Street Freaks
It begins with a dire call—right before his father disappears and his skyscraper home’s doors explode inward. It is the kind of thrilling futuristic story only New York Times bestselling author Terry Brooks can tell. “Go into the Red Zone. Go to Street Freaks.” his father directs Ashton Collins before the vid feed goes suddenly silent. The Red Zone is the dangerous heart of the mega-city of Los Angeles; it is a world Ash is forbidden from and one he knows little about. But if he can find Street Freaks, the strangest of aid awaits—human and barely human alike. As Ash is hunted, he must unravel the mystery left behind by his father and discover his role in this new world.Brooks has long been the grandmaster of fantasy. Now he turns his hand to science fiction filled with what his readers love best: complex characters, extraordinary settings, exciting action, and a page-turning story. Through it, Brooks reimagines his bestselling career yet again.

Street Freaks Details

TitleStreet Freaks
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 2nd, 2018
PublisherGrim Oak Press
Rating
GenreScience Fiction, Fiction, Young Adult, Fantasy

Street Freaks Review

  • Robin Hobb
    January 1, 1970
    As always, my honesty post: I received an advance reading copy of Street Freaks from the publisher. I’ve known Terry Brooks for years and I consider him a friend. I don’t think either of those things affect how I reacted to this book. Terry Brooks is best known for his Shannara books. When we see his name on the cover, we expect a good high-fantasy tale from him, and he always delivers a solid, readable story with great magical elements and characters. So I was a bit jolted, first by the title As always, my honesty post: I received an advance reading copy of Street Freaks from the publisher. I’ve known Terry Brooks for years and I consider him a friend. I don’t think either of those things affect how I reacted to this book. Terry Brooks is best known for his Shannara books. When we see his name on the cover, we expect a good high-fantasy tale from him, and he always delivers a solid, readable story with great magical elements and characters. So I was a bit jolted, first by the title Street Freaks and then by the tale. It’s not fantasy. It’s SF. It features biologically altered teenagers engaged in street racing custom cars. “Hm. Not really my thing. Sigh. I should still give it a try.” You see, like 97 percent of fantasy readers (I’m making up this statistic) I don’t want my favorite writers to get tricky on me. Give me the same kind of tale every time, but a little bit different. That’s all I ask. Don't step outside your box, fantasy writer! No, I don't want to explore a new world. I'm all invested in the old one. (See how reasonable that sounds?) So, in truth, I went into this book expecting it would be okay. But not my cup of tea. (Yes, I do 'duty reads'. I read books by old friends, set in new worlds, and if I don't enjoy them, I set them aside after 100 pages or so, and simply don't review them. Now you know my dark little secret.) So. First night of sampling the book. Great first chapter, in terms of, "I can't leave the character there. I'll have to read a bit more." I didn’t expect it to become, “Just one more chapter and I’ll turn out the light, dear.” But it did. You know I have a no spoilers policy. But I will say that one thing Terry Brooks got very right in this story is how tricky it can be to make friends. When one is thrown into a situation where there is little choice in who you associate with, there are always the prickly ones, the snarky ones, the ones that you would never choose to associate with if you had a choice. But the relationships form, and each one is different. Each one has the pieces that fit, and the places where those pieces rub. All the different sorts of friendships that one forms in the face of necessity are listed here. He gets that part very right. He also gets right that peculiar sensation of being an adolescent and realizing that adults are actually people. Just people. Some are nice and some care and some see you as a useful cog. And some may consider you disposable. They're not playing by any rules you can understand. Terry Brooks doesn’t tip his hand. The events unfold for the protagonist, told in a gripping present tense prose. If you want to know what is going to happen, you have to follow. As a reader, you shouldn't trust the character's assumptions. His lack of life experience is as genuine as his intelligent reactions to some difficult situations. It's a completely engrossing story.Recommended.
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  • Dave
    January 1, 1970
    Street Freaks is a fast-moving, really fun standalone novel set in a futuristic world divided between technologically advanced but controlled cities and free-wheeling lawless areas called Red Zones. The star of this book is a teenager on the run from the authorities for reasons he doesn’t understand. He befriends a group of mutated rejects, kind of like super powered X-Men who are street orphans and freakishly redesigned, sometimes more cyborg than human. Their gang/ den/ group is Street Freaks, Street Freaks is a fast-moving, really fun standalone novel set in a futuristic world divided between technologically advanced but controlled cities and free-wheeling lawless areas called Red Zones. The star of this book is a teenager on the run from the authorities for reasons he doesn’t understand. He befriends a group of mutated rejects, kind of like super powered X-Men who are street orphans and freakishly redesigned, sometimes more cyborg than human. Their gang/ den/ group is Street Freaks, also because they design and race street racers as well in preparation for the biggest race of the year. Although it has a lot of familiar themes such as the stormtroopers going giant corporation’s bidding, gangs of street urchins banding together, espionage, and auto racing, it is a story well-paced, well set up, and mainly well told. While it might be more designed for a young adult audience, I enjoyed it. Many thanks to the publisher for providing a copy for review.
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  • Chris
    January 1, 1970
    *eARC provided by the publisher through NetGalley.I enjoyed this. It was certainly different than any Terry Brooks that I’d read before, and I’ve read a lot of Terry Brooks. Loyal fans will probably like this as his storytelling quality is there, even if we’re looking at a dystopian future instead of epic fantasy. It appeals to all age groups, being friendly in tone to younger readers, but mature enough in content for older ones as well. Because the main hero and majority of the characters are t *eARC provided by the publisher through NetGalley.I enjoyed this. It was certainly different than any Terry Brooks that I’d read before, and I’ve read a lot of Terry Brooks. Loyal fans will probably like this as his storytelling quality is there, even if we’re looking at a dystopian future instead of epic fantasy. It appeals to all age groups, being friendly in tone to younger readers, but mature enough in content for older ones as well. Because the main hero and majority of the characters are teens, this would work well as being categorized YA, but it’s a good story regardless.The pacing and plot are pretty good overall, but there are a couple of plot points that didn’t make a lot of sense. The overall story was fine, but some of the hidden motivations with the “adults” in the story weren’t clear. Maybe they weren’t supposed to be, but it made for a distracting feeling as I came to the end. The ending itself felt pretty good, but these odd tidbits hung with me.Will this be a series? Had to imagine anything from Terry Brooks that isn’t, but the book could stand alone. It could also see expansion, both in continuation of threads left open here and in other stories set in this future “United Territories”. Either way, I’d be interested in seeing what will come out, if anything.
