Marriage Vacation
In season four of Darren Star’s hit TV Land series Younger, the editors at Empirical Press are shocked and deeply moved when they read Marriage Vacation, an autobiographical novel by the publisher’s estranged wife, Pauline Turner Brooks. Knowing the book will cause a sensation, they decide they must publish it. Now you can read what the hype is about.To find herself…she might lose everything.By all appearances, Kate Carmichael had the perfect life: two adorable daughters, a pre-war town house on the Upper East Side, and a husband who ran one of the most successful publishing companies in New York. But when Kate attends the wedding of two of her oldest friends and reconnects with successful classmates from graduate school, she suddenly sees her life in a different light: the career she didn’t pursue, the dreams she’s locked away, the empty veneer of her privilege.When the wedding weekend ends, instead of heading home to her husband and family, Kate gets on a plane and flies halfway around the world. She claims it’s just going to be for a week—two max—so she can clear her head, make headway with her writing, and shake free of the feeling that time is passing her by.But just like Kate’s life, the adventure doesn’t go quite as planned. When it’s time to return, she finds herself trapped between wanting to be a good mother and partner and needing to find herself again.This provocative and gripping novel asks: is a wife and mother allowed to have a midlife crisis? And, if she does, can she ever be forgiven? Marriage Vacation is for anyone who has ever fantasized about what it would be like to run away from it all.

Marriage Vacation Details

TitleMarriage Vacation
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJun 5th, 2018
PublisherSimon & Schuster
ISBN-139781982100179
Rating
GenreWomens Fiction, Chick Lit, Fiction, Romance, Adult

Marriage Vacation Review

  • Jillian
    January 1, 1970
    Okay, okay, yes, Marriage Vacation is a ghost-written tie-in novel for the tv series Younger. Which, unless you are a giant fan of the show (like me!) probably doesn't mean much to you... and you probably didn't run to pick it up on publishing day like I did! But in all seriousness - Marriage Vacation is a sometimes fun, sometimes heavy, and definitely sexy exploration of the middle years of motherhood. Not the early days when babies consume your whole lives, not the later years when your kids a Okay, okay, yes, Marriage Vacation is a ghost-written tie-in novel for the tv series Younger. Which, unless you are a giant fan of the show (like me!) probably doesn't mean much to you... and you probably didn't run to pick it up on publishing day like I did! But in all seriousness - Marriage Vacation is a sometimes fun, sometimes heavy, and definitely sexy exploration of the middle years of motherhood. Not the early days when babies consume your whole lives, not the later years when your kids are more independent, but the middle... when they're just dependent enough, and when you've been parenting for just long enough, to feel you've completely lost your sense of self. That's where we meet Pauline, an uber-privileged Upper East Side wife and mother who devotes all her endless hours to supporting her husband's career and the lives of her children, all at the cost of herself and her passion for writing. If you know the premise, you know that this sense of ennui pushes Pauline to take an unplanned extended break from her family, where she goes on some adventures, does some volunteering, and re-ignites her passion for writing. But will it come at the cost of her marriage? There were a few things I didn't love... Although Pauline recognizes her privilege, it still feels hollow at times, and without giving away too much I think the author (Jo Piazza, in reality) tried TOO hard to make her likable... after all, she did bail on her kids and husband for a year, with no notice.  I imagine this was fast-tracked to tie into the Younger Season 5 premiere, and it shows, as the book feels rushed in some ways, lacking depth for any character beyond Pauline. That being said, it was still a light and fun read. As a fan of Younger, I am DECIDEDLY #teamCharles (page 58, y'all!), so while I like Pauline on the show, we all know she's just a barrier to Liza and Charles getting together. This book is a very sympathetic (albeit, fictionalized) view into Pauline's life, and while there are a few nods to the show fans will pick up on, it also stands alone as a novel about marriage, motherhood, and the self.Perfect summer read. 3.5 Stars
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  • Rylee Richards
    January 1, 1970
    DNF, couldn't get behind Pauline as the protagonist. I'm not a huge fan of her in the show, and although the book made her as sympathetic as possible, I couldn't put the show to the side while reading it. I think I would've really liked it otherwise!
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  • Jamie Rosenblit
    January 1, 1970
    Really enjoyed this having been a long time fan of Younger (since the first episode) and it was nice to look into "Pauline's world" - however, being #TeamCharles, I do hate to sympathize with Pauline in any sense! This was a great tie in - also would recommend even for those who don't watch the show, totally stands on its own!
