In a House of Lies (Inspector Rebus, #22)
IN A HOUSE OF LIES...Everyone has something to hideA missing private investigator is found, locked in a car hidden deep in the woods. Worse still - both for his family and the police - is that his body was in an area that had already been searched.Everyone has secretsDetective Inspector Siobhan Clarke is part of a new inquiry, combing through the mistakes of the original case. There were always suspicions over how the investigation was handled and now - after a decade without answers - it's time for the truth.Nobody is innocentEvery officer involved must be questioned, and it seems everyone on the case has something to hide, and everything to lose. But there is one man who knows where the trail may lead - and that it could be the end of him: John Rebus.

In a House of Lies (Inspector Rebus, #22) Details

TitleIn a House of Lies (Inspector Rebus, #22)
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 18th, 2018
PublisherOrion
ISBN-139781409176886
Rating
GenreMystery, Crime, Fiction, Cultural, Scotland

In a House of Lies (Inspector Rebus, #22) Review

  • Paromjit
    January 1, 1970
    So Ian Rankin gives us the 22nd in the Edinburgh series featuring the iconic DI John Rebus, except Rebus is retired, although when was that ever going to stop him? He may well have given up the fags and curbed his excessive need for the drink, he may well have trouble climbing the stairs with his emphysema but he has not forgotten his well honed detective gut instincts. A group of schoolboys in Poretoun wood discover a well hidden red VW polo, in the boot is the body of a dead man with his feet So Ian Rankin gives us the 22nd in the Edinburgh series featuring the iconic DI John Rebus, except Rebus is retired, although when was that ever going to stop him? He may well have given up the fags and curbed his excessive need for the drink, he may well have trouble climbing the stairs with his emphysema but he has not forgotten his well honed detective gut instincts. A group of schoolboys in Poretoun wood discover a well hidden red VW polo, in the boot is the body of a dead man with his feet in handcuffs. The dead man turns out to be gay private investigator, Stuart Bloom, who disappeared in 2006, whilst working for film producer, Jackie Ness, in his fight over a land deal he wanted for film studios, he was up against Adrian Brand who wanted it for a golf course. The police team looking into Bloom's disappearance at the time came to be discredited in later years, with Bloom's mother, Catherine, accusing it of corruption and negligence. The new murder case is to open a can of worms, in which no-one comes out well, no-one is innocent and that includes Rebus. It is a house of lies, speaking of families and the lies they tell each other, in more ways than one. DI Siobhan 'Shiv' Clarke's reputation has a cloud hanging over it, she has been the focus of ACU, the new version of Complaints, Professional Standards with DS Brian Steele and DC Grant Edwards looking at her for leaking to a journalist contact, Laura Smith. Steele and Edwards were uniforms part of the original 2006 police team, nicknamed the Chuggabugs from the Wacky Races. Clarke has been seconded to the murder inquiry headed by DCI Graham Sutherland. Clarke is getting silent phone calls from public phone boxes. With her eye on the ACU efforts to get her for anything, Clarke asks Rebus to look into the murder conviction of Ellis Meikle for killing his beautiful girlfriend. DI Malcolm Fox has been based at Gartcosh, and with his superiors mindful of the possible ramifications to Police Scotland of the Bloom case, he is asked to go over the old case files to identify problematic areas and any corrupt police practices that took place. Needless to say, Morris Gerald Cafferty, Big Ger, the now revived gangster plays a part in the case, still regretful of the ambitions he had been forced to let go of in 2oo6.I am not sure how long Ian Rankin can continue this series given Rebus's state of health and retirement, but there is still plenty of life left in Rebus, so I hope he has a long well deserved future. There is no-one quite like Rebus for deploying all that he knows and engaging in machinations worthy of Big Ger himself when it comes to getting a result when it looks out of reach. Rebus may well be viewed as a dinosaur in the modern Police Scotland, but there is no doubt that old policing skills and instincts have their place which computers, IT, and CCTV are unable to replicate. The constant reorganisation, restructuring and bone deep budget cuts facing the police is made clear in the novel. This is another fantastic addition to what is a brilliant and well loved series. Highly Recommended. Many thanks to Orion for an ARC.
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  • Nat K
    January 1, 1970
    ”Who is it exactly that you’ve been speaking to, Siobhan?”“He’s an ex-cop. Been retired a few years. And if I know him, he’ll be turning up here in the next ten or fifteen minutes.”“Feel like telling us a bit about him before that happens?”“In ten or fifteen minutes?” Clarke gave a little snort. “I doubt I’d be able to do him justice.”Sigh. Another Rebus book devoured. So wonderful to have spent time in his company again. Sigh because the ending left me satisfied, with the carrot dangling that ”Who is it exactly that you’ve been speaking to, Siobhan?”“He’s an ex-cop. Been retired a few years. And if I know him, he’ll be turning up here in the next ten or fifteen minutes.”“Feel like telling us a bit about him before that happens?”“In ten or fifteen minutes?” Clarke gave a little snort. “I doubt I’d be able to do him justice.”Sigh. Another Rebus book devoured. So wonderful to have spent time in his company again. Sigh because the ending left me satisfied, with the carrot dangling that Rebus will be back.As I’ve mentioned before, John Rebus is very much like an old friend that you’ve lost touch with, but who is always on the periphery of your life. It doesn’t take long to settle in very comfortably with this book and get drawn in. And it also doesn’t take long for Rebus to hear of the discovery of a car in the woods…with a body in the boot that went missing twelve years previously. Never mind that Rebus has been retired for several years, in his heart he’ll always be a copper. It’s in his blood. And he still has plenty of scores to settle. I love the friendship between Siobhan Clarke and Rebus, and how much her character has grown, as she’s climbed the greasy pole of heirachy in the force. Great to see Malcolm Fox working alongside Siobhan to help solve this cold case, and great to see Big Ger Cafferty (Rebus’ nemesis) is still on the scene. Rebus and Big Ger go wayyyyy back, and now have somewhat of a grudging respect for one another, even while being on opposing sides of the law.Originally I gave this four stars, but on completing this review I’ve upped it to five. Days later, I still find it incredible how all of the stories were woven in together so tightly, with no loose threads. Ian Rankin really knows how to write.I also love that Rebus still has his dog Brillo (that he picked up in the previous book “Rather Be The Devil”). I don’t know why, but this warms my heart. I can just imagine the two older chaps, going out for their evening constitutional, mulling over the state of the nation…”Not every day you meet a legend,” he said.'Me or you?' Rebus responded.”Touché to that.
