experience.  Inspiration and application are combined and even the spiritual aspect is covered, without the judgement or narrow pr Whether you are ready to dive into the deep end or merely looking for inspiration, what Joshua Becker provides in The Minimalist Home is a practical approach to applying a minimalist's approach to your home. This is an evidence-based guide, applicable to a variety of homes and living situations, with practical lists, testimonials, and a great deal of the author's own experience.  Inspiration and application are combined and even the spiritual aspect is covered, without the judgement or narrow prescriptive thinking that sometimes characterizes minimalism.  Rather, the author acknowledges and addresses different stages of life and living.  And rather than plunk you down in your newly minimized home and abandoning you to the impulse to refill every nook and cranny, a minimalism maintenance section is included.An eminently practical, approachable, and informative guide to minimalism in the home, this is a book that I highly recommend for both inspiration and application.This review refers to a paperback Uncorrected Proof I voluntarily received from the publisher.  A positive review was not required and all opinions are my own.
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  • Kimberly
    January 1, 1970
    The Minimalist Home: A Room-by-Room Guide to a Decluttered, Refocused Life by [Becker, Joshua]I was given this book by Waterbrook in exchange for my honest review.I know that my life is filled with clutter. It seems that when I begin to get rid of some, I get distracted by other thoughts or memories. When I cam across this book The Minimalist Home, I thought why not give it a try. This book, by Joshua Becker, is a great way to motivate myself. I am always afraid that if I put something away I wi The Minimalist Home: A Room-by-Room Guide to a Decluttered, Refocused Life by [Becker, Joshua]I was given this book by Waterbrook in exchange for my honest review.I know that my life is filled with clutter. It seems that when I begin to get rid of some, I get distracted by other thoughts or memories. When I cam across this book The Minimalist Home, I thought why not give it a try. This book, by Joshua Becker, is a great way to motivate myself. I am always afraid that if I put something away I will forget where I put it. Using Becker's advice of finding a better place for these things, I will hopefully not get so overwhelmed with clutter.This book does not make a person feel ashamed but instead motivates by giving encouragement. When he talked about the peace one would feel when a space is decluttered, I was especially motivated.He has you go through one room at a time, there is even a suggested list of which areas to begin with. Then he asks a series of questions to make the process easier. This book is a great place to turn to in order to bring peace and focus to your life.
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  • Dana Portwood
    January 1, 1970
    It's been five years since I first encountered Joshua Becker and the concept of minimalism. It has been a slow process and a life changing experience for me. What I love about this book is that is answers so many of the questions I too have answered over the years in a methodical and practical way. The difficult thing to convey about minismalism is that it looks entirely different for each family and for each person in a family. But Joshua Becker does a great job explaining the philosophy withou It's been five years since I first encountered Joshua Becker and the concept of minimalism. It has been a slow process and a life changing experience for me. What I love about this book is that is answers so many of the questions I too have answered over the years in a methodical and practical way. The difficult thing to convey about minismalism is that it looks entirely different for each family and for each person in a family. But Joshua Becker does a great job explaining the philosophy without trying to dictate how specifically a person (or family) will determine what to keep and what to let go.Room by room, the reader is asked leading questions about what they want for their lives and how the style of their home reflects their personal values. Minimalism is more a journey of knowing ourselves and expressing that knowledge than it is about whittling down to a certain number of possessions and Mr. Becker does a wonderful job capturing that vision in this book. It is definitely one I will recommend to people who are seeking a different way of living than the 'American Dream' the advertisers want us to accept.
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    It's kind of ironic that I'm reading this book at Christmas time. For several years now, I've been getting more and more, I guess disillusioned with just getting things. I think I've been becoming frustrated with all the things I have, but I'm so sentimental about memories that I don't want to get rid of stuff.If you had asked me before reading this book, I would have told you that I wouldn't be a minimalist because it means that your home is sparse and impersonal and there is no room for heirlo It's kind of ironic that I'm reading this book at Christmas time. For several years now, I've been getting more and more, I guess disillusioned with just getting things. I think I've been becoming frustrated with all the things I have, but I'm so sentimental about memories that I don't want to get rid of stuff.If you had asked me before reading this book, I would have told you that I wouldn't be a minimalist because it means that your home is sparse and impersonal and there is no room for heirlooms or memory things. Yeah, I don't know where I got that idea, but Becker's minimalism is not like that.What I particularly like about this book is that it gives you guidelines for minimizing, rather than an out-and-out list. There aren't rules such as "you may only have five decorations per room". Instead, Becker gives you examples and then gives you a checklist with things like "does this room make me feel less stressed?" "can I easily find things?" "does this room function well for what I need it to?" So each room is minimized to fit YOUR life. He also addresses memories and family items. His approach and care with that subject that was a sticking point for me I think will help me greatly as I slowly start my minimalism journey. Between the Madame Chic series and this book, I have a lot of changes that I want to make in my life. I'm not going to just jump and make a drastic switch, but rather I'm going to start being intentional with my intake now, and just remove things gradually.After helping my aunt move, I thought of how there is 21 years of stuff in my parents' house. I'm hoping to try and help them become at least slightly more minimalistic because it will greatly help when they move someday. I desire my home (when I have one) to be a place of ministry. I dream of having a college student or two living with me to learn life skills. I want to have people over and be able to pour into people's lives. Developing a minimalistic mindset would greatly help in those aspirations. Thank you to the publisher for a free copy of the book to review. All opinions are my own.
