The Remarkable Journey of Coyote Sunrise
The Remarkable Journey of Coyote Sunrise introduces young readers to a girl trying to find her place in the world.Five years.That's how long Coyote and her dad, Rodeo, have lived on the road in an old school bus, criss-crossing the nation.Five years.It's also how long ago Coyote lost her mom and two sisters in a car crash.Coyote hasn’t been home in all that time, but when she learns that the park in her old neighborhood is being demolished―the very same park where she, her mom, and her sisters buried a treasured memory box―she knows she'll do whatever it takes to get back in time to save it. So she hatches a crazy plan to get her dad to drive 3,600 miles back to Washington state in four days...without him realizing it.Along the way, they'll pick up a strange crew of misfit travelers. Lester has a lady love to meet. Salvador and his mom are looking to start over. Val needs a safe place to be herself. Over the course of thousands of miles, Coyote will learn that going home can sometimes be the hardest journey of all...but that with friends by her side, she just might be able to turn her “once upon a time” into a “happily ever after.”

The Remarkable Journey of Coyote Sunrise Details

TitleThe Remarkable Journey of Coyote Sunrise
Author
ReleaseJan 8th, 2019
PublisherHenry Holt & Company (BYR)
Rating
GenreChildrens, Middle Grade, Realistic Fiction, Fiction, Family, Adventure, Young Adult

The Remarkable Journey of Coyote Sunrise Review

  • Melissa ♥ Dog/Wolf Lover ♥ Martin
    January 1, 1970
    This book was the peanut butter to my jelly!!!! Mel This book was the peanut butter to my jelly!!!! Mel 🖤🐶🐺🐾
  • Rachel Reads Ravenously
    January 1, 1970
    5 stars! What a beautiful and heartfelt story! I have to admit, I picked this book up because I had some serious cover love happening. Well, the attractive cover caught my attention and I ended up loving this story.Five years ago, Coyote's sisters and mother died in an accident. Since then, she and her dad Rodeo have never been back to their hometown, driving a bus continuously across the country. When Coyote gets word that something she, her mother and her sisters had buried was about to be 5 stars! What a beautiful and heartfelt story! I have to admit, I picked this book up because I had some serious cover love happening. Well, the attractive cover caught my attention and I ended up loving this story.Five years ago, Coyote's sisters and mother died in an accident. Since then, she and her dad Rodeo have never been back to their hometown, driving a bus continuously across the country. When Coyote gets word that something she, her mother and her sisters had buried was about to be destroyed, she concocts a plan to trick her father back to their hometown.Filled with amazing characters, this is an unforgettable story. I will be recommending it to children and adults, I think it's a book many people will love and enjoy. I got Captain Fantastic vibes from this (only in a more appropriate middle grade format). I highly recommend this book to all, I had tears in my eyes at the end.Follow me on ♥ Facebook ♥ Blog ♥ Instagram ♥ Twitter ♥
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  • Amber K.
    January 1, 1970
    Dan Gemeinhart does it again! This book should really come with tissues because it ripped my heart out and made me cry happy and sad tears throughout the entire book. Rodeo and Coyote are a father/daughter duo that live on the road in an old school bus called Yager. They have been roaming the US for five years - ever since a tragic accident that left them both devastated. They have not been home in five years and Rodeo refuses to go back to their home in Washington State but Coyote learns that Dan Gemeinhart does it again! This book should really come with tissues because it ripped my heart out and made me cry happy and sad tears throughout the entire book. Rodeo and Coyote are a father/daughter duo that live on the road in an old school bus called Yager. They have been roaming the US for five years - ever since a tragic accident that left them both devastated. They have not been home in five years and Rodeo refuses to go back to their home in Washington State but Coyote learns that she MUST go back when a beloved park is about to be torn down. In this park is a memory box that Coyote buried with her mom and sisters. Will she make it back? Will Rodeo and Coyote continuing grieving while criss crossing the United States in a bus? You will fall in love with Coyote and cry right along with her as you imagine going through the unimaginable like she is. Don’t forget my warning about the tissues. And you might want to read it alone.
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  • Pamela
    January 1, 1970
    I found this book, though expertly crafted and addictively engaging, as pleasant and believable as yet not. I loved the bus-adventure premise, the non-judgmental friendships accrued along the way promoting kindness. And I enjoyed the quirky characterizations and spunky dialogue laced with literary tie ins. Some great stuff, for sure! What tripped me up was Coyote in regards to puberty "stuff" and that she lived on a bus with no shower, or bathroom, or running water etc. and didn't make a fuss I found this book, though expertly crafted and addictively engaging, as pleasant and believable as yet not. I loved the bus-adventure premise, the non-judgmental friendships accrued along the way promoting kindness. And I enjoyed the quirky characterizations and spunky dialogue laced with literary tie ins. Some great stuff, for sure! What tripped me up was Coyote in regards to puberty "stuff" and that she lived on a bus with no shower, or bathroom, or running water etc. and didn't make a fuss over it. Girls that age demand privacy. It just didn't come across as believable. That, and the fact she and her dad had traveled essentially nonstop on the bus for 5 years with only one 5 minute phone call allowed per week to Grandma. One year, maybe two I could have bought into. But not five years total absence and grandma not having raised a ruckus. The other nonplussed items are simply my personal little niggles. The main one: I don't appreciate curse words (no matter how minor) in children's literature - especially tweens and younger.Hit or miss: 3 Cautionary Stars
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  • mindful.librarian ☀️
    January 1, 1970
    They all TOLD me to read this one, and they were RIGHT! I dug in yesterday afternoon and this morning when it was time for my walk I just couldn’t stop, so I switched to the audio version on Scribd and only took a quick break for my shower. I listened while I got ready for work, while I drove to work, and while I collected books for check in at work. I SOBBED in the car and my kids were like, “MOM, remember it’s FICTION!”.Oh, this is such a heart print book for me. It’s about family and grief, ❤️😭📚🎧They all TOLD me to read this one, and they were RIGHT! I dug in yesterday afternoon and this morning when it was time for my walk I just couldn’t stop, so I switched to the audio version on Scribd and only took a quick break for my shower. I listened while I got ready for work, while I drove to work, and while I collected books for check in at work. I SOBBED in the car and my kids were like, “MOM, remember it’s FICTION!”.Oh, this is such a heart print book for me. It’s about family and grief, and friends and adventure. It will mean one thing to kids but as a mom, it absolutely broke and warmed my heart. I won’t stop thinking about Coyote and her family and band of friends for a long long time..Thanks a million to my #bookstagram friends @librarianmsg , @redcanoereader , @afomaumesi @whatkreads for inspiring me to pick this one up as soon as it was released and to Katherine Applegate for this amazing blurb on the back cover:.“Sometimes a story comes along that just plain makes you want to hug the world. Your heart needs this joyful miracle of a book.”.She was right. And Dan Gemeinhart thank you for this story. And for making me CRY. And feel all the feels. Thanks for Coyote.