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  • Andrew Smith
    January 1, 1970
    There’s no doubt that Ian Rankin is one of Britain’s finest crime fiction writers, in recent times maybe the best of all. But he’s now having to address a problem of his own making: by allowing his Edinburgh detective to age in real time he now finds that his frontman is well past 60 and therefore at a point he can no longer actively serve. So what now? It’s the same issue a number of other well respected crime writers are facing (James Lee Burke and Michael Connelly spring to mind) and the choi There’s no doubt that Ian Rankin is one of Britain’s finest crime fiction writers, in recent times maybe the best of all. But he’s now having to address a problem of his own making: by allowing his Edinburgh detective to age in real time he now finds that his frontman is well past 60 and therefore at a point he can no longer actively serve. So what now? It’s the same issue a number of other well respected crime writers are facing (James Lee Burke and Michael Connelly spring to mind) and the choice Rankin has made is to use John Rebus as a non-serving - and often unwelcome - source of information and assistance to Police Scotland. Siobhan Clarke, long ago introduced as a mentee of Rebus, has his aid foisted upon her here when skeletal remains turn up in the boot of a car, found in a deep gulley close to the city. John is pretty sure he knows the name of the deceased, it’s that of a man who disappeared a decade or more ago. And John should know, he was involved in the botched and much criticised missing person operation back then. But for much of the first half of the book he is side-lined as Siobhan and the rest of team kick-off the murder investigation. Soon after, another of Rankin’s creations, Malcolm Fox, is parachuted in to join the team. Now, in truth, I find Siobhan somewhat irritating and Fox a dull and humourless character. At the half way point this book was going nowhere for me.Luckily (for the book and for the sake of my own mental health) Clarke asked Rebus to look into a separate matter, involving a young man who had confessed to the murder of his girlfriend. Almost immediately the book took off. The pages were once more peppered with dry one-liners and the energy of the whole thing seemed to increase exponentially. There’s no doubt that the pages light up when Rebus is about. However, my broader issue with this book is that it really feels like a case of too many cooks. There are a number of potential murderers (fair enough), loads of cops (far too many, though the bent pair from the Anti-Corruption Unit are good value) and too many faces from the past (in addition to Fox, organised crime bigwigs Big Ger Cafferty and Darryl Christie both make an appearance). It’s like they say on Masterchef: too much on the plate!I remain a huge fan of this series, now in it’s 22nd instalment, but I’m starting to wonder where Rankin takes it next time around. Maybe a retrospective novel would be a good idea? Either way, I hope he manages not to repeat the muddle he’s created in this one. Very disappointed.
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  • Tucker
    January 1, 1970
    Although John Rebus is retired and suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, he is drawn into Siobhan Clarke’s latest investigation. A skeleton is discovered in the woods and later determined to be that of a man Rebus and his team tried to find years ago. Because they were never able to locate the missing man, the team fell under serious scrutiny for their failure to solve the case. There were accusations of incompetence and corruption, and Malcolm Fox is brought in to evaluate the i Although John Rebus is retired and suffering from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, he is drawn into Siobhan Clarke’s latest investigation. A skeleton is discovered in the woods and later determined to be that of a man Rebus and his team tried to find years ago. Because they were never able to locate the missing man, the team fell under serious scrutiny for their failure to solve the case. There were accusations of incompetence and corruption, and Malcolm Fox is brought in to evaluate the initial handling of the case. Rebus wants to protect former team members when it makes sense to do so, but he was not entirely clean in the original investigation either. Siobhan Clarke and Malcom Fox have been a welcome addition to this series, especially since Rebus’s retirement often puts him on the outside looking in. But he still manages to work his way in, and that is most welcome. Rebus is one of my favorite fictional detectives and I hate to see the day he’s done. Another great Scottish crime fiction novel from one of the very best.
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  • Bill Lynas
    January 1, 1970
    Ian Rankin's legendary creation John Rebus may have retired from the police force, but he's lost none of his investigation skills. With over twenty books in the Rebus series Rankin, like the detective himself, shows no sign of slowing down.In A House Of Lies is dramatic, thrilling & surprising. It's also full of humour & great dialogue.....& that's just the first two chapters.It is perhaps more of a John Rebus/Siobhan Clarke thriller, as Rebus is now retired & it's not quite as e Ian Rankin's legendary creation John Rebus may have retired from the police force, but he's lost none of his investigation skills. With over twenty books in the Rebus series Rankin, like the detective himself, shows no sign of slowing down.In A House Of Lies is dramatic, thrilling & surprising. It's also full of humour & great dialogue.....& that's just the first two chapters.It is perhaps more of a John Rebus/Siobhan Clarke thriller, as Rebus is now retired & it's not quite as easy to squeeze him into the action. However, he does have some truly excellent moments in this story. Does he have much time left before it all ends ? I, for one, certainly hope not.
