Nightwing, Vol. 6
A threat from Dick Grayson's past past resurfaces in NIGHTWING VOL. 1: THE UNTOUCHABLE! Nightwing finally feels like he's got his life in Blüdhaven under control. But the one thing he wasn't expecting was for a case from his past in Gotham City to rear its head here--a murderer he never set eyes on, but whose unmistakable signature has arrived in his new city! How many people will die before he's stopped this time? Or worse than that...what if Dick can't stop him?  Incoming creative team Sam Humphries (GREEN LANTERNS) and Bernard Chang (BATMAN BEYOND) will take Nightwing back to his days as Robin and force him to question his future as well in NIGHTWING VOL. 1: THE UNTOUCHABLE!  Collects NIGHTWING #35-41.

Nightwing, Vol. 6 Details

TitleNightwing, Vol. 6
Author
ReleaseAug 28th, 2018
PublisherDC
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Superheroes, Dc Comics, Graphic Novels Comics

Nightwing, Vol. 6 Review

  • Chad
    January 1, 1970
    I gotta say, I was a bit disappointed in this after reading Humphries's fantastic run on Green Lanterns. The Judge ultimately didn't work as a villain. His powers and identity start to morph as the story goes on. At first he's this modern version of the devil corrupting people as he gives them poker chips. But that doesn't make any sense if he's some kind of ancient judge. You could actually see the story jump the shark or in this case get saved by a giant squid. That is Batman '66 level camp, r I gotta say, I was a bit disappointed in this after reading Humphries's fantastic run on Green Lanterns. The Judge ultimately didn't work as a villain. His powers and identity start to morph as the story goes on. At first he's this modern version of the devil corrupting people as he gives them poker chips. But that doesn't make any sense if he's some kind of ancient judge. You could actually see the story jump the shark or in this case get saved by a giant squid. That is Batman '66 level camp, right there. Bernard Chang brings a sense of dynamic motion to the book that I really liked. Humphries left the book after this story and there's also a couple of fill in issues before Benjamin Percy takes over. I found the story by Lanzing and Kelly tedious and Jorge Corona's jangly art atrocious. Michael Moreci and Minkyu Jung do a much better job in their team-up with Robin and Arsenal.
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  • Wing Kee
    January 1, 1970
    2.5. A emotionless choppy and boring mess.World: The art is fine, Chang is solid and I love his work on Batman Beyond, but I felt that his art is not gritty and glitzy enough for the Blud. The sense of motions is good, but overall it's only okay. The world building here is fairly basic, it's a call on a supposed past of Nighwing/Robin and Humpries tries very hard to build a larger and deeper story behind it but the thing is, the world he's creating and the villain that comes with it is fairly bo 2.5. A emotionless choppy and boring mess.World: The art is fine, Chang is solid and I love his work on Batman Beyond, but I felt that his art is not gritty and glitzy enough for the Blud. The sense of motions is good, but overall it's only okay. The world building here is fairly basic, it's a call on a supposed past of Nighwing/Robin and Humpries tries very hard to build a larger and deeper story behind it but the thing is, the world he's creating and the villain that comes with it is fairly boring and cliched. I'm very tired of people writing stuff from Grayson's past that bites him.Story: The biggest issue with the story is the villain, he doesn't work. Is he magic is he not, the wishy washy neither here or there character creation makes him uninteresting. His motivations are also unclear and his methods and how he turned the way also cliched and boring. That being said, to have him ground the first arc makes for a boring and expected story. There is also some choppiness in the execution of the story making for a rather long drawn and choppy read. I like Nightwing fighting ground level villains like he did in his iconic Dickson run and so far I've not seen it with Seeley and now Humpries. I want to keep the magic and the crazy away for now, ground him. Make him (for lack of a better example) like Daredevil on Netflix. Characters: Dick is okay, his past is kinda meh in terms of the villain and the drive really isn't there cause if it meant so much why have me not heard of it before, it makes no sense. The gym thing is also kinda...okay. As I said the villain is terrible making for a terrible arc, he's boring, he makes no sense and also he's a cliche of the genre. We just had Raptor who was from the past are we doing another past villain AGAIN!!!! Please work editors!!!A very disappointing start. Please keep it grounded and simple please.Onward to the next book!*read individual issues*
