Stronger, Faster, and More Beautiful
For fans of television shows Black Mirror and Westworld, this compelling, mind-bending novel is a twisted look into the future, exploring how far we will go to remake ourselves into the perfect human specimen and what it means to be human at all.Set in our world, spanning the near to distant futures, Stronger, Faster, and More Beautiful is a novel made up of six interconnected stories that ask how far we will go to remake ourselves into the perfect human specimens, and how hard that will push the definition of "human."This extraordinary work explores the amazing possibilities of genetic manipulation and life extension, as well as the ethical quandaries that will arise with these advances. The results range from the heavenly to the monstrous. Deeply thoughtful, poignant, horrifying, and action-packed, Arwen Elys Dayton's Stronger, Faster, and More Beautiful is groundbreaking in both form and substance.

Stronger, Faster, and More Beautiful Details

TitleStronger, Faster, and More Beautiful
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseDec 4th, 2018
PublisherDelacorte Press
ISBN-139780525580966
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Science Fiction, Short Stories, Fiction

Stronger, Faster, and More Beautiful Review

  • Elise (TheBookishActress)
    January 1, 1970
    Does that mean that humans, as a race, have allowed imagination and beauty to infiltrate their lives with each passing generation? Or have they destroyed imagination and beauty by capturing and codifying them? In which case—am I the final result? I… absolutely loved this.So this is an exploration of the world in the future, with technology but mostly with genetic engineering. but there's something about it that really made it stick out for me - throughout, this leaned into discussions of pri Does that mean that humans, as a race, have allowed imagination and beauty to infiltrate their lives with each passing generation? Or have they destroyed imagination and beauty by capturing and codifying them? In which case—am I the final result? I… absolutely loved this.So this is an exploration of the world in the future, with technology but mostly with genetic engineering. but there's something about it that really made it stick out for me - throughout, this leaned into discussions of privilege, who gets modifications and who doesn't, who gets forced into modifications and who doesn't, because at the heart of this conversation on genetic engineering and technology and our future is a far larger and far more consistent question - who gets to decide on the humanity of others? where do we draw the line at human and subhuman? and we have drawn these distinctions for centuries, for millennia, we as a species, but when we talk about the future we always assume power will somehow become a thing given by merit. but power is neverbased on merit - it is based on privilege and money and in the very best case scenario, what we might call merit-based growth, it is based off pure dumb luck. and not since The Hunger Games have I seen a book about the future lean into that reality. So I suppose what I'm trying to say is that every story in this book is about genetic engineering, but every story in this book is also about the people who wield power. It is frighteningly rational that one man makes an impact on every story in this book, sometimes criticizing and sometimes normalizing but never, ever giving up the power he has been given by a society desperate for a guide. → T H E S T O R I E S ←I’ve talked about thematic overlays, but each story stands fairly well on its own too. The first story follows Julia and Evan, semi-identical twins semi-merged in a landmark surgery. The second story follows Gabrielle, a girl who is definitely not morally good, and also Oppression. The third story… should not be spoiled, and contains a lot of very fucked-up religious overtones, and the title is an allusion to The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock. I have seen them riding seaward on the wavesCombing the white hair of the waves blown backWhen the wind blows the water white and black.We have lingered in the chambers of the seaBy sea-girls wreathed with seaweed red and brownTill human voices wake us, and we drown. The fourth section is my favorite of the book, and I just realized it (possibly accidentally) follows the plotline of the poem, and human beings will always alienate those with different brains. The fifth section is the second section again, evangelism of the normal. And then sixth section is reverse colonialism, and a reverse of the fifth story and the second, and I found that confusing at first, but in the end I found it a brilliant commentary on the human tendency to reverse prejudices to where they suit us. Who is human and who is subhuman is a matter of opinion no matter what side it comes from. This had a few sections I just wished went further, and I’m not sure everyone will enjoy it, but I would highly recommend to anyone intrigued by the earlier description. release date: 4 Dec 2018✨Arc received from the publisher via Netgalley for an honest review. Blog | Goodreads | Twitter | Instagram | Youtube
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  • Amber (The Book Bratz)
    January 1, 1970
    The full review + more can be found at The Book Bratz This book was absolutely amazing. Spanning over hundred of years it shows the evolution of humanity with the advances in science that have been made. This book was brilliant and thought provoking as well as terrifying and undeniably real. This book is something that can’t be missed in 2018/2019. I didn't realize this was an anthology when I had requested it, so I was a little skeptical since I am not the biggest fan of anthologies but Ohmygod The full review + more can be found at The Book Bratz This book was absolutely amazing. Spanning over hundred of years it shows the evolution of humanity with the advances in science that have been made. This book was brilliant and thought provoking as well as terrifying and undeniably real. This book is something that can’t be missed in 2018/2019. I didn't realize this was an anthology when I had requested it, so I was a little skeptical since I am not the biggest fan of anthologies but Ohmygod. The stories interconnect with a Reverend and his daughter over hundred of years worth of time. Stronger, Faster and More Beautiful was captivating, I couldn't read it fast enough and I was sad when I finished because I really wanted more. If you think about it, a lot of the things that Dayton talks about in this book are already happening or on their way of happening so her ideas aren't far fetched in the least. My favorite story in this anthology had to have been the last one. It's set far into the future where there is a huge divide between genetically modified humans and "protos" humans that have never been altered. It brings up the question of what species is more superior and if genetically altered people are a whole new species with in themselves. Stronger, Faster and More Beautiful brings up an array of questions as you read. It makes you think about the future and how things can go horribly wrong. It brings up with question of whether or not any of these things ethical and where the cut off is for ethical and unethical modifications. This book will be one to stand out in my mind for a long time to come and it will with out a doubt stay in everyone else's mind as well.