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  • Virginie
    January 1, 1970
    ''Your heart needs this joyful miracle of a book.''- Katherine ApplegateAnd what I need is a movie based on this incredible, moving novel!I want to travel with Rodeo and Coyote across the american landscapes, meet the amazing characters boarding on Yager (their school bus) along the way and cry another time at the beautiful ending of the story. And I hate crying... but this book was worth it.''There is so much happiness in the world. There is so much sadness in the world. There is just so much ''Your heart needs this joyful miracle of a book.''- Katherine ApplegateAnd what I need is a movie based on this incredible, moving novel!🎬😍I want to travel with Rodeo and Coyote across the american landscapes, meet the amazing characters boarding on Yager (their school bus) along the way and cry another time at the beautiful ending of the story. And I hate crying... but this book was worth it.''There is so much happiness in the world. There is so much sadness in the world. There is just so much in the world.'' Yeah, Coyote, you got it right.4.5 (Not 5, mainly because of the far-fetched last chapter.)
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  • Shari
    January 1, 1970
    I am not a Dan Gemeinhart fan. His books are too "Perils of Pauline" for me. You know, one cliffhanging event after another. However, my Mock Newbery group nominated this book as a possible contender for 2020, to be read in March. So I read it. Gemeinhart stayed true to his style. Coyote and her father faced one obstacle after another. It is hard to believe that someone can get into so much trouble, yet always come out smelling like a rose. Another problem is something that I am noticing in I am not a Dan Gemeinhart fan. His books are too "Perils of Pauline" for me. You know, one cliffhanging event after another. However, my Mock Newbery group nominated this book as a possible contender for 2020, to be read in March. So I read it. Gemeinhart stayed true to his style. Coyote and her father faced one obstacle after another. It is hard to believe that someone can get into so much trouble, yet always come out smelling like a rose. Another problem is something that I am noticing in middle grade books lately, "Issue Overload." COYOTE SUNRISE was no exception. Issues addressed in this book included: death in the family, domestic violence, police abuse, coming of age, teen runaway, racial discrimination, and LGBT. Phew! I'd hope that the committee does not award the biggest prize in children's literature to this book, and I hope that my group picks a better book for May.
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  • Betsy
    January 1, 1970
    Knee-jerk reaction. Definition: A quick reaction that does not allow you time to consider something carefully. Alternate Definition: What happens to me, specifically, when more than three people tell me to read the same book. I wish I wasn’t such a little pouty child about this. I wish I could say that the more that people tell me to read a book, the more intrigued I become until I just can’t help but snatch it up for a perusal. But instead, if a bunch of people say they love a book and highly Knee-jerk reaction. Definition: A quick reaction that does not allow you time to consider something carefully. Alternate Definition: What happens to me, specifically, when more than three people tell me to read the same book. I wish I wasn’t such a little pouty child about this. I wish I could say that the more that people tell me to read a book, the more intrigued I become until I just can’t help but snatch it up for a perusal. But instead, if a bunch of people say they love a book and highly recommend it to me, I get all kinds of contrary. I’ve been trying to pick apart why exactly I have this reaction and insofar as I can tell it’s some perverse combination of being sad that I didn’t read the book first and a weird kind of twisted jealousy. Not jealousy of the person, but of the book itself. Everyone thinks you’re so great, huh? Well let’s see how great you are when I refuse to read you. Ha ha! Not so clever now, are ya? Yeah. I got issues. Fortunately, I also have a kernel of good sense that, given enough time, will make itself known and pique my curiosity when the time is right. By now I’m sure you have heard about The Remarkable Journey of Coyote Sunrise from someone. Could have been a kid reader who loved it. Could have been a gatekeepe (a librarian or bookseller or teacher) who couldn’t stop talking about its bold choices. Could have been online, on best of the year lists, or just generally on the lips of the general populace. Wherever you heard about it, you may too have experienced that old “knee jerk reaction”. So here’s a little tip. You know why they really call it that? Because you would be a “jerk” to reject something quite this good without at least giving it a try. Hey, whaddaya gotta lose?“I had to get myself, and a bus, and my dad, all the way across the country in less than four days. And I had to do it without my dad noticing.” The name’s Coyote Sunrise. She’s a kid who’s been traveling with her dad in a refurbished school bus on the perpetual move these last five years. Five years ago her mom and sisters were killed in an accident, and ever since then it’s just been her and Rodeo going from town to town. They never stop for long. They never settle. And frankly, Coyote’s had enough. Something’s gotta change and after a phone call with her grandmother Coyote knows what that something is. She needs to go back to her original home, the one they’ve been avoiding all these years, to find something she buried long long ago. She knows Rodeo won’t go for it though, so that means crafty planning. It means picking up new friends along the way that can help. And it means Coyote’s going to do the one thing Rodeo has always forbidden. She’s going to remember the past. From the first chapter onward, Gemeinhart sets up the parameters of this world. And to do this he established Coyote as a very specific kind of child protagonist: the kind that is street smart to her own universe. I think I’m mixing my