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  • Megan
    January 1, 1970
    The 3 star rating is solely for the art and the last 2 issues where we first see an interesting shift in tone and style as Dick rescues Damian from death by dragon in Japan, then get to watch Damian and Roy bicker while Dick plays “dad”. Sure, Roy’s character has been absolutely shredded for the sake of entertainment value, but it’s still fun to read if you don’t think about it too hard. Everything is really “meh” in this volume. The colours, dialogue, action and mystery were all lacking in inte The 3 star rating is solely for the art and the last 2 issues where we first see an interesting shift in tone and style as Dick rescues Damian from death by dragon in Japan, then get to watch Damian and Roy bicker while Dick plays “dad”. Sure, Roy’s character has been absolutely shredded for the sake of entertainment value, but it’s still fun to read if you don’t think about it too hard. Everything is really “meh” in this volume. The colours, dialogue, action and mystery were all lacking in intensity, and my eyes glazed over while reading. There was nothing new to see here, and you could have pasted any B-list male superhero in Dick’s place and the dialogue and storyline would have been the exact same. Mentioning the words “circus”, “Batman”, and “Robin” every few panels doesn’t make-up for the fact that Dick has been granted all the personality of white-rice. I mean sure, white-rice is a staple, we’re all used to it, but it isn’t exciting and I can find it anywhere. At the moment I feel like Nightwing is suffering from writers having difficulties pinpointing Dick’s age, and the age of his audience. This volume read as an awkward mix designed for both elementary kids and adults. On the one hand, we’re constantly being reminded of things we already know, as if our tiny reader-brains won’t be able to pick up on the fact that Dick is all grown up and Not Batman Thank-You Very Much, we have the lamest villains imaginable (The Limousine Assassins, really?), we’re not going to let Dick say “ass”, and we have cliche’d, heavy-handed speeches about justice, and forgiving ones-self (you know, the classic spiels we’ve already read a thousand times in this series, and have already seen addressed in every made-to-own Disney Channel Original Movie). On the other hand, we have blood and gore, patricide, and Dick undercover as a stripper. Huh. The thing is, we’ve all read Dick written as an interesting character in his own right, so reading this watered down version is all the more disappointing.
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  • Chris Lemmerman
    January 1, 1970
    [Read as single issues]Years ago, when he was Robin, Dick Grayson was faced with a villain even he couldn’t defeat. He thought that The Judge was dead. He was wrong. Now The Judge has returned to prey on Nightwing’s new home of Bludhaven, using his uncanny ability to see into his victim’s souls and discover exactly what they truly desire. Dick may have failed in the past, but this time he’ll stop at nothing to end The Judge’s reign of terror once and for all.When Sam Humphries and Tim Seeley swa [Read as single issues]Years ago, when he was Robin, Dick Grayson was faced with a villain even he couldn’t defeat. He thought that The Judge was dead. He was wrong. Now The Judge has returned to prey on Nightwing’s new home of Bludhaven, using his uncanny ability to see into his victim’s souls and discover exactly what they truly desire. Dick may have failed in the past, but this time he’ll stop at nothing to end The Judge’s reign of terror once and for all.When Sam Humphries and Tim Seeley swapped books at the end of their successful runs on Green Lanterns and Nightwing, I was quite interested to see what they managed to do with each other’s books. Unfortunately neither of them has managed to make quite the same splash as they did originally. Thankfully, Humphries only remained on this series for one arc, although it certainly feels a lot longer. This is certainly a story that could have been told in a shorter amount of issues, since there’s a lot of running around that doesn’t amount to much.The idea of The Judge is a good one; Nightwing having foes from his past as Robin that aren’t just Batman villains helps flesh out his own rogues gallery. But he’s just not that compelling as a character. There’s an attempt later