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  • Arlen
    January 1, 1970
    Stronger, Faster, and More Beautiful by Arwen Elys DaytonPublication date December 4, 2018Read courtesy of NetGalley.comFAN-TAS-TIC!!!!There was a tadd* of a thread throughout this book of consecutive stories. Amazingly well done and thoroughly enjoyable. I will definitely be getting this for my library! Each story could be a stand alone, but they are also smoothly interwoven... and thought provoking. The first vaccine, first heart transplant, and first clone (remember Dolly the Sheep?) perpetua Stronger, Faster, and More Beautiful by Arwen Elys DaytonPublication date December 4, 2018Read courtesy of NetGalley.comFAN-TAS-TIC!!!!There was a tadd* of a thread throughout this book of consecutive stories. Amazingly well done and thoroughly enjoyable. I will definitely be getting this for my library! Each story could be a stand alone, but they are also smoothly interwoven... and thought provoking. The first vaccine, first heart transplant, and first clone (remember Dolly the Sheep?) perpetuated the human ability to dream of a stronger, faster and more beautiful human. Dayton has helped us imagine some of the future possibilities, and some we'd like, while others we'd find quite disturbing. And that's the point.... to consider what our tinkering could mean to our future. Butterfly effect, ripple effect, call it what you want, but Dayton masterfully creates realistic what-ifs (realistic what-ifs: is that an oxymoron?) I enjoyed every story in here. None of it felt redundant, repetitive, or reused. The uniqueness of each possible inevitably (another oxymoron) kept me turning those pages. Bravo, Ms. Dayton. I accept the challenge to work through these oxymorons in the hopes that it keeps humans from simply becoming morons.*intentional spelling 👍👌
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  • Kaylie (shihtzus.and.book.reviews)
    January 1, 1970
    Full review: https://shihtzusandbookreviews.com/st... I'm not going to lie. I 100% requested this book on the basis of the synopsis...or should I say, one sentence in the synopsis: For fans of television shows Black Mirror and Westworld, this compelling, mind-bending novel is a twisted look into the future, exploring how far we will go to remake ourselves into the perfect human specimen and what it means to be human at all. Are you sold yet? Because I definitely was.The anthology takes place in Full review: https://shihtzusandbookreviews.com/st... I'm not going to lie. I 100% requested this book on the basis of the synopsis...or should I say, one sentence in the synopsis: For fans of television shows Black Mirror and Westworld, this compelling, mind-bending novel is a twisted look into the future, exploring how far we will go to remake ourselves into the perfect human specimen and what it means to be human at all. Are you sold yet? Because I definitely was.The anthology takes place in the (terrifyingly) not-so-distant future, follows 6 independent yet interconnected stories with origin stories ranging from medical experimentation to life-saving procedures after a devastating accident to something else entirely. My mind is blown by how much I enjoyed this novel. It was fascinating, thought-provoking, and one of the few books that I've read lately that I literally couldn't put to rest. When I wasn't reading it, I was talking to anyone that I possibly could about it (while trying to stay spoiler-free, which is much harder than you'd think!) It brings forth so many fantastic questions, mostly related to the quest for perfection and the definition of humanity. In addition to developing a captivating topic itself, the author did such a fantastic job at providing each character with their own voice, distinctly unique to them. It never felt repetitive, and I felt that if I stopped in the middle of a chapter, I could still pop back in and know exactly who was speaking.In short, this book was incredibly stimulating, entertaining, and just plain addictive and I highly recommend getting your hands on a copy once available. Thank you so much to the publisher and Netgalley for providing my review copy. All thoughts are my own.