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  • *Thea 'Wookiee'sMama' Wilson*
    January 1, 1970
    Well, Mr Brooks, if you were trying to prove that you aren't a one trick pony with the fantasy Shannara novels by sidestepping into the world of YA Science Fiction then you have done a fine, fine job sir!I wasn't sure what to expect with Street Freaks but it wasn't the stonking dystopian adventure tale that I have just read! This book is basically a sci-fi based murder mystery after a fashion with a handful of corporate espionage mixed in and I found it to be quite remarkable and full of twists Well, Mr Brooks, if you were trying to prove that you aren't a one trick pony with the fantasy Shannara novels by sidestepping into the world of YA Science Fiction then you have done a fine, fine job sir!I wasn't sure what to expect with Street Freaks but it wasn't the stonking dystopian adventure tale that I have just read! This book is basically a sci-fi based murder mystery after a fashion with a handful of corporate espionage mixed in and I found it to be quite remarkable and full of twists and turns that took me by surprise, over and over again. His characters, both the fully human and those genetically altered or artificially created, are complex and truly fascinating, especially the main character Ash who is forced by circumstance to grow significantly throughout the course of the tale as he battles to discover the truth about his father and his work with street kids. The world building is great and really gives the reader a very clear view of the world Brooks has created for his newest creations.Street Freaks is great as a standalone novels but it also has enough potential to be added to as well. It's a wild ride and I definitely recommend it as I do anything else by Terry Brooks of course, he is most certainly NOT a one-trick pony, not that ever thought he was!
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  • Bandit
    January 1, 1970
    The reason I’ve not read Terry Brooks before was because he seems to be specializing in fantasy and series, two things I don’t care for. This book is the reason I might not be reading Terry Brooks in the future. Because nowhere..nowhere is this one classified as a YA book as it so obviously is. WTF. And because my OCD demands I finish every book I start, ended up being stuck with a YA book for nearly 400 pages. Almost all of the characters are teens and, while they aren’t annoyingly immature or The reason I’ve not read Terry Brooks before was because he seems to be specializing in fantasy and series, two things I don’t care for. This book is the reason I might not be reading Terry Brooks in the future. Because nowhere..nowhere is this one classified as a YA book as it so obviously is. WTF. And because my OCD demands I finish every book I start, ended up being stuck with a YA book for nearly 400 pages. Almost all of the characters are teens and, while they aren’t annoyingly immature or dumb, they are still teens. So essentially you have something like high tech fast and furious boombastic science fiction thriller, which starts off on an action scene and continues accordingly for the duration. There is a basic plot involving evil adults experimenting on kids for the goal of population control (cue in the maniacal mwahaha), but it ends up nearly buried under all the action. Brooks has been at this writing game long enough to put together a readable book easily and if you’re after easy reading (short words, simple sentences, etc.), this’ll certainly do the trick, but the thing is I never quite understood the appeal of dumbing down your entertainment and that’s what YA fiction is to an adult, it’s simplified, overexplained, unchallenging. It’s all the things books ought not to be. Even with all adult characters this wouldn’t have been a particularly complicated read, it’s too much of an actioneer, but as is it just pissed me off. Even the science fiction aspects are lackluster, some recycled ideas, some unimaginative nomenclature. Whether negligibly mismarketed or a cheap dishonest ploy to sell this at the adult fiction rates, this one is an action movie with teens written down as a book. And sequel ready too. Perfectly appropriate for a younger audience, complete waste of time for the mature one. Thanks Netgalley.
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  • Nancy
    January 1, 1970
    I have never read any of Terry Brooks’s books so I didn’t really have any expectations going in to reading the book. Street Freaks takes place 200 years into the future with a totalitarian world government and big bio tech companies leading the way. The blog starts of with a bang but then I quickly start to notice the writing seems more on par with a young adult book (even though I can’t find anything anywhere that this book is a young adult book). I am not anti young adult books (some of my fav I have never read any of Terry Brooks’s books so I didn’t really have any expectations going in to reading the book. Street Freaks takes place 200 years into the future with a totalitarian world government and big bio tech companies leading the way. The blog starts of with a bang but then I quickly start to notice the writing seems more on par with a young adult book (even though I can’t find anything anywhere that this book is a young adult book). I am not anti young adult books (some of my favortie books are young adult books) but this one had a few things that usually bring a books rating down for me. One is repetition of concepts and ideas. A protagonist that keeps repeating the same thing over and over and over gets tiresome. Another is constantly explaining how the world works. Id rather get dumped into an unknown world and figure it out on my own than constant explaining. And there is a lot of explaining. The book is a quick and easy read and the ending wasn’t what I expected. After having time to think about the ending, I wonder if this is intended to be a stand alone book or there will be a possible sequel? I received an advance copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Patrick St-Denis
    January 1, 1970
    Although I used to be a big Terry Brooks fan back in the day, it's been over a decade since I last read anything by the author. I'm too far behind in the Shannara saga to give new installments a shot, so I've been waiting for him to write something new that I could sink my teeth into. When I received an advance reading copy of the forthcoming Street Freaks, I knew this was the perfect opportunity to get reacquainted with Brooks. I was excited to be bringing the book with me on my roadtrip around Although I used to be a big Terry Brooks fan back in the day, it's been over a decade since I last read anything by the author. I'm too far behind in the Shannara saga to give new installments a shot, so I've been waiting for him to write something new that I could sink my teeth into. When I received an advance reading copy of the forthcoming Street Freaks, I knew this was the perfect opportunity to get reacquainted with Brooks. I was excited to be bringing the book with me on my roadtrip around Gaspésie. Unfortunately, it proved to be quite a chore to read and I finished it at a coffee shop in St-Jean-Port-Joli, glad to have finally gone through it. Indeed, there were times when I considered just giving up. But I was still on vacation with limited reading material and I elected to persevere.Alas, nowhere in the cover blurb, the press release, and all the related online material was there any indication that this was a YA novel. Because make no mistake. Terry Brooks went into full YA mode for this one. Even worse, he went into young adolescent mode regarding certain aspects of the story. As you guys know, I'm not too keen on YA as a rule, and I wish I would have known beforehand. Because now my review would be decidedly lukewarm at best. If I'd known, I would have thanked them for the opportunity, but I would have passed on this one. Now, I like Shawn Speakman and I got in touch with him when I finished Street Freaks, wondering why this work wasn't billed as Young Adult material. I was afraid that this book could suffer from the same sort of backlash that really hurt the sales of C. S. Friedman's The Dreamwalker Chronicles.You may recall that Dreamwalker was billed as a crossover novel. Something which included elements targetted to a teen audience, but also hopefully enough content and complexity that would please Friedman's adult audience. What I immediately realized when I started the book was that in style and tone it was a world