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  • Stephen Robert Collins
    January 1, 1970
    First this not an Inspector Rebus because he is now 72 finished he is past it, not even been brought back for cold cases. This perfect example of money wasted as police officers are made to retire at 60 yet load of the good offices do not become brilliant till 55-57.This is Siobhan Clarke 's big case when body turns up murdered back in 2006 it is one of John's unsolved missing cases but It is not just her its also Malcolm Fox too. So Got three way cross old fart Rebus, Siobhan & Fox as well First this not an Inspector Rebus because he is now 72 finished he is past it, not even been brought back for cold cases. This perfect example of money wasted as police officers are made to retire at 60 yet load of the good offices do not become brilliant till 55-57.This is Siobhan Clarke 's big case when body turns up murdered back in 2006 it is one of John's unsolved missing cases but It is not just her its also Malcolm Fox too. So Got three way cross old fart Rebus, Siobhan & Fox as well as gay murder.This perfect example of how much things in the police force have change in ten years.Rankin has brought Rebus back but Still not done want few fans wanted a prolong story. He cannot write much more -now as it says he is far too old.Well done to Orion the cover wins worst cover of the month award it stinks.It is set in a wood in old car. Why couldn't had a car pocking out of lot of trees but No they have very colourless depressing grey crappyThis must certainly be one of Rebus' last books at 72 he not be up for much except pissing everybody off. This be why Fox is in this, I have not said was Rebus book but Fox book with John In it & not other way around . Its all about selling the book the name Rebus sells Fox does not.Reference to the TV cartoon characters from 1970s Wacky Races which be complete loss lot of anybody under under 30. Why on earth could not used Family Guy but A old series like this just showing off, it is funny but It is also silly.There is sub plot a old case of convicted murderer That John Investigates which becomes more important than the main plot. Both stories are old cases, both run side by side not to cross paths, yet the 2nd sub becomes more interesting than the first. But Could be because it is Rebus.Oh That sod Cafferty is in it in fact lot of story is set around that bastard! Rebus now has a dog called Brillo bloody odd name for a dog named after a scrubbing wire pan brush. That is Rankin making bad joke. At the readers expense so People may not get it.His style has changed lot from his early books such as Strip Jack or Wolfman but Style still got the jokes but Not the Rolling Stones titles which is shame. I find it odd that he has not moved on from Rebus it is like an old dog with a bone. This could easily been just Siobhan Clarke but No had to bring in sour face.Cannot he move on. I think have to kill Rebus off if wanted to move on. Like Taggart or Victor Meldrew is 6ft under. But Then have all the oh why not do a prologue about how became a police man so Still be trapped hahaha!
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  • John Martin
    January 1, 1970
    Time Rebus retired for goodI’ve been a fan of Ian Rankin’s Rebus from his early books but I think it’s time for one of us to part company.Earlier books were cutting edge but I found this one to be tired, cliched and with a story that stretched credibility too much and relied on chance just a bit too often.If this was the work of a newer writer, I might have given it four stars because even though the writing fails to sparkle the story is better than average. But truth is I expect better from Ran Time Rebus retired for goodI’ve been a fan of Ian Rankin’s Rebus from his early books but I think it’s time for one of us to part company.Earlier books were cutting edge but I found this one to be tired, cliched and with a story that stretched credibility too much and relied on chance just a bit too often.If this was the work of a newer writer, I might have given it four stars because even though the writing fails to sparkle the story is better than average. But truth is I expect better from Rankin.
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  • Lou
    January 1, 1970
    I have a soft spot for Rebus given it was this series that got me interested in reading crime fiction in the first place, and I can't believe we still have new additions to it so many years after it began, not that there is any reason to stop producing a series that is universally popular. This is, in fact, the twenty-second novel to feature Edinburgh-based former Detective Inspector John Rebus of Police Scotland. You often find as a series wears on that the author becomes a little despondent an I have a soft spot for Rebus given it was this series that got me interested in reading crime fiction in the first place, and I can't believe we still have new additions to it so many years after it began, not that there is any reason to stop producing a series that is universally popular. This is, in fact, the twenty-second novel to feature Edinburgh-based former Detective Inspector John Rebus of Police Scotland. You often find as a series wears on that the author becomes a little despondent and lacks the oomph that was provided and put into earlier books, but there's no such issue here. Rankin is still very much at the top of his game!Despite Rebus being practically retired, here he is strongly featuring in 'In A House of Lies' where he assists the police with an intriguing cold case. The plot deals with a missing private investigator who is found and points to police corruption. Much like what is going on in reality, Rebus's old headquarters at Lothian & Borders Police is now defunct and has moved to a centralised location in Gartcosh near Edinburgh. So, to oversee the reinvestigation of the old case DI Siobhan Clarke and Malcolm Fox are parachuted in from the Major Incident Team (MIT). This is a soundly structured, complex and subtly nuanced tale, and each of the characters are superbly drawn but particularly Rebus, Fox and Clarke.As always, the pace is impeccable, the plot interesting enough that you become immersed quickly and Rebus, even though he is no longer in charge, is still a unique character that knows his own mind, is confident is his abilities, and although he may be a little unconventional we all know that all of the best people always are! However, with his COPD creating havoc in terms of breathing and his issues with alcohol and cigarettes not to mention his age, he now has more important priorities than just police work.Another wonderful addition to Scottish Noir with plenty of wit and dry humour and an atmosphere few crime writers know how to create! I challenge any crime buff to not enjoy this novel. The multiple strands of the plot are woven together seamlessly by a true master of the genre. I hope both him and Rankin are on top of their game for the foreseeable!Many thanks to Orion for an ARC. I was not required to post a review, and all thoughts and opinions expressed are my own.
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  • Kathy
    January 1, 1970
    Not five star is the determination of the correct edition I actually read since it does not appear in the long list of editions. I could monkey with it, but I won't. Mine is US edition from Little Brown and 372 pages. I did earlier take advantage of the free preview Kindle from Amazon and enjoyed it.After the preview, I knew I would love the book. It manages to be fresh. Such new life was breathed into this 22nd Rebus book that it sparkles. Ian Rankin rules!Yes, Rebus appears with his little dog Not five star is the determination of the correct edition I actually read since it does not appear in the long list of editions. I could monkey with it, but I won't. Mine is US edition from Little Brown and 372 pages. I did earlier take advantage of the free preview Kindle from Amazon and enjoyed it.After the preview, I knew I would love the book. It manages to be fresh. Such new life was breathed into this 22nd Rebus book that it sparkles. Ian Rankin rules!Yes, Rebus appears with his little dog Brillo, changed by COPD and retirement, yet not diminished! The main focus is old case Rebus had been assigned to twenty years ago along with others who are now hiding in the cloth of ACU, internal investigative arm of police. The puzzle presents itself with the discovery of a hidden old car in a gully that contains remains of missing person. Sioban is assigned to team by new guy in town, DCI Sutherland. Rebus asks her if it is a VW Polo since his memory has not gone. Thus he enters the action with the first clue as to who the missing person was.Plenty of time has passed since the crimes connected to this missing person and the lies have solidified and will be protected. Even old Cafferty comes into view and quite literally from Rebus's window he can be seen inside his house.
