Robert B. Parker's Blood Feud
Robert B. Parker's iconic and irresistible PI Sunny Randall is back, and the stakes are higher than ever as she races to protect her ex-husband--and his Mafia family--from the vengeful plan of a mysterious rival.Sunny Randall is "on" again with Richie, the ex-husband she never stopped loving and never seemed to be able to let go, despite her discomfort with his Mafia connections. When Richie is shot and nearly killed, Sunny is dragged into the thick of his family's business as she searches for answers and tries to stave off a mob war. But as the bullets start flying in Boston's mean streets, Sunny finds herself targeted by the deranged mastermind of the plot against the Burke family, whose motive may be far more personal than she could have anticipated...

Robert B. Parker's Blood Feud Details

TitleRobert B. Parker's Blood Feud
Author
ReleaseNov 27th, 2018
PublisherG.P. Putnam's Sons
Rating
GenreMystery, Crime, Fiction

Robert B. Parker's Blood Feud Review

  • Hobart
    January 1, 1970
    ★ ★ ★ 1/2 (rounded up)An expanded version of this originally appeared at The Irresponsible Reader.--- Since we saw her last, Sunny has had to move, Richie (her ex-) has gotten another divorce (giving them the chance to date or whatever you want to call it) and has replaced her late dog, Rosie, with another Rosie. Other than that, things are basically where they were after the end of Spare Change 11 years ago (for us, anyway, I'm not sure how long for her, but less time has passed you can bet).By ★ ★ ★ 1/2 (rounded up)An expanded version of this originally appeared at The Irresponsible Reader.--- Since we saw her last, Sunny has had to move, Richie (her ex-) has gotten another divorce (giving them the chance to date or whatever you want to call it) and has replaced her late dog, Rosie, with another Rosie. Other than that, things are basically where they were after the end of Spare Change 11 years ago (for us, anyway, I'm not sure how long for her, but less time has passed you can bet).By the way -- does anyone other than Robert B. Parker, Spenser and Sunny really do this? Your dog dies, so you go and get another one of the same breed and call him/her the same name? Is this really a thing?Then one night -- Richie is shot. It's not fatal, but was done in such a way that no one doubts for a moment that it could have been had the assailant wanted it to be. For those who don't know (or don't remember), Richie is the son of an Irish mob boss, although he has nothing to do with the family business. He's given a message for his father -- his shooter is coming for him, but wants him to suffer first. This kicks off a race for the shooter -- Sunny, the Burke family and the police (led by Sgt. Frank Belson) are vying to be the one to find the shooter.Before long, the violence spreads to other people the Burkes employ -- both property and persons are targeted by this stranger. It's clear that whoever is doing this has a grudge going back years. So Sunny dives into the Burke family history as much as she can, so she can get an answer before her ex-father-in-law is killed. Not just the family history -- but the family's present, too. As much as the roots of the violence are in the past, Sunny's convinced what the Burkes are up to now is just as important to the shooter.Richie's father, Desmond, isn't happy about Sunny sticking her nose into things. Not just because of the crimes she might uncover -- but he really wants to leave the past in the past. But as long as someone might come take another shot at Richie, Sunny won't stop. This brings her into contact with several criminal figures in Boston (like Parker-verse constants Tony Marcus and Vinnie Morris) as well as some we've only met in Sunny books.There are a couple of new characters in these pages, but most of them we've met before -- Lupica is re-establishing this universe and doesn't have time to bring in many outsiders, but really just reminds us who the players are. Other than the new Rosie, I can't point at a character and say "that's different." He's done a pretty good job of stepping into Parker's shoes. Not the pre-Catskill Eagle Parker like Atkins, but the Parker of Sunny Randall books, which is what it should feel like (( wouldn't have objected to a Coleman-esque true to the character, just told in a different way). I think some of the jokes were overused (her Sox-apathy, for one), but it wasn't too bad. Lupica did make some interesting choices, particularly toward the end, which should set up some interesting situations for future installments.The mystery was decent enough, and fit both the situations and the characters -- I spent a lot of the novel far ahead of Sunny (but it's easier on this side of the page). I enjoyed the book -- it's not the best thing I've read this year, but it's a good entry novel for Lupica in this series, a good reintroduction for the characters/world, and an entertaining read in general. If you're new to this series, this would be as good a place to hop on as it was for Lupica.I want better for Parker's creation (but I think I'd have said that for most of Parker's run with the series), and Lupica's set things up in a way that we could get that in the near-future. He's demonstrated that he has a good handle on the character he inherited, the question is, what can he do with her from here? I was ambivalent about this series coming back, but I can honestly say that I'm eager to see what happens to it next. Disclaimer: I received this eARC from Putnam Books via NetGalley in exchange for this post -- thanks to both for this.