away from the dark science fiction and fantasy series/novels Friedman has become renowned for. And no matter from which angle you looked at the plot, it was YA through and through. When I mentioned this, both Friedman and her editor requested that I kindly refrain from using the terms YA or young adult in my review of the book. The rationale was, understandably, that such a label could potentially alienate a good chunk of Friedman's readership. The problem with this strategy is that, if the online customers/readers' reviews are any indication, a vast number of people believing that they would experience more of Friedman's awesomeness felt cheated to have forked out their hard-earned money for what turned out to be a YA novel. In the end, Dreamwalker didn't perform as well as they had hoped for. Here was a YA title whose target audience was the extremely lucrative YA market. Yet there was no mention of it being a YA work, it was released by a non-YA publisher, and it wouldn't even appear in the YA section of bookstores around North America. Moreover, it received basically no coverage from YA resources. Hence, not only did the bulk of Friedman's long-time fans felt short-changed by this strategy, but the book's target audience was more or less never reached.Speakman opine that at its heart, every single Terry Brooks book is YA. They all feature young main characters going against the big bad guy. According to him, the same was true regarding Street Freaks. I wholeheartedly disagreed with him, claiming that though the main characters are often young, the Shannara novels mostly dealt with adult themes. In Speakman's opinion, Street Freaks is probably the most adult thing Brooks has ever written. Well, it appears that we'll have to agree to disagree on this one. And I can't help but feel that hiding the fact that the novel is definitely YA is a little disingenuous.Here's the blurb:"Go into the Red Zone. Go to Street Freaks." his father directs Ashton Collins before the vid feed goes suddenly silent. The Red Zone is the dangerous heart of mega-city Los Angeles; it is a world Ash is forbidden from and one he knows little about. But if he can find Street Freaks, the strangest of aid awaits―human and barely human alike. As Ash is hunted, he must unravel the mystery left behind by his father and discover his role in this new world.Brooks has long been the grandmaster of fantasy. Now he turns his hand to science fiction filled with what his readers love best: complex characters, extraordinary settings, exciting action, and a page-turning story. Through it, Brooks reimagines his bestselling career yet again.I a nutshell, Street Freaks is a teenage version of The Fast and the Furious franchise meets Divergent meets The Goonies. The main plot revolves around an evil corporate empire illegally experimenting on children to produce means to help control the world's population. How someone who became a worldwide bestselling author by capturing the imagination of millions of readers came up with something so unoriginal and uninteresting, I'll never know. Basically all the concepts and ideas in this book have been recycled and reheated in the microwave. The finished product is bland and uninspired, by far the most lackluster book by Brooks that I have ever read. While it's true that adult themes such as corporate greed and sex (to a certain extent) are explored, Street Freaks is more about juvenile themes like friendship, the desire to fit in, first love, etc. The plotlines, the way characters act and talk, the way the main protagonist thinks and acts and reacts, the way everything is kind of black and white. Everything is YA. Through and through. Nothing wrong with that, of course. Yet I felt that Street Freaks should be billed as such.If young readers are not necessarily the target audience, one has to wonder why Terry Brooks felt the need to dumb down and simplify everything. Why did the author feel the need to overexplain every idea and concept, why all the repetitions, why all the info-dumps?The characterization was incredibly subpar. Ashton Collins doesn't have the appeal necessary to carry a novel on his shoulders. There is not a whole lot of character growth as far as he is concerned. Problem is, Ash spends the better part of the book hopelessly infatuated by a girl and the rest of it being worried about who he can trust and what he can do. Brooks keeps rehashing the same feelings and worries throughout Street Freaks, which makes Ash more annoying with each new chapter. Instead of caring for him and rooting for the guy, he's not the sharpest tool in the shed and one soon forgets his plight and wishes that there were other points of view through whose lenses we could see the tale unfold. Sadly, the rest of the cast is mostly comprised of two-dimensional teenage boys and girls that are little more than cardboard cutouts. The sole exceptions being Cay and Jenny, and I wish we could have learned more about them. When all is said and done, Ash taking center stage pretty much killed it for me.The pace was decidedly uneven. Street Freaks started with a bang, but the plot quickly petered out. It took way too long for the truth about the Street Freak crew to be unveiled, methinks. And then there are action sequences and car races that were more or less unnecessary. Things finally pick up in the last third of the novel, heading toward a predictible endgame and a finale that you see coming from a mile away. With a villain that is happy to reveal the whole evil entreprise before being outfoxed by a bunch of kids, of course. Seriously, for readers aged between 12 and 15, Terry Brooks' Street Freaks would likely be a killer read.In the end, as other reviews have pointed out, while Street Freaks is perfectly appropriate for a younger audience, I believe that it is a complete waste of time for a more mature one. Consider yourselves warned. . .For more reviews, check out www.fantasyhotlist.blogspot.com
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  • Carol
    January 1, 1970
    Entertaining look at a possible near future America. Believable characters, if somewhat unlikely with interesting dynamics. Unfortunately the romance angle didn’t ring true for me but it didn’t particularly spoil the story.
  • Lauren
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to Netgalley for the chance to review this. I bailed on this 52% in. The premise was brilliant. It was like Fast and the Furious with espionage and biogenetics. But I just didn't care enough about the characters to continue. For such a seasoned author as Terry Brooks, they were sappy and 2 dimensional. The main character spent 50% of his time fawning over one of the other characters, and the other 50% worrying about everything else. I really wanted to see these characters bond and have fu Thanks to Netgalley for the chance to review this. I bailed on this 52% in. The premise was brilliant. It was like Fast and the Furious with espionage and biogenetics. But I just didn't care enough about the characters to continue. For such a seasoned author as Terry Brooks, they were sappy and 2 dimensional. The main character spent 50% of his time fawning over one of the other characters, and the other 50% worrying about everything else. I really wanted to see these characters bond and have fun, but it turned into a sappy YA novel. If this were a debut I may have finished and given it a 3🌟 but I do expect more from Terry, so I'm giving it a 2.
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  • Darcy
    January 1, 1970
    I wasn't sure what to expect with this book. I love the author's Shanara series, but this one is set in a different world, a bit futuristic. For most of the book Ashton was a fish out of water, not really fitting in and doing what others wanted of him. As time went on Ashton realized all he knew was not correct, that his dad may or may not be a good guy, it depends on who you are. By the end of the book Ashton has found his place and figured out somethings about his dad and himself. Ashton's wor I wasn't sure what to expect with this book. I love the author's Shanara series, but this one is set in a different world, a bit futuristic. For most of the book Ashton was a fish out of water, not really fitting in and doing what others wanted of him. As time went on Ashton realized all he knew was not correct, that his dad may or may not be a good guy, it depends on who you are. By the end of the book Ashton has found his place and figured out somethings about his dad and himself. Ashton's world, while totally changed, leaves him in a good place.
