The Marriage Clock
Named a Must-Read Book of the Summer by POPSUGAR, Bustle, Book Riot, and more! In Zara Raheem's fresh, funny, smart debut, a young, Muslim-American woman is given three months to find the right husband or else her traditional Indian parents will find one for her--a novel with a universal story that everyone can relate to about the challenges of falling in love.To Leila Abid's traditional Indian parents, finding a husband in their South Asian-Muslim American community is as easy as match, meet, marry. But for Leila, a marriage of arrangement clashes with her lifelong dreams of a Bollywood romance which has her convinced that real love happens before marriage, not the other way around.Finding the right husband was always part of her life-plan, but after 26 years of singledom, even Leila is starting to get nervous. And to make matters worse, her parents are panicking, the neighbors are talking, and she's wondering, are her expectations just too high? So Leila decides it's time to stop dreaming and start dating.She makes a deal with her parents: they'll give her three months, until their 30th wedding anniversary, to find a husband on her own terms. But if she fails, they'll take over and arrange her marriage for her.With the stakes set, Leila succumbs to the impossible mission of satisfying her parents' expectations, while also fulfilling her own western ideals of love. But after a series of speed dates, blind dates, online dates and even ambush dates, the sparks just don't fly! And now, with the marriage clock ticking, and her 3-month deadline looming in the horizon, Leila must face the consequences of what might happen if she doesn't find "the one..."

The Marriage Clock Details

TitleThe Marriage Clock
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJul 23rd, 2019
PublisherWilliam Morrow Paperbacks
Rating
GenreRomance, Contemporary, Fiction, Womens Fiction, Chick Lit, Contemporary Romance, Adult

The Marriage Clock Review

  • peachygirl
    January 1, 1970
    ARC received from the publisher through Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. I wanted to love this book, I really did. But I had so many issues with the protagonist and her attitude. For a 26 year old high school teacher, Liela was very immature, indecisive and judgemental. Her Bollywood dreams for a love story felt like a 14 year old's soliloquy. And her unrealistic expectations for a Mr.Perfect made me roll my eyes constantly.Her plight was relatable to some extent as the pressure to m ARC received from the publisher through Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. I wanted to love this book, I really did. But I had so many issues with the protagonist and her attitude. For a 26 year old high school teacher, Liela was very immature, indecisive and judgemental. Her Bollywood dreams for a love story felt like a 14 year old's soliloquy. And her unrealistic expectations for a Mr.Perfect made me roll my eyes constantly.Her plight was relatable to some extent as the pressure to marry at the right age is common in India, as are nosy relatives. Even the writing was pretty good for a debut. But the writer could have tried to stencil a better heroine than this clueless damsel in distress. Also the fact that she's a stickler about not paying for her meal made me respect her less and less. The ending was nice. Leila putting her self worth before her parents' expectations was a good take. But it felt little after everything she went through to please her parents. Not that this was a bad book, but I wasn't satisfied with it. Others might like it, if only for the hilarity in Leila's series of horrible dates. Maybe, it was just me!
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  • Azrah
    January 1, 1970
    ARC received from publisher in exchange for an honest review.
