The Feminist Agenda of Jemima Kincaid
A novel about friendship, feminism, and the knotty complications of tradition and privilege, perfect for fans of Becky Albertalli and Stephanie Perkins.Jemima Kincaid is a feminist, and she thinks you should be one too. Her private school is laden with problematic traditions, but the worst of all is prom. The guys have all the agency; the girls have to wait around for promposals (she's speaking heteronormatively because only the hetero kids even go). In Jemima's (very opionated) opinion, it's positively medieval.Then Jemima is named to Senior Triumvirate, alongside superstar athlete Andy and popular, manicured Gennifer, and the three must organize prom. Inspired by her feminist ideals and her desire to make a mark on the school, Jemima proposes a new structure. They'll do a Last Chance Dance: every student privately submits a list of crushes to a website that pairs them with any mutual matches.Meanwhile, Jemima finds herself embroiled in a secret romance that she craves and hates all at once. Her best friend, Jiyoon, has found romance of her own, but Jemima starts to suspect something else has caused the sudden rift between them. And is the new prom system really enough to extinguish the school's raging dumpster fire of toxic masculinity?Filled with Kate Hattemer's signature banter, this is a fast-paced and thoughtful tale about the nostalgia of senior year, the muddle of modern relationships, and how to fight the patriarchy when you just might be part of the patriarchy yourself.

The Feminist Agenda of Jemima Kincaid Details

TitleThe Feminist Agenda of Jemima Kincaid
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 18th, 2020
PublisherKnopf Books for Young Readers
ISBN-139781984849120
Rating
GenreContemporary, Young Adult, Romance, Feminism

The Feminist Agenda of Jemima Kincaid Review

  • The Nerd Daily
    January 1, 1970
    Originally published on The Nerd Daily | Review by Zoë LeonarczykThe Feminist Agenda of Jemima Kincaid by Kate Hattemer is a modern-day feminist manifesto for young men and women alike. Jemima Kincaid, because with a name like that how could you not say the whole thing, is smart, witty, and over the male “agenda.” Being one part of the Senior Triumvirate, Jemima decides that this is the year she will make a difference to the problematic misogyny and toxic masculinity at her private high school Originally published on The Nerd Daily | Review by Zoë LeonarczykThe Feminist Agenda of Jemima Kincaid by Kate Hattemer is a modern-day feminist manifesto for young men and women alike. Jemima Kincaid, because with a name like that how could you not say the whole thing, is smart, witty, and over the male “agenda.” Being one part of the Senior Triumvirate, Jemima decides that this is the year she will make a difference to the problematic misogyny and toxic masculinity at her private high school Chawton.Jemima soon picks her target of change: the senior prom. To her, this is the absolute worst tradition as the girls are forced to wait for some epic promposal in order to get a date to the dance. And don’t even get her started on the heteronormativity of it all. So, Jemima comes up with a solution to give the females some power of attorney for prom as well as to leave an epic mark on the history of the school. Instead of just a regular prom, the Senior Triumvirate decides to throw a Last Chance Dance.Jemima must work with the other two thirds of the Senior Triumvirate, Andy the flirty athlete and Gennifer the most popular person in school, to ensure that this is the best dance Chawton has ever seen. As the three plan out the dance, they set up a private website for every person in the school to submit their crushes. And by crushes, the Triumvirate means anyone you have ever even considered liking. Once all of these are uploaded, the Last Chance portion of the new and improved prom is put into action and mutual matches between individuals are sought out. Because they must be mutual, this is all about levelling out the playing field between the guys and girls of illustrious Chawton.But, will everything go according to plan?Jemima is one of those characters you will either immediately love or hate. She is amazingly herself and not afraid to share each and every opinion she has. Especially when it comes to feminism. Jemima Kincaid lives, breathes, and practices her feministic ideologies. She’s also lucky to get through any conversation without having to point out a problem with society’s frustrating ideologies about women. But Jemima’s concerns are not only about leaving her mark on the hallways of Chawton. She’s going through senior year with a secret romance while also dealing with the fact that her best friend is pulling away from her. As Jemima spreads her gospel of woman, she must also deal with the relationships in her life.Hattemer has a very witty and sharp style of writing which pairs perfectly with Jemima Kincaid. All of the characters reflect to “typical” people you find in high school. You have the brainiacs, the athletes, the basket cases, the princesses, and the criminals. Oh wait, that’s The Breakfast Club, but you get the idea. There are the typical cliques you see in a high school, but Hattemer elevates these characters another level by pointing out the flaws and the similarities between these seniors. And, in typical Breakfast Club style, Hattemer brings three very different individuals together to form the Senior Triumvirate.Overall, The Feminist Agenda of Jemima will leave you with nostalgia of Senior Year. It has all of the anxiety and rush that comes with graduating from high school. Each member of the Senior Triumvirate is afraid to move on from Chawton and be forgotten, much like the fear of many seniors in high school. I mean, who wants to spend four years of one’s life in school only to leave the doors one day and never be remembered. To never have some sort of legacy that students will talk about for years to come. And what better legacy for Jemima Kincaid than to stick it to the man and showcase the power of women.