metaphors here, but I’m having difficulty finding a better way to say this. She’s savvy, Coyote is. Knows the lay of the land, the weaknesses of the adults in her periphery, but also has enough honest-to-goodness childlike qualities to keep from sounding like a small, shrunken version of a 45-year-old woman. You’ll find this particularly kind of child hero present in such luminaries as Gilly Hopkins, the Artful Dodger, and Thelonius Mitchell in this year’s The Usual Suspects by Maurice Broaddus. It’s a hard character not to like. They fulfill a distinct kind of fantasy that kids have about having the presence of mind to see through the half-lies and all bald-faced fibs adults try to sell them. Of course, usually these characters can see through any number of adults. Coyote’s a little different. She excels at seeing through one person in particular. The one, you might argue, that got her into this mess in the first place: her dad. In terms of creating memorable characters, Rodeo’s a doozy. And Gemeinhart sets himself up with an incredibly difficult task. There’s a lotta layers on this hippy dippy fella. He’s been completely undone by grief. So much so that he cannot even allow his daughter to call him “daddy” because of the memories it might stir. So basically, the author of this book has to constantly keep you from thinking of Rodeo as a psychotic (if grief-wracked) jerk. And he does make bad bad choices. Yet somehow, and it’s not just the fact that Coyote is telling you this, you understand that the guy is decent. Now it is one thing for a fellow adult to understand a flawed parental character in a book. It is another for a child reader, who naturally is going to side with the child protagonist time and again, to sympathize as well. And yet, I think Gemeinhart manages it. Just barely (Rodeo makes some breathtakingly awful moves in the course of this story) but by the end you understand why his daughter loves him. The other characters are, by necessity, less fleshed out than these two, but none of them felt flat or two-dimensional. Gemeinhart has a gift for drilling a succinct description of a human soul right into the crevices of your heart. He also earns his big emotional moments. I’ll level with you when I say that I have no idea how an author does that. But if you’re going to try to pull off these big, powerful points in a story, you have to have come by them honestly. Do it poorly and you’ll lose the child reader immediately. You think a kid can’t tell when they’re being played? Sometimes I’ll read a middle grade novel and the emotional scenes will fall completely flat. Like the author is ramping up the background music, but should have spent more time on the plot. In this book, the author builds trust between the reader and the author. So much so that you can have a scene where two characters scream their secrets into the wind on the top of a moving school bus and it’ll feel real and earned rather than a sneaky plot device meant to further the characters’ emotional growth in the eyes of the reader. To be truthful with you, a book of this sort will win extra points with me, every single time, if it’s funny to boot. I keep track of when the funny in a book rears its head. For me, the first moment that I sincerely felt I was in good hands was when Coyote had snuck her cat onto the bus and found it later, snuggled into the neck of Rodeo. It reads, “I was standing over him, my hands reached out toward his neck . . . He blinked a few times and looked me up and down, still looming like a strangler over him.” In point of fact, let’s look at a couple other lines Gemeinhart throws at the reader. Even out of context, they’re mighty fine:- About her cat: “Ivan, guiltless and unapologetic as a cash-flush con man, closed his eyes and leaned into my fingers.”- “You could say that learning to play Rodeo was like learning to play a guitar, if the guitar had thirteen strings instead of six and three of them were out of tune and two of them were yarn and one of them was wired to an electric fence. He’s a handful, is what I’m saying.” - “I stood there for a beat or two. The fake smile I’d plastered on my face went stale and rotted away.” - “There were tears in his eyes. But that could’ve just been the wind. I had tears in my eyes too. But that could’ve just been the wind, too.”- “…my voice didn’t have an ounce of give in it. It wasn’t mean, but it wasn’t holding hands and blowing kisses either.” Hm. Seem to have gotten to the end of the review here. Probably should mention something that I didn’t like about the book. You know, to even the rest of this out. And there was, interestingly enough, one element that really bugged me as I read. At no point in the narrative does Gemeinhart ever explain what Coyote does in terms of schooling. Rodeo doesn’t seem to be the homeschooling type, nor is any mention made of that. The closest thing we get is Coyote mentioning that she has to read the newspaper for him, and newspaper reading does not a five-year education make. I found it a bit difficult to believe that the events that happen in this book (in true Blues Brothers fashion at times) do not end with the state taking a close look at whether or not Coyote’s been playing hooky all these years. I can suspend disbelief pretty far, but the leniency of the authorities struck me as a bit on the unlikely side. Otherwise, however, it’s a darn good book. Why didn’t anyone tell me? I kid. It’s kind of gratifying to know that the story has been finding its audience. And what child wouldn’t find the notion of living on a school bus, tricked out like a long, yellow mobile home, enticing? It’s not trying to be wholly realistic, but it gets there. It’s not trying to be some kind of serious novel that it’s not, because these jokes land. The voice works. The characters are believable. It sometimes dips and loses you (homeschool, Coyote’s ability to serve as a break-up intermediary on the phone, etc.) but for the most part it pulls itself together and serves as a strong reminder that at the end of the day, we all just want a good story filled with good writing. This book delivers. So, Dan Gemeinhart . . . what else you got?For ages 9-12.
