Borderless (Analog #2)
Information is power, and whoever controls the feed rules the world in this all-too-plausible follow-up to the science fiction thriller Bandwidth. Exiled from Washington after a covert operation gone wrong, Diana is building a new life as a freelance spy, though her obsessive secrecy is driving away the few friends and allies she can count on. When she’s hired to investigate the world’s leading techno capitalist, she unknowingly accepts an assignment with a dark ulterior purpose. Navigating a labyrinth of cutouts and false fronts, Diana discovers a plot to nationalize the global feed.As tech and politics speed toward a catastrophic reckoning, Diana must reconcile the sins of her past with her dreams of tomorrow. How she deploys the secrets in her arsenal will shape the future of a planet on the brink of disaster. Doing the right thing means risking everything to change the rules of the game. But how much is freedom really worth?

Borderless (Analog #2) Details

TitleBorderless (Analog #2)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 30th, 2018
Publisher47North
Rating
GenreScience Fiction

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Borderless (Analog #2) Review

  • Fabi
    January 1, 1970
    This is book 2 but if you read book 1 you know it pretty much wrapped up it's story. However, some groundwork was laid so that we could revisit this incredible near-future world with follow up characters.We follow CIA agent Diana as she's embroiled in intrigue and action in her quest to keep "the feed" safe from malicious hands. Great mystery set in a relevant near-future world.Review ARC graciously provided by the publisher via NetGalley
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  • Lucas Carlson
    January 1, 1970
    Oh. My. This is so good. So so good. This is the kind of book you wait for... why? Do you like big premise books? Check. Do you like great writing that doesn’t get in the way of the story? Check. Do you like books where you can’t put them down? Check. Do yourself a favor and stop reading this and just get it. You won’t be disappointed.
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  • Bernard Jan
    January 1, 1970
    More action. More suspense. More intrigue. More of everything in the second installment of the Analog Series, Borderless. It’s all about the feed and the clash and wisdom of two women—Diana and Helen—who keep the present, future and the ultimate destiny of the world in the fist of their attacks and counterattacks.Because,The feed was the information infrastructure that empowered nearly every human activity and on which nearly every human activity relied. A talisman that lent mere mortals the pow More action. More suspense. More intrigue. More of everything in the second installment of the Analog Series, Borderless. It’s all about the feed and the clash and wisdom of two women—Diana and Helen—who keep the present, future and the ultimate destiny of the world in the fist of their attacks and counterattacks.Because,The feed was the information infrastructure that empowered nearly every human activity and on which nearly every human activity relied. A talisman that lent mere mortals the power of demigods. Doctors used it for diagnosis. Brokers used it to place bets. Physicists used it to explore the mysteries of quantum entanglement. Farmers used it to grow food. Kindergarteners used it to learn the alphabet. The feed was power, water, transportation, communication, entertainment, public services, relationships, industry, media, government, security, finance, and education. Without it the churning torrent of human civilization would cease.Praise to Eliot Peper, the author of Cumulus, True Blue, Neon Fever Dream, The Uncommon Series, Bandwidth, and now another near-future thriller Borderless, the second novel in the Analog Series.If you haven’t read anything coming from Eliot Peper’s super brain, correct that now and grab any of his book. His writing is intelligent, seducing, enchanting, like multi-colored waterfall cascading over the central core of your brain.Read this: You were the center of gravity in a dance that you were observing but not participating in. And read this: When you owned your own decisions, you owned your own sins. And this: The overall impression it left was of something designed but not engineered, a marriage of botanical growth and human imagination.And then read the whole of Borderless, not skipping a single word because you don’t want to shatter the glass ball of magical writing in front of which we bow our heads pleased and humbled. Overwhelmed with the beauty and the rich texture of his writing style, I need to say this one last thing (or maybe two). Many great authors are out there but there are not so many great authors who are true artists. Eliot Peper is one of them.Whether you are just a reader, a budding or established writer or an author, read Eliot Peper. Read him slowly and with tender care. Enjoy the process and LEARN. You don’t want to miss the taste of the near future and live it now in your imagination before it will become real in a few years or decades; you don’t want to be excluded from the privilege of knowing one of the best composers of the written word who walks, breaths, dreams and lives in the same feed as you do. That would be a shame.Bernard Janwww.bernardjan.com
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  • Brad Feld
    January 1, 1970
    Spectacular. It's not out yet (I read the uncorrected proof) but Eliot just gets better and better with each book. Riveting, relevant, and wonderful.
