Giant Days
Based on the hit graphic-novel series from BOOM! Studios, the publisher behind Lumberjanes, Giant Days follows the hilarious and heartfelt misadventures of three university first-years: Daisy, the innocent home-schooled girl; Susan, the sardonic wit; and Esther, the vivacious drama queen. While the girls seem very different, they become fast friends during their first week of university. And it's a good thing they do, because in the giant adventure that is college, a friend who has your back is key--something Daisy discovers when she gets a little too involved in her extracurricular club, the Yogic Brethren of Zoise. When she starts acting strange and life around campus gets even stranger (missing students, secret handshakes, monogrammed robes everywhere . . .), Esther and Susan decide it's up to them to investigate the weirdness and save their friend.

Giant Days Details

TitleGiant Days
Author
ReleaseAug 21st, 2018
PublisherHarry N. Abrams
ISBN-139781419731266
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Contemporary, Fiction

Giant Days Review

  • Maddie
    January 1, 1970
    'Giant Days' was a bunch of marvellous fun, about the three best-est friends you could possibly read about. Non Pratt manages to take the exact essence of each character from the graphic novels and perfectly translate them into pure prose form. Each girl is equally focused on, so regardless of whether Susan, Daisy or Esther is your favourite, you'll definitely enjoy this book! This also perfectly balanced appealing to fans of the graphic novels, while also introducing the characters to new reade 'Giant Days' was a bunch of marvellous fun, about the three best-est friends you could possibly read about. Non Pratt manages to take the exact essence of each character from the graphic novels and perfectly translate them into pure prose form. Each girl is equally focused on, so regardless of whether Susan, Daisy or Esther is your favourite, you'll definitely enjoy this book! This also perfectly balanced appealing to fans of the graphic novels, while also introducing the characters to new readers, who have so many more university adventures to discover after this toe-dip in the world of Giant Days. The setting and shenanigans are so hilarious and relatable, you'll want to read it cover to cover.
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  • Bee (Heart Full of Books)
    January 1, 1970
    Non Pratt perfectly captures the tone, humour and characters of Giant Days, and I would definitely read more books in this world written by her! It was exactly what I expected and hoped for, and now I just want to re-read all the comics again...
  • Lauren James
    January 1, 1970
    [Gifted] I am a HUGE fan of the graphic novels, so I nearly died of excitement when I found out that one of my favourite authors was writing a prequel to the series. It lived up to all my expectations: funny, sweet, action-packed and quirky.
  • Emily A. Duncan
    January 1, 1970
    WHAT A DELIGHT
  • Marie Andrews
    January 1, 1970
    I haven't read any of the graphic novels that this is based on, so went straight into reading this with no context or idea at all of what to expect - other than I'm a huge fan of Non Pratt. I was a bit worried that I wouldn't understand some references or grasp the general characters, but I was wrong!It follows the story of Daisy, Susan and Esther, as they embark in their university experience and some weird and quirky things arise. Not only do I think this book echoes some of my experiences of I haven't read any of the graphic novels that this is based on, so went straight into reading this with no context or idea at all of what to expect - other than I'm a huge fan of Non Pratt. I was a bit worried that I wouldn't understand some references or grasp the general characters, but I was wrong!It follows the story of Daisy, Susan and Esther, as they embark in their university experience and some weird and quirky things arise. Not only do I think this book echoes some of my experiences of my first year at university (certainly not the main plot/mystery!!) but smaller details that I thought were brilliantly thought out. I think this book would be great if you're a fan of the graphic novels, but also if you have yet to read them like me, as it is full of mystery and adventure, easy to read and is a humorous book that could be enjoyed regardless of age!
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  • Jane (It'sJaneLindsey)
    January 1, 1970
    2.5 stars. Completely missing what makes the comics so magical and fun. I went in expecting to love this, but I’m really disappointed.
  • Barb (Boxermommyreads)
    January 1, 1970
    I was really excited about this novel when I first learned of it because I'm a a huge fan of the graphic novel. So when I saw it available on Hoopla, I thought it was the perfect excuse to give it a go. Let's just say I should have stuck with the graphic novel.That's not to say there weren't things I didn't enjoy. I love Ester, the Goth chick, and think she is a blast. However, I found it sad that someone who has so much going for her spent so much of the novel trying to be best buds with the ca I was really excited about this novel when I first learned of it because I'm a a huge fan of the graphic novel. So when I saw it available on Hoopla, I thought it was the perfect excuse to give it a go. Let's just say I should have stuck with the graphic novel.That's not to say there weren't things I didn't enjoy. I love Ester, the Goth chick, and think she is a blast. However, I found it sad that someone who has so much going for her spent so much of the novel trying to be best buds with the campus' other Goth chick when she was clearly so undeserving of such friendship. Susan is very sarcastic which I also found enjoyable but Daisy sort of got on my nerves. I missed the artwork and I missed the fun. "Giant Days" just didn't seem to flow very well. Instead of the chapters uniting to form a cohesive take, I felt like each one with its own plotless story. In retrospect, it was kind of like comic book issues, but in written form and while that type of flow may work in comic book form, it did not here.I wish I had liked Giant Days but I will still be following the graphic novel so there is that. Unless you're just curious, I really wouldn't recommend it.
