Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy
2018 marks the 150th anniversary of the classic Little Women by Louisa May Alcott. Join Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy as they are reenvisioned as a blended family living in modern day NYC in this beautiful, full-color graphic novel that's perfect for fans of Raina Telemeier's Smile, Svetlana Chmakova's Awkward, and Victoria Jamieson's Roller Girl. Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy are having a really tough year: Not only is their father overseas with the military and their working overtime to make ends meet, but each girl is struggling with her own unique problems. Whether it's school woes, health issues, boy troubles, or simply feeling lost, the March sisters all need the same thing: support from each other. By coming together--and sharing lots of laughs and tears--these four young women find the courage to discover who they truly are as individuals...and as a family.Meg is the eldest March. She has a taste for the finer things in life--especially when it comes to clothes and parties--and dreams of marrying rich and leaving her five-floor walk-up apartment behind.Jo pushes her siblings to be true to themselves, yet feels like no one will accept her for who she truly is. Her passion for writing gives her an outlet to feel worthy in the eyes of her friends and family.Beth is the timid sister with a voice begging to be heard. Guitar in hand, her courage inspires her siblings to seize the day and not take life for granted.Amy may be the baby of the family, but she has the biggest personality. Though she loves to fight with her sisters, her tough exterior protects a vulnerable heart that worries about her family's future.

Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy Details

TitleMeg, Jo, Beth, and Amy
Author
ReleaseFeb 5th, 2019
PublisherLittle, Brown Books for Young Readers
ISBN-139780316522861
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Lgbt, Childrens, Middle Grade, Comics, Young Adult, Retellings, Realistic Fiction, Fiction, Juvenile

Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy Review

  • Lola
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars. This is one of those books that would make a lovely present for a friend, especially someone who is having a hard time because it can give them comfort and remind them of the importance of reaching out to friends and family. It is a contemporary graphic novel retelling of Louisa May Alcott’s classic LITTLE WOMEN, which I read when I was in high school and enjoyed tremendously. The main reason for that is when I was a bit younger, I really wanted a sister. I had a brother (still have h 3.5 stars. This is one of those books that would make a lovely present for a friend, especially someone who is having a hard time because it can give them comfort and remind them of the importance of reaching out to friends and family. It is a contemporary graphic novel retelling of Louisa May Alcott’s classic LITTLE WOMEN, which I read when I was in high school and enjoyed tremendously. The main reason for that is when I was a bit younger, I really wanted a sister. I had a brother (still have him presently) but he and I were not close back then so I fulfilled my wish of a sister through books and one of those books was LITTLE WOMEN. As far as retellings go, this was a decent one. We get a sense of each of the sisters’ personalities—their likes, dislikes, wishes and values—and we see them interact frequently with their friends and family members. I found it heart-warming, even when the girls faced difficulties in their lives. The only thing is that the story was divided into short chapters that made the plotline, but alas because the chapters were so short I sensed a lack of meaningful depth. Important topics and themes were breached but rarely developed in a way that spoke of their importance… They were glossed over. So I cannot give this book more, even though it was charming and I may want to read it again before Christmas or whenever I have a fallout with my own family, but then again there might be other such stories out there that rush less through events. Last points: colourful, atmospheric and relatively memorable despite its weaknesses. Blog | Youtube | Twitter | Instagram | Google+ | Bloglovin’
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  • MissBecka
    January 1, 1970
    I liked how they made everything so modern, I'm just not sure the story worked as a graphic.Everything felt glossed over and less dramatic.Maybe I've just romanticized my memories of Little Women?I think a re-read has just been added to my 2019 to confirm.
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  • Jasmine
    January 1, 1970
    It's been 150 years, you better get your act together and make Beth pull through this, guys.
