Death in the Spotlight (Murder Most Unladylike Mysteries, #7)
Someone will take their final bow . . .Fresh from their adventure in Hong Kong, Hazel Wong and Daisy Wells are off to the Rue Theatre in London to face an entirely new challenge: acting.But the Detective Society is never far away from danger, and it's clear there's trouble afoot at the Rue. Jealousy, threats and horrible pranks quickly spiral out of control - and then a body is found. Now Hazel and Daisy must take centre stage and solve the crime . . . before the murderer strikes again.

Death in the Spotlight (Murder Most Unladylike Mysteries, #7) Details

TitleDeath in the Spotlight (Murder Most Unladylike Mysteries, #7)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 4th, 2018
PublisherPuffin
ISBN-139780141373829
Rating
GenreChildrens, Middle Grade, Mystery, Crime, Lgbt

Death in the Spotlight (Murder Most Unladylike Mysteries, #7) Review

  • Lauren James
    January 1, 1970
    I would die for Daisy and Hazel. My favourite detectives had their best adventure yet, including Daisy's coming out as LGBT! Robin writes the most diverse, authentic, wonderfully researched historical fiction. It's full of BAME and LGBT characters of all ages.She is doing such valuable work bringing younger LGBT role models to the world of MG/YA. Daisy and Hazel are 15 now - I can't wait to see where their next adventure takes them!
    more
  • Rachael Eyre
    January 1, 1970
    This is the seventh book in the Murder Most Ladylike series. By this point, the characters and plots run along like clockwork. I wouldn't say it was one of the better instalments, though I adored the setting. I've always loved stories about putting on a performance - maybe a hang up from the Muppets? The mystery itself earns points for ingenuity. It would seem far fetched if murderers hadn't pulled off similar ruses for far less reason than Rose does here.The part that stands out most for me is This is the seventh book in the Murder Most Ladylike series. By this point, the characters and plots run along like clockwork. I wouldn't say it was one of the better instalments, though I adored the setting. I've always loved stories about putting on a performance - maybe a hang up from the Muppets? The mystery itself earns points for ingenuity. It would seem far fetched if murderers hadn't pulled off similar ruses for far less reason than Rose does here.The part that stands out most for me is the stunning revelation, roughly halfway through the book, that Daisy is gay. I'd long speculated and hoped for this, but never thought Robin Stevens would actually go there in a mainstream children's story. Unless a book is specifically *for* LGBT youth, it's always teachers, aunties and other extras. So the fact one of the leads in such a successful franchise should be a lesbian - and the pretty, posh, feminine Daisy at that - made me shriek with joy. Later we learn one of the minor characters is a gay man, and it mentions the unfair, prejudiced laws of the time. I expect some parents will be outraged, and say they'll never let their kids read one of these books again, but it isn't for them. Stevens provides a lovely afterword where she explains about Section 28 and other homophobic legislation.She is a true ally and I love her. I can't wait to see how the series develops.
    more
  • Sylvie
    January 1, 1970
    4.25 stars!!
  • Laura Noakes
    January 1, 1970
    Whip smart mystery that had me guessing to the end, but what I really love about this series is Daisy and Hazel and the relationship between them. It's grown so beautifully since the first book and I love how complex and intertwined it is--a reflection that mirrors reality. This is Robin's best book yet, I adore her inclusion of BAME and LGBTQA+ characters, and I'm so glad that kids are going to be able to see their realties in this book. Also, an EPIC takedown of the British Empire was undertak Whip smart mystery that had me guessing to the end, but what I really love about this series is Daisy and Hazel and the relationship between them. It's grown so beautifully since the first book and I love how complex and intertwined it is--a reflection that mirrors reality. This is Robin's best book yet, I adore her inclusion of BAME and LGBTQA+ characters, and I'm so glad that kids are going to be able to see their realties in this book. Also, an EPIC takedown of the British Empire was undertaken in one line. Can't wait for the next one.