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  • Nancy
    January 1, 1970
    Great book if you can ignore the very, very dark place that this storyline comes from. Usually a man who has a mental break, changes his daughter’s name, refuses to let her be more than an arms distance from him and isolates her from everyone else except a phone call a week to her grandmother for over 5 years would be called abusive. In this book he’s called Rodeo.
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  • Jessica
    January 1, 1970
    A charming story about a young girl, racketing around the country with her dad in an old school bus, and the journey they make back home for the first time in years, and the people they discover and help along the way. I loved Coyote, and their fellow travelers. I was more than a little pissed, however, at "Rodeo" (her father) who I think had done a very selfish thing in order to escape his own grief, without seeming to think for a second about what Coyote might need. I'm impressed that after A charming story about a young girl, racketing around the country with her dad in an old school bus, and the journey they make back home for the first time in years, and the people they discover and help along the way. I loved Coyote, and their fellow travelers. I was more than a little pissed, however, at "Rodeo" (her father) who I think had done a very selfish thing in order to escape his own grief, without seeming to think for a second about what Coyote might need. I'm impressed that after five years, she wasn't a total basket case! Still, the ending is very satisfying, and the book is fun.
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  • Afoma Umesi
    January 1, 1970
    I need to gather my thoughts, but EVERYONE needs to read this book. I promise, it's THAT good.
  • Ms. Yingling
    January 1, 1970
    E ARC from Netgalley.comCoyote and her father, Rodeo, travel around the US in a converted school bus they call Yager. Their life seems pretty comfortable, and they go wherever they want (especially if it involves some really good destination food), but they are on the road because of a sad reason. Coyote's mother and two sisters were killed in a car accident, and their father coped so poorly that he had to sell their house, leave their town, and doesn't even want to call Coyote by her real name E ARC from Netgalley.comCoyote and her father, Rodeo, travel around the US in a converted school bus they call Yager. Their life seems pretty comfortable, and they go wherever they want (especially if it involves some really good destination food), but they are on the road because of a sad reason. Coyote's mother and two sisters were killed in a car accident, and their father coped so poorly that he had to sell their house, leave their town, and doesn't even want to call Coyote by her real name or be referred to as her father, because it makes him remember too much.When Coyote talks to her grandmother, who tells her the park near their old home is going to be torn down, Coyote wants to get back in time to retrieve a time capsule that her mother and sisters left there just five days before their death. Since she can't tell her father, she makes an excuse to travel somewhat nearby to get a special sandwich. Her father can't drive enough to get from Florida to the Pacific Northwest, so when Coyote finds a young musician who wants to travel there to see his girlfriend, she invites him along. Rodeo has done this and the past, and has series of questions for people to answer. The answers are correct, and they are on their way. They also pick up Salvador and his mother, who are fleeing his father, after Coyote is accidentally left at a gas station. They also pick up an 18-year-old runaway, Valerie, who has been kicked out of her home because she is gay. Any cross country trip will have incidents, and there are incorrect connections, break downs, and general mayhem. Will Coyote be able to make it back, and will her father eventually realize that she needs to talk about her past in order to go on with her future?Strengths: A good road trip story is always good, from Cooney's On the Road to Pla's The Someday Birds. The bus is a fun vehicle, the aimlessness appeals to the middle grade soul, and there is a lot of good relationships and adventure. While this is a little different from Gemeinhart's previous books, it shows me that he has studied up on the current climate in middle grade literature. Several topics that are currently in favor are in play here-- a dead parent, LGBTQ+ character, and domestic problems. The cover is good as well. Weaknesses: I would think that people who had lost a loved one would be really insulted by all of the literary characters who become completely dysfunctional when they are grieving. I liked that the funding for the constant traveling was explained (insurance settlement), but the father's aimlessness, combined with his unwillingness to parent Coyote in an effective way, is inexcusable. While not talking about the departed is an excellent way to deal with it, the needs of a child come first, and Coyote should have been near her grandmother and in a whole lot of grief counseling. What I really think: While I very much personally disliked the portrayal of a grieving parent, this is a good story, and I will be purchasing it for my library.
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  • Celia McMahon
    January 1, 1970
    If I could rate this book a trillion stars, I would. Holy moly this was amazing. I have been reading some good middle-grade for Middle-Grade March, and this was my next to last. Honestly, I hate that I waited all month to read it, but also happy I went out with a BANG because this book was everything I had been waiting for in a book. EVERYTHING!Ok, so here's what it's about:After the death of her two sisters and mother, Coyote and her dad, Rodeo abandoned their real names and their life in WA If I could rate this book a trillion stars, I would. Holy moly this was amazing. I have been reading some good middle-grade for Middle-Grade March, and this was my next to last. Honestly, I hate that I waited all month to read it, but also happy I went out with a BANG because this book was everything I had been waiting for in a book. EVERYTHING!Ok, so here's what it's about:After the death of her two sisters and mother, Coyote and her dad, Rodeo abandoned their real names and their life in WA for a life on the road aboard a refitted school bus. When Coyote discovers that her childhood park is going to be torn up, and the memory box she buried with her sisters and mother lost forever, she embarks on a journey home from somewhere in Florida. Along the way, they pick up some travelers: Lester, who is going to see his girlfriend in Idaho, Salvador and his mom who are trying to get to the midwest for a new life, and Val, who is heading toward Seattle after being kicked out of her home for being gay. Along with a cat named Ivan and eventually, a goat named Gladys, they all find themselves caught up in Coyote's mission to come face to face with her tragic past. First off, Coyote's voice is just amazing. She is confident and sassy and caring and everything I love in a protagonist. Her dad, Rodeo is equally as amazing which made this duo one I would follow to the ends of the world. The cast of colorful characters they meet add so much to the story that I could not put the book down. I had to know what was going to happen lest I fall over and die from agony. Normally, I am not very vocal when I am reading, but I found myself uttering a few ohs and ahs as I was reading and even grabbed myself some tissues. Because I was peeling onions, of course. GeezSo, after I finished this book, I went on ahead and bought the entire library of Dan's. I might go on ahead and say that this was the best book I have read in 2019. Buy it. Borrow it. Whatever you have to do. If you want a quirky, heartbreaking, yet happy middle-grade, this is the one.