  • Sahitya
    January 1, 1970
    I so wanted to love this book. I was actually very sure that I would adore it. I won’t say that my expectations were necessarily very high, but I just felt it in my bones and all I’m feeling is sad after finishing the book.Though I’ve been blogging for around 2 years now, I’m still not very observant and tend to not notice any flaws or problematic issues or cliches in the writing unless they are very explicit. I actually had to ask my other blogger friends what it meant when reviewers talked abo I so wanted to love this book. I was actually very sure that I would adore it. I won’t say that my expectations were necessarily very high, but I just felt it in my bones and all I’m feeling is sad after finishing the book.Though I’ve been blogging for around 2 years now, I’m still not very observant and tend to not notice any flaws or problematic issues or cliches in the writing unless they are very explicit. I actually had to ask my other blogger friends what it meant when reviewers talked about show vs tell style of writing. So, imagine my surprise when for the first couple of chapters, there was just telling and no showing in this book at all, and even I was able to recognize that. It wasn’t bad per se but I guess it just wasn’t a great beginning but it turned better once we got into the meat of the story. The book is fairly fast paced throughout, with lots of hilarious and embarrassing dating situations which were entertaining to read about, but sometimes also fell into typical South Asian stereotypes. I obviously enjoyed all the desi elements of the book - food, culture, language, parents’ expectations regarding dating and marriage, arrange marriage system and all the nosy aunties and especially Bollywood. There are so many references to movies and songs and actors which I absolutely loved and found very organic to the story, but I don’t know how readers who aren’t familiar with the industry would feel about it. There was a particular situation that made me feel very nostalgic when the main character starts sobbing uncontrollably while watching the movie Veer Zara and the Tere Liye song starts playing - while this happens to her during a flight journey, it completely transported me to a train journey I took a long time ago when I too started sobbing while listening to the same song. The main character’s reaction when she visits India also felt very relatable and I couldn’t stop reminiscing about my own experiences. It’s these little little moments in the book that made it worth reading for me.I can’t say the same for the main character Leila. She maybe twenty six years old but is very confused and judgmental, and I was both frustrated with her and felt sympathetic towards her plight. I really felt for her desperation about wanting to get married while also wanting to choose the guy and pleasing her parents, and also answering every single nosy question all the time. I could totally understand the pressure she was under because however dramatic it might seem, it is a reality for many South Asian women. However, she had too many cinematic expectations about romance and marriage and that felt pretty childish. And while I do agree that most of her dates were terrible, they were also quite caricaturish. And she kept questioning her self worth because of a guy and I absolutely hated it, because I guess I just wanted something more from a high school teacher from LA. She was very indecisive throughout, mostly making decisions based on what her friends suggested or her mother manipulated her into. I just wanted her to introspect what she wanted for herself and stand up to her parents. And when it finally happened, I found it to be too little too late and it totally frustrated me because she didn’t even come to that conclusion on her own. I’m actually not sure how to conclude my review. This book has quite a few rave reviews, so maybe I’m being overly harsh in my judgement. The writing was funny for the most part and very relatable to me as an ownvoices Indian reader (not Muslim though). It’s also a very fast read and I got through it in just a few hours. I think I wanted more from the main character and was disappointed in that regard. I won’t say that I don’t recommend it, because it might just be to someone else’s taste and I wouldn’t want to dissuade any readers.
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  • Felicia Grossman
    January 1, 1970
    I LOVED this book. Like totally loved. Leila is funny and adorable and you only want good things for her (and men who don't ghost her say "BAM" too much or ask about her genetic history or gives her his honest age...). You really feel how she's torn between loving her culture and being frustrated by it (and her well-meaning, lovable, but at times frustrating parents). Her struggle for balance is so genuine.And every single character is so well-drawn, form Leila's group of friends, to her various I LOVED this book. Like totally loved. Leila is funny and adorable and you only want good things for her (and men who don't ghost her say "BAM" too much or ask about her genetic history or gives her his honest age...). You really feel how she's torn between loving her culture and being frustrated by it (and her well-meaning, lovable, but at times frustrating parents). Her struggle for balance is so genuine.And every single character is so well-drawn, form Leila's group of friends, to her various dates (and their parents, to her family in India, each is unique and special and you can totally hear everyone's voice. And the writing--beautiful. There were so many laugh-out-loud moments as well as poignant ones. Lelia's story is familiar and unique and where her journey will take her is up in the air through the entire piece, keeping you reading until the very end. I am so happy I got to read this as an ARC. I can't recommend this book enough!
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  • Meli
    January 1, 1970
    I expected this to be a typical romcom, but there was much more depth to the characters and story than I anticipated. The mother, her friends/cousin, and Leila are each flawed and complicated in their own ways and you can't help but cheer for them throughout. I read this in one sitting because I could not put it down. Raheem's book is a hilarious yet honest look at love, heartbreak and the pressures that come with cultural expectations. I recommend this to not only gain insight about Muslim-Indi I expected this to be a typical romcom, but there was much more depth to the characters and story than I anticipated. The mother, her friends/cousin, and Leila are each flawed and complicated in their own ways and you can't help but cheer for them throughout. I read this in one sitting because I could not put it down. Raheem's book is a hilarious yet honest look at love, heartbreak and the pressures that come with cultural expectations. I recommend this to not only gain insight about Muslim-Indian culture, but also if you just want to be thoroughly entertained.
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  • Erica Boyce
    January 1, 1970
    This is a lovely and hilarious book about family, love, and finding yourself as an adult within your culture's expectations. I devoured it in three days and was so sad to see it end! Raheem deftly draws a cast of very real characters that I felt for and grew to love very quickly. I laughed out loud at several moments! A really fun and thought-provoking read.