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  • Dirk
    January 1, 1970
    I just finished Stronger, Faster, and More Beautiful by Arwen Elys Dayton! (received an ARC from the publisher.)I LOVE this book! I could not put it down. I have read all of Arwen Dayton's books and am addicted to her imagination, characters and stories. They take me on a journey whereby I feel I am watching a great film when reading.With these several stories, the author took me on fascinating adventures and got me to consider and look at new viewpoints on science, progress, bodies and moral ch I just finished Stronger, Faster, and More Beautiful by Arwen Elys Dayton! (received an ARC from the publisher.)I LOVE this book! I could not put it down. I have read all of Arwen Dayton's books and am addicted to her imagination, characters and stories. They take me on a journey whereby I feel I am watching a great film when reading.With these several stories, the author took me on fascinating adventures and got me to consider and look at new viewpoints on science, progress, bodies and moral choices. Arwen Dayton's writings take me inside of her character’s often unspoken thoughts, hopes and sensations even when somewhat taboo, personal or even unattractive. She makes me want to be with them and feel what they are feeling. The excitement of early or first love jitters and nervousness is written wonderfully. I am intrigued with the relationships as they develop and the moments of jealousy and wondering who will end up with who and the hoping, but not knowing. I admire how the author deals with injury, death, destruction and ugliness as well as how she brought me into this world with the smells, visuals and even horror. I see and feel it as I read it.I also enjoyed the hopefulness at the end of each story as well as the promise of a new chapter for each of the characters. Each story within the book feels like a film or the basis of one as there is a universe for each even though they are all related and tie together. I feel like I am watching a film when reading and can’t wait to find out what happens next. I find them very inspiring.And, like a true book addict…I want more!
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  • Sarah Forester
    January 1, 1970
    I was given an ARC of "SFMB" by a friend and read it last week on vacation. I'm intrigued with the idea of genetic modification, and since I enjoyed the "Seeker" series, I was eager to dip into another of Dayton's worlds.What a ride! SFMB was incredible. The "Dolphin Boy" story (no spoilers) was by far my favorite. This book is about a future that is both exciting and terrifying. I loved it.
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  • Sherry Larson
    January 1, 1970
    Book: Stronger, Faster, and More Beautiful by Arwen Elys DaytonI thought this was one of the most imaginative books I have read in a long time. Very different from her Seeker Series, though they were also imaginative. In many ways this book is more disturbing, dealing with real possibilities in our future and because I can see how something potentially great can get really screwed up depending on who uses it and for what purpose. Enjoyable, out-there read!
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  • Tina Gundy
    January 1, 1970
    Stronger, Fast, and More Beautiful is an intriguing read. It will leave you wondering how far we can and will take genetic engineering/human modification. Just because we can, does it mean we should? The book consists of six parts containing different stories that are related to the main idea (genetic engineering/modification). The beginning started a little slow for my taste but as the stories continued, I found I could not put the book down. Each story was unique. If you enjoy Sci-Fi stories t Stronger, Fast, and More Beautiful is an intriguing read. It will leave you wondering how far we can and will take genetic engineering/human modification. Just because we can, does it mean we should? The book consists of six parts containing different stories that are related to the main idea (genetic engineering/modification). The beginning started a little slow for my taste but as the stories continued, I found I could not put the book down. Each story was unique. If you enjoy Sci-Fi stories that are focused on genetics or thought-provoking books, you will enjoy this one. You will find yourself asking questions throughout the book such as: Do our genetic defects makes us who we are? Without modern medicine, how many of us would be here? Should we be prolonging life? Modification/genetic engineering is already happening, but at what point will it stop? Who says what is ethical in medicine and where the line is drawn? How will humans ruin this?I hope there is a follow up book. This would make a wonderful TV mini-series/movie (if done right- meaning The Wachowski’s)Trigger warnings/parental advisory: swearing, some sexual situations (making out, touching, pairing up to mate), religion (a reverend is tied in with the stories), death, some violent situations (accidents, slaves, killing). Overall, I give the book 4 ½ stars and recommend it.I received an ARC from Netgalley in exchange for my honest review.
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  • Tatiana
    January 1, 1970
    If your publisher recommends your book to fans of television shows "Black Mirror" and "Westworld" and your book's blurb says "This extraordinary work explores the amazing possibilities of genetic manipulation and life extension, as well as the ethical quandaries that will arise with these advances. The results range from the heavenly to the monstrous. Deeply thoughtful, poignant, horrifying, and action-packed, Arwen Elys Dayton's Stronger, Faster, and More Beautiful is groundbreaking in both for If your publisher recommends your book to fans of television shows "Black Mirror" and "Westworld" and your book's blurb says "This extraordinary work explores the amazing possibilities of genetic manipulation and life extension, as well as the ethical quandaries that will arise with these advances. The results range from the heavenly to the monstrous. Deeply thoughtful, poignant, horrifying, and action-packed, Arwen Elys Dayton's Stronger, Faster, and More Beautiful is groundbreaking in both form and substance", you'd better deliver something superb, which "Stronger, Faster, and More Beautiful" is definitely not. Instead, it takes the issue of genetic and physical modification, and examines the absolutely most basic moral questions associated with it, while framing in within the most basic tropes of YA fiction. If you can only assess the pitfalls of genetic engineering via stories about bullying, bad teen dates, kissing, Bible-thumping religious zealots who have nothing interesting to say from a religious perspective beside “monsters!”, and Russian gangsters doing bad things (while speaking incorrect Russian - PET PEEVE alert!) you, as an author, are out of your depth. Sorry. Who's done this thing better?For one, check out Paolo Bacigalupi's work - "Tool of War" for teens, "The Wind-Up Girl", "The Fluted Girl" for adults. Or, the queen - Margaret Atwood - her MaddAdam trilogy.Images of the fluted girl and chikinobs are forever seared in my psyche. Thanks a lot, Paolo and Margaret!