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  • Sandy
    January 1, 1970
    Now the looong wait for #23....review to follow.
  • Margaret
    January 1, 1970
    The latest John Rebus novel by Ian Rankin is simply delicious.A car is found with a skeleton in it. The skeleton of a young man who went missing several years early. Problem is, the car wasn't there when the police searched the area.Now the case is being reopened, with Siobhan Clarke and Malcom Fox involved, whilst Rebus flits around the edges making a hairy arsed nuisance of himself. Add a couple of bent coppers and someone stalking Siobhan, and you have a classic, gritty, Ian Rankin novel.Ofte The latest John Rebus novel by Ian Rankin is simply delicious.A car is found with a skeleton in it. The skeleton of a young man who went missing several years early. Problem is, the car wasn't there when the police searched the area.Now the case is being reopened, with Siobhan Clarke and Malcom Fox involved, whilst Rebus flits around the edges making a hairy arsed nuisance of himself. Add a couple of bent coppers and someone stalking Siobhan, and you have a classic, gritty, Ian Rankin novel.Often as time goes by, a series starts to get stale. There is nothing stale about "In a House of Lies". It is as fresh and chewy as a good novel can get.Well written, well balanced and a sheer delight from the first page to the last.
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  • Dorothy
    January 1, 1970
    John Rebus is now pushing 70 and has been retired from Scotland's Lothian and Borders Police for several years. He's been retired so long that the Lothian and Borders Police no longer exists; it's now Police Scotland. But all of his former colleagues are now a part of this "new" police force, and it's not really true that Rebus is retired. Being a detective is his life and he won't retire until that final exit music plays and he draws his last breath.He keeps his hand in because his former colle John Rebus is now pushing 70 and has been retired from Scotland's Lothian and Borders Police for several years. He's been retired so long that the Lothian and Borders Police no longer exists; it's now Police Scotland. But all of his former colleagues are now a part of this "new" police force, and it's not really true that Rebus is retired. Being a detective is his life and he won't retire until that final exit music plays and he draws his last breath.He keeps his hand in because his former colleagues, especially his former partner and protege, Siobhan Clarke, often call on him for his expertise regarding Edinburgh crime and criminals and for his memories regarding particular cases that he worked in the past. And that's where this story begins.Some teenage boys messing around in the woods come upon a rusted out car hidden under brush. In the boot of the car is a skeleton. Police are called and the skeleton is finally identified as that of a private investigator named Stuart Bloom who had disappeared a few years earlier. Rebus had worked on that earlier missing person case and it had never been resolved. A review of that case now finds some slipshod work and errors that should never have happened. Malcolm Fox of internal investigations is on the case and finds that Rebus may not have been as diligent in his investigation as he should have been.Meanwhile, Siobhan Clarke is assigned to the (now) murder case and she questions Rebus about how it all went down years before. She also asks his help on another case of hers - a young man who was convicted of unlawful killing (which he admitted to) and was sent to prison. Siobhan has misgivings about the case and wants a second opinion.Suddenly, the old retiree has a full plate of mysteries on which to chew. He couldn't be happier.Inevitably it seems, his reviews and his memories lead him back to his old nemesis "Big Ger" Cafferty, always the one who got away for Rebus. The two established a grudging relationship over the years, even becoming drinking buddies back in the day when Rebus was a drinker. All that, along with the constant smokes, is behind him now as he struggles with COPD. One of the great charms of this series has always been the believability of its characters. These are not supermen or superwomen. They are all too human, but they do take pride in the work they do and they try to do it to the best of their abilities. Even those like Rebus who never felt constrained by rules and who cut corners.A part of that believability factor has been the aging of Rebus, which has occurred more or less in real time along with the series that began way back in 1987 with Knots and Crosses. This is the twenty-second entry in that series and, even though some books are better than others, the quality has never faded. It's interesting to see Rebus now dealing with the problems of aging and I look forward to seeing how Rankin continues the series for - it is hoped - many more years.As for this particular book, for me it was a five-star read, near perfect. I can't think of anything about it of which I can complain.
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  • Sid Nuncius
    January 1, 1970
    Rebus may have been told that he is in a “managed decline,” but I’m delighted to say that Ian Rankin certainly isn’t. In A House Of Lies is excellent.When long-dead body is discovered in an abandoned car Siobhan Clarke and Malcolm Fox are part of the MIT investigating. Rebus, now well retired from the force, was part of the original investigation and becomes involved in this, too – not always to the delight of the team. It’s classic Rankin: complex, well structured and nuanced, with his three ce Rebus may have been told that he is in a “managed decline,” but I’m delighted to say that Ian Rankin certainly isn’t. In A House Of Lies is excellent.When long-dead body is discovered in an abandoned car Siobhan Clarke and Malcolm Fox are part of the MIT investigating. Rebus, now well retired from the force, was part of the original investigation and becomes involved in this, too – not always to the delight of the team. It’s classic Rankin: complex, well structured and nuanced, with his three central characters especially being extremely well drawn.There’s a lot of good crime fiction being written at the moment, but for me, this shows why Ian Rankin still stands out from the rest and remains among among the very best writers in the genre. He generates an excellent and wholly unforced atmosphere, sense of place and feel of police work and his characters, plot and dialogue are all completely convincing to me. That long, shadowy, complex relationship between Rebus and Big Ger Cafferty is still a brilliant feature and Rankin is doing an excellent job of widening the central focus of the books to include Clarke and Fox. Most of all, In A House Of Lies is completely compelling; I was hooked and sorry to reach the end.Probably all that really need be said is that this is a very fine Ian Rankin novel. The man is still at the peak of his form and I can recommend this very warmly indeed.(My thanks to Orion for an ARC via NetGalley.)