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  • Rachel Strolle
    January 1, 1970
    this book is a whole ass mood
  • Nalini Srivastava
    January 1, 1970
    Loved the writing and the content is so relatable. I recommend everyone to read this book.
  • Julia Phillips
    January 1, 1970
    So fresh and charming and fun! I adored being in Leila's world, from her girls' nights with her friends to her conversations with her loving, pressuring parents to her many first dates. What a joy to read.
  • Alysson
    January 1, 1970
    The Marriage Clock – Out 7/23/19.......Leila Abid's traditional Indian parents want her to find a husband and are willing to arrange a marriage for her but Leila, she keeps wishing for a Bollywood romance (love BEFORE marriage). Her parents tell her that she has 3 months to find a husband how she wants and then if she can’t find one, they will arrange one for her. ......I wanted to love this book! It is highly anticipated and I loved that it was based on South Asian characters and community but The Marriage Clock – Out 7/23/19.......Leila Abid's traditional Indian parents want her to find a husband and are willing to arrange a marriage for her but Leila, she keeps wishing for a Bollywood romance (love BEFORE marriage). Her parents tell her that she has 3 months to find a husband how she wants and then if she can’t find one, they will arrange one for her. ......I wanted to love this book! It is highly anticipated and I loved that it was based on South Asian characters and community but I was disappointed in it. The book is fast paced throughout because you are reading about Leila’s dating disasters and they are very entertaining but it all became very repetitive. I was frustrated with Leila because I found her to be judgmental and she went through the book with rose colored glasses on the whole time.
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  • Mikaela (Booklover1974)
    January 1, 1970
    3,5 star rounded up! This was a good story about the pressure a Muslim, South Asian girl usually feels regarding marriage. Is all your self worth in how fast you can get married and have children? There's a lot of great questions about family pressure... How far do you let yourself get pressured? I'm not a Muslim or from South Asia so it was very interesting to read this!
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  • K Chess
    January 1, 1970
    THE MARRIAGE CLOCK was a fun, fast read. Leila is a convincing modern heroine and the Muslim/Indian-American cultural context added depth and interest to her story. I found the speed-dating scene hilarious, the rainstorm swoonworthy, the swift reversals surprising and the resolution satisfying.
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  • Christie Grotheim
    January 1, 1970
    This was such an enjoyable read! Leila finds herself pulled between cultures when it comes to dating, love, and marriage, and I rooted for her as she navigates all kinds of dates, some cringe-worthy. This line, especially, made me laugh out loud: "I wanted to grab twenty units of Botox and pump them into his face until he looked like the Mahmoud in the photographs." This is definitely a book most women can relate to. The relationship with her parents was sweet and believable, and I was surprised This was such an enjoyable read! Leila finds herself pulled between cultures when it comes to dating, love, and marriage, and I rooted for her as she navigates all kinds of dates, some cringe-worthy. This line, especially, made me laugh out loud: "I wanted to grab twenty units of Botox and pump them into his face until he looked like the Mahmoud in the photographs." This is definitely a book most women can relate to. The relationship with her parents was sweet and believable, and I was surprised by the ending!
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  • Suanne
    January 1, 1970
    I chose to read The Marriage Clock because I’m always interested in reading own voices writing about their culture. About this time last year I read a book the premise of which was finding a man through match.com. Though that book was comical, at the end I felt unsatisfied as a reader as the female protagonist didn’t seem to grow emotionally from her experiences. That is not true of The Marriage Clock. I flew through this book in just a few hours. Raheem’s writing style is simple, direct, and ea I chose to read The Marriage Clock because I’m always interested in reading own voices writing about their culture. About this time last year I read a book the premise of which was finding a man through match.com. Though that book was comical, at the end I felt unsatisfied as a reader as the female protagonist didn’t seem to grow emotionally from her experiences. That is not true of The Marriage Clock. I flew through this book in just a few hours. Raheem’s writing style is simple, direct, and easy to read. Her characters, particularly Leila, are fully developed, funny, and all-to-human. She is a first-generation American with Indian parents. Leila is frequently torn between her more liberal American self and her family-loving Muslim self. Often she’s frustrated by her more traditional parents who have decided it is time she fulfill her destiny and marry, thus starting the countdown on The Marriage Clock. Leila is convinced she’ll find a partner equal to the men her favorite Bollywood movies but with more liberal qualities of an American male tossed into the pot.Raheem’s description of Leila’s trials in finding a husband range from sad to pathetic to hysterical. Her rejects are each individualized with traits that range from funny to totally bizarre: the guy who uses the sound “bam” to punctuate every sentence, the one who asks about the past medical history of Leila and her entire family; the one who’s far older than he admits to; the one who’s already engaged, but fails to divulge this to Leila; and finally, the one who “ghosts” her after a seemingly great deal in which she thinks they really connected.This was not a typical romantic comedy, though those elements are present. There is depth to the narration, and the characters are all well-developed, especially Leila’s family and friends. In addition, the glimpses into the Muslim Indian community and culture are wonderful. The Marriage Clock is also an amusing look into traditional arranged marriages with “auntie” matchmakers, biodata spreadsheets compiled by Leila’s parents, speed-dating, and dating apps. The joy of this book, as mentioned above, is the personal growth of Leila and her journey to self-acceptance.