  • Ivy
    January 1, 1970
    I hate to support Another Little Women remake, but this one's gay, guys, this one's gay.Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy was a perfect graphic novel. I'm familiar with Bre Indigo's art from her webcomic Jamie, and it perfectly fit the warmth and emotion of this book. I'm familiar with the story of Little Women from a coloring book I obsessively colored as a child, so to see it translated so colorfully once again was really serendipitous for me. The "diversity" definitely didn't feel forced, which was some I hate to support Another Little Women remake, but this one's gay, guys, this one's gay.Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy was a perfect graphic novel. I'm familiar with Bre Indigo's art from her webcomic Jamie, and it perfectly fit the warmth and emotion of this book. I'm familiar with the story of Little Women from a coloring book I obsessively colored as a child, so to see it translated so colorfully once again was really serendipitous for me. The "diversity" definitely didn't feel forced, which was something I was afraid of. On the flip side, it felt natural and necessary. Overall, this was an incredibly sweet and timely homage to the original novel. While the writing and dialogue weren't outstanding, the heart and soul of the story shone through, the reimagined characters bold and unique in their own right.
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  • Jennifer
    January 1, 1970
    "Bring it on, life. March girls can take anything you throw at us." Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy: A Graphic Novel is a retelling of the classic Little Women. The familiar plot line is captured with a fun present-day twist as it incorporates parental overseas deployment, a multiracial blended family, chemotherapy, coming out as gay, cell phones, email, snapchat photos, and more. Creative liberties were taken when connecting the dots as to how the March sisters came to be a family which I thought wa "Bring it on, life. March girls can take anything you throw at us." Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy: A Graphic Novel is a retelling of the classic Little Women. The familiar plot line is captured with a fun present-day twist as it incorporates parental overseas deployment, a multiracial blended family, chemotherapy, coming out as gay, cell phones, email, snapchat photos, and more. Creative liberties were taken when connecting the dots as to how the March sisters came to be a family which I thought was a nice touch, and there was a bit of real-life history included as the 1970's alliance between the LGBTQ community and the Black Panther Party was discussed. In my opinion, this retelling is both similar enough and different enough to keep a variety of readers' interest. Although written for young readers, I enjoyed this graphic novel very much as an adult. Vibrant illustrations tell the narrative just as well as the written word, and messages about the strength of family run strong. My favorite element of this book was showing how people can change. Whether it's projecting intolerance and judgment on others or targeting others to take the attention off of yourself, with a gentle touch the creators of this graphic novel show that change is possible. Although I strongly support drawing impenetrable boundaries with harmful people, it's OK to have hope that one day things will be different. Hope keeps us going, and Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy do a great job of gifting the healing power of hope to young readers.My favorite quote: "At some point, you're going to encounter intolerance. When that happens, I want you to hold your head high and be proud of who you are. The world's gotten a lot better, but it still has a ways to go. Until then, know that you are never alone."
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  • Emma Shacoconut
    January 1, 1970
    I love Little Women, but I do think only really clicks with me when set during the Civil War. Modern adaptations have failed to grab me, and this one is no exception. Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy...means well. The illustrations are pretty and bright, and changing the Marches to a biracial family was a concept that worked in some places, if not all. The problem is that the story doesn't seem to be written from a point of view that can love the characters, while also allowing them to struggle - everythi I love Little Women, but I do think only really clicks with me when set during the Civil War. Modern adaptations have failed to grab me, and this one is no exception. Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy...means well. The illustrations are pretty and bright, and changing the Marches to a biracial family was a concept that worked in some places, if not all. The problem is that the story doesn't seem to be written from a point of view that can love the characters, while also allowing them to struggle - everything they get needs to be out of nowhere and simply because They Are The March Girls! (Another aspect that grated a little was that constant refrain of "Don't mess with the March girls!" "We're the March sisters!". In the original, the sisters managed to have a close bond without having to constantly state it.) I appreciated the addition of (view spoiler)[Jo's coming out storyline, since it seemed well intentioned and parts of it worked just fine (hide spoiler)], however, Jo's voice was incredibly irritating to me the entire book. Her journal entries were flat and poorly written (a note to writers: rarely do people begin to write out a sentence, then trail off like they would in spoken conversations), and the majority of her dialogue featured randomly inserted buzzwords, as if to say, "it's the 21st century!! feminism, amirite kids?". Social issues can be dealt with in young adult literature as long as they are brought into conversations organically, and not phrased like pull-quotes from essays, which so many of Jo's lines sounded like. The author also seemed afraid of giving her flaws, instead making her as selfless, caring, and cultured as possible. To paraphrase The Office, "There's no character growth here!"The dialogue ranged from either slightly adorable to eye-roll prompting for me. Why was Meg, a caring older sister who often felt insecure about her family's financial status, reduced to someone who said the phrase, "I'm going to/want to marry rich!" in nearly EVERY. SINGLE. CHAPTER. No one speaks like that! (view spoiler)[Also, her sudden decision to become a lawyer...came out of nowhere. I didn't understand it even after it was explained. (hide spoiler)]Beth seemed like a whole new character as well - apart from one chapter, she was fairly outgoing and strangely sassy. (view spoiler)[Her storyline, featuring a leukemia diagnosis instead of scarlet fever, was one of the few actually effective changes, because it still made for an emotional, yet uniting for the family, event. The head shaving scene was heartwarming and worth a star on its own. (hide spoiler)] Amy's portrayal here was great, though! Still her vain, sweet, charming self. Laurie was basically nonexistent, Aunt March had her moments but her importance to the plot seemed to be misunderstood, and there was a strange lack of Marmee in the girls' lives. While there are other parts of the book I just didn't enjoy - random introduction of never-before-mentioned characters, name changes that didn't make any sense, and AWFUL characterization of Mr. Brooke (view spoiler)[who was changed to be rich and scornful of Meg's career?? Caring husband and father John Brooke would NEVER (hide spoiler)] - I'm going to end by saying I'm sad I didn't enjoy this more. A lot of potential that ended up letting me down as an adaptation and cohesive story itself.
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  • Sarah Wyatt
    January 1, 1970
    This was SO SO SO good! Awesome female characters, a diverse family. Somehow covered so many topics including poverty, bullying, lgbtq+, cancer, disability, love all in just this one book without feeling like it was trying too hard. I have to confess--I haven't actually read Little Women, so I can't compare it to the original. But just as a stand-alone graphic novel, this was so good!
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  • laura (bookies & cookies)
    January 1, 1970
    I, WOW. Just wow.As someone who was first introduced to the 1994 classic movie, dodged endless terrible adaptations, looked forward to new ones, AND read the book that started it all (as a precocious 13 year old who lugged it around to the playground hang out spot), this book is DEAD-ON. WOW.I don't know what to say, but every little detail is included, even Amy's limes!It's a new twist, the March sisters live in Brooklyn in a small apartment and their dad is fighting in the Iraq. Jo is submitti I, WOW. Just wow.As someone who was first introduced to the 1994 classic movie, dodged endless terrible adaptations, looked forward to new ones, AND read the book that started it all (as a precocious 13 year old who lugged it around to the playground hang out spot), this book is DEAD-ON. WOW.I don't know what to say, but every little detail is included, even Amy's limes!It's a new twist, the March sisters live in Brooklyn in a small apartment and their dad is fighting in the Iraq. Jo is submitting short stories to publications, Beth plays guitar and writes her own songs, Amy draws cartoons and plays video games, Meg is into fashion and is concerned about their money. Jo is from her Mom's first marriage, Meg is from her Dad's, and they form a new, larger family together. It was fun, it was light-hearted, it was current, it was accessible. One of the main characters is gay. Beth has leukemia instead of small pox. All around, wow.(view spoiler)[Also, Beth doesn't die! I've never cried so hard when Jo was staring into the mirror contemplating her life. And, I never knew I needed to see the March women walk in the Women's March until this moment. (hide spoiler)]
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  • Pressed Between Pages
    January 1, 1970
    "Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy" a Graphic Novel by Rey Terciero and Bre Indigo — I am so overwhelmed, and in such a positive and empowering way. "Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy" is absolutely magical, and, in my opinion, a nearly PERFECT modern retelling of "Little Women" which is steeped in research of the original book itself, but also the Author, Louisa May Alcott, and her family. As a historian of Alcott myself, I could see and pick up on all the beautiful references of the original text that the authors l "Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy" a Graphic Novel by Rey Terciero and Bre Indigo — I am so overwhelmed, and in such a positive and empowering way. "Meg, Jo, Beth, and Amy" is absolutely magical, and, in my opinion, a nearly PERFECT modern retelling of "Little Women" which is steeped in research of the original book itself, but also the Author, Louisa May Alcott, and her family. As a