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  • Catie
    January 1, 1970
    This book was mildly amusing, but it pales in comparison to the wildly entertaining comic book series. I am left wondering: who is the target audience here? Fans of the comics don’t need to read this – it covers a lot of the same ground as the first volumes, and the new material really isn’t groundbreaking. The author even appears to painstakingly describe elements of the comic books in sections, much like a nature documentarian would for a herd of lions. Here we see Esther, wearing knee high bl This book was mildly amusing, but it pales in comparison to the wildly entertaining comic book series. I am left wondering: who is the target audience here? Fans of the comics don’t need to read this – it covers a lot of the same ground as the first volumes, and the new material really isn’t groundbreaking. The author even appears to painstakingly describe elements of the comic books in sections, much like a nature documentarian would for a herd of lions. Here we see Esther, wearing knee high black leather boots, a skull t-shirt, and a mischievous expression… (not an actual quote). The repetition of details that I already knew left me feeling bored and disengaged.Likewise, I can’t see any reason for non-fans to pick this up. If you haven’t read the comic book series, WHY NOT? They’re incredible and guaranteed to cure sadness. Esther, Daisy, Susan, Ed, and McGraw have gotten me through some very stressful times. If you’ve read them and didn’t care for them, WHY NOT? You need to examine your personal taste because it’s obviously flawed. However, EVEN YOU can still skip this novel version.So who should read this? Maybe there’s a case to be made for this as a great alternative version for blind or visually-impaired folks who want to enjoy Giant Days. Libraries may want to purchase a copy of this for that reason, but overall this book is highly skippable.
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  • Fall-Out-Book-Nerd
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed this but the simplistic writing style and the plot that kept jumping around kept me from reading it in one sitting and instead it took me over a month.This book definitely has a way of making me remember my first year of uni, I related to so many of the struggles that are mentioned and I would have loved this book more then.I am still thinking of picking up the graphic novel series but hopefully I can borrow them from the library.
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  • Izzy
    January 1, 1970
    THERES A BOOK FOR GIANT DAYS GRAPHIC NOVELS?! Hebsbahsbsnshhsbsnsjshnsbsbdjxjnslsjxjxjdnsnsndjjxjxnsbagajzmnshxuxnsmalzijznsnakalnzndjsjsmadhslaishdnsksnsjs
  • Stacey (prettybooks)
    January 1, 1970
    Even though I've only read the first volume of the graphic novels, I was so excited to hear about this book inspired by the Giant Days series – and written by one of my favourite YA authors! In Giant Days, we follow the lives of "three university first-years: Daisy, the innocent home-schooled girl; Susan, the sardonic wit; and Esther, the vivacious drama queen". Continue reading this review over on Pretty Books. #gifted: Thank you to the publisher for providing this book for free in exchange fo Even though I've only read the first volume of the graphic novels, I was so excited to hear about this book inspired by the Giant Days series – and written by one of my favourite YA authors! In Giant Days, we follow the lives of "three university first-years: Daisy, the innocent home-schooled girl; Susan, the sardonic wit; and Esther, the vivacious drama queen". Continue reading this review over on Pretty Books. #gifted: Thank you to the publisher for providing this book for free in exchange for an honest review!
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  • Connie
    January 1, 1970
    4/5 starsI love Giant Days. It's my favourite comic series, and, after seeing this on Netgalley, I knew I had to read it ASAP. I was fortunate enough to get access to this, and I'll definitely be buying a physical copy after how much I loved this book. As far as I can tell, this takes place just after the events of the original minicomics but before the events of the second volume (my favourite, nudge nudge wink wink), although the timeline does feel very whack, honestly. Everyone goes through d 4/5 starsI love Giant Days. It's my favourite comic series, and, after seeing this on Netgalley, I knew I had to read it ASAP. I was fortunate enough to get access to this, and I'll definitely be buying a physical copy after how much I loved this book. As far as I can tell, this takes place just after the events of the original minicomics but before the events of the second volume (my favourite, nudge nudge wink wink), although the timeline does feel very whack, honestly. Everyone goes through different problems: Esther is dying to make a good impression on a popular goth girl on her course (English with modules in Creative Writing, represeeeennnt); Daisy is feeling dejected and lonely and sets out to make friends by joining every single society she can, including a mysterious cult-like Yoga group; and Susan is dealing with course stuff and McGraw stuff, the latter being my favourite 'stuff' in this entire series. I guess I'll review each character's story individually. I'm not able to post quotes because I received an early review copy, but lemme tell you, Esther? Absolutely hilarious. She has some great moments talking about her course and boys, and it was actually painful how much I saw myself in her character. Her just having no idea what people were going on about in seminars was hilarious, making things up as she goes along like I always seem to be doing. However, seeing her changing parts of herself to appeal to friends... also hit close to home, which was difficult to read. Out of all of them, I think what she went through was treated with the most care, which I will comment on in Daisy's part.Oh, Daisy. She goes through all the classic first year woes that I also experienced last year. Homesickness? Check. Being scared you're the only person with no friends while the people you thought were friends never seem to have time for you? Check. Feeling like bursting into tears when you talk with family over the phone? CHECK. Joining a cult? Chhhhhhh........ not so much. I think the personal issues Daisy experience are handled perfectly, but I feel like the seriousness of what was happening at the yoga group were glossed over at the end, and made out to be... not as serious as they most definitely were. You could get arrested for all of those things, and even though it would stray from the general happiness of the series, it still has moments where things are taken seriously, and I feel like Daisy's story lacked that.But anyway who cares about them two when I have Susan and McGraw to gush about? This book sees them go from enemies (mostly on Susan's part, but I feel like it's justified, even though I swoon constantly at McGraw) to reluctant (again, Susan) friends, and I loved it. Susan's deadpan humour and dry wit is perfectly captured, and McGraw being pretty much oblivious but very much the greatest man to ever live is evident constantly. I would re-read this just for them two. I'm tempted to re-read the series now, just for them two. They will always be my favourite part of Giant Days and I feel no regrets saying that.As much as I love this, I've had to lower it a star for the whole Daisy thing, but also because this probably wouldn't have been as good if I didn't already love the comics. It throws you straight into things and is quite... info-dumpy at the start, unfortunately, but I am willing to overlook that because of the brilliant characterisation of the main girls and their friends (poor, poor Ed Gemmel). I also found that Susan was kind of pushed to the back and made to sort out all the drama without having much going on herself, other than little moments with McGraw.
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  • Mehsi
    January 1, 1970
    *flails around*My favourite girls are back, this time in novel/book form!I was absolutely ecstatic when I heard about this project. Of course, I was also worried. Would the voices/characters still be the same (important to me), how about their friendship, or their college days, would this truly feel like a Giant Days graphic novel volume just without pictures? I can answer all those questions now. Yes, and no.The characters were pretty much on point with the graphic novel (though Daisy was sligh *flails around*My favourite girls are back, this time in novel/book form!I was absolutely ecstatic when I heard about this project. Of course, I was also worried. Would the voices/characters still be the same (important to me), how about their friendship, or their college days, would this truly feel like a Giant Days graphic novel volume just without pictures? I can answer all those questions now. Yes, and no.The characters were pretty much on point with the graphic novel (though Daisy was slightly more naive/dumb here than there), the way they interacted was at points the same (though at points also no), Susan and McGraw's relationship was just as it was in the graphic novel (but felt much deeper and better), the story was just as fun as the graphic novel stories. We follow all three girls. We see how Daisy falls in the claws of a drugged cult full of yogi (as I would call it), we see Esther fall for Vectra's non-existent charm, we see Susan try to keep her friends together while also trying not to show that she is actually totally in love with McGraw. The POV switches from girl to girl, and at times I had a bit of a hard time with the POV switches. Maybe it works better in the paper-version of the book, but with my kindle copy quite often there was no room between the POV switches. One moment it was Susan, then Esther, and then Daisy. So I have had to do some re-reading.My biggest frustration lay with Daisy. She is normally my top girl (followed closely by Esther and then Susan), but in this one I just wanted to shake her. How she didn't even notice anything was wrong. how she just didn't get that she was being drugged. I get that she is homeschooled, but I am sorry, I don't think that is an excuse. How she just gave stuff away because she needed a family, you already have one, your two friends and your granny. Sure, your two friends aren't always around, but hey, that is life. That is how it works. Your friends can't be there with you 24/7. I just got a bit pissed at her. Before and after the whole yogi debacle she was the Daisy I loved. The Daisy who indeed would just sign up for every club possible, no matter if it is impossible to do so many clubs. The Daisy who is there for her friends, the quiet girl who always has some wise advice, the girl who is raising a tiny little bird named Baby Gordon. Esther's obsession with Vectra. Man, oh man. I was frustrated with her as well, that she was so blinded that she couldn't see what Vectra was. But for most I just adored Esther, how she tries to bullshit her way out of stuff (though it doesn't always work), the way she dresses herself and how she looks, the way she cares about her friends, the fact she always want people to be happy. Though I do hope that she will work harder on her school work. You can't just go to college without the whole learning thing. :P Susan was so on point. It was like Susan just casually walked out of the graphic novel and settled down in this novel. We see her struggle with what to tell her friends, share the whole dirty past, or just bits and pieces. And I could relate to her so much in that way. I am also not the type of person who just spits out everything about my life in an instant. I first need trust. And it can take months before I will finally open up fully. Before I trust. I loved her investigation stuff, and I was rooting for her to figure out what was going on with Daisy. McGraw and her? I already knew quite a bit because of the graphic novels, but it was fun to read about it in the novel. How she always acts like he is the worst, makes mean jokes, but