    more
  • 3 no 7
    January 1, 1970
    “Blood Feud” by Mike Lupica reintroduces readers to Sunny Randall, Robert B. Parker’s PI last seen in “Spare Change.” A few things have changed; she moved; she got a new dog, and she is a little older. “Do I look as if I’m getting older?”“This is some kind of trap,” he said. “I’m being serious,” I said. “The UPS kid ma’amed me the other day.” However, most things remain the same.“I assume you shot him,” Spike said.“No,” I said. “But I thought about it.” In a first person narrative, readers find “Blood Feud” by Mike Lupica reintroduces readers to Sunny Randall, Robert B. Parker’s PI last seen in “Spare Change.” A few things have changed; she moved; she got a new dog, and she is a little older. “Do I look as if I’m getting older?”“This is some kind of trap,” he said. “I’m being serious,” I said. “The UPS kid ma’amed me the other day.” However, most things remain the same.“I assume you shot him,” Spike said.“No,” I said. “But I thought about it.” In a first person narrative, readers find Randall still in a turbulent on-again off-again relationship with her ex-husband Richie Burke, despite his “unfortunate” crime mob family connections. When Burk is shot, Randall searches for answers and finds herself plunged into the middle of his family’s business. The situation becomes more personal that she expected. Lupica did a fine job of renewing the franchise and reacquainting readers with familiar characters after all the years. He also introduced a few new ones that advance and refresh the franchise. I received a review copy of “Blood Feud” from Mike Lupica, G. P. Putnam’s Sons, Penguin Group, and NetGalley and found it very entertaining. Previous readers will feel right at home with the new series. New readers will easily jump into the franchise. I look forward to reading the next book in the series.
    more
  • Don Gorman
    January 1, 1970
    (3). Another reincarnation of a Robert B. Parker franchise, how interesting. And even more so, as it turns out that Mike Lupica was a friend of Parker's. Better yet for us readers, Lupica has Parker's style down, with just a little more interpretation and feel to make it his own. This is not quite as strong as the work that Atkins has done with Spenser or Reed Farrel Coleman has done with Jesse Stone, but Sunny Randall is not the character that either one of them is. In fact, way down deep, Sunn (3). Another reincarnation of a Robert B. Parker franchise, how interesting. And even more so, as it turns out that Mike Lupica was a friend of Parker's. Better yet for us readers, Lupica has Parker's style down, with just a little more interpretation and feel to make it his own. This is not quite as strong as the work that Atkins has done with Spenser or Reed Farrel Coleman has done with Jesse Stone, but Sunny Randall is not the character that either one of them is. In fact, way down deep, Sunny is a little shallow. This story is fun, but like most of the others of her I can recall, it centers around her Ex's family. Oh well, it is nice to see this carried on and I will certainly be intriqued to see how Lupica follows up. Good fun.
    more
  • LInda L
    January 1, 1970
    Sunny Randall was always one of my favorites of the Robt. B. Parker books -- I was sorry there were only 6 books with her as the heroine. In my opinion, Lupica has done a great job with her, and I hope he continues. There were so many great characters in the book -- besides Sunny -- the main one being Spike. Someone commented that everyone should have a Spike in their life, and I agree. He was just wonderful. Also, I had forgotten about Sunny's love life -- I only remembered Jesse. Did not even Sunny Randall was always one of my favorites of the Robt. B. Parker books -- I was sorry there were only 6 books with her as the heroine. In my opinion, Lupica has done a great job with her, and I hope he continues. There were so many great characters in the book -- besides Sunny -- the main one being Spike. Someone commented that everyone should have a Spike in their life, and I agree. He was just wonderful. Also, I had forgotten about Sunny's love life -- I only remembered Jesse. Did not even remember that she had been married, but I read those a LONG LONG time ago. And apparently did not retain some vital information. Anyway -- I loved the book. Keep it up, Mike.