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  • Molly
    January 1, 1970
    This book, a set of short(ish) stories set in the distant future when gene-editing has become a reality, is unexpectedly sweet and terrifying all at once. I don't want to say much about the plots, as it is honestly such a delight to read - one of the best books I have read this year, hands-down.
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  • Andrea Reader
    January 1, 1970
    I read an Arc copy and couldn't put it down. It has everything in it that I love. The reality of what the future brings, great love story and heart. I have been telling everyone about this book!
  • Alexandra
    January 1, 1970
    I was so pleasantly surprised by how much I loved this book! I was given an ARC by the publisher, and having really enjoyed Dayton's Seeker series, I thought this would be of a similar ilk. It's just completely different, and really really special.As some other reviewers have stated, yes, it is in the same family as the Black Mirrors of today, but "Stronger, Faster, and More Beautiful" is a more intimate look at the good, the bad and the gnarly of where technology could take us. These several sh I was so pleasantly surprised by how much I loved this book! I was given an ARC by the publisher, and having really enjoyed Dayton's Seeker series, I thought this would be of a similar ilk. It's just completely different, and really really special.As some other reviewers have stated, yes, it is in the same family as the Black Mirrors of today, but "Stronger, Faster, and More Beautiful" is a more intimate look at the good, the bad and the gnarly of where technology could take us. These several short stories are interconnected by the advancing world they live in, and even though you only have a short while with each, Dayton draws you in to every reality and emotionally connects you with the main characters instantly. I couldn't put it down, and, in fact, was left wishing there was more. I wanted to learn more about the world, more about the later fate of each character. The book left me with my own thoughts and imagination sparked.Can't wait to re-read or listen to the audiobook when it's actually released. 5 stars.
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  • Sheryle
    January 1, 1970
    Wow! This book was a winner from the first page to the last. Each of the six stories was so interesting on its own, but, tied together by a thin and frightening thread, they made up a truly remarkable story. Before starting the book I thought it was going to be more on the light side; perhaps looking at how physical modifications might effect one person at a time, in both the near and more distant future. Instead, it took a much broader look at what could happen throughout the world of the futur Wow! This book was a winner from the first page to the last. Each of the six stories was so interesting on its own, but, tied together by a thin and frightening thread, they made up a truly remarkable story. Before starting the book I thought it was going to be more on the light side; perhaps looking at how physical modifications might effect one person at a time, in both the near and more distant future. Instead, it took a much broader look at what could happen throughout the world of the future. By telling these six stories, each further into the future, the reader is taken on a wild ride of “just because we can, does that mean we should?” This well-written, fast-paced book was hard to put down and will stay with you long after it is finished. It is definitely not to be missed!My thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for the opportunity to read and review this book.
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  • Alice
    January 1, 1970
    A subtle wisdom weaves its way through the interconnected stories that make up "Stronger, Faster, and More Beautiful." What will be the outcome of genetic modification of bodies when the world has not yet caught up with knowledge of the humanities and ethics? What is the effect of these developments on human beings and their ability to love without reservation? Dayton's writing contains wit, humor and a vital intelligence, drawing characters from the inside out, giving us the gift of feeling wha A subtle wisdom weaves its way through the interconnected stories that make up "Stronger, Faster, and More Beautiful." What will be the outcome of genetic modification of bodies when the world has not yet caught up with knowledge of the humanities and ethics? What is the effect of these developments on human beings and their ability to love without reservation? Dayton's writing contains wit, humor and a vital intelligence, drawing characters from the inside out, giving us the gift of feeling what they feel, so we can’t help but fully embrace them and their stories. The dialogue is real and pulls us along with "just enough" action and suspense, a little bit of outer space gore, and a whole lot of understanding of human beings. People made into machines, machines that are part-people, technology that does not exist, but could. And in the first story: Spirit. Technology that saves lives but then develops to a point of madness, even while linked intrinsically with aesthetics. What is the effect on religion and how does religion affect these events? One character appears throughout all the stories, "Tad Tadd," a religious extremist who has inspired genetic modification into the future. This character, well delineated in Part Three, becomes a shadow, a myth and an idol as the book progresses through Part Six. A quote from Dr. Seuss, “From there to here/From here to there/Funny things are everywhere,” heads the last chapter. Anyone who has read “One fish, two fish, red fish, blue fish” as a child has come to believe that life can assume any shape or form. This is almost ironic in the light of Dayton’s last story which is a slap at eugenics and contains little humor but much lyricism. (There is quite a lot of witty dialogue in the earlier stories, which carries one along like a little inner ribbon of light.) In the last story the fanciful, yet fated creatures are the product of man’s “arrogance,” an insatiable vanity, and one can feel Greek tragedy in the background, man’s “hubris” having led him to these extremes…but unlike the sad Greeks, people emerge with love as eternal answer, not bowing down to any god, real or artificial. Bravo Ms. Dayton. Her best book yet. A cliché: "I couldn't put it down." (I am guilty.)