you can see that she deeply cares about him, she is just hurt and Susan + hurt means she may just spit fire. Plus, I just adored that, while you could see it in the graphic novel as well, this one showed us much more on how Susan ticked. We see her actions, all her thoughts and more.The girls' friendship was at times the same old happy and joy friendship that I saw in the graphic novels, but at times I just wanted to shout at these girls. If any of them had just dragged the other two with them, sat down, talked, I am sure there wouldn't have been any problems or doubts. But hey, I guess then the book would have been shorter. But then it could have been filled with more of this wonderful friendship. Thankfully, the ending definitely makes up for the unhappiness I at times felt. I loved how these three, very different girls, fitted together perfectly. Esther's always happy go lucky attitude, Susan's sarcasm and protectiveness, and Daisy's wisdom and quiet down to earthness. I was definitely shocked to see what happened at that Halloween party, thank heavens that Esther has her friends. I don't even want to think about what would have happened hadn't they intervened. :|I had quite a laugh at how Esther and Susan tried to eject Daisy from every club she had signed up to. Some of their ways were pretty dang hilarious. That poor Paper Clip Fanciers club. The ending, and how they all went to extract Daisy from that drugs/yogi/cult was hilarious and fun to read. All in all, I could go on and on and on and on for more time about this book, there is just so much I could still talk about, but I don't want my book to become too long. All I want to say is that I do hope that there is going to be another Giant Days novel in the future, maybe even a whole series. Non Pratt did a pretty dang good job on writing! I would also recommend this one. I had tons of fun reading this, even with the frustration I also felt at times. I just couldn't stop reading. Review first posted at https://twirlingbookprincess.com/
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  • Robin Stevens
    January 1, 1970
    I love the Giant Days comics, and I love Non Pratt's YA novels - this combination of the two is just as funny and perfect as you might expect! (14+)*Please note: this review is meant as a recommendation only. If you use it in any marketing material, online or anywhere on a published book without asking permission from me first, I will ask you to remove that use immediately. Thank you!*
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  • Samantha (WLABB)
    January 1, 1970
    Though I had never read the graphic novels upon which this book is based, I was still all in from the very first page. As soon as I was introduced to these three ladies, I knew I wanted to know them better.• Pro: This book was pure fun. I couldn't keep the smile off my face as I read it. Giant Days combined great characters, snappy banter, and pitch perfect tone to produce a fabulous reading experience for me. • Pro: I loved how different each of the women were, yet how well they complimented ea Though I had never read the graphic novels upon which this book is based, I was still all in from the very first page. As soon as I was introduced to these three ladies, I knew I wanted to know them better.• Pro: This book was pure fun. I couldn't keep the smile off my face as I read it. Giant Days combined great characters, snappy banter, and pitch perfect tone to produce a fabulous reading experience for me. • Pro: I loved how different each of the women were, yet how well they complimented each other. There was a great synergy, when they were together, and I loved watching this friendship take shape. • Pro: Non Pratt captured those early days at university so well. The feeling of being out of place, being a little lost, missing your home and your old life. All of this plus academic demands can be quite stressful, and I thought that came across really well in the book. • Pro: The whole Yogic Brethren plot was sort of hilarious. I couldn't help but think of the Scoobies during those scenes, which just added to the fun. • Pro: There was a ton of satire in here, which delighted me to no end. Well done!• Pro: This book had the three Hs: humor, hijinks, and heart, which always makes this girl happy. Overall: A fun and entertaining look at the lives of first years, which does a fantastic job capturing the highs and lows of university life. I hope we get to explore more Giant Days with Daisy, Susan, and Esther.*ARC provided in exchange for an honest review. BLOG | INSTAGRAM |TWITTER | BLOGLOVIN | FRIEND ME ON GOODREADS
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  • Billie
    January 1, 1970
    This just never quite worked for me. I think, in part, that's due to the jumping around between characters and storylines. While this works in comics form, jumping from character to character and plot to plot within a chapter of a book leaves everything feeling a little disjointed and never really allows for the time necessary to get emotionally involved with any of it. Plus, if I hadn't already read the comics and known who these girls were from that context, I'd have been left with only the mo This just never quite worked for me. I think, in part, that's due to the jumping around between characters and storylines. While this works in comics form, jumping from character to character and plot to plot within a chapter of a book leaves everything feeling a little disjointed and never really allows for the time necessary to get emotionally involved with any of it. Plus, if I hadn't already read the comics and known who these girls were from that context, I'd have been left with only the most superficial sketch of each of their characters. Of the series of novels based on Boom! Box comics that Abrams has been publishing, the only ones that have really worked well for me are the Lumberjanes books by Mariko Tamaki. I think, in part, this is because Tamaki has worked in comics and so is better able to translate that sensibility to prose more smoothly than the other writers.