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  • Tillie
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent book. Really opened my eyes to the Muslim culture. Leila's dilemma was presented in a very real fashion. Her thoughts and struggles were real and poignant. I applaud her decision in the end.
  • Malini
    January 1, 1970
    Let me start by saying that if you’re not familiar with traditional Indian customs, you may have difficulty understanding Leila’s approach to dating, but for someone like me, I found this book to be so extremely relatable. Leila Abid is given 3 months to find a husband otherwise she’ll end up with someone her parents select for her. What follows is a humorous and realistic glimpse into the world of dating from an Indian American woman’s eyes. Even though most American women Leila’s age are more Let me start by saying that if you’re not familiar with traditional Indian customs, you may have difficulty understanding Leila’s approach to dating, but for someone like me, I found this book to be so extremely relatable. Leila Abid is given 3 months to find a husband otherwise she’ll end up with someone her parents select for her. What follows is a humorous and realistic glimpse into the world of dating from an Indian American woman’s eyes. Even though most American women Leila’s age are more experienced with dating at this stage in their lives, Leila's experience differs because of the culture she grew up in, which prohibits all forms of dating until reaching a “marriageable" age. Throughout the book, Leila expresses her frustrations with this custom because of how it stunts and hinders her in her romantical pursuits. Her actions, which some might perceive as immature or naive on the surface is actually a deeper result of her lack of experience due to her cultural upbringing. This also explains why she and many of her suitors are so unprepared and overwhelmed by the dating process. The portrayal of these challenges through Leila’s experiences is both realistic and relatable and a perfect example of how stories like these can offer deeper insights into different cultures and customs. Kudos to the author for bringing awareness to this topic and will definitely be recommending this book!
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  • Sarah
    January 1, 1970
    I was super looking forward to this book, but it does not live up to its earlier reviews or publisher blurbs.Unfortunately, the main character isn't very sympathetic. On paper she's 26, but thinks, acts, and reacts like a character in a YA novel. It was hard to feel sorry for her or empathize with her situation when she enforces no boundaries with her parents, isn't forthcoming or honest but is judgmental with her romantic interests, and approaches love like a teenager. She even handles her big I was super looking forward to this book, but it does not live up to its earlier reviews or publisher blurbs.Unfortunately, the main character isn't very sympathetic. On paper she's 26, but thinks, acts, and reacts like a character in a YA novel. It was hard to feel sorry for her or empathize with her situation when she enforces no boundaries with her parents, isn't forthcoming or honest but is judgmental with her romantic interests, and approaches love like a teenager. She even handles her big moment of self-discovery and standing up to her parents in a very melodramatic way, making a not-her social engagement all about her, instead. It felt like the equivalent of getting engaged at your sister's wedding reception.It also isn't clear who the intended audience is for this novel. Bollywood movies and (I assume real?) Bollywood stars were mentioned constantly with no remarks or references to ground the reader ("[This actor], known for his emotional portrayal of..." or whatever): you either knew who they were or it meant nothing. Similarly, there were lots of little bits of conversation that weren't translated. Without popping on to Google Translate every other minute, they were just noise on the page. I can't think of any specific person I would recommend this book to.
