Anthony Bourdain's Hungry Ghosts
Hungry Ghosts is cooked up by the best selling author and veteran chef, Anthony Bourdain ( Kitchen Confidential , Emmy-Award winning TV star of Parts Unknown ) and acclaimed novelist Joel Rose ( Kill, Kill, Faster, Faster ) back again from their New York Times #1 best seller, Get Jiro !. Featuring all-new original recipes prepared by Bourdain, plus a guide to the ghostly legendary spirits behind these horrifying tales. This horror anthology is sure to please--and scare! On a dark, haunted night, a Russian Oligarch dares a circle of international chefs to play the samurai game of 100 Candles--where each storyteller tells a terrifying tale of ghosts, demons and unspeakable beings--and prays to survive the challenge.Inspired by the Japanese Edo period game of Hyakumonogatari Kaidankai, Hungry Ghosts reimagines the classic stories of yokai, yorei, and obake, all tainted with the common thread of food.Including stellar artists Sebastian Cabrol, Vanesa Del Rey, Francesco Francavilla, Irene Koh, Leo Manco, Alberto Ponticelli, Paul Pope, and Mateus Santolouco as well as amazing color by Jose Villarrubia, a drop-dead cover by Paul Pope.

Anthony Bourdain's Hungry Ghosts Details

TitleAnthony Bourdain's Hungry Ghosts
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 2nd, 2018
PublisherBerger Books
ISBN-139781506706696
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Graphic Novels, Comics, Horror, Fiction, Comic Book

Anthony Bourdain's Hungry Ghosts Review

  • Gabrielle
    January 1, 1970
    Anthony Bourdain loved creepy stories, and he was very fond of Japanese culture, and “Hungry Ghosts” is his take on an old Edo-period Japanese parlor game. In the original context, guests would gather at night to tell each other folk tales and ghost stories; in the adjoining room they would light one hundred candles and set a small mirror on a table. After each story, the story-teller would go to the candle room to blow out one flame and look into the mirror. The game was considered a test of co Anthony Bourdain loved creepy stories, and he was very fond of Japanese culture, and “Hungry Ghosts” is his take on an old Edo-period Japanese parlor game. In the original context, guests would gather at night to tell each other folk tales and ghost stories; in the adjoining room they would light one hundred candles and set a small mirror on a table. After each story, the story-teller would go to the candle room to blow out one flame and look into the mirror. The game was considered a test of courage, because the candle room would grow darker and darker as the candles were blown out, creating a creepy atmosphere some believed appropriate for the summoning of the various spirits the tales they were sharing were about. Bourdain’s spin on it is a little different: a Russian crime boss hosts a magnificent dinner, and after the meal is done, he invites the cooks to participate in this game of the hundred candles. The cooks will share scary stories, which are reimaginings of classic Japanese horror stories that all share the theme of food. Or at least, eating.The stories he picked are not terribly frightening, at least not to me; but having read a few Zen folktales, I wasn’t surprised to find most of them contained more or less subtle moral lessons against behaviours like greed, breaking one’s promise, etc. But even if they didn’t spook me, I still enjoyed every story: the artwork is different for each, giving them all a unique style.This was Bourdain’s last book project before he died, and this collected edition of the four issues is dedicated to his memory. I would not say it was his best work, but it has his unmistakable style all over it, and if you enjoyed “Get Jiro!” (https://www.goodreads.com/review/show...), you will probably like a lot as well.
