THE ADVENTURES OF JOHN JEWITT
John Jewitt’s adventures in the Pacific Northwest must surely rank as one of history’s greatest wilderness survival stories. His book is also a tale of two vastly different cultures – indigenous North American and European civilization – colliding head on.When the nineteen-year-old blacksmith boarded the brigantine The Boston in his home port of Hull, England, in 1802, he couldn’t have envisaged what awaited him upon arrival in Nootka Sound, Vancouver Island, off the west coast of the country now known as Canada. Jewitt was one of only two survivors when fierce Mowachaht warriors slaughtered twenty-five crew members aboard the brig. He and his fellow survivor had to endure more than two years as slaves of the First Nations people of Nootka.According to Jewitt’s diary entries, the Mowachahts’ slaughter of his crewmates was quite premeditated. Unfortunately, his description of the events leading up to the massacre doesn’t tell the full story, which is that the Mowachahts – like most or all the tribes of the Pacific Northwest – had put up with many, many years of abuse by successive Spanish, English and American traders. History shows that the abuse ranged from unfair trades to the frequent rape of indigenous women and all too often to murder.There’s no denying the Mowachahts could be cruel at times. Jewitt himself writes of their cruelty. However, he also refers to the kindness and generosity of his captors and their love of family, and we note the examples he gives far outweigh references to their cruelty.Thanks to Jewitt’s fondness for the written word and his diligence in maintaining his diary entries throughout his captivity, we have been left with an intriguing insight into his life, and into the lives of First Nations people. His account is made all the more extraordinary by virtue of the fact that such interaction between whites and the tribes of the Pacific Northwest was virtually unheard of and certainly never before (and seldom since) written about in such detail.In his self-effacing way, a modest Jewitt explains how his work ethic, his friendly nature and his willingness to accept the native peoples as his equal endeared him to many of his captors. He even married a local maiden who bore him a son – though he makes little mention of this in his writings other than admitting his wife was very pleasing on the eye. (Georgian era attitudes perhaps dissuaded him from revealing more).Such was his eye for detail, John Jewitt leaves the reader with a clear understanding of the Mowachahts’ customs, language, daily work habits, hygiene, trading, hunting, whaling and fishing techniques, diet and food preparation, potlatches, housing (they lived in lodges left by Spanish visitors), tree-felling and canoe-making, toolmaking and weapons, worship, feuds and settlement of intertribal disputes. How Jewitt eventually engineered his freedom makes for entertaining reading.All this, and more, will become evident as you read The Adventures of John Jewitt (The true story that inspired Into the Americas). The book also has 10 original illustrations.As the book’s title suggests, Jewitt’s adventures were the inspiration for the bestselling novel Into the Americas by father-and-son writing team Lance & James Morcan.

THE ADVENTURES OF JOHN JEWITT Details

TitleTHE ADVENTURES OF JOHN JEWITT
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseApr 9th, 2018
PublisherSterling Gate Books
Rating
GenreHistorical, Historical Fiction, Young Adult, True Story, Crime, True Crime

THE ADVENTURES OF JOHN JEWITT Review

  • Todd Simpson
    January 1, 1970
    What an incredible story. It’s hard to imagine what it would be like to go through what John Jewitt experience for almost 3 years. What started out as an adventure for him, quickly turned into a nightmare. I really enjoyed reading this story, and it really hit home what he went through. It’s been well written, and it certainly captured my attention. Working down the docks as a blacksmith sure opened John Jewitt’s eyes, especially when he started talking to the sailors. After hearing about their What an incredible story. It’s hard to imagine what it would be like to go through what John Jewitt experience for almost 3 years. What started out as an adventure for him, quickly turned into a nightmare. I really enjoyed reading this story, and it really hit home what he went through. It’s been well written, and it certainly captured my attention. Working down the docks as a blacksmith sure opened John Jewitt’s eyes, especially when he started talking to the sailors. After hearing about their travels around the world, he knew that’s exactly what he wanted to do. He was in luck when a position became available onboard The Boston, to assist in the armoury. Sailing on a ship was certainly different from being on land, and an adventure was exactly what John was looking for. However, when the ship was attacked by a tribe of Indians at Nootka Sound in Vancouver Island, he suddenly found himself a slave. Mind you, they killed just about everyone else on the ship, so being a slave for a couple of years was better than being killed. A great story that it well worth a read. If you enjoy reading this, then I would also recommend a fiction series based on this true story by Lance and James Morcan: ‘Into the Americas’
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  • Sterling Gate Books
    January 1, 1970
    NB: This is a review from the publisher.
  • Lisa Norris
    January 1, 1970
    Nineteenth Century English seaman-turned author John Jewitt provides readers with a mesmerizing account of his time as a captive of Mowachaht warriors on Vancouver Island. I doubt a more intriguing insight into the lives of Canada’s First Nations people has ever been written. And how he survived after 25 of his crewmates were slaughtered almost defies belief.
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  • Sheri
    January 1, 1970
    THE ADVENTURES OF JOHN JEWITT: The true story that inspired Into the Americas by John Rodgers JewittA fascinating, compelling story of one many journey aboard "The Boston". He chronicles his life, through rough , and often brutal times. A courageous man who is determined to remain open-minded and kind, in a world of Cruelty. Through John's journals, we learn of the (horrific) treatment of the Native people, and how John coped during this tumultuous time. I highly recommend to all. A definite fiv THE ADVENTURES OF JOHN JEWITT: The true story that inspired Into the Americas by John Rodgers JewittA fascinating, compelling story of one many journey aboard "The Boston". He chronicles his life, through rough , and often brutal times. A courageous man who is determined to remain open-minded and kind, in a world of Cruelty. Through John's journals, we learn of the (horrific) treatment of the Native people, and how John coped during this tumultuous time. I highly recommend to all. A definite five star read!
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  • Jack
    January 1, 1970
    I found the book worthwhile mostly because it dealt with an area and peoples which I had had earlier personal exposure. It wasn't particularly engaging in terms of writing style and his frequent use of both names and local language made it a bit difficult to follow, but being a recollection of experiences and facts helped mitigate this obstacle. If I hadn't lived close to the area being covered and had acquaintance with neighboring tribes (at a much later date), I don't know if I'd have been abl I found the book worthwhile mostly because it dealt with an area and peoples which I had had earlier personal exposure. It wasn't particularly engaging in terms of writing style and his frequent use of both names and local language made it a bit difficult to follow, but being a recollection of experiences and facts helped mitigate this obstacle. If I hadn't lived close to the area being covered and had acquaintance with neighboring tribes (at a much later date), I don't know if I'd have been able to complete reading it.
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  • Lance Morcan
    January 1, 1970
  • James Morcan
    January 1, 1970
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