  • Dubi
    January 1, 1970
    When we last left the Analog series at the end of its initial entry, Bandwidth, that story was pretty well wrapped up, with the groundwork laid for a follow-up. I expected to drop back into Dag's life and follow him as he handled the ensuing situation. But Eliot Peper had a better idea. Yes, let's follow that lead, but let's look at it from a different angle. So instead of Dag, we're in the head of Diana, the former CIA agent Dag used to get intel and, as we left off Bandwidth, a promising roman When we last left the Analog series at the end of its initial entry, Bandwidth, that story was pretty well wrapped up, with the groundwork laid for a follow-up. I expected to drop back into Dag's life and follow him as he handled the ensuing situation. But Eliot Peper had a better idea. Yes, let's follow that lead, but let's look at it from a different angle. So instead of Dag, we're in the head of Diana, the former CIA agent Dag used to get intel and, as we left off Bandwidth, a promising romantic interest.We may be in a near-future world where ecological disaster has caused tectonic shifts in society, economics, politics, and culture, and the entire world, beyond the borders of its nation states, relies on The Feed -- the internet structured as an amalgam of social media feeds, implanted into people's heads and into the electronics of, well, everything. But Peper never forgets that all else aside, what makes for good storytelling is character. And so Diana, who was an interesting supporting player in Bandwidth, becomes the firebrand protagonist of Borderless.How does this play out? Imagine if you will a plot twist that requires Diana to get from San Francisco to DC despite a nationwide (worldwide) blackout, where all electronic technology has ceased to function, which because of The Feed means, as we've seen, pretty much everything. All Diana really needs to do to move the plot along is get into an airplane that predates all this technology, say a WWII-era fighter. So in the hands of your average action novelist, this would be one line or one paragraph -- Diana rode her bike to the marina, took a sailboat across the Bay, swam to shore, ran across the airport, and got into the Lockheed Whatever that was waiting for her. Simple enough, 'nuff said.But Peper takes that one line and makes a whole chapter out of it. Nell, who provides all this for Diana, and who has been a peripheral presence to this point, gets to not only shepherd Diana to the plane, but to reveal her own character (perhaps in anticipation of becoming a major figure in a future entry, since she runs the establishment the series is named for, the bar/club called Analog). We also learn more about Diana in this chapter, even though this is already late in the book. Peper even has the wherewithal to add a couple of objective correlatives to help deepen the literary side of his action story, notably one about a peregrine falcon hunting a pigeon (he makes liberal use, and effective use, of objective correlatives throughout).Folks, this is the stuff of good writing. And good writing elevates anything, even a good dystopian post-apocalyptic techno-action thriller like this.Add to that some timely topics -- the ongoing debates about the role of social media in shaping our last election, the issue of net neutrality, and the globalization of society, culture, and commerce, with the concept of nationalism and borders inexorably heading toward anachronism (and currently the hotly contested subject of pushback) -- and you've got yourself one dandy series happening here. Looking forward to more, although the difference this time is that, while the story is brought to conclusion, there is no obvious loose thread leading to the next entry (well, there are a couple of possibilities, but nothing as direct as where we left off in Bandwidth).Thanks to NetGalley for providing an advance copy of this book for review.