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  • Lauren
    January 1, 1970
    Hungry Ghosts: Tales of Fear and Food from Around the World was Anthony Bourdain's last work before his death in June 2018.Bourdain, an admirer of Japanese folklore as well as graphic novels/comics, worked with several artists to compile Hungry Ghosts.They were released as single issues, but I read the book form, which includes all 9 stories.The scene is set with a Russian oligarch-type figure who hosts a dinner party, and wants to end the evening with a parlor game - hyakumonogatari kaidankai " Hungry Ghosts: Tales of Fear and Food from Around the World was Anthony Bourdain's last work before his death in June 2018.Bourdain, an admirer of Japanese folklore as well as graphic novels/comics, worked with several artists to compile Hungry Ghosts.They were released as single issues, but I read the book form, which includes all 9 stories.The scene is set with a Russian oligarch-type figure who hosts a dinner party, and wants to end the evening with a parlor game - hyakumonogatari kaidankai "Kaidan", the game of 100 ghost stories. He invites the chefs to play along as storytellers.Each story is intended to be more macabre and terrifying than the last. As the storyteller finishes, they blow out a candle, making the room darker with each passing story... Until it is pitch black.The sections (scroll to see some of the art from the stories!) are various themes, all include yokai, the catch-all Japanese name for ghosts & goblins. Each story has a larger theme of food, or eating - signature Bourdain.A little unsettling, but not terribly horrific, the stories border more on grotesque and eerie. Artwork is different for each one, adding even more flavor. My faves were "The Pirates", "Snow Woman", and "The Heads".
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  • Elspeth
    January 1, 1970
    Oh mannnnn I really wanted to love this. It could have been perfect. I don't know if it was a short production schedule or what but the transitions between issues just did not make sense. First it's these rich guys doing this ritual and I'm thinking damnnn this is going to backfire on them but then in the next few issues the rich dudes are not even there? They explained at the beginning that everyone was to sit together in one room and light 100 candles and after each person told a scary story t Oh mannnnn I really wanted to love this. It could have been perfect. I don't know if it was a short production schedule or what but the transitions between issues just did not make sense. First it's these rich guys doing this ritual and I'm thinking damnnn this is going to backfire on them but then in the next few issues the rich dudes are not even there? They explained at the beginning that everyone was to sit together in one room and light 100 candles and after each person told a scary story they were to extinguish one candle. Except they moved rooms and characters disappeared and the candles kept multiplying???We have the chefs go into this room with the candles alone without the rich dudes (the characters are divided into the richies and the chefs who just cooked their 5-star dinner), but the whole conceit was that you sit together and one at a time extinguish a candle, chefs and rich dudes alike. I seriously went back to the beginning several times because I was like, am I missing something?It was a genuinely terrifying concept that was executed poorly. A group of people from different worlds, summoned by a mysterious and eccentric millionaire, is convinced to play an ancient samurai game where 100 candles are lit and everyone has to go around telling a scary story and extinguish one candle until all the candles are out and a demon is summoned. That's a genuinely awesome story!But this isn't that story.
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  • Peacegal
    January 1, 1970
    I'm starting this review by saying that I have changed my mind about Anthony Bourdain (sort of) in the wake of his untimely death. I used to hate the guy. His obnoxiousness to the animal world...ok, most people eat meat, I get that. But most people don't revel in eating endangered species, either. But it was his detestable comments about vegans, such as saying that we should kill ourselves, that tipped my opinion of him into loathing. Then, after Bourdain's suicide, I watched a YouTube video th I'm starting this review by saying that I have changed my mind about Anthony Bourdain (sort of) in the wake of his untimely death. I used to hate the guy. His obnoxiousness to the animal world...ok, most people eat meat, I get that. But most people don't revel in eating endangered species, either. But it was his detestable comments about vegans, such as saying that we should kill ourselves, that tipped my opinion of him into loathing. Then, after Bourdain's suicide, I watched a YouTube video that threw things into relief for me.It's the old trope of "hurting people hurt people." Like Roseanne Barr, Bourdain was a deeply ill person who lashed out at others to mask his own pain. Bourdain's tragic death and the revelation of his mental illness and addiction problems doesn't erase the suffering he caused animals. Nor does it negate the hurtful things he said about those of us whose values he disagreed with, especially damaging if the listener happened to be a depression sufferer themselves. But now I just feel sad for him, not angry. Still not going to read any of his books or watch his shows, though. I'm not that much of a glutton for punishment. But on to HUNGRY GHOSTS. This is a comic collection featuring horror stories from Japan, home to some of the strangest and scariest ghouls and goblins of any folklore traditions. While the monsters were definitely scary, I felt the stories were just too short to build up any real tension. Many of the comics fall back on gore and body horror, so if that isn't your thing--beware. Interestingly given Bourdain's values, two of the stories involve nonhuman creatures (one real, one fantastical) taking revenge on the people who have eaten them. The artwork is pretty incredible, even when the scenes being depicted are quite ugly. I think I actually may have liked the end pages, which depict and explain several bizarre ghosts and monsters of Japanese legend, as much or more than the book itself.