historian of Alcott myself, I could see and pick up on all the beautiful references of the original text that the authors left for new readers –even down to the year of publication, 1868!More over, this book is filled with beautiful and living tolerance. The March family is an interracial, blended family who struggle and succeed with love, loss, friendship, relationships, social justice, sickness, and even a parent in the armed forces! This novel packs a punch to the emotions and ties it all together with so much humor, Grace, and amazing pop-culture and history references that I finished it in mere hours. This is a book I will reread over and over again and I would recommend it to any person, especially a young person, trying to figure out who they are. Also, the intersectional female empowerment in this book is EARTH SHATTERING. Do not walk, run to your nearest independent bookstore and pick up a copy. Read it with your mom, sister, partner, best friend, ANYONE. And then talk about it!
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  • Andréa
    January 1, 1970
    A little preachy / heavy-handed with the messages, but otherwise a great retelling. The changes to the story made it much more appealing to me than the original. And I found all of the characters to be more likeable in this format / retelling.
  • Kim
    January 1, 1970
    I'm not quite sure what the authors/illustrators were trying to accomplish with this. At times, it adhered strictly to the original story...and at others, it threw everything of the original out the window in favor of unfamiliar characterization and modern-day moralizing. It seemed what this book really wanted to be was somewhere in between...and it just didn't quite get there.
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  • India
    January 1, 1970
    I feel like if this was just a story of a blended family overcoming obstacles and finding themselves I would have enjoyed it far more. Being an adaptation of Little Women brought with it a bit of back story, baggage, and reader knowledge that I don’t think translated as well as I would have liked.That being said, the illustrations are gorgeous, the plot was relevant, and it was an overall fun read. I didn’t love it, but I liked it and I’m glad it’s here for readers who want a bit of social and p I feel like if this was just a story of a blended family overcoming obstacles and finding themselves I would have enjoyed it far more. Being an adaptation of Little Women brought with it a bit of back story, baggage, and reader knowledge that I don’t think translated as well as I would have liked.That being said, the illustrations are gorgeous, the plot was relevant, and it was an overall fun read. I didn’t love it, but I liked it and I’m glad it’s here for readers who want a bit of social and political commentary mixed into their classics.
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  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    February 5th 2019 by Little, Brown Books for Young Readers The March family lives in a brownstone in the city. Their mother is a harried hospital nurse, and their father is fighting overseas. Things are economically tough, and each girl has their own wishes for Christmas that don't come true. Jo, whose biological father left when she was a baby but who was adopted by Robert March when he married her mother, what great literature. Meg, the oldest, wants the latest fashion. Beth, the quiet musicia February 5th 2019 by Little, Brown Books for Young Readers The March family lives in a brownstone in the city. Their mother is a harried hospital nurse, and their father is fighting overseas. Things are economically tough, and each girl has their own wishes for Christmas that don't come true. Jo, whose biological father left when she was a baby but who was adopted by Robert March when he married her mother, what great literature. Meg, the oldest, wants the latest fashion. Beth, the quiet musician, wants her own guitar, and bratty Amy just wants everything. When wealthy neighbor Mr. Marquez invites them to share Christmas dinner with him, they meet his grandson, Laurie. There are triumphs and tragedies along the way that echo the ones in Alcott's book but are modernized. Several things do change, such as the trajectory of Beth's disease and of Meg's romance, and a surprise announcement from Jo.Strengths: The events are convincingly updated with added diversity. The characters stay fairly true to form. The illustrations are quite nice, and the colors are good. There are some e mails and journal entries that help explain some more complicated events, like how the family was created. It remains, as always, a good tale of sisterhood and finding yourself in the face of adversity.Weaknesses: Readers who love the original won't necessarily like some of the updates, but since few people under the age of 50 have read the original, it's not really a concern.What I really think: I didn't buy Schaefer's 2017 Littler Women: A Modern Retelling and Baratz-Logstead's 2012 Little Women and Me doesn't circulate too well (although it is SUPER clever and fun). The Anne of Green Gables graphic novel I have goes out occasionally, but it's a paperback and doesn't have this look to it. If your library can't keep Telgemeier and Jamieson books on the shelf, this would be a good purchase, but I don't think it will necessarily encourage readers to pick up the original. I prefer updates to original stories that are more along the lines of Jason Henderson's Young Captain Nemo-- more reimaginings than retellings.