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  • Jess 📚
    January 1, 1970
    3.5! I did enjoy this book. It was silly and quirky and I liked the writing. It was easy to read however it just didn’t grip me or hold my attention for very long when I was reading it. I’d read for 20 mins and then be ready to put it down. The characters were just like the graphic novel, funny with great dialogue. More fleshed out which is the benefit of a novel. I liked this but much prefer the graphic novel tbh.
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  • Ben Babcock
    January 1, 1970
    Having not read the graphic novels that started this series, I can’t compare them to Giant Days the novel. Nevertheless, the fingerprints of comic form are all over this book. By this I mean that Non Pratt manages to replicate the slight zaniness inherent in any comic universe, even one purporting to be as prosaic as a story about three people in university. This shouldn’t always work in the novel form (it’s why so many superhero novels fall flat for me), yet Pratt somehow nails it.Susan, Daisy, Having not read the graphic novels that started this series, I can’t compare them to Giant Days the novel. Nevertheless, the fingerprints of comic form are all over this book. By this I mean that Non Pratt manages to replicate the slight zaniness inherent in any comic universe, even one purporting to be as prosaic as a story about three people in university. This shouldn’t always work in the novel form (it’s why so many superhero novels fall flat for me), yet Pratt somehow nails it.Susan, Daisy, and Esther are roommates in their first year of university and couldn’t be more different. Susan is cagey about her past and relentless in her investigations of any injustice. Daisy, homeschooled by her grandmother, is trying to get used to this whole new socializing thing. Esther is chronically unable to actually focus on school, preferring instead to dive into socializing—until she becomes obsessed with attempting to win over a friend who embodies, for her, the epitome of her Goth girl aesthetic. As each of our protagonists becomes embroiled in her own challenges at school, they experience moments of crisis and doubt in themselves and in their friendships with each other. Giant Days, as the title implies, is about the hugeness of striking out on one’s own as a new adult, and the importance of having people you can trust, even when they’re telling you things you don’t want to hear.For those of us unfamiliar with the comics, the story starts slow and the characters will feel somewhat cookie-cutter at first. But if you keep reading you soon get thrown into some intense and interesting conflicts. Each of the characters struggles with things that are uniquely related to her own personality. Susan’s attempts to impose a contract on McGraw are just one more way in which she uses a cool and calm exterior and relentless ordering of the world around her to soothe her internal anxiety and self-doubt. Daisy’s overindulgence in clubs is perhaps the most transparent of the three’s dilemmas and maybe something that a lot of readers who went to university can recognize. Esther’s reverential attempts to befriend Goth Girl will also feel very familiar to anyone who has ever longed platonically after someone who barely gives them the time of day.I want to talk about this last point first and comment more generally on how Giant Days is really a great story of friendship. There are only the smallest shades of romance in this book, present in the history and tension between Susan and McGraw, for instance. Beyond that, these relationships are platonic and diversely so. I’m not just talking about Susan/Esther/Daisy—Daisy’s whole involvement with Zoise is predicated upon the desire to be among friends (or family). Esther’s dynamic with Vetra and Ed Gemmel is, likewise, a wobbly top of friendship woes. As an aromantic and asexual reader who loves stories that highlight the importance and conflict of friendships, all of this really appeals to me. Indeed, this has been a common thread throughout my reading of Pratt’s works and one of the many reasons for which I adore, inhale, and sweat out through my pores every word.Pratt doesn’t just get it (I hope, for all our sakes, that most of us just get it to some extent)—she gets how to write about friendships in a nuanced multiplicity of manners. Whereas something like Second Best Friend is a meditation on how projection can harm our friendships and aimed at a younger audience, Giant Days is about the scary world of new adult friendships. These aren’t people we’ve known all our lives and bonded with through thick and thin. They are usually brand new to us, and not only are we worried that we’ll screw something up and they won’t want to be friends with us, but we are busy figuring out who we are as adults. And through the differences in the three protagonists’ personalities, Pratt emphasizes that this experience is not limited to any particular type of person. We all go through these growing pains, in one way or another.I feel both seen and personally attacked by the scenes depicting and critiquing Esther’s semantic shenanigans and how she complains to herself that she is rusty when it comes to academic doublespeak! (Just look at my lengthy, essay-style reviews from 2008ish into 2012 to see what I mean.) Pratt lampoons academia here, and the way it encourages young people to affect an air of knowledge that is largely unearned, and it is glorious. Esther’s desperation to impress Vetra prompts her to contort herself, socially, in ways she would find so unappealing if she were an outsider looking at herself—but how often can we realize that? Meanwhile, through some pretty sharp commentary via Susan, Pratt points out that Vetra herself, far from being a kind of stock character in this story, is another example of a type of character a young person often becomes in university in order to feel like they belong (or in this case, deliberately don’t belong—yay counterculture).I should mention that my university experience was, for the most part, extremely different from Susan, Esther, and Daisy’s. I didn’t live in residence. It’s only now, well after university and now that I finally have fulfilling adult friendships, that I realize I was so impoverished during university. I had largely drifted away from high school friendships. There were people I knew, fellow students, with whom I forged some superficial let’s-meet-up-and-study type bonds. For the most part I just spent more time with slightly older coworkers at my job; it wasn’t until my last couple of years in university when I really fell in with some people I felt got me. I don’t regret how this unfolded—for one thing, for better or for worse it led to my life as it is now, and that life is pretty great, with some people whom I’m incredibly fond of. It’s just interesting, the different paths that we take, especially during those critical years of self-discovering at the commencement of adulthood and independent living.If there are moments when Giant Days feels too over-the-top, too twee—like the ramifications of Daisy’s involvement with Zoise—then I’ll fall back on what I said at the beginning of this review: this is a comic book universe poured into prose form, and the regular rules maybe don’t apply so much. Realism is not a binary in literature but a spectrum, and Pratt is an expert at adjusting the realism dial until it is just so for the story she wants to tell. That’s why I keep coming back, for that perfect combination of offbeat, quirky situations yet deep and real human connections. This is what stories are for.