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  • Kaylie (shihtzus.and.book.reviews)
    January 1, 1970
    I’m going to be totally honest: this book review isn’t totally unbiased. You see, I am a huge fan of the tv show Younger and have literally counted down the minutes until this book was released. I just HAD to know Pauline’s (er, Kate’s) story of her year away from Charles (er, Karl?). If you’re not a fan of the show, I’m not sure how you will feel about this novel, but if you’re anything like me, it’s exactly what I needed it to be. Don’t get me wrong-it’s not exactly deep, or thought provoking I’m going to be totally honest: this book review isn’t totally unbiased. You see, I am a huge fan of the tv show Younger and have literally counted down the minutes until this book was released. I just HAD to know Pauline’s (er, Kate’s) story of her year away from Charles (er, Karl?). If you’re not a fan of the show, I’m not sure how you will feel about this novel, but if you’re anything like me, it’s exactly what I needed it to be. Don’t get me wrong-it’s not exactly deep, or thought provoking (this is the only reason I went with 4 rather than 5 stars), but it was exactly what I needed from the book.I honestly absolutely loved this. I kept matching up the story with the show that I love, and comparing names, scenarios, etc. I loved the “Easter eggs” such as Millenial Prints logo and the Acknowledgment thanking Liza for believing in her.What I truly loved, though, was how the story was used to address two huge topics that should be brought to light: depression and postpartum depression. What Pauline/Kate experienced was nothing that a woman should experience alone, and I truly think this book serves as a reminder that depression does not discriminate based on social class, family life, wealth, or any other topic that might make another person seem “elite.” It also brought to light that you should never rely on another for your identity and you should never be afraid to express your wants/needs. While I was initially concerned that the novel would just slam Charles/Karl for not being what Pauline/Kate needed, I was pleasantly surprised that the story actually reflected a need to vocalize ones needs in order to get what they want before they...well, have to jet off to Thailand to escape all responsibilities. Now, if you’ll excuse me, I’m going to re-binge watch Younger and look for the other little nods from Marriage Vacation.
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  • nomadreader (Carrie D-L)
    January 1, 1970
    So, so fun. I'm still Team Liza, but damn do I love Pauline. This book is so great.
  • Kim
    January 1, 1970
    Absolutely awful. If my brain wasn’t needing a break I would have given up. Makes Eat, Pray, Love (one of the worst, most self indulgent books ever conceived, said as an Elizabeth Gilbert fan) feel like a masterpiece.
  • Kelsey
    January 1, 1970
    A big hit for Millennial Print. Didn't love the ending though.
  • Cordula
    January 1, 1970
    As a tie-in to the TV show Younger, this book is more or less guaranteed to be a bestseller (or at least a hit with fans). It's a beach-read kind of book and easy page-turner. Rather unfortunately, for both Millennial Print and Simon Schuster, it feels like the production process was rushed to coincide with the release of the fictional version of it on the show. There are some typos, shoddy grammar and inconsistencies (e.g. even though the characters are called Karl and Katharine, in one scene K As a tie-in to the TV show Younger, this book is more or less guaranteed to be a bestseller (or at least a hit with fans). It's a beach-read kind of book and easy page-turner. Rather unfortunately, for both Millennial Print and Simon Schuster, it feels like the production process was rushed to coincide with the release of the fictional version of it on the show. There are some typos, shoddy grammar and inconsistencies (e.g. even though the characters are called Karl and Katharine, in one scene Kate recalls her husband scratching a C+K into a dining table...did "Pauline" forget that Charles has been renamed Karl or that they've spelled Katherine with a K instead of a C? In another scene Kate describes leaving the phone lying next to her on speaker but then recounts how it was still on her ear at the end of the call). I find these annoying because I think Liza would have done a better job...the thinly veiled references at Kelsey, Diana and Radha add a fun layer to the series and it's an interesting way to add more depth to a character we have actually not seen that much of on the show. I'm having a bit of a hard time though fusing the Pauline we see on TV with the alter-ego depicted in the book. I wonder if we will see any other Millennial Print books IRL (the one written by the dog, maybe?). This is a fun experiment in a way and makes for an entertaining book club/holiday read with a glass of chilled white. And at least we finally know what happens on p.58!