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  • R.
    January 1, 1970
    Terrifying Tales Served Too Soon with a side of Mashed Pota-toes and Grave-yWhat could have been a fun Vault of Horror style romp is hampered by artwork a bit too serious for the, ha ha, undertaking. And shitty continuity that would shame the archivists and editors and cosplayers of Radioactive Man and Fallout Boy. And, overall, the entire project is, for my tastes, made creepy in a very un-fun way by the looming shadow of Bourdain's untimely demise - especially when you read the warning, heed t Terrifying Tales Served Too Soon with a side of Mashed Pota-toes and Grave-yWhat could have been a fun Vault of Horror style romp is hampered by artwork a bit too serious for the, ha ha, undertaking. And shitty continuity that would shame the archivists and editors and cosplayers of Radioactive Man and Fallout Boy. And, overall, the entire project is, for my tastes, made creepy in a very un-fun way by the looming shadow of Bourdain's untimely demise - especially when you read the warning, heed the moral, of the final story. I mean, I know this sounds ridiculous in this day, this age, but Anthony's sad real-life suicide (or "suicide"), takes on the patina of a classic horror story twist ending (with a twist ending) worthy of the Cryptkeeper when viewed, when considered, when focused, through the lens of the classic EC Comics of yore.
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  • dg
    January 1, 1970
    great illustrations, nonsensical stories. there were two stories that were just about rape and there were also two stories just about pulling something out of a guys ass. why???a banquet for hungry ghosts by ying chang compestine did it a lot better, and had more recipes/explanation for stories/scary stuff.
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  • Kirsten
    January 1, 1970
    I didn’t love this as much as I wanted to. There’s some great horror artwork, and the stories are ably told, but it was often kind of difficult to discern what exactly was happening, particularly at the end of some of the stories.
  • Michael J.
    January 1, 1970
    I read this in single issues, published January through April 2018. I highly recommend the collected edition once it is published (October schedule).I'm already missing the observational skills and honesty of Anthony Bourdain. He wasn't perfect but he was genuine. Those properties are reflected in his comics work as well.This is a clever anthology of food-themed horror stories taken from Japanese mythology and placed in various global settings.I wrote an extended review of these issues on my blo I read this in single issues, published January through April 2018. I highly recommend the collected edition once it is published (October schedule).I'm already missing the observational skills and honesty of Anthony Bourdain. He wasn't perfect but he was genuine. Those properties are reflected in his comics work as well.This is a clever anthology of food-themed horror stories taken from Japanese mythology and placed in various global settings.I wrote an extended review of these issues on my blog, which you can access via this link:https://popculturepodium.blogspot.com...