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  • Jenna
    January 1, 1970
    An entertaining read that captures the hearts of our trio perfectly. It managed to feel familiar yet not stale, which was what I worried a bit about when starting the book. But our new side characters did a great job in creating what I could easily see as a new arc in the comics. I am glad that they did squeeze in Daisy's attractions, as that's something that starts a bit later. Will definitely look into this author more, and I'll have to resist a grand reread of all of John Allison's epic works An entertaining read that captures the hearts of our trio perfectly. It managed to feel familiar yet not stale, which was what I worried a bit about when starting the book. But our new side characters did a great job in creating what I could easily see as a new arc in the comics. I am glad that they did squeeze in Daisy's attractions, as that's something that starts a bit later. Will definitely look into this author more, and I'll have to resist a grand reread of all of John Allison's epic works.Pre-Read: Aaaaa, must read!! I hadn’t even thought about an adaptation. But now I could definitely see either Giant Days or Bad Machinery as cartoons. If they’re making Hilda, I’m sure they could do them all!
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  • Luana
    January 1, 1970
    As with any novelisation of a beloved graphic novel I entered this read worried that it would not do it justice - I needn't have been. It utterly did justice to the three university friends; Daisy (in all her sweet authenticity, earnestness and nascent queerness), Susan (bluntly caustic, practical and ready to rumble for her sense of justice), and Esther (happy goth literary beauty with a flair for drama and for skipping lectures and reading requirements). It not only gave them a whole new adven As with any novelisation of a beloved graphic novel I entered this read worried that it would not do it justice - I needn't have been. It utterly did justice to the three university friends; Daisy (in all her sweet authenticity, earnestness and nascent queerness), Susan (bluntly caustic, practical and ready to rumble for her sense of justice), and Esther (happy goth literary beauty with a flair for drama and for skipping lectures and reading requirements). It not only gave them a whole new adventure as university first years but also fleshed out their characters in a way that detracted nothing from their graphic novel versions and added new insights to their backstories and internal worlds. Susan Ptolemy's backstory involving hunky McGraw and also her somewhat nefarious past was especially a bonus there. In the meanwhile tension was kept in the foreground with emotional stakes levered as they all find themselves chasing situations while we the reader can see the potential shark fins. This is especially so for Daisy who gets caught up in a manipulative yogic cult and to a lesser degree, but still vexingly 'oh dear no, back away now' situation, Esther's pursuit of Vectra's friendship. What the book does really well is how it balances the emotional tenseness found in the various storylines with wit, humour and a genuine warmth and lightness - this deft alignment of all these diverse components makes it obvious why the author was shortlisted and longlisted for quite a few literary prizes with her previous novel 'Trouble'.While Susan's character might be my favourite, in this novel Daisy also won me over right from the beginning. She was utterly adorable and had, with Susan and Esther, some delightfully funny scenes as in a few examples below:From the Halloween party scene - ..."You're missing the point. Sexy's fine, but it should be a choice not a rule. I mean look..." Susan pointed through the door to the front room. "Sexy witch, sexy car mechanic, sexy sentient tree, sexy crayon, sexy mobile phone...sexy tin of beans. But the boys...gross zombie, gross swamp monster, gross monk, gross rugby player..." "Hey!" The boy whom Susan had non-too-subtly pointed out last took offense. "I've just come from the rugby social. I'm not in costume." "Even more horrific." Susan shooed him off. .... "My point is: Why are the men fully clothed and the women in their underwear?" When Susan failed to get any response from Esther, she turned to Daisy. "You're with me on this, right?" "Umm..." Daisy's attention was bouncing around the room like a pinball. "Many bras. So objectionable. Much patriarchy." "Daisy!"The extract Daisy from the 32 social clubs she signed up for at the activity fair scene - "The plan was going well, and, between them Esther and Susan had successfully extracted Daisy from almost every society she'd signed up for. ...Esther's shameless ability to make a spectacle of herself was working out well. There were few people one could rely upon to willfully misunderstand the ethos of the Paper Clip Fanciers by loudly declaring a sexual attraction to stationary and rubbing herself up against a display of pastel-coloured bulldog clips, moaning sensuously and shouting, "Daisy! Thank you so much for enabling my erotic predilections by inviting me to this orgy!" Daisy had been ejected from the club, and an email with Esther's photo attached had been sent out to every stationary store in Sheffield warning employees not to let her in. ...Susan favored overly competitive involvement and anarchy. She'd entered and opening game of the Snap Soc meeting with such aggression that she'd broken someone's finger and started a bar fight, ..(To be continued)
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  • Marco Morano
    January 1, 1970