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  • Melissa Italiano
    January 1, 1970
    I’ll be honest, it was pretty bland most of the way through. I was intent on rating it a 3-star book but something about that last 25% really pulled me in. That bit was fun to read so it inched it’s way up to 3.5 stars for me. It’s not new, challenging, very well-written or anything like that but hey, it’s fun and quick and is a tie-in to one of my favorite TV shows to watch, Younger. So yeah, I’m sticking with 3.5 (rounded down since that is not a Goodreads option).
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  • Beth Blevins
    January 1, 1970
    Marriage Vacation is a lot like Rogue One. The whole purpose--and really, the only plot point--of Rogue One was to explain how the Death Star could have been so easily penetrated and destroyed by Luke Skywalker in a movie that came out decades ago. It is backstory (yawn), and we know how it will eventually end. The whole purpose of Marriage Vacation is to explain how a woman could abandon her children for a year and still not consider herself a bad mother/person. According to MV, it turns out sh Marriage Vacation is a lot like Rogue One. The whole purpose--and really, the only plot point--of Rogue One was to explain how the Death Star could have been so easily penetrated and destroyed by Luke Skywalker in a movie that came out decades ago. It is backstory (yawn), and we know how it will eventually end. The whole purpose of Marriage Vacation is to explain how a woman could abandon her children for a year and still not consider herself a bad mother/person. According to MV, it turns out she is a good person after all and not a selfish hedonist because she is doing good! and writing again! and she desperately misses her children the whole time! Unfortunately, "how could she be gone for a year?" is the only plot point/unanswered question for the entire 240 pages. It's not enough to keep most readers turning the page, except maybe for Younger viewers who are looking for backstory.Marriage Vacation also is a lot like Eat, Pray, Love--written in the form of a memoir, a woman describes going on a journey to foreign countries to find herself and reclaim her life. Except... there is no memorable eating, no praying (despite taking place almost entirely at a Zen center), and no successful lovemaking (except in past tense). However, given that Younger is my weekly guilty pleasure TV, reading Marriage Vacation is proving to useful in watching the current season since the character Pauline Turner Brooks is going on a book tour to promote this book in the first couple of episodes; it's kind of cool and uber meta to see her reading lines from the actual book.Finally, I want to applaud the ghost writer of this book, who managed to hit all the marks they were supposed to. Millennial Books wanted to acquire this book on the show because of the "hot sex" scene on page 58, and the ghost writer delivered something like that. That writer also managed to drag out one woman's weekend get-away into a year-long sabbatical without making it sound too selfish on her part, and also explained how she managed to live that long without her wealthy husband's money. So, Younger fans, read it if you want--it's summer, after all. Just don't expect a page-turning experience.
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  • Kayla
    January 1, 1970
    I wanted to read this because I am a Younger fan...Urg. Kate (Pauline) is so infuriating that I often wanted to throw the book. I would have rathered a more realistic ending. *Spoiler Alert*No way would I have let that selfish bitch come home.
  • Nate
    January 1, 1970
    As a huge fan of Younger when I heard about this book I nearly fainted. Literally nearly fainted. There have been only a select few (I can only think of Charm from All My Children) that have been featured on a show and created in real life. Being able to read page 58 and understanding even more about what they have been speaking about and will speak about since this book will play heavily into this season is just so cool. I bought it while watching the first episode this season. When it arrived As a huge fan of Younger when I heard about this book I nearly fainted. Literally nearly fainted. There have been only a select few (I can only think of Charm from All My Children) that have been featured on a show and created in real life. Being able to read page 58 and understanding even more about what they have been speaking about and will speak about since this book will play heavily into this season is just so cool. I bought it while watching the first episode this season. When it arrived I rushed to see if only the Simon and Schuster label was on it and was delighted as a fan to see both the S&S as well as Millenial imprint on the dust jacket.Now for the book it is not the next Pulitzer Prize winner but it is good. I turned pages and I craved the story. It is the story of Pauline and where she disappeared to in novel form with the names changed but you knew who she was talking about. While I did not like the ending (the final 10 pages) the first 230 were fantastic. I think I have a little more sympathy for the character of Pauline but at the same time I am still shocked by the idea of someone leaving their family because they need a break and being surprised by the negative repercussions of that decision. Highly enjoyable and very recommended for all but especially for fans of Younger of which this is almost required reading!