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  • Kat
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Net galley and the publisher for providing me with an e copy of this book.I may be slightly biased as Terry Brooks is one of my favourite authors, but this book was really enjoyable! I live his writing style and the world and characters were well built. Great little standalone Sci fi!
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  • J.D. Grimm
    January 1, 1970
    When I first read the title “Street Freaks” I must admit, I giggled like an adolescent schoolboy hearing a dirty word for the very first time. To say that Sci-fi is not my usual cup of tea would be a profound understatement. However, with my first encounter with Terry Brooks I must admit… I was hooked relatively quickly. I could literally smell the jet fuel pouring from the pages as I read each word and if you're not seeing neon chrome in your sleep, you're not reading it right! Okay but serious When I first read the title “Street Freaks” I must admit, I giggled like an adolescent schoolboy hearing a dirty word for the very first time. To say that Sci-fi is not my usual cup of tea would be a profound understatement. However, with my first encounter with Terry Brooks I must admit… I was hooked relatively quickly. I could literally smell the jet fuel pouring from the pages as I read each word and if you're not seeing neon chrome in your sleep, you're not reading it right! Okay but seriously, I've rated this book 3/5 stars. I won't go into great detail as to why, until the book is released in October when I can throw all my notes on here for those curious enough to see how my odd mind works. But for now, just know that it was....So as you can probably tell, I had my gripes with the story. While the settings and actions are painted masterfully, the main character, Ash, sometimes falls flat. There are moments when he shows flashes of brilliance... and others where he seems to be lacking more than just your average sheltered upper-class teen. To be more specific... not knowing what the term "new-fish" means when you're clearly "new" to an area was slightly frustrating and unbelievable to me. There was also a tendency to overstate the obvious, instead of just relying on his descriptive skills and allowing the reader to gather their own conclusion, we also had the main characters jumping in to tell the reader exactly the same thing. It's the classic old Telling not showing dilemma. It definitely got old, very quickly. However, I couldn't help but keep reading. Whenever, I felt like I wanted to put the book down and just say "meh," I couldn't. I turned page after page until finally... It was over. I reached the end. I was satisfied. That should speak volumes to the entertainment value of this title. So should you read it? Well... that depends. Do you like Sci-Fi? Then yeah. Do you like the Anime Akira? Theeeen Yeah.But if you're looking for a good fantasy style novel, this isn't for you. I would suggest this book for anyone that's trying to slowly transition into the Sci-fi genre without going full Star Wars. Overall, this book was okay and I do look forward to checking out more of Brooks in the SciFi genre.. however, I just won't be going back to this one any time soon.
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  • Let's Geek
    January 1, 1970
    Read the full review also on my blog Let's Geek: https://lets-geek.blogspot.com/2018/1...Street Freaks is an action-packed SciFi adventure, with lots of twists, secrets and thrill.Total Rating: 8.6/10Originality: 8/10Language: 8/10Atmosphere: 8/10Characters: 10/10World building: 9/10Fun: 8/10Predictability: 8/10Believable: 8/10Relevancy: 9/10Cover: 8/10Genre: SciFiFor You if you like: Robots, Humanoids, CarsTime It Took Me To Read: approx. 4.5 hours“You know what your trouble is?”, she says, po Read the full review also on my blog Let's Geek: https://lets-geek.blogspot.com/2018/1...Street Freaks is an action-packed SciFi adventure, with lots of twists, secrets and thrill.Total Rating: 8.6/10Originality: 8/10Language: 8/10Atmosphere: 8/10Characters: 10/10World building: 9/10Fun: 8/10Predictability: 8/10Believable: 8/10Relevancy: 9/10Cover: 8/10Genre: SciFiFor You if you like: Robots, Humanoids, CarsTime It Took Me To Read: approx. 4.5 hours“You know what your trouble is?”, she says, pointing the Bryson back the way she had come. There is anger in her voice now. "You want to pigeonhole everyone. You like the idea of a world all nicely ordered and dependable. But that isn't how things are. Peopel are messy and changeable. The world is fluid; the people who inhabit it are chameleons. You want to think of everyone as stable and identifiable, but they aren't." THE BOOK:The book starts with a bang: Asthon Collins receives a message from his father to run away, to the dangerous Red Zone, to a place called Street Freaks. Ashton does not know what happened, or what is happening - because suddenly he gets attacked and hunted, and he runs for his life. At Street Freaks, he meets a bunch of teenagers, who are not what they seem, but are able to help. Surrounded by secrets, Ashton slowly unravels why his father send him to this place, and why he is hunted. Originality: 8/10Amazing but simple idea that throws you into the action from page one, and doesn't let go until the final page. It is obvious that Terry Brooks, author of this novel, is not new to the craft of storytelling, but knows what he is doing, and how to do it. Language: 8/10The language is good - I mean, as said, Terry Brooks knows what he is doing. As often, I did end up finding myself skim-reading in action scenes, because they weren't as fluid and quick as my mind wanted them to be. I am not sure whether this is a good or bad thing yet. At the same time, the language continuously hinted, or actively pointed, to the fact that there was more than the reader, and the main character Ashton, knew. It got annoying after a while."He does as she asks. There is a lot going on that he doesn't understand. He is horrified by what has happened but oddly resigned as well. They are all pawns in a much larger game, one that none of them fully understands." Atmosphere: 9/10Reading this I felt continuously on the edge - things happen, then things happen, then more things happen. My heartbeat was high throughout the novel. I kind of longed for a breather, partly to avoid a heart attack, but when it came in form of a car race, and I find cars boring, I felt almost like I was left to fall on my face. Characters: 10/10Ashton is a teenager who never had trouble before, but suddenly is thrown into a cat and mouse chase, where he doesn't even know why he is hunted, and what his father is hiding from him. He is very naive, and I like how he doesn't immediately turn bad-ass or knows how to handle this situation - he makes mistakes and he gets into trouble. The other characters of interest are the other teenagers in Street Freaks, all with their own story to tell that brought them there. They are all different and unique characters, with their own motivation, desires and strengths and weaknesses. World building: 9/10We are in a future world, where we have the Red Zone, equivalent to a Ghetto. We know the existence of different organisations that build advanced medication and humanoids, for which Ashton's father works as well. Without telling us too much about the world beyond those two entities, I felt like the core issue at hand was really well build out. We have unique language, such as the insult "tweener" for humanoids, or the bars or gaming arcades in the Red Zone with their unique clientele and entertainment. Fun: 8/10This novel was big on the fun factor - the only reason I deduct points are because the emphasis on cars. If you like cars, add two points to this without a doubt, but the amount of car-talk, street racing and car-pimping was really boring. I did not quite understand why cars became such a central item in the Red Zone. Predictability: 8/10This novel had a good 6-7 twists (I got confused while counting, sorry folks!) that some took me by surprise and some were quite obvious, so I deducted one point. I decided to deduct another point, because I got annoyed by the many times characters told Ashton, and the reader, that there is more but they were not ready yet to talk about it. It almost felt like too forced, trying to tell the reader "there is more, but I will not tell you yet", rather than naturally create the setting that yes, we don't know everything yet, but there is an answer to everything, and connections we yet have to learn.Believable: 8/10There are a few big question marks when reading this novel. Quite at the beginning, Ashton runs away from, what is equivalent to the police or FBI or something I guess, in this story. How he does it, I still did not quite understand, or believe. Otherwise, many of the "this makes no sense" story lines actually make sense towards the end, such as why the Street Freaks take on Ashton without too much questioning and protect him. Relevancy: 9/10What I loved so much about this scifi novel was the existence of the humanoids, abandoned in the Red Zone, and we learn quickly, each one with their own sad story and background. This opened up a lot of questions: What makes humans human? With our advancement in technology and medicine, lab-grown organs, machines instead of legs, this is all in the scope of possibility. So one day we will have, like in this world, humans that are not 100% natural. Are they any different than humans? How should they be treated? How should failed experiments be treated? All very intriguing and very important questions that are important far beyond this novel.Cover: 8/10This cover shows actually the first few minutes within the story - Ashton escaping with his rucksack. I love the image - but I almost think showing another scene from the book, such as the inside of Street Freaks, would be much cooler. I really do like the side characters more than Ashton, and I find them really crucial to the story, so I miss them somewhat there. Total Rating: 8.6/10Maybe it is a bit late to admit, but this is my first novel by Terry Brooks, even though I of course know his name and the numerous novels he wrote. I just never came around to reading them. But now I definitely will. Street Freaks is an intriguing, non-stop action packed adventure with secrets and complex characters. A must read for sci fi fans. Read the full review also on my blog Let's Geek: https://lets-geek.blogspot.com/2018/1...