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  • Eliana
    January 1, 1970
    Super cute, and everything I would want in a modern retelling of Little Women. I liked how the characters were super diverse in a way that felt very natural, and I'm definitely a fan of (view spoiler)[ Beth surviving and Jo being gay. (hide spoiler)] I just wish it had been longer so that we could've gotten to see even more character development and adaptations of scenes from the original book. But I would gladly read any sequels that the authors decided to write! The shorter length also means t Super cute, and everything I would want in a modern retelling of Little Women. I liked how the characters were super diverse in a way that felt very natural, and I'm definitely a fan of (view spoiler)[ Beth surviving and Jo being gay. (hide spoiler)] I just wish it had been longer so that we could've gotten to see even more character development and adaptations of scenes from the original book. But I would gladly read any sequels that the authors decided to write! The shorter length also means that you don't get as much of the full effect of the characters and their personalities, so I would recommend reading this graphic novel after reading the original Little Women so you can better understand the characters and better appreciate the changes that were made for the graphic novel.
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  • Helen
    January 1, 1970
    This was not for me but I think that if you go into not expecting the magic of the original, you may like it a lot more then. For me though this was not what I was wanting and I was left very disappointed.
  • Pamela Groseclose
    January 1, 1970
    Louisa May Alcott would be proud of this updated version of her book. This is my favorite book of 2019 so far. <3 I can't wait to promote and recommend this book to everyone I encounter.
  • Steph L
    January 1, 1970
    A fantastic retellingAs a fan of Little Women I wanted to read this. I loved the LGBTQ rep. The art style is amazing and adorable. I recommend this for anyone who has read Little Women and those that are looking for a quick Graphic Novel to read.
  • Rachel Macklin
    January 1, 1970
    This was so cute with so much heart
  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely glorious modern retelling. I have never been so moved while reading a Graphic Novel.
  • Heather McC
    January 1, 1970
    A beloved tale of sisterhood (Louisa May Alcott's 'Little Women' gets a very modern retelling that keeps the heart and spirit of the source material. The March girls may have 21st century problems, but their strength is still found in the love they share for one another and the ability to dream big.
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  • Whitney
    January 1, 1970
    Love, love, love, love, this book. I have always been fan of Little Women so when I heard there was going to be graphic novel retelling of the story I was PUMPED! Let me tell you this book did not disappoint AT ALL! The visuals and colors are stunning and I've already started to go back and look at them again. The story is also amazing. The authors stuck to the original story but they also made it modern, fresh, and so relatable to kids today. Everyone should read this! This book features dive Love, love, love, love, this book. I have always been fan of Little Women so when I heard there was going to be graphic novel retelling of the story I was PUMPED! Let me tell you this book did not disappoint AT ALL! The visuals and colors are stunning and I've already started to go back and look at them again. The story is also amazing. The authors stuck to the original story but they also made it modern, fresh, and so relatable to kids today. Everyone should read this! This book features diverse characters and situations that we need to see in children and young adult literature.