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  • Yves Loomans
    January 1, 1970
    Japanese Ghosts, Food, Great Artists (Pope, Ponticelli, Manco, Francavilla) and Karen Berger. Already the anthology book of the year?—- While reading this I learned about the dead of Anthony Bourdain, co-creator of this book. A lot of us Europeans might not now him but this American masterchef, well esteemed tv host, world traveler and all around nice guy was a very talented writer and huge star in America.He took his life in a hostel in Paris at the age of 61. May his spirit rest in peace. —-
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  • Charlene Nelson
    January 1, 1970
    What a fine collection of scary stories that made for interesting reading. The fact that the late Anthony Bourdain had the foresight to put these stories together in one place made them accessable to all to read. The graphics are terrific and each story has an underlying theme, that of food. This book is able to say things with the graphics that one wouldn't say otherwise. One of the most unique things is in the back of the book there are some great recipes. But then considering that the late An What a fine collection of scary stories that made for interesting reading. The fact that the late Anthony Bourdain had the foresight to put these stories together in one place made them accessable to all to read. The graphics are terrific and each story has an underlying theme, that of food. This book is able to say things with the graphics that one wouldn't say otherwise. One of the most unique things is in the back of the book there are some great recipes. But then considering that the late Anthony Bourdain was always looking for great food, this makes perfect sense. What an interesting concept and reading this book during the month of October really helps to get one in the mood for Halloween! There also is a glossary that talks about the different legends and beliefs from around the world that were the inspiration for these stories.
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  • Eve Schaub
    January 1, 1970
    I'm a fan of graphic novels and Anthony Bourdain, but not horror... if you love all three I can guarantee you'll adore Hungry Ghosts. I love the audacity of this premise more than anything- the combination of food, blood and guts, Asian monsters and comics sounds like it might be hard to sustain for very long but to the contrary: the gruesome tales unfold effortlessly, like so many ghost stories told at an all-chef slumber party.A little gross and grim for me, but at the same time a demonstratio I'm a fan of graphic novels and Anthony Bourdain, but not horror... if you love all three I can guarantee you'll adore Hungry Ghosts. I love the audacity of this premise more than anything- the combination of food, blood and guts, Asian monsters and comics sounds like it might be hard to sustain for very long but to the contrary: the gruesome tales unfold effortlessly, like so many ghost stories told at an all-chef slumber party.A little gross and grim for me, but at the same time a demonstration of Bourdain's often surprising versatility and ability to re-invent and re-re-invent himself as a creative person. Oh, I miss him.
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  • CJ - It's only a Paper Moon
    January 1, 1970
    While it was interesting (and some of the stories I actually knew, thanks obsession with Manga) there seemed to be lacking a concrete thread from one story to another. Some ended similarly while others seemed to just end. If this was supposed to be something of a roundtable of stories (like the game is supposed to be played) that wouldn't have happened. I didn't need character development because the star of the show were the stories (which weren't as scary as they could have been) but I would'v While it was interesting (and some of the stories I actually knew, thanks obsession with Manga) there seemed to be lacking a concrete thread from one story to another. Some ended similarly while others seemed to just end. If this was supposed to be something of a roundtable of stories (like the game is supposed to be played) that wouldn't have happened. I didn't need character development because the star of the show were the stories (which weren't as scary as they could have been) but I would've liked the stories to have had some of these stories better told.
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  • Susan
    January 1, 1970
    As I had expected these short stories all focus on eating. Not eating delicious mouthwatering food but disgusting and nauseating consumption. People eat horses, people eat people, ghosts eat people and it's all pretty gross. The stories weren't scary so much as just straight up gruesome. The one I actually really liked was "The Snow Woman" which was quite beautiful. The others I could take or leave. I appreciate the overall message of the bigger story which was not to be greedy and selfish, to h As I had expected these short stories all focus on eating. Not eating delicious mouthwatering food but disgusting and nauseating consumption. People eat horses, people eat people, ghosts eat people and it's all pretty gross. The stories weren't scary so much as just straight up gruesome. The one I actually really liked was "The Snow Woman" which was quite beautiful. The others I could take or leave. I appreciate the overall message of the bigger story which was not to be greedy and selfish, to help others who have less. That has Anthony Bourdain written all over it.