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  • Karma♥Bites ^.~
    January 1, 1970
    **ARC provided by Grim Oak Press via NetGalley**Read/finished 26 Sept 2018 (★★)ARC review so to be posted via review account. **ARC provided by Grim Oak Press via NetGalley**Read/finished 26 Sept 2018 (★★½)ARC review so to be posted via review account.
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  • Karen’s Library
    January 1, 1970
    Set 200 years in the future, Ash is a sheltered teen who receives a frantic call from his father telling him to Get. Out. Now!! He manages to escape his apartment just as a swat like team storms in destroying everything in their path. Ash's father tells him to go to the Street Freaks. In a very unsavory part of the City where rules don't really apply, the Street Freaks, a group of modified teens, takes Ash in. Soon after, Ash finds that his father is dead and he has nowhere else to go. The story Set 200 years in the future, Ash is a sheltered teen who receives a frantic call from his father telling him to Get. Out. Now!! He manages to escape his apartment just as a swat like team storms in destroying everything in their path. Ash's father tells him to go to the Street Freaks. In a very unsavory part of the City where rules don't really apply, the Street Freaks, a group of modified teens, takes Ash in. Soon after, Ash finds that his father is dead and he has nowhere else to go. The story starts out with a lot of action that continues throughout the story. Throw in some great street racing, lovable members of Street Freaks, and the gang trying to solve the mystery of who, what, why is going on with Ash and his father, and we have a decent story that kept my attention. As much as I adore Terry Brooks, his veering off into YA sci-fi was just ok. Although not my favorite of his books (Hello... Shannara!), I WAS connected enough with the characters that I wanted to find out how it ended.It feels like this book is a standalone although I could see how there could be a sequel. I would definitely be interested to read more about this future world. The sci-fi tech was definitely pretty cool.*Thank you so much to NetGalley and Grim Oak Press for the advance copy!*
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  • Phil Parker
    January 1, 1970
    I struggled with this novel, which is such a shame because I really wanted it to work. I’m a long-time fan of the legend that is Terry Brooks but the story itself is a good one and worthy of a higher rating than 3 stars.It’s the narrative style that didn’t work for me. Written in a third person, present tense is fine but it is the decision to use so much Passive Voice that robs the story of the drama that should be there. It means that, as the reader, you don’t get the same level of engagement. I struggled with this novel, which is such a shame because I really wanted it to work. I’m a long-time fan of the legend that is Terry Brooks but the story itself is a good one and worthy of a higher rating than 3 stars.It’s the narrative style that didn’t work for me. Written in a third person, present tense is fine but it is the decision to use so much Passive Voice that robs the story of the drama that should be there. It means that, as the reader, you don’t get the same level of engagement. It feels like a deliberate choice but it turns into the kind of story an inexperienced writer often makes, where exposition is clumsily inserted.The result was that I skim-read the story. I didn’t care about the characters. In fact, at times I found them downright annoying. The protagonist, a 17 year old boy called Ash, is a classic example. The character is supposed to be your typical teenager, rather naïve and lacking street smarts, but it’s inconsistently delivered. He reacts one way and then another later on. I didn’t find him credible either. When he is forced to deal with an important death (avoiding spoilers here) there is little reaction, to anything. He acts withdrawn. That’s it. And it doesn’t last for very long. The story takes place in a futuristic world, in an America that has broken up into territories and we find ourselves in a dystopian Los Angeles. Metro is the main city where the rich and powerful live, most of the story takes place in The Red Zone which is where criminals and low-lifes and outcasts live. There’s a lot of information dumping in the first three chapters, disguised in a chase sequence, but it comes at the expense of characterisation.The premise is along the lines of Marvel’s X Men. Genetic enhancement, mechanised humans are the order of the day, a mega-powerful conglomerate out to rule the world-kind of story. It sounds trite but it’s not that bad. The climax and the motivation of the villain is cliched but it was obvious where the story was going, there are no real surprises. The ending itself was naff, sentimental and overly romanticised.There were so many times I wanted to give up on this book. I’m pleased I saw it through to the end but it was only out of curiosity to see if anything unexpected might happen. It didn’t. But it was the writing style that killed this book for me. Such a shame.
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  • Elaine
    January 1, 1970
    One of the really great changes in literature is how genres are breaking down, merging, and recombining into something hard to categorize. This is advertised as science fiction, but there is actually very little science (either hard of soft). Rather, this seems to be a well written YA story based in the future when humans zip around in transporters, live in high rises to escape the pollution and live very different lives whether they are up top, or down below. Blade Runner investigated this trop One of the really great changes in literature is how genres are breaking down, merging, and recombining into something hard to categorize. This is advertised as science fiction, but there is actually very little science (either hard of soft). Rather, this seems to be a well written YA story based in the future when humans zip around in transporters, live in high rises to escape the pollution and live very different lives whether they are up top, or down below. Blade Runner investigated this trope more than twnety years ago, and thus it is already well established in our minds and luckily Terry Brooks spends little time building a set of place other than passing references to transportation, cloning, and bionic alteration of children into self-named Street Freaks.This is an easy read that seems most pointed towards middle schoolers, even though the main characters are teenagers. The story line moves along quickly, the characters are interesting and overall, there is a sense that another book might show up at a later stage. This is, after all Terry Brooks, whose roots in multi-volume epics about quests and elves. But, it is terrific to see someone who is so well established in one area stretch out into something else.