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  • TheMistressofBooks
    January 1, 1970
    Cute and up-to-date for 2019. Although I don't know how I feel about (view spoiler)[ Beth living in this rendition (hide spoiler)]. Jo's a bit whiny and in-your-face, but nonetheless I enjoyed reading this. The artwork is really endearing, but I have to say I enjoyed one artist's work much more than the other. When they switched artists, it's very telling because the artwork loses some of its charm and preciseness, imo.
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  • RivkaBelle
    January 1, 1970
    **3.5 starsI don't read many graphic novels, but I have loved Little Women since my first reading at age 9, so *of course* I had to give this one a whirl. I liked it -- the March sisters are vibrant and lively, the pacing is good. The graphic format really helps speed things along, and I like that it stopped after a year's events (rather than trying to carry too far into the future/the rest of the story). As with anything, turning a classic into a modernized retelling is tricksy -- but I think t **3.5 starsI don't read many graphic novels, but I have loved Little Women since my first reading at age 9, so *of course* I had to give this one a whirl. I liked it -- the March sisters are vibrant and lively, the pacing is good. The graphic format really helps speed things along, and I like that it stopped after a year's events (rather than trying to carry too far into the future/the rest of the story). As with anything, turning a classic into a modernized retelling is tricksy -- but I think the authors did a good job, minus a few places where it felt too forced. (I got the feeling a time or two that they had a check list of modern ideas/concepts/etc they were checking off as they went, rather than letting it develop more organically). On the whole, a nice introduction to the story of Little Women.
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  • Liz
    January 1, 1970
    I think this will have great appeal for fans of Smile and similiar GNs, it was enjoyable and the art style was appealing. I just felt like it tried to cram so much in, blended interracial family, economic struggles, racism, sexuality, woman's rights, that it felt like tokenism on parade at times. They could have made this a series, still included all the things, but dealt with each more indepth.
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 stars rounded up because it is great for a young audience, I only wish it had not been a re-telling for Little Women. The story and characters were well done and I love the family and perspectives. There are big chunks that feel forced in an effort to follow the LW story. If they had done their own thing the entire time, rather than attempt to have major plot points that follow LW I would have given this 5 stars without thought. I would read more about them as well but it should have been "i 3.5 stars rounded up because it is great for a young audience, I only wish it had not been a re-telling for Little Women. The story and characters were well done and I love the family and perspectives. There are big chunks that feel forced in an effort to follow the LW story. If they had done their own thing the entire time, rather than attempt to have major plot points that follow LW I would have given this 5 stars without thought. I would read more about them as well but it should have been "inspired" rather than a "retelling".
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  • Chadd Huizenga
    January 1, 1970
    It got a little preachy at the end, but I had a few good cry moments (both happy and sad) throughout so I really enjoyed it. Never read "Little Women" but I might add it to my to read list.
  • Cy
    January 1, 1970
    this was really sweet, but i've never read little women and don't remember literally anything from the movie, so i don't have the original to compare it to lmao.some parts were a little soapboxy and preachy, and there were parts where i was like "ppl don't talk like that in real life" but otherwise, this was a really cute book. fans of raina telgemeier will love it.
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  • Lauren
    January 1, 1970
    I wanted to love this, I really did. There was so much about this adaptation I was looking forward to. Sadly, I was disappointed by a lot of it. Some devices felt repetitive and awkward; some the dialog comes off stilted and preachy; some plot points, obviously from the source material, didn't feel adequately set up in this iteration.
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  • Jeimy
    January 1, 1970
    This graphic novel is more than a mere retelling. It offers (20th and 21st century) readers what we always wanted from Alcott’s work. This made me love it, but I wonder if readers who are unfamiliar with Alcott’s work and chose to read the original will be disappointed.
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  • Julia Francis
    January 1, 1970
    I have no idea if they followed the story of Little Women exactly but I can't wait to read it now. I originally followed this when it was just a webcomic and the complete version in a book form was an amazing idea. I could see myself reading this over and over again.
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