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  • Richelle Priscilla
    January 1, 1970
    Man this graphic novel was wild and more than gruesome but it was a fun time. I enjoyed the art and the different stories. I gasped a bit, said ewww a lot and chuckled more than once. I learned a thing or two about different types of ghosts and best believe I’ll be trying the recipes they included at the end. Maybe some of the writing was a bit choppy at times and it’s certainly not the best compilation of stories I’ve ever read but overall, I’d read this again because it was enjoyable, interest Man this graphic novel was wild and more than gruesome but it was a fun time. I enjoyed the art and the different stories. I gasped a bit, said ewww a lot and chuckled more than once. I learned a thing or two about different types of ghosts and best believe I’ll be trying the recipes they included at the end. Maybe some of the writing was a bit choppy at times and it’s certainly not the best compilation of stories I’ve ever read but overall, I’d read this again because it was enjoyable, interesting and the last published work of Anthony Bourdain. 4-4.5 rating
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  • Doria
    January 1, 1970
    Delightfully creepy selection of stories drawn directly from Japanese traditional tales, with appropriately brilliant and lurid illustrations. Not for the faint of heart or weak of stomach. The stories are accompanied by several luscious and elaborate Bourdain recipes which tie in rather wickedly to the stories. However, I found it difficult to contemplate cooking and eating directly after reading this graphic novel!
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  • Sunny
    January 1, 1970
    I was intrigued by a comic that integrated Japanese folk horror with cooking. Plus, I wanted to read something that may inspire me to try cooking different dishes. Gory images mixed with storytelling--graphic imagery and a taste of some of the Japanese folk tale (one I have to confess I heard many times) but not so great for stimulating the appetite or encouraging one to cook. Nevertheless, it did a good job of introducing horror stories in relationship with food.
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  • Simon
    January 1, 1970
    An inventive set of tales that features all the tastiness of modern comics art (Francavilla and Pope and Santaluoco, oh my) but lacks a bit of substance. The stories, as is tradition in anthologies, vary in quality, which means some issues are half-full of great stuff and half-full of, erm, the rest. Still, a very worthy dish for fans of the horror genre.
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  • Scott Gould
    January 1, 1970
    I love Anthony Bourdain, obviously. But this was so dumb, I can't even really be mad at it. Maybe the stories were too short to get invested in them in any real way. Cool art though, good for some sight gags.
  • Alex
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoy Anthony Bourdain's writing and mourn the loss of his voice. Unlike his other writings i don't hear his voice in my head when I read it, but I love that he worked in comics. His sensibilities still come through. I look forward to picking up the other issues
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  • J
    January 1, 1970
    Short little horror stories from a man who's now joined the ghosts. Relatively little time for character development in these tiny quick tales, the set up is good but these just exist to creep you out a little. They aren't more than little snacks.
  • Jana Eichhorn
    January 1, 1970
    Great story collection, perfectly spooky. I'm glad I bought this one.
  • Eric Riggs
    January 1, 1970
    This was a fun take on Bourdain's love of food, culture, and horror. Quick read with some great recipes.
  • Sarah I
    January 1, 1970
    Great art and concept, but the stories fall flat.
  • Lizzy Walker
    January 1, 1970
    Review forthcoming for Monster Librarian.
  • Meredith
    January 1, 1970
    Two stars for weird stories, four for awesome illustrations. Meet in the middle. Meh.
  • Julie
    January 1, 1970
    It’s really difficult to say anything bad about this posthumous work, and impossible not to notice the hunger now, looking back. Honestly, it’s a great collection of stories with outstanding art.
  • Benjamin
    January 1, 1970
    I’m hungry.
  • Susie Steadman
    January 1, 1970
    Do you enjoy spooky stories? Then this is for you.
  • Tricia
    January 1, 1970
    🖤 AB 🖤
  • Jenifer
    January 1, 1970
    This was a nice quick read that reminded me of the horror comics I loved as a kid; but be prepared-most of the stories are dark and gory and sometimes too gratuitously sexual.
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