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  • The Story Girl
    January 1, 1970
    If you're a fan of the show Younger, you need to pick this book up ASAP. How did I not know they were turning this into an actual book?!?! So excited to read it!If you haven't heard of or have never watched Younger, then you are missing out on an amazing show, one that I think every book lover would truly love. It revolves around a woman who pretends to be younger than she is in order to get back to work in the publishing industry, and the whole show revolves around publishing and books! Do I ne If you're a fan of the show Younger, you need to pick this book up ASAP. How did I not know they were turning this into an actual book?!?! So excited to read it!If you haven't heard of or have never watched Younger, then you are missing out on an amazing show, one that I think every book lover would truly love. It revolves around a woman who pretends to be younger than she is in order to get back to work in the publishing industry, and the whole show revolves around publishing and books! Do I need to say more? Seriously, what other show do you know that actually shows Goodreads on there? They show behind the scenes of what it takes to market a book, keep the publishing industry afloat, and just so much more. My words can't do it justice, but do me a favor do yourself a favor and check out the first episode (available on Hulu and elsewhere)! It's only 20 minutes long, so even if you somehow don't end up liking it, you won't have wasted any time!They even have an author that's basically like George R. R. Martin who has a series similar to Game of Thrones called Crown of Kings! And they have cosplays related to it and so much more!And if I still haven't convinced you, check out these two beautiful men who are in the show as well.Oh, and did I mention the show is based on a book?And one last picture with Charles, who is played by Peter Hermann. Not only he is a graduate of Yale, but he recently just published his own book! I love the talented cast so much.Also, follow me on my blog here: https://thebookishexpedition.wordpres... for book reviews and a lot more!
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  • Kelly Hager
    January 1, 1970
    As you may know, I am a huge fan of the show Younger. When I found out that Marriage Vacation was going to become a real book, I was excited and nervous. I know in general that when books are tie-ins for TV, they aren't always very good. This book is actually surprisingly good. It's a book I would've enjoyed if I had just encountered it randomly, with no idea it came from a TV show. It's really fun. I also like the way it gave us more insight into Pauline. (As backstory, if you watch the show, y As you may know, I am a huge fan of the show Younger. When I found out that Marriage Vacation was going to become a real book, I was excited and nervous. I know in general that when books are tie-ins for TV, they aren't always very good. This book is actually surprisingly good. It's a book I would've enjoyed if I had just encountered it randomly, with no idea it came from a TV show. It's really fun. I also like the way it gave us more insight into Pauline. (As backstory, if you watch the show, you know Charles' wife left him and their girls and was gone for a year. If you read the book, you see that there's a little more to it than that. She was constantly talking to the girls and Facetiming; she planned to be gone for a couple weeks, a month at most, and it just kept getting pushed back. And she was doing good things in the world. She wasn't just doing spa days and exotic travel.)Pauline is a really polarizing character, but I always liked her. (Part of it is definitely because I'm a huge fan of Jennifer Westfeldt; I'm pretty sure it's literally impossible to dislike any character she plays.) This book really cemented that. Even if you don't watch Younger, this is a super fun book. Grab some wine or a daiquiri and read it by the pool. You'll have the best time.Recommended.
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  • Simone
    January 1, 1970
    I mean I'm very #teamcharles but I was interested in reading this as an extension of the fictional world of Younger. It was a quick, fun read, although not well written enough to be as amazing as Liza sells it to be in the show? (Though page 58 lives up to the hype.) It's a catch-22. Also, this seems like a weird Millenial Press book, considering it's about a woman older than that demographic? It seems more of a fit for women actually Liza's age. But, I digress, no use unnecessarily poking the p I mean I'm very #teamcharles but I was interested in reading this as an extension of the fictional world of Younger. It was a quick, fun read, although not well written enough to be as amazing as Liza sells it to be in the show? (Though page 58 lives up to the hype.) It's a catch-22. Also, this seems like a weird Millenial Press book, considering it's about a woman older than that demographic? It seems more of a fit for women actually Liza's age. But, I digress, no use unnecessarily poking the plot device, the real-life book does what it needs to do.
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  • Gloria Verdino
    January 1, 1970
    I wanted to love this book because I love the show but I just really didn't relate to this one. It all seemed a little cliche and I wanted more from it - more about their marriage before she left, more about their reconnecting after she got back. I wanted it to be juicier knowing what the show is. And it didn't at all feel like a "tell all" of their marriage. I guess it just wasn't my kind of story...