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  • Cozy Ink
    January 1, 1970
    UGH. Okay, so at first I thought this was stupid. And then I was like oh, okay! This is pretty vapid but a good enough book. And then it sucked. So badly. So I really couldn't decipher a message here but - It's okay to be judgey! As long as you think about it like once and decide it's okay. If everyone tells you to shut up, you should probably do it! Because outing your brother is equivalent to taking down a misogynistic tradition, totally. Rigging an election is fine if you're morally right. As UGH. Okay, so at first I thought this was stupid. And then I was like oh, okay! This is pretty vapid but a good enough book. And then it sucked. So badly. So I really couldn't decipher a message here but - It's okay to be judgey! As long as you think about it like once and decide it's okay. If everyone tells you to shut up, you should probably do it! Because outing your brother is equivalent to taking down a misogynistic tradition, totally. Rigging an election is fine if you're morally right. As long as your boyfriend knows he's misogynistic, it's okay! And he doesn't need to change, either. Ultimately, this had no message. Like it was maybe a three star and then the ending was just ????? What was the point here?
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  • Michele
    January 1, 1970
    Jemima is one-third of the student governing body at her exclusive private school. She tries to take measures to confront some stereotypes and misogyny that surround some of their school traditions, but instead ends up in the middle of a scandal. This is 14 plus for sexual content, but the author is also a high school teacher, so the dialog and relationships are very realistic and authentic.
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  • bee
    January 1, 1970
    this was actually a big surprise, in a good way! at the beginning of the book, Jemima had a really horrible way of thinking about other girls, but she actually grew and changed and recognized her flawed mindset. the only thing that I thought could have been addressed more was the kind of mildly racist mindset Jemima had. but generally, this book was good and surprising and definitely worth the read.
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  • The Bookish Faerie
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to @times.reads for sending me this ARC. It will be for sale in bookstores starting 18th February 2020.The Feminist Agenda of Jemima Kincaid tells the story of Jemima Kincaid's senior year and her agenda of how to fight for women's rights in her super problematic private high school by being a feminist. As she is the Senior Triumvirate, she has the power to invoke change and a voice that people will hear regardless if they want to or not because she has the stage and mike, literally. Thank you to @times.reads for sending me this ARC. It will be for sale in bookstores starting 18th February 2020.The Feminist Agenda of Jemima Kincaid tells the story of Jemima Kincaid's senior year and her agenda of how to fight for women's rights in her super problematic private high school by being a feminist. As she is the Senior Triumvirate, she has the power to invoke change and a voice that people will hear regardless if they want to or not because she has the stage and mike, literally. In the Triumvirate, we have star athlete and golden boy Andy and popularity princess Gennifer. It is the end of the school year, and the responsibility of the most anticipated event in High School falls to the trio - PROM. Sick of the double standards and rules that were written by those who are dead, she is inspired to reinvent prom into something less medieval, it is named Last Chance Dance. Every year, girls wait around for a "promposal" while guys get their pick of the fish they want. But Jemima, girls can also ask guys to prom, it is 2020, helloooo. Sure. There are some who do that. But some who do, they get slut-shammed for being direct with a boy they like whereas, if a boy asks a girl, it is romantic. This year, it will be fair to all. Last Chance Dance requires students to sign in to a website to key in a list of people they are interested and the system keep it private and match them together. Of course, students can go old school too and stay off the tech because WhO pUtS PrIvAtE iNfOrMaTiOn LiKe ThAt OnLiNe?!! Chawton High School does.Meantime, Jemima is intertwined in a hush-hush romance with the school's golden boy which she hates and yearns for all at once. And her best friend since childhood, Jiyoon develops a romance of her own, a bridge stars to build between them slowly. Senior year, drama, and a school filled with toxic masculinity. I wonder who will last for graduation. This book focuses a lot about high school government politics and toxicity that we sometimes don't notice. From being a feminist to a misogynistic and the process of losing a friend and making up again. Kate Hattemer's got you covered. Speaking of cover, this book cover is so cool! Thank you once more to @times.reads for the ARC!