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  • Leslie
    January 1, 1970
    This forthcoming novel (July 2019) might easily be written off as "chick lit," but behind the humor, the angst, the determined search for a husband, is a pretty powerful look at the life of a first-generation Indian Muslim young woman whose family's expectations for her are marriage--first, last, and everything. While reading this, I happened on a new NPR report about marriages in India where arranged marriages still account for 4 0ut of 5 unions and where there are dire consequences for choosin This forthcoming novel (July 2019) might easily be written off as "chick lit," but behind the humor, the angst, the determined search for a husband, is a pretty powerful look at the life of a first-generation Indian Muslim young woman whose family's expectations for her are marriage--first, last, and everything. While reading this, I happened on a new NPR report about marriages in India where arranged marriages still account for 4 0ut of 5 unions and where there are dire consequences for choosing to marry outside your religion or caste. Author Raheem does a fine job exploring the various sides of freedom of choice and arranged marriages, and her characters are interesting and three-dimensional personalities. Even the mother, who seems so overbearing, is more realistic than caricatured. This is an eye-opening book for "non-desi" readers and would also be excellent material for discussion groups.
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  • Christine SY
    January 1, 1970
    This book was a spark that I needed in life. As a single, 24-year-old college student busy with her own life, marriage is something I have not yet even thought about, and this book definitely opened my eyes in different ways. The Marriage Clock made me realize marriage and love shouldn’t be something forced and rushed upon and that this chapter you encounter in life will come when you meet the right one. Thank you Zara Raheem for reminding me that love shouldn’t be based on a clock, and that it’ This book was a spark that I needed in life. As a single, 24-year-old college student busy with her own life, marriage is something I have not yet even thought about, and this book definitely opened my eyes in different ways. The Marriage Clock made me realize marriage and love shouldn’t be something forced and rushed upon and that this chapter you encounter in life will come when you meet the right one. Thank you Zara Raheem for reminding me that love shouldn’t be based on a clock, and that it’s something to be worth waiting for.
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  • Stephanie
    January 1, 1970
    A good fit for readers of gentle romance or stories about family dynamics, particularly as it highlights a cultural tradition that many may not be as familiar with.
  • Megan Collins
    January 1, 1970
    THE MARRIAGE CLOCK is a fun yet poignant debut that follows Leila, an American-born Indian woman whose parents are determined to marry her off to a man of their choosing within the South Asian-Muslim American community. Leila has her own plans, though, which include being swept off her feet by a man equal to a Bollywood hero. When she strikes a deal with her parents in which they’ll allow her three months to find a husband on her own terms before they step in, the adventure really begins. What f THE MARRIAGE CLOCK is a fun yet poignant debut that follows Leila, an American-born Indian woman whose parents are determined to marry her off to a man of their choosing within the South Asian-Muslim American community. Leila has her own plans, though, which include being swept off her feet by a man equal to a Bollywood hero. When she strikes a deal with her parents in which they’ll allow her three months to find a husband on her own terms before they step in, the adventure really begins. What follows is a series of hilariously awkward dates and unexpected heartbreak, and it’s through this clock-ticking journey that Leila discovers what she is and isn’t willing to fight for, and what love really means to her. This book is effortlessly charming, relatable, funny, and vibrant, with a deeply satisfying ending that will have you cheering and perhaps even feeling inspired. I can’t wait to see what Zara Raheem writes next!
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  • Abigail (abigailsbookself)
    January 1, 1970
    What a charming and utterly lovable book! I kept finding myself grinning and laughing out-loud (when I wasn't cringing at the content that was WAY too relatable). I recommend this for anyone looking for a fun romp through dating in your mid-twenties and anyone interested in learning a new perspective on Indian culture. Under mounting pressure to get married and "start" her life, twenty-six year old English teacher Leila makes a deal with her parents -- if she can't find her own husband in three What a charming and utterly lovable book! I kept finding myself grinning and laughing out-loud (when I wasn't cringing at the content that was WAY too relatable). I recommend this for anyone looking for a fun romp through dating in your mid-twenties and anyone interested in learning a new perspective on Indian culture. Under mounting pressure to get married and "start" her life, twenty-six year old English teacher Leila makes a deal with her parents -- if she can't find her own husband in three months, her parents can arrange a marriage for her. Thus we tumble with Leila through awkward first dates, ambush dates, speed dating, online dating and more as she attempts to find her Bollywood romance before her parents can set her up with a boring (or worse! OLD!) mate. Along the way, Leila learns more about herself, her culture, and her family. I normally read the last paragraph of a book early on (keep out of the comments, you beasts! Let me do what I like!) but two chapters into this I broke my habit because I didn't want to know before I knew! My only complaint was that the end was a little rushed, and I wish we would have had a little more introspection and dialogue with her mother specifically about the end, but that's pretty much all I can say. Fingers crossed for a sequel!