    more
  • Karen Barber
    January 1, 1970
    With the Detective Society being sent to Daisy’s Uncle Felix for their own protection, this could have been a bit of a damp squib. Fear not, the irrepressible Daisy and Hazel seem to sniff out suspicious circumstances without even trying, and number seven in the series is no exception to the rule.Daisy and Hazel are growing up and as they approach fifteen it’s interesting to see how society tries to dictate what they should do.The duo are a delight to read. Working together like so many famous d With the Detective Society being sent to Daisy’s Uncle Felix for their own protection, this could have been a bit of a damp squib. Fear not, the irrepressible Daisy and Hazel seem to sniff out suspicious circumstances without even trying, and number seven in the series is no exception to the rule.Daisy and Hazel are growing up and as they approach fifteen it’s interesting to see how society tries to dictate what they should do.The duo are a delight to read. Working together like so many famous duos, these two get caught up in a most intriguing case and the story fizzes along.Much of our story is set in the theatre where Daisy and Hazel have been sent for their own protection. Unfortunately, the lead actress is being threatened and when her body is discovered in a well underneath the theatre it doesn’t take long for the Detective Society to spring into action.While the solving of the murder is at the fore, I loved that there’s so many other things going on. The backdrop of the theatre and production of Romeo and Juliet was fascinating, and the historical details to flesh out some aspects of the story were a nice touch. There may be shock from some quarters at the direction in which Stevens takes things, but I think it’s important that we see an array of characters in stories for young adults. What was great to see was the acceptance from our main characters of those who - in the wider world - are seen as ‘different’. In Daisy’s words ‘it’s idiotic’ to see how skin colour or sexuality could cause such an issue. The case is meticulously investigated and the girls flirt with danger. There’s death and intrigue, but everything works out in the end. I laughed out loud at Uncle Felix’s assertion that nice child detectives stick to smuggling cases, and applaud Stevens for letting Daisy and Hazel take centre stage in their own story.
    more
  • Nic
    January 1, 1970
    I don't want to spoil anything for people who haven't read it yet, but ahhhhhhhhhhhh Stevens did the thing I've been wanting her to do for more than half the series now ahhhhhhhhhhhhhAnyway. Breathe. Daisy and Hazel are on an extended break from London after the trip to Hong Kong, Uncle Felix sends them to a nearby theatre to keep them out of trouble (ha), and this is possibly my favourite in the series so far. It's got a clever mystery that's perfectly aligned with the setting, it's got various I don't want to spoil anything for people who haven't read it yet, but ahhhhhhhhhhhh Stevens did the thing I've been wanting her to do for more than half the series now ahhhhhhhhhhhhhAnyway. Breathe. Daisy and Hazel are on an extended break from London after the trip to Hong Kong, Uncle Felix sends them to a nearby theatre to keep them out of trouble (ha), and this is possibly my favourite in the series so far. It's got a clever mystery that's perfectly aligned with the setting, it's got various recurring characters (Inspector Priestley, George and Alexander, Felix), and it's got further character development for our leads (Hazel's growing self-confidence goes hand-in-hand with growing assertiveness in her friendship with Daisy, and in her relationship to England, metropole of empire; she's also having Thoughts about her role as narrator). There are also several hints that the bubble in which the girls live - and can operate largely undetected - is getting increasingly fragile as they get older. Can't wait for the next.
    more
  • Alicia
    January 1, 1970
    http://wordnerdy.blogspot.com/2018/10...YAYYYY it’s a new Wells and Wong mystery!! Just what I needed at this precise moment in time. In this seventh outing, the girls are spending some time in London with Uncle Felix and his new wife, who decide to get the girls bit parts in a local production of Romeo and Juliet to keep them out of trouble. But then the leading lady starts receiving threatening notes, and the Detective Society is on the case! With the help of some old friends, of course. There http://wordnerdy.blogspot.com/2018/10...YAYYYY it’s a new Wells and Wong mystery!! Just what I needed at this precise moment in time. In this seventh outing, the girls are spending some time in London with Uncle Felix and his new wife, who decide to get the girls bit parts in a local production of Romeo and Juliet to keep them out of trouble. But then the leading lady starts receiving threatening notes, and the Detective Society is on the case! With the help of some old friends, of course. There is a hilarious bout of the flu here, as well as a revelation about Daisy that I was pleased by, to say the least (I might have started crying, but things are a bit emotional these days). And of course very solid mystery plotting, as always. Anyway, I am grateful to Robin Stevens for these books and recommend them to everyone. A.
    more
  • Melanie
    January 1, 1970
    As Hazel and Daisy grow older they face even more opposition to their Detective Society than when it was founded. Once again Robin Stevens has created an exhilarating mystery which us almost impossible to put down and manages to weave important issues seamlessly into the storyline. I'm cross with myself for reading it so fast because now I have to wait months for the next instalment.
    more
  • Jenn
    January 1, 1970
    Is this the best Detective Society book yet? Maybe! I’m a delighted MESS.