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  • Thebooktrail
    January 1, 1970
    Well there's nothing stopping Rebus is there?Coming back on the scene for a cold case and getting into some really troubling lies.Set in Edinburgh, it's familiar territory as far as the city goes, but there's nothing familiar about what Rebus finds in this novel.Tip: Venture yee not into Poretoun woods near the city. Oh they're fictional thank goodness. Just as well.Loved the warmth and humour of the novel that only Rebus/Rankin can give. I've been on a 'wacky race' around Edinburgh a few times Well there's nothing stopping Rebus is there?Coming back on the scene for a cold case and getting into some really troubling lies.Set in Edinburgh, it's familiar territory as far as the city goes, but there's nothing familiar about what Rebus finds in this novel.Tip: Venture yee not into Poretoun woods near the city. Oh they're fictional thank goodness. Just as well.Loved the warmth and humour of the novel that only Rebus/Rankin can give. I've been on a 'wacky race' around Edinburgh a few times with this writer but this one had me chuckling as well as gasping in fear. ;)
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  • Eric
    January 1, 1970
    In A House of Lies, Ian Rankin's retired police detective is brought back for another novel. An abandoned vehicle is found hidden in the woods and inside of the trunk is the decomposed body of a male, handcuffed at the ankles. It is believed the body may be that of a man missing for over a decade and from a case where the mother of the missing man has accused police of covering up and botching the case of her missing son. Because of the accusations of police cover-up, Malcolm Fox is brought in t In A House of Lies, Ian Rankin's retired police detective is brought back for another novel. An abandoned vehicle is found hidden in the woods and inside of the trunk is the decomposed body of a male, handcuffed at the ankles. It is believed the body may be that of a man missing for over a decade and from a case where the mother of the missing man has accused police of covering up and botching the case of her missing son. Because of the accusations of police cover-up, Malcolm Fox is brought in to review the original investigation conducted by then Detective Rebus and other characters known from previous Rankin novels. A parallel thread involves a murder investigation conducted by Siobhan Clarke that ended in a conviction based on solid and credible evidence, that she now has doubts over. Clarke asks retired John Rebus, now with failing health of his own, to look over her murder investigation and both cases take center stage, with Rebus also interjecting his skills into the found body case, among accusations of his own misconduct during the earlier missing person investigation. Soon, familiar characters start appearing, including Rebus' longtime foe, Big Ger Cafferty. Rankin's novel includes a blending of policing from the past and present, which includes a contrast of how investigations were conducted in the past, to how they are conducted in the present. Like Jo Nesbo's Harry Hole novels, Rankin is not afraid to "age" his star character and creates plots that have interwoven lessons of morality and real-life. Rankin also creates plots that realistically unfold and are actually mysteries and does not rely upon body counts to propel his tales forward, unlike the so many serial killer tales being published today.
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  • David Gooch
    January 1, 1970
    A dead body from an investigation years back turns up in a car and what are the chances that retired DI Rebus will know who he is and about the case? Odds on if you know anything about Rebus from previous experience.Once he knows about the body, he does his usual of trying to get in on the case and find out what's going on. Mainly to cover his back as he was on the original investigation and also because, as we know with Rebus, he just can't help himself. The current crew investigating do their A dead body from an investigation years back turns up in a car and what are the chances that retired DI Rebus will know who he is and about the case? Odds on if you know anything about Rebus from previous experience.Once he knows about the body, he does his usual of trying to get in on the case and find out what's going on. Mainly to cover his back as he was on the original investigation and also because, as we know with Rebus, he just can't help himself. The current crew investigating do their best to keep him away but you know with Rebus that won't happen don't you. DI Clarke even tries getting him investigating an old case of hers to help keep him out but like a boomerang he just keeps coming back. All his major characters are here with Rebus and involved, DI Clarke, DI Fox, Cafferty, et al, as they search to find the killer they couldn't find years back. What will come out of the woodwork and who will get a bloody nose in this one from the police to others? That is what makes this book so readable and enjoyable. You know before you read an Ian Rankin novel that it will be well written and keep you enthralled all the way through and it does that and more. He leads you down the many strands he creates in a story and you wonder what will be relevant and not come the final reckoning. Finally he delivers an ending which has kept you guessing from page one....what more can you ask?This is undoubtedly one of the best novels of this year so don't miss out, make sure you read it.
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  • MadProfessah
    January 1, 1970
    The DI John Rebus series is quite mature and familiar now that it is well over 20 entries long. Ian Rankin has done an excellent job of revitalizing the series recently by raising the profile of DI Siobhan Clarke (whom we have seen grown and develop from a uniformed officer to a seasoned criminal investigator under Rebus’ tutelage) and introducing Malcolm Fox (a former “Internal Affairs” Officer who initially tried to investigate and prosecute Rebus for his past misdeeds but in the last few book The DI John Rebus series is quite mature and familiar now that it is well over 20 entries long. Ian Rankin has done an excellent job of revitalizing the series recently by raising the profile of DI Siobhan Clarke (whom we have seen grown and develop from a uniformed officer to a seasoned criminal investigator under Rebus’ tutelage) and introducing Malcolm Fox (a former “Internal Affairs” Officer who initially tried to investigate and prosecute Rebus for his past misdeeds but in the last few books has worked with him to solve crimes).“In a House of Lies” is the latest Rankin mystery. Rebus has been retired for several years now so DI Clarke is the primary investigator of a case which revolves around the discovery of a car with a desiccated body with handcuffed ankles in the boot (trunk). The case involves Sir Adrian Brand, a prominent real estate developer, and Jackie Ness, a producer of low-quality, cheap movies who have feuded for years. When the body turns out to be identified as an openly gay private investigator who had disappeared after meeting with Ness and had been dating the son of an Edinburgh cop, the corrupt mistakes of the missing person investigation conducted by Rebus and his contemporaries are brought to the fore. This attracts Fox’s boss, who sends him back to Edinburgh to review the old files.However, this being Rankin of course there’s more plot threads. This time that involves an open and shut case of a teenaged high school dropout who was convicted last year of murdering his Queen Bee girlfriend but Clarke is convinced by the boy’s uncle to take another look in hopes of getting the uncle to help her take down some corrupt Internal Affairs cops who had targeted her before. She passes the case on to Rebus (something to keep him occupied instead of interfering with her investigation of his old missing person case which turned into her dead body in the trunk case) and the reader gets to enjoy Rebus’s unique methods of unraveling the motives and secrets of a murderer. The truth about what happened is both surprising and heart-breaking, raising the question of whether it is always better for the truth to come out. In a House of Lies” is another excellent John Rebus mystery, even though it also stars DI Clarke and Malcolm Fox. The British police procedural aspects are very familiar but the mysteries (both of which get resolved in the end) and the complications of Rebus’ problematic past make this book an enjoyable and compelling read.OVERALL RATING: 4.5 STARS.