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  • Shannon (It Starts At Midnight)
    January 1, 1970
    You can find the full review and all the fancy and/or randomness that accompanies it at It Starts at Midnight Where oh where to begin? Well, let's start with how fabulous this was, and then actually, let's just never stop. In fact, when trying to write about it, all I can come up with are things that make me want to shove this into your hands immediately, so let's just go with that, yeah? Great. Reasons to grab thyself a copy ASAP: •It is terrifyingly plausible how human beings would do both t You can find the full review and all the fancy and/or randomness that accompanies it at It Starts at Midnight Where oh where to begin? Well, let's start with how fabulous this was, and then actually, let's just never stop. In fact, when trying to write about it, all I can come up with are things that make me want to shove this into your hands immediately, so let's just go with that, yeah? Great. Reasons to grab thyself a copy ASAP: •It is terrifyingly plausible how human beings would do both the most amazing and most awful things with medical science. Ah, we humans are a fun bunch, no? We can be giving and caring to a fault; we can be cruel and selfish just as easily. Add messing with actual biology to it? Oh you know that is going to be a trip. We as a species rarely have the self awareness to realize that we're crossing lines or going too far. And this book showcases it all- the good, the bad, the morally gray. And there's nothing I love better than the morally gray! •The format is fun! It's actually not one story, but six separate stories artfully tied together. They all connect, but they're all their own entities. It's extremely well done, too. I have read books like this before that didn't quite hit the mark in this regard- the stories either felt too disconnected or too similar- but the author truly does this format justice. I knew I was in the same world, the same overall novel, but each story seemed new and exciting. (Incidentally, my favorites are the first and last- they're kind of perfect.) •I had many feelings, so many feelings. Obviously this book is thought provoking, but more than that, it's emotive. Which is no small feat considering the stories were all separate. No matter, I cared about each one of them. •There was honestly nothing I didn't like. Like okay, guys. There were bird people in this book and I didn't hate them! Do you understand the significance? It is real. •The science stuff was so freaking fascinating! You can tell that the author really did her homework, because wow, it was handled well. Also, there's an interesting twin scenario that sent me down a very long Wikipedia hole and I have zero regrets. Nothing ever seemed too simplistic, nor too hard to follow. •I was basically unable to put the thing down. I so, so badly needed to know what was going to be the next bonkers thing that human beings did, that I kept "one more chapter"-ing it. And at the same time, I wanted it to go on forever because frankly, I could have read 100 stories about this world, especially the way the author made me care about the characters so quickly! P.S.- If you weren't necessarily the biggest fan of  Seeker , but this sounds up your alley, I urge you to try it! I was a little hesitant but I am so, so glad that I did! One of the best books of the year for me!Bottom Line: Oh for goodness sake, just read the thing. If you like sci-fi, or futuristic stuff, or just find human behavior interesting, this is absolutely a book you don’t want to miss!
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  • Christy
    January 1, 1970
    I finished this in a DAY and did not want to put it down. Told in an expanding universe where bioengineering continues to test the limits of humanism and humans inevitably act like humans, this story is so real and yet unlike anything else I've ever read. Don't sleep on this beauty!
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  • USOM
    January 1, 1970
    (Disclaimer: I received this free book from Netgalley. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.)There are so many brilliant things to say about Stronger, Faster, and More Beautiful. While this collection is six separate stories, they are interwoven throughout a common thread. We can appreciate the distance between the stories, as well as the similarities. It never felt disjointed, just like separate parts of this immense gorgeous robotic machine working in harmony. What I ad (Disclaimer: I received this free book from Netgalley. This has not impacted my review which is unbiased and honest.)There are so many brilliant things to say about Stronger, Faster, and More Beautiful. While this collection is six separate stories, they are interwoven throughout a common thread. We can appreciate the distance between the stories, as well as the similarities. It never felt disjointed, just like separate parts of this immense gorgeous robotic machine working in harmony. What I adored is how unique this book feels. Everything from the format to the ideas.full review: https://utopia-state-of-mind.com/revi...