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  • Krista
    January 1, 1970
    I absolutely loved this middle grade book. It was quirky and full of heart - my favorite combo! Coyote Sunrise is a 12 year old girl living on a school bus with her father, Rodeo. They travel around the country following whatever whim hits them in the moment and running from the grief of a family tragedy. Along the way they pick up some strangers who become entwined in their story. Themes of love, friendship, story, grief, kindness, honesty, and so many more are included here. It was fabulous.
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  • Lorie Barber
    January 1, 1970
    Oh, Dan Gemeinhart, why do you write such incredible books that rip me apart, then put me back together again. First it was The Honest Truth. Then came Good Dog. Not to mention Scar Island. Each so different, yet kept me thinking about them for days after finishing; each leaving an indelible mark on my heart. And then you give me Coyote and Rodeo and their Remarkable Journey. It’s a journey that takes them across many miles in a school bus-turned home (think a bright yellow tiny house on Oh, Dan Gemeinhart, why do you write such incredible books that rip me apart, then put me back together again. First it was The Honest Truth. Then came Good Dog. Not to mention Scar Island. Each so different, yet kept me thinking about them for days after finishing; each leaving an indelible mark on my heart. And then you give me Coyote and Rodeo and their Remarkable Journey. It’s a journey that takes them across many miles in a school bus-turned home (think a bright yellow tiny house on wheels.) More importantly, though, it’s a journey of the heart. To help heal what’s been broken. I can relate. Each additional character (read: passenger) so thoughtfully introduced, moves Coyote & Rodeo toward a place neither one of them thought they’d be, and through moments so real, heart wrenching, and gripping that I often found myself reading blurry words through tears and reaching for Kleenex so I wouldn’t miss a thing. To say I can’t wait until this book is out is an understatement. I have students that NEED Coyote’s perseverance, Salvador’s loyalty, and Rodeo’s heart right this very second.
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  • Farah
    January 1, 1970
    There is something magical and absolutely beautiful in books that can manipulate your emotions as well as change your heart. When every page is not only a part of the written story, but somewhere along, it’s starting to become a part of your reality. There is no better part of reading great story than being so tangled with it, that you ache, you cry and you’re happy for the fictional characters.The Remarkable Journey of Coyote Sunrise captivated me quickly with brutal honesty, raw and gritty There is something magical and absolutely beautiful in books that can manipulate your emotions as well as change your heart. When every page is not only a part of the written story, but somewhere along, it’s starting to become a part of your reality. There is no better part of reading great story than being so tangled with it, that you ache, you cry and you’re happy for the fictional characters.The Remarkable Journey of Coyote Sunrise captivated me quickly with brutal honesty, raw and gritty beginning and hidden messages. I was not expecting that I will be flooded with so many emotions.No one can tell another person on how to grief or how long they should be holding on to it, Coyote's dad lost so much 5 years ago, three quarters of his heart and soul. He made a decision to bury the memories alongside the bodies and set a new style of living for him and Coyote. He was a wonderful person/father, the prototype of don't judge a book by its cover but he owed the owner of his remaining heart + soul so much more.Coyote, a 12-year old girl who was the epitome of the word ordinary, yet it was that very quality that made her extraordinary. Her childlike innocence, her inquisitive nature, and her curiosity for the unknown were some of the things that I wasn't sure most of us in our younger years could relate to. Her thoughts were pretty deep, and when pitted against her young age, the weight of her words just felt extra heavy and stirred up all these feelings in my heart. She was a willing participant to her father's ways of handling grief but she was unable to forget/to block out the someones who gave her so much to remember.Whatever expectations I had, I didn’t count on this book being so gut-wrenchingly emotional. The characters were yanking at my heartstrings right from the beginning, and little by little, the emotions built up until it exploded in the last part of the book and basically nuked my heart. Don't think I have the time to check the other nominees under this category so, The Remarkable Journey of Coyote Sunshine will be getting my vote.
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  • Megan C.
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 - a fantastic middle grade read with a story you won't want to leave and characters you'll fall in love with. One of my fave MG reads this year!