    This book was sent to me by the publishers for review as a part of the teenreads.com Teen Board. Non Pratt, UK author of books such as TROUBLE and TRUTH OR DARE has a new release; GIANT DAYS. GIANT DAYS is the novelization of a popular graphic novel series Giant Days, in which we follow our three girls as they experience their first year of college. First, we have Esther, the emo goth girl who is struggling with trying to have fun and taking college seriously. Then there’s Susan, who is going in This book was sent to me by the publishers for review as a part of the teenreads.com Teen Board. Non Pratt, UK author of books such as TROUBLE and TRUTH OR DARE has a new release; GIANT DAYS. GIANT DAYS is the novelization of a popular graphic novel series Giant Days, in which we follow our three girls as they experience their first year of college. First, we have Esther, the emo goth girl who is struggling with trying to have fun and taking college seriously. Then there’s Susan, who is going into pre-med and doing fine until she randomly bumps into her ex-best friend, which causes some drama. Lastly, we have Daisy, the sweet, innocent girl who was homeschooled her entire life and just wants to make friends.I was a bit hesitant going into GIANT DAYS; I love the graphic novel series, so I was curious to see how the novelized version would turn out. As it turns out, I had nothing to worry about, because I really enjoyed reading this book! I was worried that when I read the novel it wouldn’t feel the same as the graphic novel series, but Non Pratt did an absolutely excellent job at keeping the same tone that the graphic novels had; it felt very much like the graphic novels.As for the characters, I was also pleasantly surprised! They were very much like the characters I know and love from the graphic novels, so it was amazing to see them put into a different format. Non Pratt was able to expertly transform the tone and characters from the graphic novel series into GIANT DAYS. Something that I didn’t really like in the graphic novels was that we often didn’t get to see much of Daisy, who is perhaps my favorite character out of the three main characters. However, it is in this novelized version where her character really shines. It was really nice to see her in the spotlight!The plot was really interesting in my opinion. I wasn’t quite sure what Non Pratt was going to go with the plot, because there were multiple different directions she could have gone, but I was pleased with the decision she made. For the most part, the novel is pretty slow and mostly focuses on the little things in life along with the experience these girls have in college. This does cause the book to be slow, especially during the beginning, but after the first half it does pick up the pace. Near the last sixty pages or so, the plot gets really intense, and I loved that sudden burst of intensity!GIANT DAYS by Non Pratt is perfect for fans of the graphic novel series and a great read in general for those who haven’t read the series. It’s a fun, lighthearted, slice-of-life read that is most enjoyable during the summer. With its funny characters and strange plotline, GIANT DAYS is a book I would definitely recommend to just about anyone. This is overall just an extremely fun book that packs a punch!
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  • Sionna
    January 1, 1970
    *I voluntarily read and reviewed an ARC of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own.*2.5 starsI'm so BUMMED!I absolutely adore the graphic novel series this book is based off of, but just couldn't get into this. The book reads much like how the comic is... which I just don't think worked. I don't like POV switches mid-chapter without warning or division (might have just been the ARC or e-book copy but it was one paragraph about Susan then switched to Esther, then after 2 paragraphs to Dai *I voluntarily read and reviewed an ARC of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own.*2.5 starsI'm so BUMMED!I absolutely adore the graphic novel series this book is based off of, but just couldn't get into this. The book reads much like how the comic is... which I just don't think worked. I don't like POV switches mid-chapter without warning or division (might have just been the ARC or e-book copy but it was one paragraph about Susan then switched to Esther, then after 2 paragraphs to Daisy-- repeat and there was nothing to show clear division of change). I also thought things were going too quickly and we could have slowed down to enjoy some of it more. The scenes don't always feel connected, but rather are just segments featured out of their lives, which I think works better for the comics. Also, there is some overlap with the comics. Some things that happen in the comics are written out here and other things are talked about which happened in the comics, but you wouldn't know that if you hadn't read the comics. So, I wish they would have picked if this was a companion or not. I did laugh a few times, I smiled at a few scenes, and my heart warmed when I recognized scenes or knew exactly what the characters would look like or would be doing because I'd read some of the comics. And while I mention that things go by quickly or feel more like featured segments, there is an overarching theme and a connecting thread, so that felt like it brought the story together more. So, super bummed about how I just wasn't interested in this... maybe I hyped it too much??? At this point, I think I'd recommend the graphic novels over reading the book, but fans might enjoy this and have fun with reading about these characters in a different format.