    more
  • Jennifer Ladd
    January 1, 1970
    Too easy to figure out the twist. Liked the side players better than Sunny. We all need a Spike in our lives
  • Bookreporter.com Mystery & Thriller
    January 1, 1970
    One of the primary questions that has been asked since Robert B. Parker’s sudden death in 2010 is whether or not someone would take up the reins of his Sunny Randall series. Sunny, a Boston private investigator with an interesting public and private life, appeared to have vanished into the ether. The question of succession has been answered with the publication of the wonderfully written BLOOD FEUD. The author of this extremely pleasant surprise is Mike Lupica, a somewhat acerbic sportswriter an One of the primary questions that has been asked since Robert B. Parker’s sudden death in 2010 is whether or not someone would take up the reins of his Sunny Randall series. Sunny, a Boston private investigator with an interesting public and private life, appeared to have vanished into the ether. The question of succession has been answered with the publication of the wonderfully written BLOOD FEUD. The author of this extremely pleasant surprise is Mike Lupica, a somewhat acerbic sportswriter and political commentator who is also the highly regarded author of sports novels for younger readers. So it should not be a shock to learn that this book is a fast-paced and entertaining read that is true to Parker’s voice.Lupica picks up where Parker left off on SPARE CHANGE without a misstep. Sunny is involved with her ex-husband, Richie Burke, demonstrating that the old flame still flickers. Richie, who comes from a well-known Boston-area crime family, has eschewed his father’s and brothers’ business. Apparently this is not enough to save him, as he is the victim of a deliberate street shooting. The interesting element of the hit is that it is obviously professional, but the doer shoots Richie to (seriously) wound, not to kill, making reference to “the sins of the father” as he lay bleeding in the street.The attack is by no means the last of the moves against the Burke crime family. Things escalate, and soon there is a trail of bodies that lead ever closer to Desmond Burke, the family patriarch. The problems with investigating the shootings are that the Burkes will not talk to the police, and there are countless suspects. Regarding the latter, Desmond has left an army of enemies in his wake on both sides of the law, but particularly among his fellow crime families.Sunny, motivated by her concern for Richie and her relationship with her quasi-father-in-law, takes it upon herself --- even when her help is not wanted --- to investigate the several tentacles of Desmond’s past to see who has the greatest grudge against him and possibly the most to gain. She manages to uncover a family secret or two along the way that also fractures a few of her own alliances, the consequences of which may play out in future installments of the series.Lupica hits all the right notes here, from the stunning cover and a couple of cameo appearances from some characters in one of Parker’s other series to the very satisfying ending. It also contains one of those unintentional ironies that puts the events in BLOOD FEUD squarely in the real world. Whitey Bulger, who is frequently mentioned as an influential player in the background of the book, was murdered in prison while I was reading it, making the ruthlessness described therein all the more believable.Even with that aside, I cannot imagine that anyone who was a fan of Sunny during the Parker years would be anything less than totally satisfied with Lupica’s stellar handling of the character. As for those who may not have been completely enamored of this particular Parker creation, I would urge them to read BLOOD FEUD. This would be a terrific and worthwhile novel if it was introducing a new PI series featuring a detective named Samantha Jones. That it continues the Sunny Randall canon, and does it so well, makes it all the better.Reviewed by Joe Hartlaub
    more
  • The Real Book Spy
    January 1, 1970
    After years of rumors and speculation, Sunny Randall, Robert B. Parker’s beloved, Boston-based PI, is finally back. No matter what, Sunny Randall (who was last seen in Spare Change, 2007) has always loved Richie Burke. And yet, she’s never been able to settle down and commit to their relationship. Well, not since the two divorced years back, which had a lot to do with Richie having serious ties to the Mafia. Still, even now, those ties have a way of coming between the two, especially when his un After years of rumors and speculation, Sunny Randall, Robert B. Parker’s beloved, Boston-based PI, is finally back. No matter what, Sunny Randall (who was last seen in Spare Change, 2007) has always loved Richie Burke. And yet, she’s never been able to settle down and commit to their relationship. Well, not since the two divorced years back, which had a lot