  • Laurie
    January 1, 1970
    Interest Level: 3-6Do you think it would be fun to have your house be a school bus that was gutted and turned into a home? You could go just about anywhere in the US whenever you want. Fun, right? Well, Coyote Sunrise didn't have a problem with it, at least not until everything changed. Coyote and her dad, Rodeo, have been traveling the country for five years, ever since the day her mom and two sisters were killed in a car wreck. Since then Ella has been called Coyote and her dad has been Rodeo. ​Interest Level: 3-6Do you think it would be fun to have your house be a school bus that was gutted and turned into a home? You could go just about anywhere in the US whenever you want. Fun, right? Well, Coyote Sunrise didn't have a problem with it, at least not until everything changed. Coyote and her dad, Rodeo, have been traveling the country for five years, ever since the day her mom and two sisters were killed in a car wreck. Since then Ella has been called Coyote and her dad has been Rodeo. They live life on the road stopping at gas stations and truck stops all over America. Every Saturday Coyote calls her grandmother but everything changed when her grandmother told her that they were going to be bulldozing the playground next to their old house. Coyote knows that she has to get back home to a memory box that her, her mom, and her sisters buried five years earlier, just five days before their death. The problem is that going home is a no-go for Rodeo so she is going to have to trick him. She knows she only has a few days to get across the country so she has to rely on the help of strangers to help. Along the way they take on these people (and even a couple of animals) who need help themselves getting to where they need to go. Little do they all know that they would become a family on that bus and they will all do whatever it takes to get Coyote to that memory box on time. Can they overcome a broken brake line, someone being left behind at a gas station, Rodeo finding out the truth, and multiple police? Will Coyote be able to make it back to her home town of Poplin Springs in time to save her memory box? Will Rodeo and Coyote ever be the same again? Read this amazingly incredible story of family, friends, love, loss, and one incredible journey!All I can say about this story is WOW! There are not many stories that will have you laughing and crying over and over again. I want so bad to be on that bus with this incredible group of people (and animals). I wanted so bad to get some pom-poms and and cheer this group the whole way across the country. This is a Newbery Award winning book waiting to happen. Do! Not! Miss! This! Book!!!!!!!Merged review:​Interest Level: 3-6Do you think it would be fun to have your house be a school bus that was gutted and turned into a home? You could go just about anywhere in the US whenever you want. Fun, right? Well, Coyote Sunrise didn't have a problem with it, at least not until everything changed. Coyote and her dad, Rodeo, have been traveling the country for five years, ever since the day her mom and two sisters were killed in a car wreck. Since then Ella has been called Coyote and her dad has been Rodeo. They live life on the road stopping at gas stations and truck stops all over America. Every Saturday Coyote calls her grandmother but everything changed when her grandmother told her that they were going to be bulldozing the playground next to their old house. Coyote knows that she has to get back home to a memory box that her, her mom, and her sisters buried five years earlier, just five days before their death. The problem is that going home is a no-go for Rodeo so she is going to have to trick him. She knows she only has a few days to get across the country so she has to rely on the help of strangers to help. Along the way they take on these people (and even a couple of animals) who need help themselves getting to where they need to go. Little do they all know that they would become a family on that bus and they will all do whatever it takes to get Coyote to that memory box on time. Can they overcome a broken brake line, someone being left behind at a gas station, Rodeo finding out the truth, and multiple police? Will Coyote be able to make it back to her home town of Poplin Springs in time to save her memory box? Will Rodeo and Coyote ever be the same again? Read this amazingly incredible story of family, friends, love, loss, and one incredible journey!All I can say about this story is WOW! There are not many stories that will have you laughing and crying over and over again. I want so bad to be on that bus with this incredible group of people (and animals). I wanted so bad to get some pom-poms and and cheer this group the whole way across the country. This is a Newbery Award winning book waiting to happen. Do! Not! Miss! This! Book!!!!!!!Follow me:Blog - Blazer Tales - https://blazertales.com/Facebook - Laurie’s Library Place - https://www.facebook.com/LauriesLibra...Instagram - laurieslibrary - https://www.instagram.com/laurieslibr...Twitter - @laurieevans27 https://twitter.com/laurieevans27?lan...Goodreads - Laurie Purser - https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/1...Pinterest - https://www.pinterest.com/auburngirl2...YouTube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCulD...
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  • DaNae
    January 1, 1970
    2 stars for me. 4 for the readers I will give it to, whom will love it.This really should be the kind of story I would go gaga over. A story from the road with mismatched compadres coming together for a greater purpose, is very much in my wheelhouse. I'm can't quite put my finger on what it is about Gemeinhart's writing the grates against my ear. I am always impressed with his pacing, even if some of the plot turns are little too contrived, but it's great for holding the attention of young 2 stars for me. 4 for the readers I will give it to, whom will love it.This really should be the kind of story I would go gaga over. A story from the road with mismatched compadres coming together for a greater purpose, is very much in my wheelhouse. I'm can't quite put my finger on what it is about Gemeinhart's writing the grates against my ear. I am always impressed with his pacing, even if some of the plot turns are little too contrived, but it's great for holding the attention of young readers. His characters are fine, perhaps a little overly quirky in this book. I think what bugs me is he leaves nothing for the reader to figure out on their own. He is right there telling every feeling and thought and motivation. I'm afraid that his style suffers from comparison. Recently, I've spent time with Gary Schmidt and Kate DiCamillo, who are both so great at creating characters whom show their feeling without spelling them out.
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  • Kari
    January 1, 1970
    I couldn't stomach this one. It was over-the-top with the quirkiness as they kept adding people to the bus and then even a goat. I rolled my eyes at the goat. I just wasn't into it. I stand by my assessment that there were some real believability issues when it came to how Coyote as a 12-year-old girl was portrayed. There are some realistic puberty issues that would have come with riding on a bus with her dad all the time. Girls that age are doing things like showering regularly, shaving their I couldn't stomach this one. It was over-the-top with the quirkiness as they kept adding people to the bus and then even a goat. I rolled my eyes at the goat. I just wasn't into it. I stand by my assessment that there were some real believability issues when it came to how Coyote as a 12-year-old girl was portrayed. There are some realistic puberty issues that would have come with riding on a bus with her dad all the time. Girls that age are doing things like showering regularly, shaving their legs (when she wore a bathing suit without any concern, that did not ring true to my experiences with and at that age), having a period. I wondered if Gemeinhart had considered that many/most girls have those concerns at 12. Because of that, I almost felt like it would have been better if Coyote was a boy so that those things could have been written away more easily. The one thing I did like was the portrayal of how Coyote protected and worked around her dad's feelings. I think that in a more heartfelt and less quirky book, that would have been outstanding but in this book it couldn't overcome my broader frustrations. There is a very sweet and real story in here that was overshadowed by the emphasis on adding an ever-increasing band of characters. And a goat.