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  • Helaine
    January 1, 1970
    I am an avid Inspector Rebus fan. When Rebus left the police, I hoped that wasn't the end of the series. And it wasn't. This is the best post-retirement book so far. I loved it.
  • Susan Johnson
    January 1, 1970
    Rebus may be retired from the police force but he certainly is still detecting. A dead body is found in an abandoned car with a little quirk to it. It turns out to be linked to a case Rebus investigated unsuccessfully years ago. The investigation was a scandal in itself with all types of police misbehavior and cover-ups. The body is never found until now. Rebus' protege, Detective Inspector Siobhan Clarke, is involved in the new investigation so she draws him in. It turns out that he has a lot Rebus may be retired from the police force but he certainly is still detecting. A dead body is found in an abandoned car with a little quirk to it. It turns out to be linked to a case Rebus investigated unsuccessfully years ago. The investigation was a scandal in itself with all types of police misbehavior and cover-ups. The body is never found until now. Rebus' protege, Detective Inspector Siobhan Clarke, is involved in the new investigation so she draws him in. It turns out that he has a lot to answer for. There are ties to crime bosses and corrupt cops that must be explored. Clarke starts to receive some nuisance calls and visits to her home. She asks Rebus to investigate which he does with gusto. The solution is a tough one. Rebus' health is getting worse so I am not sure how many more cases he can investigate. It's also hard when you are no longer employed in that job so I am glad to spend some remaining time with him. It's a satisfying read. Thanks to Net Galley for a copy of this book in exchange for a fair review.
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  • Mike
    January 1, 1970
    No need to say anything. Rankin and Rebus are a winning combination.
  • David Harris
    January 1, 1970
    In a House of Lies is, of course, the latest book about John Rebus, sometime DI with Lothian and Borders Police. That will be enough for most people to just decide to read - it would (was) be enough for me. But as this series evolves, Rankin continues to develop his characters and to address new challenges and there is a fair bit here to analyse, so please indulge me.Rebus is now retired and in declining health. Ill with COPD (the two flights of stairs to his flat becoming "a definite issue"), h In a House of Lies is, of course, the latest book about John Rebus, sometime DI with Lothian and Borders Police. That will be enough for most people to just decide to read - it would (was) be enough for me. But as this series evolves, Rankin continues to develop his characters and to address new challenges and there is a fair bit here to analyse, so please indulge me.Rebus is now retired and in declining health. Ill with COPD (the two flights of stairs to his flat becoming "a definite issue"), he has given up smoking - couldn't get too grips with vaping, too tech - and is largely off the booze (the Oxford Bar hardly features, and we even witness Rebus visiting a pub... for a coffee).Lothian and Borders Police has gone, too, swallowed up into Police Scotland, a unitary force run from the glossy "crime campus" at Gartcosh, miles from Edinburgh. Instead of local detectives investigating murders, a mobile squad - MIT ("Major Incident Team") is parachuted in as required with experienced cops like Siobhan Clarke squeezed out. It's not hard to see Rankin's frustration with this situation ("This was the way things were now, thanks to the changes at Police Scotland - local CID reduced to a secondary role..." "Police Scotland's process of centralisation meant a lot of local information-gathering either didn't happen or went ignored") especially since in recent books he's had to devote a lot of ingenuity not only to making Rebus's presence, but even that of Clarke, the other real regular from the old days, plausible, even before getting the story itself moving.In a House of Lies achieves the former by making one of Rebus's old cases relevant again when a missing person is found long dead. Rebus can therefore be brought in to elucidate the botched enquiry from 2006 and as a bonus, Malcolm Fox gets to give the original case papers a once-over. Clarke is attached to the enquiry for her local knowledge. In terms of plausibility I think this is one of the better set-ups of recent books (Rebus doesn't have to keep trying to blag his way into the enquiry room) even if it does mean repeating what feels like a bit of a running theme: Rebus in the sights of Complaints for past failings and potentially taking the rap for the corrupt and lazy - even though (as we know well) he may always have been unconventional, but was never corrupt or lazy. It's perhaps in keeping with this somewhat backward-looking and even elegiac mood that a recurring theme here is memory and its trickiness. Clarke stores names on her phone, in case she forgets them. Rebus accuses her and her generation of having short memories, and having "forgotten how to store information". He wonders about the point of "dusting off people's memories" from the earlier enquiry, and how soon they will forget the body found in the woods. Amidst all this loss of memory, despite the vague promise that soon it will all be "kept in the Cloud, whatever that is", it's not surprisingly Rebus - and his old nemesis Cafferty - who know what's what even if "it was hard [for Rebus] to remember the person he'd been, new to the city and new to the job" (a bit of a sly joke there, perhaps, given the way that Rankin has reinvented and reinterpreted Rebus over the course of this series).But this series is far from becoming a showcase for grumpy old men (whether characters or author). There is a considerable freshness to In a House of Lies whether it's the greater sense of equality between Clarke, Rebus and Fox (in previous books, there has been a hierarchy which has dotted about a bit with one or the other of the three on top at different times depending who is investigating who, whether Rebus is in or out of the police and where Clarke is in her career), Rebus (finally!) taking more care of his health or - oddly - Cafferty, who clearly has Plans (and is considerably more adroit with the tech than Rebus, as Rankin makes clear when describing his infosec measures)The story itself is pacy, twisty and substantial. Apart from the body that comes to light, Clarke is being threatened, giving her an early excuse to bring in Rebus with a relatively self-contained task. I thought for a while that was going to be Rebus's main role in the story, with the focus on her. That might not be before time (personally I'd love a series of Siobhan Clarke novels with Rebus backgrounded) but perhaps Rankin knows his audience too well for this. At any rate, Rebus gets plenty to do here, and on the main case, though perhaps he