to do with Richie having serious ties to the Mafia. Still, even now, those ties have a way of coming between the two, especially when his uncle Felix calls Sunny in the middle of the night from Mass General to inform her that Richie had been shot. Sunny enters the ER waiting room to find Felix and Desmond Burke, Richie’s father, waiting for her. The two men explain to her that he’s alive, but that someone shot him in the back with zero warning. Thankfully, Richie’s saloon was close to the hospital, which might have saved his life. . . unless the shooter never intended to kill him, a question that Sunny can’t help but wonder. Felix and Desmond are asking that same question, and their instincts eventually prove correct when it’s revealed that the gunman muttered, “Sins of the father,” before putting the trigger.Sunny believes the words were chosen carefully, meant to be a direct message to the Burke family, which sets up a great line from Felix. “Tell that f–ing f–k to send an email next time.”Sadly, Sunny’s theory takes shape when Peter, Desmond’s youngest brother, is . . . Continue reading this review here: https://therealbookspy.com/2018/08/26...
    more
  • Sandy
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to NetGalley, for a copy of this book in return for a fair and honest review.I think Mike Lupica has a real advantage over Ace Atkins (continuation writer of the Spenser books) - Sunny Randall was just not as fully developed a character as Spenser (or Jesse Stone). I read and liked the Robert B. Parker Sunny Randall books, but it's been a long time. So, I didn't have any real opinions about her, nor was I inclined to re-read the older books before I read this one.Because of this, I was ab Thanks to NetGalley, for a copy of this book in return for a fair and honest review.I think Mike Lupica has a real advantage over Ace Atkins (continuation writer of the Spenser books) - Sunny Randall was just not as fully developed a character as Spenser (or Jesse Stone). I read and liked the Robert B. Parker Sunny Randall books, but it's been a long time. So, I didn't have any real opinions about her, nor was I inclined to re-read the older books before I read this one.Because of this, I was able to approach this on its own merits, and I enjoyed it. References to other Robert B. Parker characters aside (particularly Susan Silverman, Vinnie Morris and Jesse Stone), the book stood on its own and you didn't need to have read earlier books in this or any other Parker series to enjoy it. Nothing profound, no serious surprises, but an enjoyable read.The one problem that I think the author has is how to portray a strong woman. We shift back and forth, between people telling her that she "really has balls," because she's so brave and gutsy, and her somewhat obsessive attention to how good she looks in her jeans and how she's a little jealous of Susan Silverman's looks, dress, and makeup. Not that a woman can't be both tough and concerned with her appearance, but it seemed a little forced. I wish a strong woman could be just that - a strong woman - without men having to analogize her to a man to "compliment" her.But, that aside (and I was able to put it aside - it's a detective story, not a serious piece on gender issues!), it was a solidly entertaining book. I look forward to reading more in the series.
    more
  • Vickie
    January 1, 1970
    Mike Lupica has taken over the writing of the Sunny Randall series created by the late Robert B. Parker. I have not read any of the earlier Parker novels, so cannot comment on this continuation.In Blood Feud, Sunny Randall, former police officer turned private investigator, looks into the shooting (wounding) of her ex husband and still lover, Richie. Richie is the son of a crime boss and Sunny gets drawn into the business of the Boston crime syndicates that Richie’s father has always tried to sh Mike Lupica has taken over the writing of the Sunny Randall series created by the late Robert B. Parker. I have not read any of the earlier Parker novels, so cannot comment on this continuation.In Blood Feud, Sunny Randall, former police officer turned private investigator, looks into the shooting (wounding) of her ex husband and still lover, Richie. Richie is the son of a crime boss and Sunny gets drawn into the business of the Boston crime syndicates that Richie’s father has always tried to shield from him. It seems the attack on Richie is the beginning of a full assault on all that his father holds near and dear. Though continually warned off the investigation by all involved, Sunny persists and enlists the assistance of other mob bosses as well as some law enforcement authorities and her close friend, SpikeThe story is predictable, although with a twist and some of the actionstrains credibility. Despite that, I enjoyed this fast read. It was entertaining and kept my interest throughout. I would certainly read future titles in this series by Lupica.