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  • Dubi
    January 1, 1970
    When we last left the Analog series at the end of its initial entry, Bandwidth, that story was pretty well wrapped up, with the groundwork laid for a follow-up. I expected to drop back into Dag's life and follow him as he handled the ensuing situation. But Eliot Peper had a better idea. Yes, let's follow that lead, but let's look at it from a different angle. So instead of Dag, we're in the head of Diana, the former CIA agent Dag used to get intel and, as we left off Bandwidth, a promising roman When we last left the Analog series at the end of its initial entry, Bandwidth, that story was pretty well wrapped up, with the groundwork laid for a follow-up. I expected to drop back into Dag's life and follow him as he handled the ensuing situation. But Eliot Peper had a better idea. Yes, let's follow that lead, but let's look at it from a different angle. So instead of Dag, we're in the head of Diana, the former CIA agent Dag used to get intel and, as we left off Bandwidth, a promising romantic interest.We may be in a near-future world where ecological disaster has caused tectonic shifts in society, economics, politics, and culture, and the entire world, beyond the borders of its nation states, relies on The Feed -- the internet structured as an amalgam of social media feeds, implanted into people's heads and into the electronics of, well, everything. But Peper never forgets that all else aside, what makes for good storytelling is character. And so Diana, who was an interesting supporting player in Bandwidth, becomes the firebrand protagonist of Borderless.How does this play out? Imagine if you will a plot twist that requires Diana to get from San Francisco to DC despite a nationwide (worldwide) blackout, where all electronic technology has ceased to function, which because of The Feed means, as we've seen, pretty much everything. All Diana really needs to do to move the plot along is get into an airplane that predates all this technology, say a WWII-era fighter. So in the hands of your average action novelist, this would be one line or one paragraph -- Diana rode her bike to the marina, took a sailboat across the Bay, swam to shore, ran across the airport, and got into the Lockheed Whatever that was waiting for her. Simple enough, 'nuff said.But Peper takes that one line and makes a whole chapter out of it. Nell, who provides all this for Diana, and who has been a peripheral presence to this point, gets to not only shepherd Diana to the plane, but to reveal her own character (perhaps in anticipation of becoming a major figure in a future entry, since she runs the establishment the series is named for, the bar/club called Analog). We also learn more about Diana in this chapter, even though this is already late in the book. Peper even has the wherewithal to add a couple of objective correlatives to help deepen the literary side of his action story, notably one about a peregrine falcon hunting a pigeon (he makes liberal use, and effective use, of objective correlatives throughout).Folks, this is the stuff of good writing. And good writing elevates anything, even a good dystopian post-apocalyptic techno-action thriller like this.Add to that some timely topics -- the ongoing debates about the role of social media in shaping our last election, the issue of net neutrality, and the globalization of society, culture, and commerce, with the concept of nationalism and borders inexorably heading toward anachronism (and currently the hotly contested subject of pushback) -- and you've got yourself one dandy series happening here. Looking forward to more, although the difference this time is that, while the story is brought to conclusion, there is no obvious loose thread leading to the next entry (well, there are a couple of possibilities, but nothing as direct as where we left off in Bandwidth).Thanks to NetGalley for providing an advance copy of this book for review.
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  • David Mandell
    January 1, 1970
    The compelling core of most of Peper’s books for me is the relevance his near-term fiction holds to my current world. Borderless is no exception. I just finished the uncorrected proof and, again, was left creating solid connections to everything I am thinking about on a daily basis. The main character, Diana, gets pulled through from Bandwidth - the other book in his Analog series - and after playing a supporting role in the previous book, takes center stage and drags you into a frenzied, believ The compelling core of most of Peper’s books for me is the relevance his near-term fiction holds to my current world. Borderless is no exception. I just finished the uncorrected proof and, again, was left creating solid connections to everything I am thinking about on a daily basis. The main character, Diana, gets pulled through from Bandwidth - the other book in his Analog series - and after playing a supporting role in the previous book, takes center stage and drags you into a frenzied, believable, high velocity mission chock full of all the psychological struggles of a war-torn, immigrant / spy and all the complexities you can imagine would tag along with that kind of history. And that’s really the best part - as you get to know Diana, she becomes another flawed but wonderful part of the harried world he’s already crafted in Bandwidth whose main characters also become part of the chase in a way that deeply connects you to all of the characters - as well as a few references to players from other great books he’s written. It’s those welcome references that remind you you’re just looking at a small, but incredibly enjoyable part of a much bigger world that Peper’s creating and everywhere you turn, it’s exciting.
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  • Eric C.