  • Lucy ❁♡ ★
    January 1, 1970
    The seventh instalment in the Murder Most Unladylike series has captured my heart once again. Through the development of the main protagonists, the reappearance of recurring characters such as Felix and Alexander and the introduction of some new ones, the book has truly earned its five stars. This series occupies such a special place in my heart. It means the world to me. I even got the privilege of having the book signed when I got the opportunity to meet the amazing and sweet author this past The seventh instalment in the Murder Most Unladylike series has captured my heart once again. Through the development of the main protagonists, the reappearance of recurring characters such as Felix and Alexander and the introduction of some new ones, the book has truly earned its five stars. This series occupies such a special place in my heart. It means the world to me. I even got the privilege of having the book signed when I got the opportunity to meet the amazing and sweet author this past week! Robin Stevens and her cast of characters are everything to me. I mean, not to be dramatic or anything, but I would die for Daisy and Hazel. The dynamic duo clearly develop throughout the novel. They speak about their inevitable plunge into later adolescence and eventually adulthood and how frightening that can be. Since I’m 16 myself, I can definitely relate to the woes and fear of ageing. Seeing society dictate their actions was also fascinating to me and noticing the contrast to today. I feel as if their friendship only became stronger which made my heart swell. Their connection is so beautiful and pure. Name a more amazing female friendship. I’ll wait. The other characters are also brilliant. Alexander. George. The Junior Pinkertons are back! They're fantastic! I loved seeing their connections to the girls and how that relates to growing older. Uncle Felix returns too. He’s my favourite relative of Daisy’s and one of my favourites from the second book. I’m not sure why, I just really enjoy him. His wife, Lucy (hee hee) was also lovely to meet. I hope to see her in later instalments. Another thing I absolutely adored about this book is the setting. I’m not involved with theatre myself due to my complete lack of talent in the area, but I enjoy plays and musicals all the same; seeing Stevens tackle this location was utterly brilliant and not only did I get to learn about play production, I also picked up some interesting theatre vernacular! The time period in which it is set is also remarkable. The entire series spans through the 1930s and often discusses issues of the time. Hitler, for example. Homophobic legislations. Racism and discrimination. Evidently it is well-researched and only adds to the enjoyment of the novel. The inclusion of an LGBT+ element made my bisexual heart very happy, I assure you. I think it is absolutely inspiring and incredible that Robin Stevens is introducing children to homosexuality. Doing this allows them to accept it into their understanding and culture early on, avoiding prejudice and homophobia later on. Stevens wrote a delightful afterword explaining Section 28 and her decision to add gay relationships. I find this fantastic. The plot itself was fast-paced, gripping and exciting as per usual. This author never disappoints. The murder reveal at the end was one of the best plot twists and as usual is never who you think it is. The murder this time was just as good as the previous six!I just adore this series with my whole heart. Never stop writing, Robin Stevens. Love Lucy (unofficial member of the Detective Society) x
    more
  • Izzy
    January 1, 1970
    This is the best book in the series! I was reading several other books when Death in the Spotlight arrived but like all Wells and Wong books, it got top priority. Now all the books I was reading before seem really bad, because I just read a Murder Most Unladylike Mystery. The murder was the most clever yet, it is really surprising but also make total sense, with lots of clues dropped in along the way. This book can be read well as a standalone though it is probably a bit better to read the other This is the best book in the series! I was reading several other books when Death in the Spotlight arrived but like all Wells and Wong books, it got top priority. Now all the books I was reading before seem really bad, because I just read a Murder Most Unladylike Mystery. The murder was the most clever yet, it is really surprising but also make total sense, with lots of clues dropped in along the way. This book can be read well as a standalone though it is probably a bit better to read the other books first but it doesn’t matter hugely. You should definately get this if you enjoyed the other books in the series. When I finished it I felt warm and happy. The climax at the end and the reveal of the murder is really gripping, probably the most exciting build up yet. Obviously it all turns out well in the end.(view spoiler)[ The personal side is great too. Daisy has her first crush, which is really lovely in itself but it is revealed Daisy is a lesbian. This made me really pleased but then of course what can you expect from Robin? She is always amazing at giving a voice to loads of different types of people. (hide spoiler)]
    more
  • Erris
    January 1, 1970
    I'm so glad Daisy was finally confirmed not straight. I read the author's note at the end -particularly the part about lgbtq+ people- it really made me feel more accepted in the world. Thank you Robin Stevens! I love your diverse writing. It's what we deserve in this age full of homophobia.Aside from that wonderful part, I loved the plot. It was so clever! I thought the murderer was definitely going to be Annie. I suppose I was kinda right. In a roundabout way.Anyway 10/10 would def recommended
    more
  • Noodles78
    January 1, 1970
    I'm just loving how Haze and Daisy are developing as characters. Superb as normal.
  • Toni
    January 1, 1970
    I was so excited to get hold of this one and of course it didn’t disappoint. And I was excited that I managed to work out one part of the solution pretty early on, because that almost never happens!
  • Isabel Coffey-Corrigan
    January 1, 1970
    Personally I thought it was better than the last two books!!!!!! I love the way Daisy and Hazel have maintained their relationship even now, when both the girls are getting older. This series is one of my favourite series ever and I'm hungry for more after this amazing seventh book!
    more
Write a review