    more
  • Bonnie Franks
    January 1, 1970
    It was good to go back and read a story about Sunny Randall, one of my favorite of Robert B. Parker's characters.I was happy to see that Sunny hasn't changed much, nor has Richie or Spike. Reading a book like this is a comfort. I am glad to see that the writing of the characters has been done well. It's the type of writing I expect when reading these books. I come here expecting comfort and I found it.I do not mean to imply that the story is a comforting one...far from it. Simply that these peop It was good to go back and read a story about Sunny Randall, one of my favorite of Robert B. Parker's characters.I was happy to see that Sunny hasn't changed much, nor has Richie or Spike. Reading a book like this is a comfort. I am glad to see that the writing of the characters has been done well. It's the type of writing I expect when reading these books. I come here expecting comfort and I found it.I do not mean to imply that the story is a comforting one...far from it. Simply that these people are old friends of mine. This situation is a personal one for sure and keeps you questioning throughout. I love the flow of the story and the banter. I recommend this book to anyone who is familiar with Sunny, or anyone who is interested in getting to know a well worth reading about character. You will enjoy this book tremendously.This book was provided to me by NetGalley and the publisher, for which I thank them.
    more
  • Ryan Madland
    January 1, 1970
    I have enjoyed Mike Lupica for years as a panelist on the "Sports Reporters" and when I found out he was taking over the Sunny Randall series, I was definitely intrigued. "Blood Feud" starts with off with Sunny's ex husband getting shot, but surviving the attack. This then enters Sunny Randall into the situation. Obviously she won't stand by and do nothing. She takes matters into her own hands and starts investigating as to who did this to Richie and thus, "Blood Feud" takes off. Mike Lupica had I have enjoyed Mike Lupica for years as a panelist on the "Sports Reporters" and when I found out he was taking over the Sunny Randall series, I was definitely intrigued. "Blood Feud" starts with off with Sunny's ex husband getting shot, but surviving the attack. This then enters Sunny Randall into the situation. Obviously she won't stand by and do nothing. She takes matters into her own hands and starts investigating as to who did this to Richie and thus, "Blood Feud" takes off. Mike Lupica had very big shoes to fill as does any author that takes over a series and I thought he did a great job. The main characters remained lovable and provided such lively interactions. The storyline was well written and was not predictable. Definitely a page turner.If you enjoyed the Sunny Randall series when Robert Parker wrote it, I truly believe you will continue to the love the series in the well equipped hands of Mike Lupica. Sunny Randall lives on. Robert Parker would be proud.