    January 1, 1970
    Peper's second novel in the Analog series amps up the scope while continuing to add layers to primary and previously peripheral characters. I will say I thoroughly enjoyed reading Diana's story and love seeing how the author continues to evolve his craft. It is a wildly entertaining read that takes on a real-world significance as big tech and political structures quickly move towards a collision. It also takes on the theme of isolation, personal compartmentalization, and vulnerability in a way t Peper's second novel in the Analog series amps up the scope while continuing to add layers to primary and previously peripheral characters. I will say I thoroughly enjoyed reading Diana's story and love seeing how the author continues to evolve his craft. It is a wildly entertaining read that takes on a real-world significance as big tech and political structures quickly move towards a collision. It also takes on the theme of isolation, personal compartmentalization, and vulnerability in a way that is extremely fluid in a compelling narrative. I won't give away too much, but will say this is a very satisfying read with characters you come to care for and leaves you ready to dive into the #3 in the series to see what happens to this world and its inhabitants.
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  • Eric Walker
    January 1, 1970
    Eliot does it again with another action packed near future storyBorderless picks up where Bandwidth leaves off as groups are more aware of the true power that the feed can possess on the global civilization. This story is from Diana's viewpoint, who is a working as a freelance spy now that she has left the CIA. A subtle underlying story of the book is how Diana is trying to figure out how to avoid second-guessing herself, putting trust in others, all while battling mentors and others from her pa Eliot does it again with another action packed near future storyBorderless picks up where Bandwidth leaves off as groups are more aware of the true power that the feed can possess on the global civilization. This story is from Diana's viewpoint, who is a working as a freelance spy now that she has left the CIA. A subtle underlying story of the book is how Diana is trying to figure out how to avoid second-guessing herself, putting trust in others, all while battling mentors and others from her past. While she is dealing with her own internal struggles, she needs to stay sharp in order to put a stop to others taking over one of the worlds most important resources.One of the things I appreciate about Eliot's books is the realistic characters, their struggles, and overall attention to detail. Even though the book is written in a near future time, he used tools at his disposal to map/chart out what the world would have looked like and the paths the characters could have taken.For more of my take on the book check it out at https://stillthinking.me/borderless-b...
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  • Ronald Pomerantz
    January 1, 1970
    A Lesson For Our TimesSo close to a reality just short years ahead, or is it a recount of a reality we 're already entered? Regardless of your fluency or comfort with today's technologies, Eliot Peper's Analog books present a view of the underbelly, of the uses and misuses of advancing digitization toward which we are screaming. At both individual and societal levels there lie awakenings and cautions as we step forward, of both digital as well as analog. How you voted in this 2018 midterm may fo A Lesson For Our TimesSo close to a reality just short years ahead, or is it a recount of a reality we 're already entered? Regardless of your fluency or comfort with today's technologies, Eliot Peper's Analog books present a view of the underbelly, of the uses and misuses of advancing digitization toward which we are screaming. At both individual and societal levels there lie awakenings and cautions as we step forward, of both digital as well as analog. How you voted in this 2018 midterm may foreshadow the case for possible outcomes caste and nearly achieved in Borderless.
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  • Jacob Chapman
    January 1, 1970
    Borderless continues and deepens the exploration of fake news, distributed power and the far reaching consequences of environmental degradation Peper began with Bandwidth. This series is so timely and so well conceived that it could just as easily be describing our present as one possible near future. If you loved Bandwidth (like I did), you'll love the follow-up which is faster paced but manages to be just as serious an exploration of current real world challenges without losing the feel of a f Borderless continues and deepens the exploration of fake news, distributed power and the far reaching consequences of environmental degradation Peper began with Bandwidth. This series is so timely and so well conceived that it could just as easily be describing our present as one possible near future. If you loved Bandwidth (like I did), you'll love the follow-up which is faster paced but manages to be just as serious an exploration of current real world challenges without losing the feel of a fun and thrilling adventure.Can't wait for the next installment!
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  • Brian
    January 1, 1970
    It was hard to put this book down! I enjoyed the change of narrator from book 1 of the series and many of Peper’s ideas.