doesn't quite own the stage as in the past.I only had a couple of reservations. First, in a couple of places the portrayal of secondary women characters seemed a bit perfunctory, with a main feature being how much make-up they wore - either too much, or little or none because "she really didn't need it" (of course, it may be she just didn't bother with it, or was in a bit of a hurry that morning...) And there's reference to Cafferty's investment in a low budget British film in the mid 2000s having produced a profit. No way was there a profit - that investment would have been for tax purposes, designed to produce a loss. However, perhaps that's not a lapse by Rankin and Cafferty knew this all along - or the producer would have received an unwelcome surprise of some sort - and is spinning a line for Rebus. OK, maybe I'm being a bit picky here. Overall, for me, this is one of the best, if not the best, Rebus story since Rankin brought the character back after Exit Music. It has a complex, satisfying story, plenty of atmosphere and lots for my favourite three detectives to do, with, apparently, plenty of life still in the series.
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  • Ellen
    January 1, 1970
    In a House of Lies (Inspector Rebus, #22) by Ian Rankin.Siobhan Clarke receives a call that puts a smile on her face. She's at a freshly uncovered body inside the trunk of a car. A body that sets the team back to a case thought solved in 2006. Rebus is on the ball again. Although retired he apparently knew about this new case. That call also put a smile on my face. Rebus is in it to win it.This is the case that finally brings every officer under scrutiny and that includes Rebus.My welcomed escap In a House of Lies (Inspector Rebus, #22) by Ian Rankin.Siobhan Clarke receives a call that puts a smile on her face. She's at a freshly uncovered body inside the trunk of a car. A body that sets the team back to a case thought solved in 2006. Rebus is on the ball again. Although retired he apparently knew about this new case. That call also put a smile on my face. Rebus is in it to win it.This is the case that finally brings every officer under scrutiny and that includes Rebus.My welcomed escape from reality-Rebus. Siobhan, having been mentored by the greatest, is now standing on her own two feet. Could it be Siobhan will be his successor?
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  • Richard Brand
    January 1, 1970
    If you are at #22 of the Rebus series you know the flavor, style, characters and conflicts. This is a very satisfying tale. In fact there is more "justice" in this one than I have felt in some others. There is still Cafferty ruling the under world and Rebus still trying to put him away, but this is an old case come back to life by the finally discovering the body. The original investigation had been flawed and a lot of accusations of mismanagement are brought forward. Shiv is still a good friend If you are at #22 of the Rebus series you know the flavor, style, characters and conflicts. This is a very satisfying tale. In fact there is more "justice" in this one than I have felt in some others. There is still Cafferty ruling the under world and Rebus still trying to put him away, but this is an old case come back to life by the finally discovering the body. The original investigation had been flawed and a lot of accusations of mismanagement are brought forward. Shiv is still a good friend but she has been accused of improperly giving tips to a reporter friend. There is a good deal of philosophizing about the changes with the internet and what people have lost and how things like police work have lost the human touch. There is a subplot of an investigation into an old case which has a brother taking the rap for his sister. It is a good Rebus read.
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  • Sophie Eminson
    January 1, 1970
    Okay, I understand that Ian Rankin can write crime. That much is obvious. But In A House of Lies has been coined a ‘thriller’, and honestly, the first half of the novel is about as thrilling as my Monday evenings. Rankin takes a lot of time setting the scene with so many different characters, both from Rebus’ past and quite a few new faces, which ultimately leads to too many threads leading to the investigation. In A House of Lies by Ian Rankin is out now from Orion Books. My rating: 2.5*.The st Okay, I understand that Ian Rankin can write crime. That much is obvious. But In A House of Lies has been coined a ‘thriller’, and honestly, the first half of the novel is about as thrilling as my Monday evenings. Rankin takes a lot of time setting the scene with so many different characters, both from Rebus’ past and quite a few new faces, which ultimately leads to too many threads leading to the investigation. In A House of Lies by Ian Rankin is out now from Orion Books. My rating: 2.5*.The storySimply put, a body has been uncovered of a man who went missing more than a decade ago. There are handcuffs around his ankles, so everybody is a suspect, including the police who worked the missing persons case way back when. So, of course Rebus knows all about it. He trots up, bringing a few nearly forgotten characters from the series with him and offers vague clues and gets in the way right until the end. Clarke and Fox and a myriad of other police ranking at varying levels of seniority band together to discover the truth. But will they get to the bottom of it?What I thought…In A House of Lies by Ian Rankin is not a thriller. It is a crime novel with a thousand police, members of authority and everybody is stepping on one another’s toes to hide the truth, or to discover it. There are far too many characters, old and new, making this book difficult to follow and enjoy. Also, now that Rankin has clearly exhausted his interest in Rebus as a main character, I believe that he should move on to and stick with his new detectives, or create a new series in a new setting where it isn’t convenient for Rebus to stick his nose in wherever it suits him.While I agree that Rankin can definitely write and tell a story, it was a struggle to get through this book. I didn’t get to enjoy a fast-paced, thrilling who-dunnit, or simply even the police procedures of interviews and searching for evidence, as I was far too busy trying to keep track of who was who and what their role was in the narrative. I believe that Rebus is a dead-weight character, and it is time for him and his huge series to be left on the shelf so that a new protagonist can be formed in Rankin’s mind.Overall, I found In A House of Lies to be quite disappointing. I would recommend this book only to die-hard Rankin/Rebus fans, as new readers would not know the characters or the history which has made this story possible. Thank you to NetGalley and Orion for my advance e-copy of In A House of Lies by Ian Rankin in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Barbara
    January 1, 1970