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  • Laura Gardner
    January 1, 1970
    Thanks to @macmillankidsbooks for the free book to share with #kidlitexchange!.〰〰I LOVE this book! ALL THE STARS! How much do I love it?Let me count the ways....〰〰1. It's a road trip! Who doesn't love a road trip!?2. There's a GOAT! Also she's spunky and cuddly and comes in big in a clutch moment.3. Coyote and Rodeo may be stuck in the denial stage of the grief process, but they have tons of love to go around nonetheless. For two people who have lost almost everything, that's pretty remarkable. Thanks to @macmillankidsbooks for the free book to share with #kidlitexchange!.〰️〰️I ❤️LOVE❤️ this book! 🌟ALL THE STARS!🌟 How much do I love it?Let me count the ways....〰️〰️1. It's a road trip! Who doesn't love a road trip!?2. There's a GOAT! Also she's spunky and cuddly and comes in big in a clutch moment.3. Coyote and Rodeo may be stuck in the denial stage of the grief process, but they have tons of love to go around nonetheless. For two people who have lost almost everything, that's pretty remarkable.4. It's snort-laugh funny. For real. My 4 year old thought I was crazy.5. It's also at times extremely sad. I'll never forget reading SOME KIND OF COURAGE, which a co-worker gave to me with tissues attached. I needed those tissues and I needed them for this book, too. And yet! COYOTE SUNRISE is all about acknowledging the sadness in the world while also celebrating all the happiness in the world. I can get behind that. .〰️〰️Simply put, @dangemeinhart has written an absolute winner. Coyote and Rodeo are characters I won't forget for a long, long time. This doesn't come out until January, 8, 2019, but put it on your pre-order list now! It's a must-buy..〰️〰️#bookstagram #book #reading #bibliophile #bookworm #bookaholic #booknerd #bookgram #librarian #librariansfollowlibrarians #librariansofinstagram #booklove #booktography #bookstagramfeature #bookish #bookaddict #booknerdigans #booknerd #ilovereading #instabook #futurereadylibs #ISTElibs #TLChat #mgbooks
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  • Leonard Kim
    January 1, 1970
    There is a climactic moment in this book that the narrator describes as “just like in some dumb movie.” And that’s really what this book is. I am tempted to rate it lower because I don’t like movies that are emotionally manipulative and have a warped moral compass in the sense that the only things we are supposed to care about are the selfish interests of the designated “good” characters, and everything that works to their ends is justified regardless of how much mayhem, heartbreak, or emotional There is a climactic moment in this book that the narrator describes as “just like in some dumb movie.” And that’s really what this book is. I am tempted to rate it lower because I don’t like movies that are emotionally manipulative and have a warped moral compass in the sense that the only things we are supposed to care about are the selfish interests of the designated “good” characters, and everything that works to their ends is justified regardless of how much mayhem, heartbreak, or emotional damage they cause. That being said, that is just the way a lot of American entertainment works, and people respond to it. As such, this book was effective. People will respond to it. Listened to audiobook.
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  • Holly
    January 1, 1970
    An emotional 4.5-star rating! And I mean that in a good way. It’s just too good and sweet and sad and weak and strong and wise and funny to be otherwise. Cried my eyes out. And honestly the scene toward the beginning when Rodeo discovers Ivan had me cracking up out loud. the scene on top of the bus shouting secrets had me in tears. And the scene in the auditorium. Salvador is my absolute favorite supporting character, but a band of misfits, or at least loners... coming together for a cause will An emotional 4.5-star rating! And I mean that in a good way. It’s just too good and sweet and sad and weak and strong and wise and funny to be otherwise. Cried my eyes out. And honestly the scene toward the beginning when Rodeo discovers Ivan had me cracking up out loud. the scene on top of the bus shouting secrets had me in tears. And the scene in the auditorium. 🙌🏽Salvador is my absolute favorite supporting character, but a band of misfits, or at least loners... coming together for a cause will get me most of the time. Coyote herself is easy to root for, and her voice is charming. You really root for her.Yeppers. It’s a good one and I want everyone to read it.
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  • Book Hunter
    January 1, 1970
    This is a story of Coyote, a 12-year-old girl, and her dad as they have been on the road, living in a converted school bus for five years, trying to run away from the memories that broke their hearts. This book is amazing. There's really no other way to say it. It’s about family and grief, and friends, and adventure. It absolutely warmed my heart and made me feel all the feels. The story is full of lovable characters, and I savoured every page. It’s early to call my favorite middle grade read of This is a story of Coyote, a 12-year-old girl, and her dad as they have been on the road, living in a converted school bus for five years, trying to run away from the memories that broke their hearts. This book is amazing. There's really no other way to say it. It’s about family and grief, and friends, and adventure. It absolutely warmed my heart and made me feel all the feels. The story is full of lovable characters, and I savoured every page. It’s early to call my favorite middle grade read of 2019, but I cannot imagine a book topping this one for me.