  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    4.25 Rating, Lowered to 4 Stars for GoodreadsThis book I felt was better than the first. It had much more action and I didn't feel like there was many slow parts. It's a very interesting premise. One that easily could happen and who knows probably is happening. I love how this wrapped up my questions given by the first novel and I felt more content at the end. I also feel like the authors writing which is amazing actually got better from book one to book two. I would recommend if you are into sc 4.25 Rating, Lowered to 4 Stars for GoodreadsThis book I felt was better than the first. It had much more action and I didn't feel like there was many slow parts. It's a very interesting premise. One that easily could happen and who knows probably is happening. I love how this wrapped up my questions given by the first novel and I felt more content at the end. I also feel like the authors writing which is amazing actually got better from book one to book two. I would recommend if you are into sci-fi, political intrigue, thrillers that have you stressed through the book!I received an E-ARC from NetGalley in exchange for my honest review of this book
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  • Maria Haskins
    January 1, 1970
    A stylish and action-packed scifi thriller full of thought-provoking ideas about technology, social media, and politics.
  • Harry McLaren
    January 1, 1970
    A short but entertaining readNot only does Elliot do his research but he describes characters in a captivating and engaging way. He describes an interesting if somewhat bleak future that we're all likely to discover is closure to the truth than is comfortable.
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  • Simon
    January 1, 1970
    Borderless. Eliot Peper's Analog trilogy continues the war between the establishment and the future. This is Diana's book: the freelance spy faces down her past and her present, to build a better tomorrow. Peper channels John Perry Barlow and declares independence.(Proof copy from the author, who's a friend)
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  • Sarah E.
    January 1, 1970
    Eliot Peper's latest novel is gripping, thrilling, and highly relevant. Concerns of technology, data, power, politics, and privacy play out with Commonwealth, who run and curate the Feed. Rather than focus on Dag, Peper's latest focuses on Diana, an incredible protagonist written with skill and delicacy. Highly recommended reading.Edit
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  • Galen Strickland
    January 1, 1970
    Eliot just keeps getting better. I reviewed Bandwidth earlier this year, but decided to combine titles of his Analog series on one page. Link is for comments on Borderless, but you can scroll to top of the page for the previous review.http://templetongate.net/analog.htm#b...
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  • Chris
    January 1, 1970
    Another gem from Eliot Peper! I had been in a reading slump, no books seemed to hold my attention. Then I read Borderless! I'm a long time fan of Peper's books, and this is another great one! I love the pace, details, and stories. Borderless is a particularly timely look into government and corporate entanglement and then issues of how some of our largest corporations heavily sway, influence, or downright control aspects of our lives across the world. It's fascinating to think about and contempl Another gem from Eliot Peper! I had been in a reading slump, no books seemed to hold my attention. Then I read Borderless! I'm a long time fan of Peper's books, and this is another great one! I love the pace, details, and stories. Borderless is a particularly timely look into government and corporate entanglement and then issues of how some of our largest corporations heavily sway, influence, or downright control aspects of our lives across the world. It's fascinating to think about and contemplate how this might play out for real. About the only downside to the book, is that it reads fast, and you're finished quickly, leaving you wanting more!
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  • Sara
    January 1, 1970
    First off – I wouldn’t have guessed that the Author isn’t female. The main character is written realistically, palpable and very rounded.I wanted to read the book for some good near future sci-fi and an adventure. I got so much more out of it. Borderless essentially shows you the story of an immigrated citizen with a complicated past, that has to question her way of loving and protecting her new home – be it her own little sanctuary or the United States of America. You follow Diana through her j First off – I wouldn’t have guessed that the Author isn’t female. The main character is written realistically, palpable and very rounded.I wanted to read the book for some good near future sci-fi and an adventure. I got so much more out of it. Borderless essentially shows you the story of an immigrated citizen with a complicated past, that has to question her way of loving and protecting her new home – be it her own little sanctuary or the United States of America. You follow Diana through her journey and meet every side-character through her eyes. The writing is beautiful and it brings the different relationships to live. Knowing that you were being manipulated didn’t stop it from working.Besides Dag, I got a good sense of the people in her life and I’m looking forward to meeting him in Bandwith. […] sketches capturing the multiyear fire […] his enthusiasm was aedent, fueled by the guilt.Eliot Peper seems to write very descriptively but less with adjectives and more through actions, which I liked a lot. The appearances of people seem secondary unless something is described in context of an action or a feeling it evokes. It’s an interesting story that feels like you’re slowly unearthing various layers of the story, the people and the ploys. While it is Sci-Fi everything feels realistic and I enjoyed seeing a catheter using agent who’s human and doesn’t go rogue with kung-fu skills. Just like that Diana’s plan evaporated. She wanted to come back with a firm rebuttal, explain how she’d thought through every contingency. But the fact was, she hadn’t.I joined her in a journey, starting out with eager nervousness, through all the turmoils of present and past and in the end was moved by few unremarkable words in a melancholic world, full of shit and beauty. Because life isn’t a fairy tale, but it writes the best stories. And the stories of this characters are rooted in real human emotions in all their complexity. Please get yourself some tissues for the epilogue.