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  • Charlotte
    January 1, 1970
    A GoodReads giveaway win.This book was NOT for me. It didn't hold my interest.I would say it's for a younger audience, probably 12 to 15 years olds.I felt the characters were under developed.It was repetitious. Some of the action scene and races that were written in, didn't feel necessary.The ending was predictable.
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  • Paul
    January 1, 1970
    Yet, Brooks’s Street Freaks has some very good surprises and a certain edge to some of the twists, and there’s definitely room for a sequel. Its best parts are the coming-of-age moments for its characters. The times when growth is forced, when change is a necessity.For my full review: https://paulspicks.blog/2018/09/19/st...For all my reviews: https://paulspicks.blog
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  • Patrick
    January 1, 1970
    In a future Los Angeles, Ash Collins has led a rather sheltered life. Sure, he’s been around the globe, and seen some pretty cool stuff, but he’s a serious fish out of water in the REAL real world. When out of the blue he gets a call from his dad telling him to get the hell out of Dodge and into the Red Zone, he’s at a loss. And what the hell’s this STREET FREAKS he’s supposed to go to? Still, our boy’s got a few skills and he manages to find his way. Now, in order to survive, he’s going to have In a future Los Angeles, Ash Collins has led a rather sheltered life. Sure, he’s been around the globe, and seen some pretty cool stuff, but he’s a serious fish out of water in the REAL real world. When out of the blue he gets a call from his dad telling him to get the hell out of Dodge and into the Red Zone, he’s at a loss. And what the hell’s this STREET FREAKS he’s supposed to go to? Still, our boy’s got a few skills and he manages to find his way. Now, in order to survive, he’s going to have to figure out what happened to his dad while hiding out in the most dangerous part of the mega-city. That, and find his place in this very weird and brave new world. Easy. The Overlord of Shannara – one of fantasy’s most long-standing and popular series – sets his sights on dystopian science fiction, genetic engineering, and extreme body modifications. Street Freaks is a fascinating glimpse into our future, a future when you might just be able to edit yourself as easily as I did this document. Awesome characters and a high speed plot keep the pages racing by. Like our hero Ash Collins, our Mr Brooks has got skills. Long may he reign.
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  • Jenn
    January 1, 1970
    I received a digital ARC of this title from Edelweiss for an honest review.Street Freaks takes place in the not too distant future when the United States has become the United Territories. Ash Collins has a comfortable life with his Dad in a high rise apartment, until he gets a frantic message from him telling him to run to the Red Zone and head for Street Freaks. Ash is bewildered since he doesn't know what Street Freaks even is. However, a few minutes later, his door is being knocked down and I received a digital ARC of this title from Edelweiss for an honest review.Street Freaks takes place in the not too distant future when the United States has become the United Territories. Ash Collins has a comfortable life with his Dad in a high rise apartment, until he gets a frantic message from him telling him to run to the Red Zone and head for Street Freaks. Ash is bewildered since he doesn't know what Street Freaks even is. However, a few minutes later, his door is being knocked down and his droids are being blown apart. Suddenly Ash is on the run and he doesn't even know why.Fans of Terry Brooks won't find anything familiar here, but that shouldn't stop you. This is an action-packed story that melds The Fast and the Furious with science fiction. I adored the writing and the characters here, but there are several major plot points that just didn't make logical sense to me. I'm not going to enumerate them because SPOILERS, but it definitely drew me out of this story.
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  • Gareth Otton
    January 1, 1970
    It was tempting for me to give this book a much higher score because finally, we're getting a Terry Brooks book that actually hooked me in the opening pages. I have a whole shelf full of hardback Shannara books from my days as a devoted Terry Brooks fan, but over the last decade, his work has grown stale. His Shannara series has been whimpering along and the Landover novel he released a few years back... well, the less said about that the better. So, when I started reading this book and the stor It was tempting for me to give this book a much higher score because finally, we're getting a Terry Brooks book that actually hooked me in the opening pages. I have a whole shelf full of hardback Shannara books from my days as a devoted Terry Brooks fan, but over the last decade, his work has grown stale. His Shannara series has been whimpering along and the Landover novel he released a few years back... well, the less said about that the better. So, when I started reading this book and the story started to kick in, the pages turned a bit faster and there was some real momentum here, I was thinking "Finally. This is what I've been missing."It wasn't to last. Instead, the promise soon faded into a book of cliches, highly unoriginal elements and a complete lack of character building. (view spoiler)[It was as though Mr Brooks saw the Fast and Furious franchise and thought, "A crew of thieves who do street racing on the side and call themselves a family, I'll take some of that." Then he watched Equilibrium and thought, "The premise behind the plot in that movie is good too. I'll take some of that." And then he watched... You know what, I could go on. The point is that (hide spoiler)] Mr Brooks seems to have cobbled this book together from a lot of popular elements in other media and novels, and assembled them into a 'new' story here. The worst part is that they're not even original concepts in the places I first encountered them, they've been used before... in some cases countless times.It made the book overly predictable to the point where there wasn't a single twist or turn that you don't see coming from the opening chapters. Then there's the trouble I had finding the target audience for this book. It reads like a YA novel with the way it's written and the characters involved. But, I got a strong 1980s vibe. I can't quite put my finger on why I felt that but I think it might be in the names everyone gave each other and the way they spoke that made me think of how youth culture in the 80s and early 90s was portrayed in TV and film. With names like 'Street Freaks', characters dressed in the Goth look and listening to Metal Head Music, it just felt really out of touch for a modern, young audience. But above all this, my biggest gripe was the main character. What a useless and pathetic wet sack of nothing he turned out to be. He was a plot device in his own book. He existed for no reason other than to progress the story. He had no real character arc to go on, never showed any sign a personality, and was basically there as a reason for things to happen. When his romantic storyline reared its ugly head, he soon went from being a nothing character to being detestable, creepy and pathetic. (view spoiler)[Another storyline better left in stories from decades ago is the trope of a woman not showing any kind of interest in a man but because she's beautiful he keeps trying and trying until he finally wins her over. If she was just playing hard to get or there was a mutual attraction beyond the power of boners involved then it might not have been so bad, but the woman made it abundantly clear, on multiple occasions, that a romance would never happen and him constantly acting like a creep made her uncomfortable. But because she was hot he kept going and going in the face of rejection, sure the only reason she didn't love him yet was because she hadn't given him a chance. We have a word for that in the real world, a stalker. But, to make it even more creepy and twisted... SHE'S A SEX ROBOT! There's no attempt to make her seem human or question if an AI could actually be 'alive', she outright says she was built to attract men and not to fall in love with her... but he keeps at it anyway for no other reason than she's attractive. It was ridiculous. (hide spoiler)]Overall, this book was a big disappointment. The very last Shannara book had promise of the old Mr Brooks and I hoped that he might be more passionate about a new project and I could get excited again. Never mind. It's a 2.5 star novel, not awful but not good either, but I just couldn't bring myself to round up to a 3 because I just can't give it that score with everything that was wrong with it. I think that maybe some young people who haven't read much might enjoy this, for everyone else, you might want to give it a miss.