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  • My BookSwap Club
    January 1, 1970
    I loved this book! it's short, and to the point. I recently moved house and realized how much stuff i have accumulated over the years....(books don't count as my stuff).I wasn't sure where to start....and so started following simple advise from this book! Two weeks later,..I've pretty much got rid of lots of duplicate in the house. I am more mindful about replacing those duplicates.I love the fact that after clean up, you've also got an advise on how to keep it going...(I have a long way to go.. I loved this book! it's short, and to the point. I recently moved house and realized how much stuff i have accumulated over the years....(books don't count as my stuff).I wasn't sure where to start....and so started following simple advise from this book! Two weeks later,..I've pretty much got rid of lots of duplicate in the house. I am more mindful about replacing those duplicates.I love the fact that after clean up, you've also got an advise on how to keep it going...(I have a long way to go..but am sure i will get there)My favorite concept from the book...'think about the purpose of your room', and then start designing it. It really works!Great book, highly recommend if you are looking to clean up your house.
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  • Bethwyn (Butterfly Elephant Books)
    January 1, 1970
    Having read a few books on minimalism by this point, and having a favourite that I actually reread regularly for inspiration, a lot of this book felt a little re-hashed to me - stuff I've read before and know about fairly intimately.However, it was clear how much research had gone into the writing of this book, and the testimonies sprinkled throughout, and at the very end of the book, were absolutely wonderful.A definite winner for those new to minimalism who want a guide to clearing and declutt Having read a few books on minimalism by this point, and having a favourite that I actually reread regularly for inspiration, a lot of this book felt a little re-hashed to me - stuff I've read before and know about fairly intimately.However, it was clear how much research had gone into the writing of this book, and the testimonies sprinkled throughout, and at the very end of the book, were absolutely wonderful.A definite winner for those new to minimalism who want a guide to clearing and decluttering the family home, room by room. The testimonies are great for those already familiar to minimalism.
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  • Katarina
    January 1, 1970
    ***I received a free copy in return for an honest review***I enjoyed reading this book and learning about the minimalist approach to the home. I thought the room-by-room advice for minimizing possessions was helpful. In particular I found the section on downsizing the home and the many benefits that provides to be a fresh perspective I haven't read in other books about organization and minimalism. Overall, this book helped me take a good look at my lifestyle and evaluate ways to implement minima ***I received a free copy in return for an honest review***I enjoyed reading this book and learning about the minimalist approach to the home. I thought the room-by-room advice for minimizing possessions was helpful. In particular I found the section on downsizing the home and the many benefits that provides to be a fresh perspective I haven't read in other books about organization and minimalism. Overall, this book helped me take a good look at my lifestyle and evaluate ways to implement minimalism.
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  • Kristin Lee Williams
    January 1, 1970
    I received an advance copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.This is a practical book with some good tips for creating a more minimalist home. I appreciate how the author was careful to draw a line between currently popular minimalist decorating/design styles and actual minimalist lifestyle/philosophy. Joshua Becker’s advice about involving the whole family and working room by room was helpful too. There are some aspects that reminded me of The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up but o I received an advance copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.This is a practical book with some good tips for creating a more minimalist home. I appreciate how the author was careful to draw a line between currently popular minimalist decorating/design styles and actual minimalist lifestyle/philosophy. Joshua Becker’s advice about involving the whole family and working room by room was helpful too. There are some aspects that reminded me of The Life Changing Magic of Tidying Up but overall this is a welcome entry to the minimalist homemaking cannon.