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  • Jennifer Hagler
    January 1, 1970
    3.75 Stars
  • Brooke Nuzie
    January 1, 1970
    Let me start by saying that I don’t watch Younger. Maybe if I did, I wouldn’t mind the frustrating story, illogical plot, and mediocre writing. But like I said, I don’t watch Younger.
  • Natasha
    January 1, 1970
    This book was fairly entertaining and enjoyable even though it was loosely based off a tv show. I’d recommend it!
  • Alissa
    January 1, 1970
    🤣🤣🤣🧀🥥🧀🧀🧀🧀🧀😂😂😂😂
  • Adelyn
    January 1, 1970
    Great quick read companion to Younger! Captures that same finding yourself vibe as the show
  • Sierra
    January 1, 1970
    This book was such a nice quick read! I’m a huge fan of the show younger and was very excited when it was announced that they actually were releasing the book from the show! While I think even those who aren’t fans of the show (which if you haven’t watched it you really should because it’s SO good!) will enjoy this book, those of us who have watched the show will enjoy all the little things added to this book that connect to the series. Now we’re just left to wonder if the ending of this book wi This book was such a nice quick read! I’m a huge fan of the show younger and was very excited when it was announced that they actually were releasing the book from the show! While I think even those who aren’t fans of the show (which if you haven’t watched it you really should because it’s SO good!) will enjoy this book, those of us who have watched the show will enjoy all the little things added to this book that connect to the series. Now we’re just left to wonder if the ending of this book will actually correspond to the show... hmmmmm
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  • Natalia Buia
    January 1, 1970
    If you've read Eat Pray Love and wtched the movie, there's no need to read this book. Kate, the main character and narrator is just a terrible, annoying, onbnoxious, tone deaf person and I would not be her friend if I knew her in real life.
  • Abby C
    January 1, 1970
    I thought this would be total garbage considering it is a tie in novel to a sitcom and that cover and title scream "chick lit."It was actually really fun and pretty self aware.
  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    Audiobook ***5 STARS***Wow! What a great listen! WHY does this novel ONLY have a 3.5 star rating?! I can connect with Kate on so many levels (besides being a millionaire and actually going on a one year hiatus). Being a mom and wife can be so exhausting mentally. I’m 37 and already feel the same way sometimes. How I’d love to do what she did, I don’t think I could leave my family for that long though. Maybe for a couple of weeks! I don’t judge her by all means, she needed the hiatus and fortunat Audiobook ***5 STARS***Wow! What a great listen! WHY does this novel ONLY have a 3.5 star rating?! I can connect with Kate on so many levels (besides being a millionaire and actually going on a one year hiatus). Being a mom and wife can be so exhausting mentally. I’m 37 and already feel the same way sometimes. How I’d love to do what she did, I don’t think I could leave my family for that long though. Maybe for a couple of weeks! I don’t judge her by all means, she needed the hiatus and fortunately her husband, even if reluctant, allowed her to go and forgave her. That’s LOVE. You truly LOVE someone if let them go even if you’re unsure of the outcome. MONEY will NEVER make you 100% internally happy. STATUS is only a facade. STATUS doesn’t make you a good person. Lovely story!
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  • Eric Klee
    January 1, 1970
    If you love the TV Land series Younger, this book is a MUST READ. It's a great tie-in to the characters and storyline. If you're not familiar, Younger is about a 40-something year old woman named Liza who pretends to be 20-something in order to get a job at a publishing house after her divorce. Based on a novel, the series was developed for television by Darren Star, also famous for Sex and the City and Melrose Place. Liza succeeds (for the most part), but has to play the part of a millennial in If you love the TV Land series Younger, this book is a MUST READ. It's a great tie-in to the characters and storyline. If you're not familiar, Younger is about a 40-something year old woman named Liza who pretends to be 20-something in order to get a job at a publishing house after her divorce. Based on a novel, the series was developed for television by Darren Star, also famous for Sex and the City and Melrose Place. Liza succeeds (for the most part), but has to play the part of a millennial in all aspects of her life, which proves to be difficult at times. By seasons 4 and 5, the company she works for ends up buying and publishing the book "Marriage Vacation." As it turns out, the "author" Pauline is the wife of the head of the company. The story is based on her real life, when she took a "vacation" from her marriage by running off to Thailand to "make a difference," to rediscover herself, and to write again. She does this with no planning, no notice, and barely an explanation, leaving behind her husband and two daughters. When I first started reading "Marriage Vacation," I took Pauline's side. I could see her point of view. She's lost herself. She got married, became a wife to a successful business man, became a mom to two kids...and just lost every part of herself as an individual. I could definitely feel for her and sympathize with those feelings. I think we've all felt lost at one point and wanted to get away from everything. On the other hand, there comes a point where you make your own choices and have to be responsible for the choices you've made. She chose to get married. She chose to have children. You can't just walk away from your responsibilities, not expect there to be consequences, and have everyone just waiting for you to return to your normal life after you've gone and had your fun. The novel was an easy, interesting read, though, and really gave me some more insight into the character of Pauline on the TV series. It also works well as a stand alone chick-lit story, even if you no nothing about the TV series. I also enjoyed some of the extras details in the book. There's an author bio and acknowledgements of the fictional character of Pauline. The book also says on the spine and inside that it's a "Millennial Imprint," which is from the TV series.