    I have read Ian Rankin for years. I was not a fan, however, of the novels that featured a local thug and crime boss named Cafferty. These kinds of crimes and the corruption involved don't make exciting stories to me. Rebus has been retired for several years so his involvement in investigations is not only unofficial, but not allowed. But he worms his way into an investigation of a cold case murder after the victim is found.This was the story of a murder but it centered on possible police corrupt I have read Ian Rankin for years. I was not a fan, however, of the novels that featured a local thug and crime boss named Cafferty. These kinds of crimes and the corruption involved don't make exciting stories to me. Rebus has been retired for several years so his involvement in investigations is not only unofficial, but not allowed. But he worms his way into an investigation of a cold case murder after the victim is found.This was the story of a murder but it centered on possible police corruption and the crime boss Cafferty. I have never been able to figure out why anyone would talk to a private investigator and even more puzzling is why they'd talk to someone they know is a retired cop, because there are no controls over someone no longer with the police. There is a lot of running around by Rebus, and interactions with Cafferty. These back and forths were confusing and in the end boring.After Rebus retired, there was an attempt to keep Rebus going by the creation of the character Malcolm Fox, who worked for the Complaints Unit, and investigated police corruption. Fox shows up in this book, though he works in a different department. To be honest, I didn't love the Fox novels (The Complaints and 4 more). Maybe it's time to retire the Rebus series, though so many of us love Rankin and this series.
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  • Ron Chicaferro
    January 1, 1970
    What a joy the Rebus series has been over years. He's a bit slower now, he's a retired copper now and he has COPD. Does the slow the man down? Of course not! The bulk of the investigative work (and heavy lifting) is in the capable hands of Rebus protege D.I. Siobhan Clarke - she is sort of the younger female equivalent of Rebus. The story is a murder case - it's some years old and Siobhan has her hands full working the case - Rebus helps out as best he can but its Siobhan's case to work. The usu What a joy the Rebus series has been over years. He's a bit slower now, he's a retired copper now and he has COPD. Does the slow the man down? Of course not! The bulk of the investigative work (and heavy lifting) is in the capable hands of Rebus protege D.I. Siobhan Clarke - she is sort of the younger female equivalent of Rebus. The story is a murder case - it's some years old and Siobhan has her hands full working the case - Rebus helps out as best he can but its Siobhan's case to work. The usual cast of characters are in the book, which makes it that more enjoyable - if this is your first Rebus book you'll love the twists and turns - this is Police Scotland at work and do they ever. Rebus might be getting older as a character but the stories are still first rate.
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  • ♥ Jx PinkLady Reviews ♥
    January 1, 1970
    Crime is not something I often read but I do enjoy watching the John Rebus series on TV so when I noticed this book I thought I'd give it a read.The story opens up well with the discovery of a dead body. It engaged my attention and had me interested. A private investigator locked in a car and hidden in the woods but it seems the murder happened years ago causing the reopening of an old investigation that to be honest became a little tedious for my tastes. I didn't especially engage with the char Crime is not something I often read but I do enjoy watching the John Rebus series on TV so when I noticed this book I thought I'd give it a read.The story opens up well with the discovery of a dead body. It engaged my attention and had me interested. A private investigator locked in a car and hidden in the woods but it seems the murder happened years ago causing the reopening of an old investigation that to be honest became a little tedious for my tastes. I didn't especially engage with the characters as the story developed and really only looked forward to scenes with Rebus so in the end I wasn't too fussed about who had committed the crime all those years ago.Perhaps crime genre does not suit my reading tastes and perhaps if I had known the other characters, from having read previous stories in this series. maybe I would have enjoyed this book more. I would certainly recommend seeking out other reviews as I suspect many readers will appreciate this novel more than I did.Advance copy provided by NetGalley
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  • eyes.2c
    January 1, 1970
    A crime read treat!A slow start but really heated up as Rebus orchestrates in the background. A dead body missing for some years is found in a rusty burnt out car, the ACU: Police Scotland’s Anti-Corruption Unit is still on the tail of Siobhan Clarke, dirty cops are in full bloom and then there's Rebus lending a hand. A skeleton in situ and skeletons in the closet make for an interesting read. Catching the threads and pulling them together is a challenge and in the end our man Rebus stitches the A crime read treat!A slow start but really heated up as Rebus orchestrates in the background. A dead body missing for some years is found in a rusty burnt out car, the ACU: Police Scotland’s Anti-Corruption Unit is still on the tail of Siobhan Clarke, dirty cops are in full bloom and then there's Rebus lending a hand. A skeleton in situ and skeletons in the closet make for an interesting read. Catching the threads and pulling them together is a challenge and in the end our man Rebus stitches them all up.A NetGalley ARC
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  • Chuck Slack
    January 1, 1970
    I love the Rebus series and have read them all. This is yet a very solid effort and very enjoyable read. Highly recommended. The book centres mostly on Siobhan Clarke - as it should since Rebus has been retired from the force for quite awhile. So how does Master Rankin bring Rebus back? Well a cold case when the body turns up of course. And who worked the original case - John Rebus. Well done.
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  • Diane Dickson
    January 1, 1970
    The writing was excellent of course. The characters are quite a number of old friends. The plot is intriguing and fairly complicated but unrolls to a very satisfactory conclusion. I enjoyed it but do you know what - I really wish Rebus wasn't retired and he wasn't sick. It makes me sad when I read the books and really with a crime book I don't want to feel like that. However, I am still a fan but the trouble is what is wrong with him is not going away so we can't hope for improvement. Sad.
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