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  • Rebecca Allen
    January 1, 1970
    I requested this book from NetGalley based on a recommendation from an author I love:"An alternately charming and horrifying exploration of what it means to be human and how far we'll go in pursuit of personal and societal 'perfection.' I devoured this book." --Kiersten White, New York Times bestselling author of And I DarkenIt lived up to that! The book is a series of short stories, each with a different set of characters living out possible futures that employ today's emerging technologies mor I requested this book from NetGalley based on a recommendation from an author I love:"An alternately charming and horrifying exploration of what it means to be human and how far we'll go in pursuit of personal and societal 'perfection.' I devoured this book." --Kiersten White, New York Times bestselling author of And I DarkenIt lived up to that! The book is a series of short stories, each with a different set of characters living out possible futures that employ today's emerging technologies more broadly. The stories range from the near-future with small changes to the human body driving heart-felt debates on morality and policy, to hundreds of years from now when "human" bodies are markedly different from what they are now. Each story stands on its own, yet as a whole, they hold together to give the book a satisfying end.Each story highlights one aspect of emerging technology: genetic manipulation, organ transplant, extreme modification of the human body. As a writer of science fiction, I found the possibilities fascinating. As a reader and mom, I found them terrifying. This is a great book to get teens thinking through their point of view on how we should use the technology currently being developed.Find more reviews of great young adult and middle grade books at:TheWingedPen.com
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  • Paul
    January 1, 1970
    Every story is a bittersweet satisfaction. A try for perfection, yet a dash towards a possible cliff.Highly recommended for high school students and beyond. The speculative and dystopian fan will jump to this book.For my full review: https://paulspicks.blog/2018/11/10/st...For all my reviews: https://paulspicks.blog
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  • Sky Morfopoulos
    January 1, 1970
    I received and ARC from the publisher and found this to be a fascinating read. Arwen Dayton is an incredibly imaginative writer, and I found several of the stories take twists and turns that I hadn't expected. In some ways the subjects are grotesque and uncomfortable, but there is also a gritty realness to her writing which allows her characters to live and breath amongst us. Her understanding of human nature and why people act as they do is impressive. We see this manifested in each of her char I received and ARC from the publisher and found this to be a fascinating read. Arwen Dayton is an incredibly imaginative writer, and I found several of the stories take twists and turns that I hadn't expected. In some ways the subjects are grotesque and uncomfortable, but there is also a gritty realness to her writing which allows her characters to live and breath amongst us. Her understanding of human nature and why people act as they do is impressive. We see this manifested in each of her characters by the ways they interact with each other and by the decisions they make.One of my favourite things about Dayton's writing is how approachable and fast-paced it is. Though each of the stories in this book could stand alone, there is a thread of commonality that has been woven between them which kept me rapidly reading to find out what came next!In some ways this book is terrifying, but only in that it approaches the subject of medical ethics in a way that is actually very real and possible in the near future. I found it posed questions that we may all have to confront as technology continues to race ahead, and gets us to consider at what point do we allow technology to trump morality. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and highly recommend it. I can't wait to see what Dayton comes out with next!
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  • Samadhi
    January 1, 1970
    This was such an awesome book. I takes place in different parts of the future and all of the stories are connected by one guy. In the future people are changing the way they look and its crazy to the point where they might not even look human. Everyone should definetely read this book.