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  • Andrea
    January 1, 1970
    This book is only slightly better than you think...and yes, it definitely feels rushed. Throughout the story, Pauline—excuse me, Kate—writes several letters to her husband explaining how she feels about their relationship and why she needs the “marriage vacation.” Those moments are the novel’s most heartfelt pages, and I wish the book relied more on that format since that’s where the real author’s talent shines (Jo Piazza). To that point, Piazza is a clever writer. Unfortunately, she’s saddled w This book is only slightly better than you think...and yes, it definitely feels rushed. Throughout the story, Pauline—excuse me, Kate—writes several letters to her husband explaining how she feels about their relationship and why she needs the “marriage vacation.” Those moments are the novel’s most heartfelt pages, and I wish the book relied more on that format since that’s where the real author’s talent shines (Jo Piazza). To that point, Piazza is a clever writer. Unfortunately, she’s saddled with material she doesn’t have a clear stake in—a fact that drags the book down when Kate isn’t writing her letters—and that’s often the trouble with writing from a premise that’s not one’s own.And yet, as a writer, I enjoyed the stories about Kate’s struggles to find her literary voice. I was also pleased to note that in the book she sends several manuscripts to a rival publisher, Zeotrope, instead of to her husband’s imprint. I realize Marriage Vacation is Pauline’s fictionalized version of the truth, but on the show, I couldn’t understand how she could feel accomplished as a writer when publishing her work at her husband’s company. Wouldn’t she want to build her writing life on her own terms? I also understand the show set things up so that Pauline could use the book to win back Charles, but as a REAL writer, wouldn’t she always wonder about the value of her prose when it’s possible her husband only published her work to appear as the bigger person?Anyway, I am getting off point here, if you’re a fan of the show and recall how critics describe this novel as “meaty” and “literary.” I would say that’s a huge exaggeration. If that’s what you’re looking for, you’re going to be disappointed. There’s a lot of repeated language, simplistic dialogue, unnecessary misunderstandings (thongs = flip flops, duh), rich white people concerns that probably won’t resonate with the general populous, and the wrap-up of finding her friend’s husband came together all too quickly (as does her reunion with Carl). Plus, the sex scenes feel clumsy. Yes, even page 58. However, there are a few gems about writing and living in one’s truth that newbie novelists and young women may enjoy being reminded about.
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  • Dana
    January 1, 1970
    Marriage Vacation had an interesting premise that might appeal to married people- Kate, a married mother of two, decided she needed a vacation from her life. When she attended a wedding surrounded by her college friends she was suddenly yanked back into the dreams she had in her youth. When a former roommate invited her to Thailand, an accidental ecstasy trip prompted her to buy a ticket there instead of home to her husband and two daughters. Kate was an interesting character because throughout Marriage Vacation had an interesting premise that might appeal to married people- Kate, a married mother of two, decided she needed a vacation from her life. When she attended a wedding surrounded by her college friends she was suddenly yanked back into the dreams she had in her youth. When a former roommate invited her to Thailand, an accidental ecstasy trip prompted her to buy a ticket there instead of home to her husband and two daughters. 
Kate was an interesting character because throughout the novel I both agreed and disagreed with her decision. The author gave plenty of background that supported why Kate needed some time for herself and more out of life than just being a housewife and taking care of her two girls. Her college friends all seemed so certain she would be a successful author that I accepted that she had squandered her natural writing ability and instead let go of her dreams. So, the trip to Thailand to find her voice and be able to get back to a spot where she could do more than household duties seemed reasonable, if not necessary.