    more
  • William Bentrim
    January 1, 1970
    I have to say the author has really captured the spirit of Robert Parker. The syntax and the delivery are so familiar and welcome. This book is another Sunny Randall book and the interplay and the characters are almost historic in nature. Sonny's ex-husband’s family draws her in to a mob feud. I'm guessing that many of the people or perhaps most are Robert Parker friend fans and consequently a lot of the humor will be picked up. I think it might be missed by the first time reader but there is a I have to say the author has really captured the spirit of Robert Parker. The syntax and the delivery are so familiar and welcome. This book is another Sunny Randall book and the interplay and the characters are almost historic in nature. Sonny's ex-husband’s family draws her in to a mob feud. I'm guessing that many of the people or perhaps most are Robert Parker friend fans and consequently a lot of the humor will be picked up. I think it might be missed by the first time reader but there is a lot of humor in the book. It's particularly poignant considering the murder just this week of Whitey Bolger in prison. Kind of brings the Irish mob in Boston to the front of the newspapers again. This was a good book and I give it my recommendation.,
    more
  • Laurie
    January 1, 1970
    The new installment of Robert B. Parker’s Sunny Randall, the Boston based P.I. is a fantastic read. It left me more than grateful that the Parker estate selected Mike Lupica to continue the character that we all know and love. It is indeed a blood feud when somebody shoots your boyfriend/ex-husband, as is the case in the opening of this highly entertaining, pleasurable, witty and diverting novel. As we traverse the plot and story, we meet the characters that usually people the Parker novels. Vi The new installment of Robert B. Parker’s Sunny Randall, the Boston based P.I. is a fantastic read. It left me more than grateful that the Parker estate selected Mike Lupica to continue the character that we all know and love. It is indeed a blood feud when somebody shoots your boyfriend/ex-husband, as is the case in the opening of this highly entertaining, pleasurable, witty and diverting novel. As we traverse the plot and story, we meet the characters that usually people the Parker novels. Vinny Morris, the gun for hire, Tony Marcus, the well-dressed purveyor of prostitutes, Frank Belson homicide cop extraordinaire, and Susan Silverman, PhD in Psychology and Spencer’s longtime girlfriend.Blood Feud is tremendous fun. Reading it is a pleasure that comes around all too rarely.
    more
  • Heather
    January 1, 1970
    DNFGreat job Mike Lupica for ruining a fun character and series! Again, a liberal mouthpiece infuses his disdain for Republicans and Trump into a non political PI series. Lazy lazy writing. All Republicans are white? Give me a break. The liberal elites in the USA mock or ignore black conservatives. And because someone is white, why does that mean to liberals that he/she is homogeneous, without diversity? I know white people with a variety of heritages - from Russia, England, Croatia, Ireland, Fr DNFGreat job Mike Lupica for ruining a fun character and series! Again, a liberal mouthpiece infuses his disdain for Republicans and Trump into a non political PI series. Lazy lazy writing. All Republicans are white? Give me a break. The liberal elites in the USA mock or ignore black conservatives. And because someone is white, why does that mean to liberals that he/she is homogeneous, without diversity? I know white people with a variety of heritages - from Russia, England, Croatia, Ireland, France, Scotland, Scandanavian countries, South American countries, etc - has Lupica forgotten that diversity isn’t just skin tone? Meh. Characterizing an entire political party as single-dimensional and racist is just dumb and lazy. Lupica can suck it.
    more
  • Cheryl
    January 1, 1970
    Sunny Randall's ex-husband, Richie, has been shot in back and told it's a message to his father, mob boss Desmond Burke. Told to stay out of it by everyone, Sunny is determened to find out who and why Richie was shot. After several murders and threats to herself only makes her more unstoppable. Thanks to the Parker estate for choosing Mike Lupica to continue the Sunny Randall series. I felt as if I was reading a story straight form Robert B. Parker's hand, one of my favorite authors. Thank's for Sunny Randall's ex-husband, Richie, has been shot in back and told it's a message to his father, mob boss Desmond Burke. Told to stay out of it by everyone, Sunny is determened to find out who and why Richie was shot. After several murders and threats to herself only makes her more unstoppable. Thanks to the Parker estate for choosing Mike Lupica to continue the Sunny Randall series. I felt as if I was reading a story straight form Robert B. Parker's hand, one of my favorite authors. Thank's for the free copy I recieved for an honest review.
    more
  • Judy
    January 1, 1970
    There is something comforting about coming back to visit with characters in a series. It is rather like connecting with friends you have not seen for a long while. This book started slowly for me. So slowly that I thought about abandoning it several times. I think I was comparing it to the original Sunny Randall books. Then, at some point, I was hooked and finished it. I especially enjoyed seeing Susan Silverman from a different point of view. I received an ARC from thepublisher through NetGalle There is something comforting about coming back to visit with characters in a series. It is rather like connecting with friends you have not seen for a long while. This book started slowly for me. So slowly that I thought about abandoning it several times. I think I was comparing it to the original Sunny Randall books. Then, at some point, I was hooked and finished it. I especially enjoyed seeing Susan Silverman from a different point of view. I received an ARC from thepublisher through NetGalley. The opinions expressed in this review are solely my own.