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  • Vicky Who Reads
    January 1, 1970
    3 starsI was so excited for this one and very much expecting to love it, so I was really sad that it didn't completely click for me.I think a lot of people will love it (see Lili @ Utopia State of Mind who wrote this wonderful review here) but I think it just didn't click with me, honestly.The concept was perfect and something I totally could have loved--a set of multigenerational stories about the effects of altering humans so they're, well, stronger, faster, and more beautiful.I'm a huge sci-f 3 starsI was so excited for this one and very much expecting to love it, so I was really sad that it didn't completely click for me.I think a lot of people will love it (see Lili @ Utopia State of Mind who wrote this wonderful review here) but I think it just didn't click with me, honestly.The concept was perfect and something I totally could have loved--a set of multigenerational stories about the effects of altering humans so they're, well, stronger, faster, and more beautiful.I'm a huge sci-fi fan so I love anything a little speculative and a little science based and very commentary-based about science. I think it's interesting and if you're someone who likes this too, then keep on reading because this still might be for you.And the ideas Dayton incorporated were awesome--lots of plotlines explored with the different effects of this on so many groups of people through many many years. It let Dayton explore a very dynamic set of problems, and this was a super unique take.But ultimately, this is what made this book's downfall (for me). I felt like Dayton never really went enough in depth in each topic, but rather brushed over each one in the stories.There were six stories and some of them were really brief, and others were a little too long in my opinion (the Russian one near the end especially). I think the lengths were very dynamic and it didn't really link up for me.Similarly, it also felt pretty segmented, and even though I see where Dayton added overlaps plot-wise--I felt like the subtext and the symbols of each story didn't perfectly match up or link as well as I wanted it to.I don't know, I guess I'm not huge on the short stories concept and I kind of would have preferred a more traditional format with a more central plotline. I don't think Dayton executed this badly, but I just also don't think that it was what I was expecting, and that threw me off guard.Yet, it still remains that the concept was really interesting and strong, and I think the impact was one of the highlights of this book. It made me think a lot about the idea of altering humans and how one small thing for medicine can lead to a lot of greater implications in the future.I think what Dayton did cover was done well, and I am a bit picky for wanting more.This would definitely appeal to someone who (1) is ready for that short story format and (2) is interested in reading about this topic.Overall, I still had a good time reading and sped through this book. I would definitely recommend Stronger, Faster, and More Beautiful to people who find the concept and premise interesting and is ready to really explore a wide range of topics over a long period of time and see some of the implications of this, but maybe not go so deep into it that things become overly complicated.Thank you so much to Random House and Netgalley for providing me with a digital review copy in exchange for an honest review!Blog | Instagram | Twitter
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  • Theresa
    January 1, 1970
    Stronger, Faster, and More Beautiful (Hardcover) by Arwen Elys Dayton This is a compilation of stories in the book, loosely tied to each other because of the idea and premise that human adaptation will change the world as we understand. Part One Matched PairA set of semi-identical twins are dying. They are losing a battle against their own bodies, but its opposing parts that are failing. So the doctors propose a solution, combine them to save one. But which would you save, which is more viable. Stronger, Faster, and More Beautiful (Hardcover) by Arwen Elys Dayton This is a compilation of stories in the book, loosely tied to each other because of the idea and premise that human adaptation will change the world as we understand. Part One Matched PairA set of semi-identical twins are dying. They are losing a battle against their own bodies, but its opposing parts that are failing. So the doctors propose a solution, combine them to save one. But which would you save, which is more viable. The real question is how does a young child comprehend that his sibling needs to die so he could live. This is a great theoretical proportionate to the idea of medical intervention and our responsibility to life. Part TwoSt. LudmillaThe idea that we can repair ourselves, change our appearance to the point of an entirely different race of man would come out of it. How much of this is humanity? how much are we creations of our own making? This shows how survival is not always the easiest part of living after a tragedy, its coming to grips with what you have faced and how you have faced it. Part ThreeThe Reverend Mr. Tad and Tadd's love storyThe corruption of belief, the rejection of new ideals makes some pretty heavy and enterprising installments of social changes. Reverend Tad has jumped on the bandwagon that those who have chosen to go beyond their normal life span, or genetic preponderance are evil. He has made a fortune spouting his soapbox beliefs. The problem is, he is a fraud. This story is a great look at human acceptance, and the ability of the public to accept and adapt to social changes caused by technology and advancement. Part Four Eight Waded The idiomatic adaptation of the mind is brought to question. How do you accept physiological and psychological change in a drastic nature? How do you survive when life had brought to question all that matters?Part Five CaliforniaPower corrupts absolute power corrupts absolutely. The idea that humanity is lost because of political affiliation, or the psychological change of humanity. Russia has returned, it uses the technology at their disposal to change humanity. They take those deemed unfit for Russian society, those out side the law, or from another jurisdiction and transform them into the partial robotic slaves. Using them to forced labor, and subjection of social ridicule. The idea is what is humanity, and what is political power. Part SixCuriosities There is a division in society, those they deem human and those that don't. Never allowing the inhuman to touch the human, caging them behind force fields, and social walls. Yet when crisis comes they are left with needing the help of those they deem unworthy. Showing the meaning of humanity and having compassion for others.