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  • Barbara
    January 1, 1970
    Jemima Kincaid is smart, witty, and confident. A longtime feminist, she's part of her class's leadership team, the Triumvirate, she has grown increasingly troubled by some of the school's misogynistic traditions. In a bid to change things while also gaining some recognition, she comes up with an idea for the prom--a Last Chance Dance in which all of her classmates list their romantic interests for a website that then matches them up with whoever listed them as well. At first things go well until Jemima Kincaid is smart, witty, and confident. A longtime feminist, she's part of her class's leadership team, the Triumvirate, she has grown increasingly troubled by some of the school's misogynistic traditions. In a bid to change things while also gaining some recognition, she comes up with an idea for the prom--a Last Chance Dance in which all of her classmates list their romantic interests for a website that then matches them up with whoever listed them as well. At first things go well until someone hacks the coded information for the students and their submissions and makes it public. Through it all, Jemima is fighting her physical attraction to Andy Monroe, a fellow Triumvirate leader, and their relationship goes from witty banter to knees touching during meetings to even more intimate encounters. But the physical stuff is kept secret, and Jemima isn't sure what any of it means. Meanwhile, her best friend Jiyoon is falling in love for the first time and has decided to run for Triumvirate chair. Jemima finds herself feeling jealous of Jiyoon's relationship and ashamed that she never saw her as a viable candidate for the position. Then, too, she starts to realize that many of her comments about her female peers and her judgment of how they dress and act just might be as misogynistic as the attitudes of the males at her school and the school alums she dubs Old White Dudes. There are several examples of messy ethics in this book, and the author raises quite a few questions about what it means to be a feminist and how hard it can be to really know oneself. I wish she'd included a bit more about Jemima's internal struggles and how she resolved some of them, but I give her plaudits for covering some unconventional territory in an entertaining way. Not only is there much snark in this book, but there are some very steamy scenes between Jemima and Andy that might remind older readers of their own sexual awakening. As Jemima begins to recognize, it's often hard to make changes when you yourself might be more part of the problem than you realized.
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  • Colline Vinay Kook-Chun
    January 1, 1970
    The Feminist Agenda of Jemima Kincaid is a novel about an emerging young woman who learns to take a look at herself and at the way other people see her. Jemima learns that she needs to take a step back and think about what – and who – is important to her and who she wants to have in her life.As suggested in the title, the concept of feminism plays a role in the novel. Jemima comes to understand what true feminism is. It is not about being the antithesis of femininity. Instead, it is about The Feminist Agenda of Jemima Kincaid is a novel about an emerging young woman who learns to take a look at herself and at the way other people see her. Jemima learns that she needs to take a step back and think about what – and who – is important to her and who she wants to have in her life.As suggested in the title, the concept of feminism plays a role in the novel. Jemima comes to understand what true feminism is. It is not about being the antithesis of femininity. Instead, it is about knowing who you are, being comfortable with it, and supporting other women who express themselves in ways that are comfortable to them. She comes to realise that a woman can be feminine – and still fight the patriarchy. She also comes to the realisation that her reactions might just be supporting the patriarchal system.Hattemer has shared with us a story that is a life story – not a love story. It is a story that centres on the message that girls can empower and support one another in subtle ways and, in so doing, work against the patriarchal system.The Feminist Agenda of Jemima Kincaid is a coming of age novel that is a perfect read for those thinking about what type of person they want to be in our society. It is also a story which shows the importance of supporting other young women.
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  • Julia
    January 1, 1970
    Truthfully my rating would be 3.5 stars. I like this books for its light fluffy story. It is not too heavy or deep. It does ask some interesting questions about checking our on bias and those that we have been taught by society especially in high school. This quick read does contain some sexual situations and also discusses a spectrum of what sex is. Unlike many private school books Jemima's family is a part of the story especially her older brother who is used as a confidant for her. I think at Truthfully my rating would be 3.5 stars. I like this books for its light fluffy story. It is not too heavy or deep. It does ask some interesting questions about checking our on bias and those that we have been taught by society especially in high school. This quick read does contain some sexual situations and also discusses a spectrum of what sex is. Unlike many private school books Jemima's family is a part of the story especially her older brother who is used as a confidant for her. I think at parts the book could have went a little deeper some of Jemima's emotions and attitudes feel light. Overall I would recommend this book for anyone looking for a good beach read or just a morning alone.This review is thanks to an ARC from Netgalley.
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  • Karyn Silverman
    January 1, 1970
    Great dialogue, and a fantastic critique of and exploration of internalized monogamy. Sex positive and no fade to black, either. Funny at times, thought provoking, and while Jemima is often awful, she’s very real and it’s a virtuoso feat of writing to have a first person narrator both be stupid and myopic and also make great strides and yet for the book to never come across as didactic.
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  • Sam
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars
  • Zach Foley
    January 1, 1970
    Would’ve been a better book if Jiyoon was the main character.
  • Jill Heather
    January 1, 1970
    Feminist but has somehow never considered even basic things like "slut shaming" and "not like other girls syndrome" even though her best friend complains about her tendencies there? Nah.
  • Britt
    January 1, 1970
    Read and Reviewed for School Library Journal (issue 2020-01-01):https://www.slj.com/?reviewDetail=the...Full text TK
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