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  • Katelyn
    January 1, 1970
    Leila is an independent American woman who lives with her more traditional Indian parents. She's a teacher and enjoys spending time with her friends after work and going on occasional dates. Her parents start pressing her to get married. She's 26 and her mother wants to arrange her marriage. Leila asks her mother to give her a few months and if she still hasn't found anyone, her mother can analyze all the biodata sheets she wants to try and find someone right for Leila. Leila enlists her friends Leila is an independent American woman who lives with her more traditional Indian parents. She's a teacher and enjoys spending time with her friends after work and going on occasional dates. Her parents start pressing her to get married. She's 26 and her mother wants to arrange her marriage. Leila asks her mother to give her a few months and if she still hasn't found anyone, her mother can analyze all the biodata sheets she wants to try and find someone right for Leila. Leila enlists her friends and tries dating apps and speed dating. She goes on a lot of terrible, hilarious dates, and even goes to a wedding in India for her cousin (the ultimate place to meet a husband).I flew through this super fun book. Raheem does a great job examining the pull between traditional and modern. You'll root for Leila. This book went too fast.
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  • Rosann
    January 1, 1970
    I wanted to like this book so much! The protagonist, a Muslim American woman who feels trapped into a deal she makes with her parents: find a mate before their wedding anniversary or have one chosen for her. She isn't really comfortable in her own skin, she isn't comfortable with her family, seems at odds with her religion. I waited for her to grow, to change, to commit to something. Sadly, though she whines about her mother, her friends, her circumstance, she just doesn't seem to get a handle o I wanted to like this book so much! The protagonist, a Muslim American woman who feels trapped into a deal she makes with her parents: find a mate before their wedding anniversary or have one chosen for her. She isn't really comfortable in her own skin, she isn't comfortable with her family, seems at odds with her religion. I waited for her to grow, to change, to commit to something. Sadly, though she whines about her mother, her friends, her circumstance, she just doesn't seem to get a handle on her life. Other reviewers seem to find great humor here, I wanted to know more, wanted the author to give me more than the journey of this woman in the shallow end of things.
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  • Ellen
    January 1, 1970
    Leila is approaching the age her parents insist she find a husband or allow them to choose one for her. As a young Indian woman, her unrealistic visions of love are based on her Bollywood obsession, making most of her potential suitors unacceptable. Humorous and clever, I enjoyed the story and the characters in the novel. Thanks to Edelweiss for the ARC. I recommend this one.
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  • Daniela Petrova
    January 1, 1970
    I so loved this book about family tradition and relationships. Leila is a very interesting and relatable young woman with a great sense of humor. She had me laughing out loud throughout the book. This fun, breezy novel will be perfect as a beach read. I highly recommend it!
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  • Noelle Salazar
    January 1, 1970
    LOVED this book. Elegantly written and fun, quick, and insightful. Lovely and sassy Leila is so many of us women in America with our lists of wants and needs for a partner - but unlike many of us, she is Muslim-American and her parents have very different ideas about how marriage is done. The clock is TICKING and Zara Raheem kept me laughing and commiserating as Leila went on one date after another, finding suitable men and not-so-suitable men - nearly sacrificing her own happiness until conclud LOVED this book. Elegantly written and fun, quick, and insightful. Lovely and sassy Leila is so many of us women in America with our lists of wants and needs for a partner - but unlike many of us, she is Muslim-American and her parents have very different ideas about how marriage is done. The clock is TICKING and Zara Raheem kept me laughing and commiserating as Leila went on one date after another, finding suitable men and not-so-suitable men - nearly sacrificing her own happiness until concluding with a satisfactory and hopeful ending. Rom-com at its finest. (Psst... I'd love a sequel!)
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  • Laura
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars. This really wasn't what I was expecting. I think I would have liked it more if I understood beforehand what it was and what it wasn't. Sorry for the vagueness, I don't want to accidentally give anything away. Still a fun read.
  • Yoga And Books
    January 1, 1970
    Hilarious. Relatable. Loved how the book kept me guessing until the very end. What a fun and quick read this was!
  • Chermaine
    January 1, 1970
    This is defiantly an author that I will put down in my new book to read list.The great thing about this book and the main character is they chose a path that not many people let alone cultures would take and gained their own respect and well as the respect of the people around them.
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