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  • The Captain
    January 1, 1970
    Ahoy there me mateys!  I received this sci-fi eARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.  So here be me honest musings . . .This novel contains six interconnected stories that showcase the possibilities and potential problems that could result from medical science.  Apparently the author's first thought when reading about gene editing was "This is it! We'll be able to eradicate disease, extend our lives, turn humans into superhumans!"  Her second thought was "We will definitely find s Ahoy there me mateys!  I received this sci-fi eARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.  So here be me honest musings . . .This novel contains six interconnected stories that showcase the possibilities and potential problems that could result from medical science.  Apparently the author's first thought when reading about gene editing was "This is it! We'll be able to eradicate disease, extend our lives, turn humans into superhumans!"  Her second thought was "We will definitely find some way of messing this up in a spectacular fashion."  She uses this novel to explore the space between the two thoughts.This was an engrossing read whose beautiful writing kept me captivated.  The six parts explore organ transplants, synthetic organs and robotic parts, religious questions surrounding medical ethics, genetically designed children, cryonics, and body modifications.  But this list does not do these stories justice.Because behind the background of the medical and scientific marvels posed by each chapter, ye also get a brilliant look at the human morals, personalities, and conflicts involved.  Each section poses new questions.  All questions are challenging.  The answers are unexpected or non-existent or both.  This book makes the reader think and feel.  Each jump in time and technology is plausible because of what came before.  And yet when the end is reached, the landscape seems unfathomable.  And possible at the same time.I highly recommend this book.  Part four was me favourite though all of it was so very good.  Words don't really do it justice.  It has to be experienced.  A fantastic book that the whole crew should read.So lastly . . .Thank you Random House Children's / Delacorte Press!Side note: much thanks to me matey, Paul @ paul'spicks for making me aware of this book's existence.  Arrr!Check out me other reviews at https://thecaptainsquartersblog.wordp...
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  • Thomas
    January 1, 1970
    Sometimes it's nice just to read a finely written extrapolation of a simple scientific idea. Thankfully Arwen is able to create compelling characters and imaginative scenarios in which to explore her interest - in this case genetic modification of humanity.It's a bit like Cloud Atlas meets Black Mirror, episodic in structure jumping through time into an unknown future. Asks some pretty big questions, and isn't overtly ideological, so a quick read that manages to stimulate the mind. Recommend.
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  • Marochka
    January 1, 1970
    7/10
  • Donna Foster
    January 1, 1970
    Full of creative talent in bringing altered life and new insights into futuristic reading.
  • Kristin
    January 1, 1970
    Brilliant! More describing words to come ☺ Brilliant! More describing words to come ☺️
  • Rana⚡
    January 1, 1970
    "There were horrors and there was death, there was evil and arrogance and apathy. But more than these, there were friends and there was hope."WHAT WAS THAT?? the blurb certainly didn't lie when it said for the fans of black mirror And westworld! SO, season 5 is coming soon and i expect some high level shit like what happened in the book. It wasn't beautifully written tho. Like it wasn't quotable as much as other books, but it was written with passion and that was more than enough to me. 4.5 🌟
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  • Justine
    January 1, 1970
    Stronger, Faster and More Beautiful has been one of the most technologically advanced world I had read this year! It is alternately subtle and outrageously stunning with each story introduced. What draws me more is the how it was all different yet is clinging on a thin thread that solidifies these stories together.And I meant it that good. There are six short stories in the book, yes, six! It all pans out with such different dilemma with different teen characters that would rise up to the challe Stronger, Faster and More Beautiful has been one of the most technologically advanced world I had read this year! It is alternately subtle and outrageously stunning with each story introduced. What draws me more is the how it was all different yet is clinging on a thin thread that solidifies these stories together.And I meant it that good. There are six short stories in the book, yes, six! It all pans out with such different dilemma with different teen characters that would rise up to the challenge of their modern world. The set-up was superb, it takes us in six different worlds set in the same one.With each featuring story, there is a different quandary, that each character is facing, the details of the advancement they are in are both enchanting, literally like a scientific accident that you can’t take your eyes off from looking and horrifying in levels of belief. Taking it into today’s world way of societal thinking and moral structure. It is scary-possible. It could happen, my mind is provoked now. At the same time, it is addictingly entertaining.What I did like is that, it is a sci-fi read but it is not as heavy as one would expect from, the jargons through the story is light but heavy on the ethical structure in society. There was technological advancement in skin grafting, genetic structures, and human modifications. From the first short story, there is a-um (I said earlier…) subtle but outrageous development that you’ll be inhaling through. The stories pace were fast and told in a different manner, nothing recycled nor repetitive.And the character’s well, character. Presented by the decisions they took and made. They are not perfect they are flawed. Each is driven with whatever it takes to lead, to do the right, the opposite. The slice of life present in these pages as human beings, interaction amongst lands on the grayness. Leaving with more questions and light speed thoughts. They weren’t wrong associating it with Black Mirror. And I can’t believe that had the opportunity to be part of it earlier on its release!I have my bets on Stronger, Faster and More Beautiful as the kind of read that even non-science-fiction would have a hard time to put down and be not be intrigued with its intricate futuristic world taking.It will leave a heavy portrayal of the future in each reader’s mind, what of us, what will be of humanity, morality, technology, and the standing environment fast-forwarding to a hundred years from the present.Also, I see a wide range possibility that there could be another anthology or maybe a full-on novel with one of the stories featured in Stronger, Faster and More Beautiful.More on Bookish Wisps.
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