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  • Belle
    January 1, 1970
    Alright y'all, who's surprised that I read yet another sci-fi dystopian novel? Not me! For some reason I always get drawn to the novels about our broken future in which technology is crazy cool and the people are flawed. Luckily for me, Street Freaks by Terry  Brooks had just that.Here are the things I loved about this novel:1. It jumps into the storyline very quickly. Sometimes I pick up a novel and I spend a good couple chapters stuck reading about what someone's house looks like or the color Alright y'all, who's surprised that I read yet another sci-fi dystopian novel? Not me! For some reason I always get drawn to the novels about our broken future in which technology is crazy cool and the people are flawed. Luckily for me, Street Freaks by Terry  Brooks had just that.Here are the things I loved about this novel:1. It jumps into the storyline very quickly. Sometimes I pick up a novel and I spend a good couple chapters stuck reading about what someone's house looks like or the color of a characters hair. Sometimes those chapters are important. However I appreciated that despite being descriptive, Terry Brooks jumped right into the story line. It practically starts with Ash escaping - so if you're needing a high-action, fast paced book, this is it.2. It has a unique premise. There is so much to discuss after reading this novel. For one, there is the question of genetically altering humans. There is the question of what is human, and what is not - when does a machine begin to be a human? With the current rise of AI, there is the question of free thought. For someone who loves technology, Street Freaks had a lot to explore. Another thing that I found very unique was how racing and street cars were brought into the mix. I feel like usually, science fiction writers tend to make everything completely brand new, but in this case, Terry Brooks allowed a current obsession (for some people anyways) to be a big part of the novel. I really enjoyed that, and I didn't know what to expect from page to page. 3. Illustrations!!! You guys already know how much I love illustrations. These, of course were very cartoon like, but they still caught my eye and helped with making a little more sense of how certain things in this unknown future world looked like. There were two smallish things that I didn't really like.1. Repetitive descriptions- in particular, during the racing, or in other situations where Ash was "new" or "inexperienced", I felt like certain parts of the setting were drilled into your head over and over. I like my descriptions to be subtly worked into the reading, but thats personal preference.2. The ending chapter read like an epilogue. It switched over from being in the present tense, to a kind of "fast forward" where everything was wrapped up carefully and all loose ends were cleaned up, except the one where I assume the author will be continuing the novel in another book. Don't get me wrong, I love epilogues and I love when theres a happy ending, but please don't smoosh it into a random chapter for me.Would recommend to: Anyone who enjoys cars and racing, and action. This novel reads as YA, so if you would prefer something a little more mature, then maybe this isn't for you
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  • Joel Flank
    January 1, 1970
    Streak Freaks is Terry Brooks' first outright science fiction novel. Set about 200 years in the future, the world has become more dystopian, with the fragmented United States reborn as the United Territories, and rules by a more controlling government. The rich live in high tech sky towers while only the poor and disenfranchised live at ground level and travel outside without protective breathing masks. When Ash has his life turned upside down by an abrupt message from his father to flee his pos Streak Freaks is Terry Brooks' first outright science fiction novel. Set about 200 years in the future, the world has become more dystopian, with the fragmented United States reborn as the United Territories, and rules by a more controlling government. The rich live in high tech sky towers while only the poor and disenfranchised live at ground level and travel outside without protective breathing masks. When Ash has his life turned upside down by an abrupt message from his father to flee his posh but isolated life of luxury, and seek help in the Red Zone from the Street Freaks, Ash has to rely on his wits and instincts to survive a world he hasn't experienced.The street freaks are one of many gangs in the relatively free Red Zone, living as an urban blight which is largely ignored by the surrounding city of Los Angeles. They're made up on various teens and young adults who have been tweaked in one way or another - genetically, bio-mechanically, or chemically. Because of their extreme differences, they're victims of prejudice and discrimination, but have made a life for themselves surviving among the other dispossessed. Ash has to learn who he can trust, why he's being hunted by the elite commando force of the government, and how to reclaim his life from being framed for unspecified crimes he hasn't committed.Along the way, he learns that not everyone is what they seem, and not everything the citizens of the United Territories are told to believe are true. The dual themes of the story resonate around discrimination against the "other" and making a close knit family among those you choose, rather than the family you're born into. Both resonate strongly in today's world, without completely beating the reader over the head about it. There's good elements of suspense, wonder at discovering the world Brooks has created, and subterfuge and misdirection, even if a few plot points are a bit telegraphed. A fun diversion from the typical fantasy works Brooks writes, and engaging enough to make we look forward to a sequel, even if it might take a few years based on his publishing schedule.