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  • Rhiannon Sacco
    January 1, 1970
    This is a topic that has interested me and I have slowly been tackling this in my life. Very slowly. Way too slowly!!I was excited to read "The Minimalist Home" and I was not disappointed. Not only did I find it inspirational and fueling the fire to clean, part with stuff we don't need, and create a home we can enjoy instead of just clean.But I love that Joshua Becker does not leave us wondering where to start or how to make our home the way we want. He gives directions and suggestions on both.I This is a topic that has interested me and I have slowly been tackling this in my life. Very slowly. Way too slowly!!I was excited to read "The Minimalist Home" and I was not disappointed. Not only did I find it inspirational and fueling the fire to clean, part with stuff we don't need, and create a home we can enjoy instead of just clean.But I love that Joshua Becker does not leave us wondering where to start or how to make our home the way we want. He gives directions and suggestions on both.I would recommend this to anyone frustrated with their clutter and wanting to embrace a more minimalistic lifestyle.
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  • Kate TerHaar
    January 1, 1970
    I have read several decluttering/minimalist type books. This was a bit more in depth than others i have read. After all, how many ways to declutter are there. Most give the same advise but just packaged differently.
  • Claudia
    January 1, 1970
    I need to do this. Becker's suggestions are solid and straightforward. Easy to follow, but with a greater reason than just getting stuff out of the house. I look at corners and I know I need to start. Really.
  • Leonard Davis
    January 1, 1970
    Very practical adviceI appreciate that the author has divided the chapters into different parts of the house and has given lists on how to tackle them. The personal stories from others were also inspiring.
  • Sarah Ruut
    January 1, 1970
    Minimalism is trendy, but for someone who is just getting started, where do you even begin?The Minimalist Home takes you room by room through your house, addressing many of the common clutter issues in each room and offering perspective on the decisions to be made. It won’t do the work for you, but it will give you tools to help you along the way.So much of the decluttering process is mental: deciding what to keep and what to get rid of. The Minimalist Home does a great job of painting a picture Minimalism is trendy, but for someone who is just getting started, where do you even begin?The Minimalist Home takes you room by room through your house, addressing many of the common clutter issues in each room and offering perspective on the decisions to be made. It won’t do the work for you, but it will give you tools to help you along the way.So much of the decluttering process is mental: deciding what to keep and what to get rid of. The Minimalist Home does a great job of painting a picture of what your home — and life!— could be like while still maintaining your own uniqueness and style.If you are ready to make some changes for the better (or even if you’re just thinking about it), this will be a wonderful resource to keep at hand.(This review was first posted on my blog -- sarahruut.com. I received a complimentary copy of this book. The thoughts expressed here are entirely my own.)
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  • Janet
    January 1, 1970
    I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher --- A popular minimalist blogger and author of The More of Less shows you how to methodically turn your home into a place of peace, contentment, and purposeful living.One of today's most influential minimalist advocates takes us on a decluttering tour of our own houses and apartments, showing us how to decide what to get rid of and what to keep. He both offers practical guid I received a DIGITAL Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher --- A popular minimalist blogger and author of The More of Less shows you how to methodically turn your home into a place of peace, contentment, and purposeful living.One of today's most influential minimalist advocates takes us on a decluttering tour of our own houses and apartments, showing us how to decide what to get rid of and what to keep. He both offers practical guidelines for simplifying our lifestyle at home and addresses underlying issues that contribute to over-accumulation in the first place. The purpose is not just to create a more inviting living space. It's also to turn our life's HQ--our home--into a launching pad for a more fulfilling and productive life in the world.Okay, there is minimalist and there is waaaaay too empty: I mean, where would I put my books? I have an e-reader but it’s not the same: if you don’t buy PHYSICAL books, the book trade that I am passionate about and the libraries in our lives (ESSENTIAL!!!!!) would disappear. Another point presented that I had a problem with? Americans spending $1.2 TRILLION on non-essential goods a year. If they didn’t, think of the MILLIONS of jobs in retail and manufacturing and shipping and storage companies, etc. etc. that would disappear! Maybe work on simpler alternatives – something as simple as buying a stainless steel or silicone straw and carrying it around (vs the plastic straws you get at restaurants) 500 million straws get tossed and end up in lakes/oceans every year…that is an easy thing to minimalize without emptying your house of everything you own.Okay, rant over – if you are into this idea of minimalism you will love the ideas in the book. I did get some de-cluttering ideas (I am up to my waist in boxes of things to be donated to the Goodwill and have way too many painted canvasses at the moment that need to go to silent auctions so this did spur me to get those things out of my house.)This is a hard book to rate --- it made me angry at times but I get it…maybe. If this is your jam, 5 stars. If you love your stuff, 1 … so 3 in the end.
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