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  • Vicky
    January 1, 1970
    When I was a little girl my first exposure to TV was in black and white, then one day my dad brought home a color TV. WOW, I thought it was the greatest thing on Earth. When cell phones came out, I thought I would never need one, but then I finally got one I wondered how I got by without it. We are in the era of a technological revolution and when the latest new technology comes out, there are plenty of people who are the first in line to get it. With such a demand and the prize potentially bein When I was a little girl my first exposure to TV was in black and white, then one day my dad brought home a color TV. WOW, I thought it was the greatest thing on Earth. When cell phones came out, I thought I would never need one, but then I finally got one I wondered how I got by without it. We are in the era of a technological revolution and when the latest new technology comes out, there are plenty of people who are the first in line to get it. With such a demand and the prize potentially being in the billions of dollars, entrepreneurs are eager to get the latest technology on the market even without taking into consideration the consequences.When Henry Ford churned out the first model T for the masses, he never considered that the automobile would be instrumental in changing the world’s climate. When Mark Zuckerberg launched Facebook in 2004 and along with Twitter’s release in 2006 by Jack Dorsey, neither one of them considered that their creation would contribute to meddling in the US election process. Robotics, genetic engineering, and nanotechnology are some of the emerging technologies that could have catastrophic effect on the human race if not kept in check. But with increasing demand, profitable competition, and lack of government oversight, keeping these technologies under control will be difficult if not impossible. This brings me to Eliot Peper’s latest addition to his Analog series, Borderless, which looks at the emerging technology of brain-computer interface, specifically neural connection with the internet. We are already addicted to the internet, and being connected 24 hours a day would leave us 100% dependent. In his first book of the series, Bandwidth, Peper delves into how this technology could be used to manipulate an individual on a grand scale. In Borderless, Peper reflects on how this technology could influence the governments of the world and the danger of creating a new world order.Peper’s Borderless stars a delightful protagonist, an ex-CIA spy known as Diana, who unveils a government plot to take over the ‘feed’. Because of her knowledge on information only known by her, the burden of stopping this takeover is left to her. Time is of the essence which lends to a white knuckle escapade to save her lover and to protect the feed.I applaud authors like Eliot Peper for bringing up topics about the latest and emerging technologies and giving us readers a glimpse of their potential dangerous side in such an entertaining yet thought provoking way. I give Eliot Peper a standing ovation for Borderless.I would like to thank the author for my advance reader copy of Borderless.If you are interested in learning more about the Analog Series check it out on my blog A-Thrill-A-Week
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  • LeeAnn Bonds
    January 1, 1970
    Loved this fast moving and broad-thinking story. Big ideas permeate the action-packed plot. Occasionally a big idea got a little longwinded, but the action picked back up immediately. And I have to say, I love (spoiler alert) a happy ending, though the story will continue... Can't wait to read the next volume. (Book one was great, also!)
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  • Peter O'Kelly
    January 1, 1970
    Read Bandwidth (https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/3...) first...
  • JP Iwanade
    January 1, 1970
    Fantastic near-term science fiction with a spy-thriller storyline. The playing out of the current corporate and geopolitical situation has a coherent scenaric perspective, without going into too detail. When is the third part of analog coming out!
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