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  • JW
    January 1, 1970
    Giant Days is one of my favorite slice of life comics, so I was super excited to find out there was a stand alone novel based off of it. Non Pratt did a marvelous job of conveying the the quirky personalities of the various characters, their banter and antics, and the awesomeness that is their friendship. The story revolves around three college freshmen who live on the same dorm room hall. We also get a cast of great supporting characters who add to the fun. Despite their massive differences, Da Giant Days is one of my favorite slice of life comics, so I was super excited to find out there was a stand alone novel based off of it. Non Pratt did a marvelous job of conveying the the quirky personalities of the various characters, their banter and antics, and the awesomeness that is their friendship. The story revolves around three college freshmen who live on the same dorm room hall. We also get a cast of great supporting characters who add to the fun. Despite their massive differences, Daisy, Susan, and Esther become close friends. The book takes us through their eventful first semester of college as the girls navigate starting new lives away from home. Crazy antics and hilarity are mixed in with deeper moments of bonding and of vulnerability as each woman faces her own personal challenges. If you’ve read the graphic novels, you may be slightly bored because there isn’t really any new ground covered. Personally I was still entertained and was pleased to see a favorite comic brought to a new audience. I’m guessing the book was written to reach a larger audience?It was still a fun read. Check it out, and then go read the graphic novels!
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  • Dani
    January 1, 1970
    Giant Days is one of my very favorite comics, the one I read the same day I buy it, without fail. I adore this series. I admittedly read this novel with trepidation, because I feared that the characters I love would be amiss, but my worries were misplaced. This novel is fun and funny, and reminiscent of those confusing first days of adulthood. Susan, Daisy, and Esther (and Ed and McGraw!) were portrayed true to character, and this felt very comfortable to read.My only complaint? No Dean Thompson Giant Days is one of my very favorite comics, the one I read the same day I buy it, without fail. I adore this series. I admittedly read this novel with trepidation, because I feared that the characters I love would be amiss, but my worries were misplaced. This novel is fun and funny, and reminiscent of those confusing first days of adulthood. Susan, Daisy, and Esther (and Ed and McGraw!) were portrayed true to character, and this felt very comfortable to read.My only complaint? No Dean Thompson! That chump is just the freaking worst, and hating him is the best part of Giant Days!
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  • Becki
    January 1, 1970
    I adore the Giant Days graphic Novels and this was a nice addition to the already beloved series. I really enjoyed how it took place before the first Giant Days volume we got to see the characters I believe more fleshed out. They were very sympathetic and relatable. Lovers of the graphic novel will still enjoy this and even those who haven’t had the pleasure will still find Esther, Daisy and Susan great protagonists to read about.
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  • Alicia
    January 1, 1970
    A narrative version of the awesome graphic novels and Pratt cinematically captures what's drawn in graphics and translates it to text perfectly. I think you do need the context of the graphic novels though I think a non-graphic reader could certainly be entertained by its humor and hijinks then get into graphic novels if they weren't before. I'm a fan of this cross-pollination of narrative complimenting a graphic novel series and this one was boatloads of university fun.
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  • Debbie at Snuggling on the Sofa
    January 1, 1970
    Whilst I haven't read all the comics that this novel is based from, this book stands alone. Its such a relief to have a book about university. I feel like there is such a gap in the market. As with all of Non's previous works, the characters are amazing and I immediately connected with them. I loved the first half, but felt the second half was too rushed, and felt like its purpose was more to tie up loose ends.
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  • ~*~Meg~*~
    January 1, 1970
    I ADORE John Allison’s Giant Days series. Love love love it. I always look forward to getting my copy of the monthly issue. So when I happened upon an article talking about an actual novel I was both excited and a bit hesitant. Long story short, while I did enjoy this novel version it will never replace my adoration for the graphic series. I am glad I read the novel though. It was cute and gave me a little more backstory to each of the characters. A little more of a glimpse inside the character’ I ADORE John Allison’s Giant Days series. Love love love it. I always look forward to getting my copy of the monthly issue. So when I happened upon an article talking about an actual novel I was both excited and a bit hesitant. Long story short, while I did enjoy this novel version it will never replace my adoration for the graphic series. I am glad I read the novel though. It was cute and gave me a little more backstory to each of the characters. A little more of a glimpse inside the character’s minds. If you haven’t already tried some of the graphic novels I really, really recommend them.
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  • Jill
    January 1, 1970
    I absolutely love the Comic Series, it is one of my favorites. I however, do not feel this novelization captured Susan, Daisy, and Esther the same way. I was pretty bored with the Yoga Cult by the end but I did enjoy how it was concluded. I am hoping for a sequel to the book that digs dipper into Susan, Daisy, and Esther's friendship. I would also be lying if I was not rooting for more McGraw.
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  • Kristin Boldon
    January 1, 1970
    I love the Giant Days comic, as do my 12 and 15yo kids, and reading this book was getting to nm spend more time with Daisy, Susan, and Esther. I had trouble not laughing aloud when I read it in public.
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