    more
  • Andrew
    January 1, 1970
    I found this to be a compelling mystery with some unpredictable twists and three-dimensional characters that I was interested in. Perhaps more importantly, for the first new book in the series since Robert B. Parker's passing, the characters and tone felt consistent with what Parker had established in the previous books. It didn't feel like Mike Lupica was copying Parker's style, but he was definitely writing Parker's characters in Parker's world. I enjoyed revisiting Sunny Randall and her frien I found this to be a compelling mystery with some unpredictable twists and three-dimensional characters that I was interested in. Perhaps more importantly, for the first new book in the series since Robert B. Parker's passing, the characters and tone felt consistent with what Parker had established in the previous books. It didn't feel like Mike Lupica was copying Parker's style, but he was definitely writing Parker's characters in Parker's world. I enjoyed revisiting Sunny Randall and her friends, and I hope this isn't the last we see of her.
    more
  • Runner10
    January 1, 1970
    This is my first book to read by Mike Lupica and I will be reading more! I enjoyed Sunni and Richie’s story and all the secondary characters. There was plenty of suspense to keep me anxiously reading until the final page. I wish I had read their storyline from the beginning to fully appreciate the characters.
    more
  • Lynn Laryn
    January 1, 1970
    EnjoyableGood story about Sunny Randell, P.I., who wants to find out who shot her ex-husband and current lover. He's the son of a mob boss, who doesn't have any connection to his father's business. She's determined to find out why, which leads her to other mob bosses and more murders.
    more
  • Janis
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed the return of Sunny Randall. My memory isn’t that great, so I appreciated that the author reminded us who the characters all were. Story line was good as well. I’m not as smart as all the reviewers who claim to have figured everything out way before the end of the story, because I didn’t & I’m not ashamed to admit it.
    more
  • Exapno Mapcase
    January 1, 1970
    This is a Goodreads First Reads review.Taut and fast paced, Sunny is back this time in the capable hands of Mike Lupica. Sunny and Richie’s on and off again relationship takes a new turn when his family is being shot at. This has all the hallmarks of Parker, love and loss, family and friends, and the occasional psycho.
    more
  • Jenee
    January 1, 1970
    Another great Sunny Randall story. The story line and characters' voices were on par with Robert B. Parker's original novels. Interesting twists and revelations come out from the Mob side of Sunny's family. #goodreadsgiveaways
  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    Having never read the other books in this series, I found it very easy to get to know the main character. The storyline started slow for me, probably because I was learning the characters, but once it picked up I had a hard time putting the book down.
    more
  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    Mike Lupica does a great job writing Sunny Randall! You always feel concern when someone takes over a series but Mr. Lupica does Robert Parker proud. The series is in good hands. Looking forward to the next time.
  • Julie Hobus
    January 1, 1970
    Like Parker is back.... Lupica channels Parker better than anyone has. The dialogue is pitch perfect, even for beloved Parker side characters such as Susan Silverman, Vinnie Morris, and the like. Longtime Parker fans will love this!
  • Sheldon
    January 1, 1970
    Lupica started out almost hitting this Sunny Randall novel out of the park, but by the end it was only between halfway and three quarters of the way there. Lupica comes pretty close to getting the old Robert Parker style down, so he is certainly worth the time, but no one is Parker.
    more
  • Joseph
    January 1, 1970
    Great story of Sunny Randall in top form as she pursues a vendetta against the family of her ex-husband. The flame is still there with her ex and she is dedicated to resolving the problem involving past slights and antagonisms of Richie's mob family.
    more
  • Ed Foss
    January 1, 1970
    long time coming but enjoyed
  • Leslie Basney
    January 1, 1970
    Lupica is a surprisingly great choice as author for continuation of this series. Well worth the wait to meet Sunny Randall again.
  • Reatta Stafford
    January 1, 1970
    Glad to have Sunny back!If you missed Sunny and Richie you'll be glad they are back. Some things are off( where Is Richies kid?) but Spike and the Burkes are the same. Loved it!
Write a review