But when her week long trip turned into two weeks, then two months, I started to identify less with her. That was the point she seemed self involved, and overly interested in the problems of strangers rather than even slightly worried about her daughters. And this was what made this such a good read! The author had the heroine making choices that pulled the reader to her,  then against her. Kate's decisions seemed impromptu and emotionally driven which made it fun to read and see what would happen to her.
I liked that she didn't fall into the arms of another man, this was not a book about the wrong love, this was a book about life choices, adventure, helping others, and finding worth in oneself. For a short read, it packed n plenty of emotion through letters home to her family, plot peaks with each week she stayed away, and misunderstandings that left her wondering whether she even had a home to return to. This was a thoughtful,yet fun, beach read that I think many married women would appreciate.

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  • Natalie
    January 1, 1970
    (3.5/5) Thank you Simon & Schuster for kindly providing me a copy of Marriage Vacation in exchange for a review. As a huge Younger fan (since season 1 y’all!), this was a treat and I couldn’t wait to dive in. The book was/is constantly mentioned in the show and it just makes you wanna get your hands on a copy. I’m so happy this became a real book - to understand Pauline more. While she annoys me in the show, I now understand why she left and did what she did. However, she tried too much to m (3.5/5) Thank you Simon & Schuster for kindly providing me a copy of Marriage Vacation in exchange for a review. As a huge Younger fan (since season 1 y’all!), this was a treat and I couldn’t wait to dive in. The book was/is constantly mentioned in the show and it just makes you wanna get your hands on a copy. I’m so happy this became a real book - to understand Pauline more. While she annoys me in the show, I now understand why she left and did what she did. However, she tried too much to make herself the victim and is often naive in situations. This story was quite the adventure - Pauline did a lot of good charity work/aid which helped her find her purpose again. But her constantly questioning herself and thinking her husband would take her back and being shocked when he moved on kept annoying me. For someone who’s in her forties, she seemed as if she was acting like a 20 year old. That was one of my main pet peeves with the book, which allowed for it to have a lesser rating. *SPOILER* if I was Karl/Charles, I don’t know if I’d be able to forgive Pauline that easily. However, I’m glad it sparked the heat back up in their marriage and that she found her identity again as she clearly lost herself. Their relationship was hot at the times that she described it, but I expected more heat and chemistry. The so called “page 58” could have used more spice honestly. Pauline tried to downplay things and make it more coy and PG like. I may also be more critical as I’m a huge fan of the show 🤷‍♀️ I enjoyed getting to know more about Charles through this though, as he’s a closed book in the show.
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  • Karen
    January 1, 1970
    Kate runs away. From her marriage, her girls, her life. She didn’t go to the wedding in California intending to do anything so extreme but as she watched her friends take vows and glanced at Karl’s empty seat, it suddenly didn’t seem like the craziest idea. Kate is invited to a retreat in Thailand, a few weeks will not be the end of the world, she thought. Karl will understand, the girls will be fine. When two weeks turns into a year Kate’s life is turned upside down and her NY world will never Kate runs away. From her marriage, her girls, her life. She didn’t go to the wedding in California intending to do anything so extreme but as she watched her friends take vows and glanced at Karl’s empty seat, it suddenly didn’t seem like the craziest idea. Kate is invited to a retreat in Thailand, a few weeks will not be the end of the world, she thought. Karl will understand, the girls will be fine. When two weeks turns into a year Kate’s life is turned upside down and her NY world will never be the same again- if it exists at all. Kate begins to write, a huge part of herself she had regrettably left behind, she spends her time living in the moment, remembering who she is and what kind of life she wants to live. Mid life crisis? Maybe. Another version of Eat Pray Love? Sort of. But here’s the catch; this book is a take off from the hit tv show Younger and Pauline Turner Brooks, the author, is a character on the show. If you watch Younger, it brings this story to life and if you don’t, it’s still a great take on something most of us would never ever imagine doing. I bet many women have fantasized about taking a break, reevaluating, making sure we are living the life we want before its too late. The guilt leaving the children and expectations of our society would never condone such behavior. But guess what? You can reevaluate and change your life right from your own backyard. You don’t have to wait for mid life or a plane ticket to Thailand. You can make changes big or small any day of the week. I thoroughly enjoyed this quick glimpse at pseudo reality, tv show or not. Thanks ghost writer Jo Piazza for bringing it to life.
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