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  • Crittermom
    January 1, 1970
    Terry Brooks is well known for his beloved Shannara novels.  Classic fantasy is his specialty. Street Freaks is his first science fiction novel, so I wasn’t sure what to expect.  I was astounded. Street Freaks is as innovative as Sword of Shannara was, giving readers a story that will appeal to teens and adults alike.  On one level it is a story about growing up and finding where you fit. On another it is an action adventure pitting corrupt corporate and government forces against a teen who may Terry Brooks is well known for his beloved Shannara novels.  Classic fantasy is his specialty. Street Freaks is his first science fiction novel, so I wasn’t sure what to expect.  I was astounded. Street Freaks is as innovative as Sword of Shannara was, giving readers a story that will appeal to teens and adults alike.  On one level it is a story about growing up and finding where you fit. On another it is an action adventure pitting corrupt corporate and government forces against a teen who may be able to reveal their secrets.  The characters have more breadth than found in most young adult novels. All are exceptional in one way or another, labeled as “rejects” by the majority. They’ve made a family of sorts in the workshop of Street Freaks, using their unique talents to design and build exotic street racers for rich clients. The juxtaposition of the beautiful and individualistic cars they build and race to the bot controlled taxis and mass transport of the wealthier city outside of the red zone has a bit of a “Red Barchetta” flavor that will resonate with Rush fans.Shortly before armored troops break into his apartment, Ash receives a message from his father telling him to run, to go to the Red Zone to Street Freaks.  On the run, pursued by elite troops, Ash goes to Street Freaks. He doesn’t know why he is being pursued or what his father was working on. His world is changing and so is he.  His new friends have secrets but they are the only ones that can help him find the truth.Brooks pairs a fascinating dystopian setting with a group of unforgettable characters to tell a story that will appeal to a wide range of readers.  It is a refreshing departure from the average dystopian young adult science fiction novel.5 / 5 Young adult ( 4 / 5 adult )I received a copy of Street Freaks from the publisher and Netgalley.com in exchange for an honest review.— Crittermom
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  • Joel Smith
    January 1, 1970
    There was something very familiar about this book. It was reminiscent of movies that I remember from the 80s that also revolved around young people.It reminded me of James Patterson's Maximum Series (also Young Adult Fiction). Even as an adult I enjoy Young Adult fiction. Mostly because they are easy reads to occupy your time until another book comes along. Sometimes it is refreshing for an author to be able to tell a story without graphic violence that is inappropriate for young readers. I like There was something very familiar about this book. It was reminiscent of movies that I remember from the 80s that also revolved around young people.It reminded me of James Patterson's Maximum Series (also Young Adult Fiction). Even as an adult I enjoy Young Adult fiction. Mostly because they are easy reads to occupy your time until another book comes along. Sometimes it is refreshing for an author to be able to tell a story without graphic violence that is inappropriate for young readers. I like to share my love of reading with my children and would also like to share some of my books but the majority of them are not appropriate for them. So, to have one of my favorite authors write a story that bridges the gap is a wonderful thing.I was glad to see something different from Terry Brooks and I am probably going to make a lot of people mad but, I have to say it... "I am Shannara-ed out!"
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  • Kristine
    January 1, 1970
    Street Freaks by Terry Brooks is a free NetGalley ebook that I read in early October.I remember thinking when I was tapped to review this draft, I was excited, like “Hey, my first Terry Brooks book!” and then bemoaning how long a book it might be. In a tech-enhanced future, Ash is asked by his father to go ‘to the Red Zone’ after their home is razed by men in hazmat suits. Once he finds it, he encounters the world of Street Freaks - vigilant, unofficiated street racers (each giving off whispers Street Freaks by Terry Brooks is a free NetGalley ebook that I read in early October.I remember thinking when I was tapped to review this draft, I was excited, like “Hey, my first Terry Brooks book!” and then bemoaning how long a book it might be. In a tech-enhanced future, Ash is asked by his father to go ‘to the Red Zone’ after their home is razed by men in hazmat suits. Once he finds it, he encounters the world of Street Freaks - vigilant, unofficiated street racers (each giving off whispers of Divergent without the direct division of classes and the Warriors). Over time, Ash entrusts his life’s secrets to them before gradually learning why his father directed him to them and the reasoning behind the involvement of outside government and big-tech on his life. There's a gradual, yet rough introduction of Brooks' world-making concepts and he unfolds a massive furl of characters, each with their own car and involvement in races.
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  • Sarai Henderson
    January 1, 1970
    See the full review at Confessions of an ExBallerinaA wild ride that will keep you on your toes. This book was pretty dang cool. I'm used to Terry Brooks writing epic fantasies, so this was a new adventure for me. True to Brooks fashion, there was a deep character filled world that seemed real and wild. I loved the whole premise about the street racing and the world around it. I was excited to read that part and see what was going to happen. I had the excitement of pod racing from Star Wars. Wha See the full review at Confessions of an ExBallerinaA wild ride that will keep you on your toes. This book was pretty dang cool. I'm used to Terry Brooks writing epic fantasies, so this was a new adventure for me. True to Brooks fashion, there was a deep character filled world that seemed real and wild. I loved the whole premise about the street racing and the world around it. I was excited to read that part and see what was going to happen. I had the excitement of pod racing from Star Wars. What I didn't like was the fact that the whole street racing thing was overlooked. There is a big buildup though out the story and then nothing really happened. The scene was short and lackluster. I wanted more.The rest of the story was wild and crazy. A bunch of kids experimented on and altered, then discarded because they are deemed worthless. There are people out to kill the main character and you really don't know who's behind it until the very end. A great read for scifi fans and fantasy fans alike. Received an advance reader copy in exchange for a fair review.
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  • Brad Kirk
    January 1, 1970
    I've been a fan of Terry Brooks since I read The Sword of Shannara in 7th grade. Having said that, I've never particularly liked his books outside of the world of Shannara. This book isn't much of an exception. It was enjoyable enough and as we can always expect from Brooks, the characters are solid and you care about them. But, this book is fairly mediocre. The plot is genetic and the futuristic world is about as exciting as plain Cheerios, dry. Brooks doesn't even attempt to come up with inter I've been a fan of Terry Brooks since I read The Sword of Shannara in 7th grade. Having said that, I've never particularly liked his books outside of the world of Shannara. This book isn't much of an exception. It was enjoyable enough and as we can always expect from Brooks, the characters are solid and you care about them. But, this book is fairly mediocre. The plot is genetic and the futuristic world is about as exciting as plain Cheerios, dry. Brooks doesn't even attempt to come up with interesting names for things in his future world, just throws a lazy "robo-" in front of whatever automated thing he's talking about. This book is generally safe for consumption by people in any age group and YA types might find it particularly enjoyable but if you're a big sci-fi person or a big Shannara fan, it might fall a bit short.
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  • Casey Wheeler
    January 1, 1970
    I received a free Kindle copy of Street Freaks by Terry Brooks courtesy of Net Galley  and Grim Oak Press, the publisher. It was with the understanding that I would post a review on Net Galley, Goodreads, Amazon, Barnes and Noble and my fiction book review blog. I also posted it to my Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google Plus pages.I requested this book as I am a fan of the author's Shanarra fantasy series.This book is very much more science ficition in approach than fantasy which has been the I received a free Kindle copy of Street Freaks by Terry Brooks courtesy of Net Galley  and Grim Oak Press, the publisher. It was with the understanding that I would post a review on Net Galley, Goodreads, Amazon, Barnes and Noble and my fiction book review blog. I also posted it to my Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google Plus pages.I requested this book as I am a fan of the author's Shanarra fantasy series.This book is very much more science ficition in approach than fantasy which has been the author's forte in the past. That said, it is a very engaging and enjoyable read which makes it also a fast read. It covers the basic premise of big brother trying to control things, but with a different approach.If you are a fan of Terry Brooks or science fiction, you will find this a good read.
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