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  • Cindy
    January 1, 1970
    I LOVED this book! Coyote, a 12-year-old girl, and Rodeo (which I pronounced as Roh-DAY-oh in my head every time!), her dad, have been on the road, living in a converted school bus, for 5 and a half years. They are on the run from the tragedy of losing their mom/wife and two little girls. (This is not a spoiler—it says as much on the book jacket.) The story begins as Coyote decides to take a free kitten that some boys are giving away at a mini mart. Her dad says that pets are a “no-go”, but she I LOVED this book! Coyote, a 12-year-old girl, and Rodeo (which I pronounced as Roh-DAY-oh in my head every time!), her dad, have been on the road, living in a converted school bus, for 5 and a half years. They are on the run from the tragedy of losing their mom/wife and two little girls. (This is not a spoiler—it says as much on the book jacket.) The story begins as Coyote decides to take a free kitten that some boys are giving away at a mini mart. Her dad says that pets are a “no-go”, but she is drawn to the quiet, intense gaze of the small gray and white cat. As their journey continues, she and her dad pick up a few more “strays”—people who also have troubles to escape from. ***All the characters in this book are wonderful. They have been well-defined, and their individual stories are relatable. Together, they all seem to be just what the other travelers need to work through their struggles. I love the bonds that they form, and the closer I got to the end of the book, the more emotional I became. By the end of it, I was a mess! — Oh, and I just love it when characters in books reference other books. Coyote’s favorite book is The One and Only Ivan, so that’s what she names her cat. And when she discovers that one of their new traveling companions is Esperanza, she is delighted because it reminds her of another favorite, Esperanza Rising. (See my recent review of that book as well!) It’s even better when I, too, have read and loved those books! So, in a way, this review is a hat trick—3 recommendations in one! ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️
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  • Beth
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for an ARC of this book.Another good book by this author that the kids are going to enjoy.
  • Krisette Spangler
    January 1, 1970
    Cute story, but a few too many curse words for a children's book.
  • Kaylee
    January 1, 1970
    This book is something special. (It made me feel very much like The Neverending Story made me feel.) It is, first of all, a good story, and one told by an exceptional storyteller. It is remarkably attentive to the details of both big events and everyday moments, and very insightful about what's going on below the surface. One thing Gemainhart does that I particularly like, is that after describing a significant event, he describes the quality of that moment, what it felt like, what kind of This book is something special. (It made me feel very much like The Neverending Story made me feel.) It is, first of all, a good story, and one told by an exceptional storyteller. It is remarkably attentive to the details of both big events and everyday moments, and very insightful about what's going on below the surface. One thing Gemainhart does that I particularly like, is that after describing a significant event, he describes the quality of that moment, what it felt like, what kind of moment it was. Here's one: I woulda smiled, but it wasn't really a smiling kind of a moment. I don't know what kind of moment it was, really, but I know it was a big kind. And a good kind, in the way big moments can be good without being happy, exactly. This is a book about love. I saw him talking into his phone, up there, in the shadow of the Idaho pines. He talked with his mouth, with his eyes, with his face, with his hands, with his heart. He paced and he nodded and he shook his head and sometimes he talked high and sometimes he talked low. I watched him, a lump in my throat. 'Cause he was doing all that talking for me.I loved that man, watching him talking for me by the side of the road. And I knew he loved me, too. Because that's what love is. Caring about what the other person cares about because you care about them. And want them to be happy.I love the way Gemainhart describes people, the way they talk, the way they move, the way they feel in their souls. He knows what people are like, inside and out. It's a book about living for today, but not leaving things behind."Rodeo shook his head. "That ain't no way to live, sugarbear, living in the past like that. We need to live for right now, for right now today, for--" "'Remember' ain't a past-tense word. It's a right-now word. The kind of person I wanna be, right now today, is the kind of person that remembers my mama and my sisters, right now today. ... I'm not saying I missed them. I'm saying I miss them. Right now, today. And I'm not saying I loved them. I love them. Right now. Today.""Then he said it. He said it so quiet I barely heart it. Said it so small that his lips hardly moved. But he said it. "Me, too." And it's a book about keeping memories alive. I started a new tradition for us, too. Most night before we go to sleep, we each tell a memory. One a day. A memory about our family. It can be a big memory or a small memory, a sad memory or a happy memory.I remember the night before we made it home. How I was afraid that once I got there, my mom and my sisters would feel gone. Well, they are gone. But, lord, they aren't gone at all. Not even close. Not anymore. Not ever again.Once-upon-a-times are important.The audiobook is also excellent. (I read most of this in ebook format, but also occasionally listened to a few chapters on audio when my hands were busy.) Khristine Hvam is a fantastic narrator. She read Coyote's parts with kind of a scruffy voice, which was just perfect for the character. Whatever emotion the characters were feeling, Hvam made you feel it in her voice.
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  • Natalie Fitzpatrick
    January 1, 1970
    This book is beautiful, sad, funny, heartwarming and heartbreaking. Every character felt real and I miss all of them. Read this book!
  • Abigail
    January 1, 1970
    This book was AMAZING!!! I cried for the last 50 pages at least. This book is a good story of keeping your family close even when things are tough. The things that Coyote goes through is crazy and the way she handles them is amazing. Coyote is definitely a great role model for young girls. I’ve only read two of Dan Gemeinhart’s books but the two that I’ve read (this one and The Honest Truth) make me want to read so many more. I could read this book over and over and never get tired of it. This This book was AMAZING!!! I cried for the last 50 pages at least. This book is a good story of keeping your family close even when things are tough. The things that Coyote goes through is crazy and the way she handles them is amazing. Coyote is definitely a great role model for young girls. I’ve only read two of Dan Gemeinhart’s books but the two that I’ve read (this one and The Honest Truth) make me want to read so many more. I could read this book over and over and never get tired of it. This book is awesome and I think every young girl should read it. I am 12 and I found the message really inspiring. Thank you so much Dan for putting this book out into the world.
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