on to give him a supernatural origin that really doesn’t gel with the portrayal of the character up until that point, and his powers aren’t defined properly – he can kind of just do what he wants, when he wants, which makes him a bit too mysterious. There’s an attempt made to tie him into Nightwing’s existing supporting cast which I appreciate, but he’s just not great, and when he’s the lynchpin of the entire story, it all crumbles around him as a result.I can’t fault the art however. The majority of the issues are pencilled by Bernard Chang, fresh from a run on Batman Beyond, and his dynamic style and sleek lines are a great fit for Nightwing’s world. Marcelo Maiolo’s colours continue to make Chang’s art look very individual, and the neon world of Bludhaven really shines under his palette. Also included here are some fill-in issues from the end of Humphries’ run before Benjamin Percy takes over. First there’s a tale by Collin Kelly and Jackson Lanzing in which Dick has to rescue Damian from ninjas, which has some unique narration and some super jagged art from Jorge Corona.Then there’s a three-way team-up with Arsenal and Robin that made me smile; Michael Moreci writes this, and he handled a fill-in issue of Titans where Nightwing and Wally West teamed up, so this seems to be his thing, while the art is by Minkju Jung who has proven herself on Nightwing multiple times already.The Untouchable is a bold story, but it doesn’t hit the mark. The villain’s not interesting enough, and the story meanders around before culminating in a plot that isn’t half as unique as the villain wants it to be. The supplementary material is pretty solid though, and the art can’t be faulted, so there are some good areas of the volume, but after Tim Seeley’s brilliant five volume run, this is a step down.
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  • Eric
    January 1, 1970
    The digital copy I read actually had 8 issues in the collected volume. 35-43. It had two story arcs and it said it was 216 pages. I have been sort of in and out on the Nightwing Rebirth. I really enjoyed it at the beginning, but then I lost interest. But I really liked this one. I especially enjoyed the first 5 issue arc.
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  • Colleen
    January 1, 1970
    I love Dick Grayson/Nightwing; but throughout the main arc he was self-flagellating in such an overwrought way that it was annoying to the point of feeling inauthentic. Three stars because of the final story featuring Damian & Roy.
  • Ben Truong
    January 1, 1970
    Nightwing: The Untouchable picks up where the previous volume left off, collecting five issues (35–43) of the 2016 on-going series.Nightwing: The Untouchable has three stories: the seven-part story "The Untouchable" and two one-time stories "The Crimson Kabuki" and "The Noble, The Obnoxious, and the Inept".The seven-part story "The Untouchables" has Nightwing confronting a villain that he had faced twice before and failed to capture. Once when he was Robin, it was his first trip to Blüdhaven wit Nightwing: The Untouchable picks up where the previous volume left off, collecting five issues (35–43) of the 2016 on-going series.Nightwing: The Untouchable has three stories: the seven-part story "The Untouchable" and two one-time stories "The Crimson Kabuki" and "The Noble, The Obnoxious, and the Inept".The seven-part story "The Untouchables" has Nightwing confronting a villain that he had faced twice before and failed to capture. Once when he was Robin, it was his first trip to Blüdhaven with Batman, and the second when he was a student at Hudson University in Blüdhaven – both times, he had failed to capture or was instrumental of the villains' escape. Therefore, when the villain comes to Blüdhaven a third time around, he feels heavily responsible for all the deaths he could have been prevented had he was not instrumental in his first escape when he was Robin.Nothing much is known about this elusive villain except for his name – The Judge until his identity was revealed to Nightwing during the story. Jacob de Witt, known as the Judge, is an immortal Blüdhaven-based serial killer who was actually the first Judge when Blüdhaven was settled many years ago. The Judge is a cunning mastermind that has killed many people and makes them do unspeakable things, by looking directly into their souls and compel them to execute them. Many known alias that the Judge use is current and former member of the Supreme Court Justices.In "The Crimson Kabuki", we have Nightwing on a vacation that was interrupted when he had heard that his youngest brother Damian Wayne as Robin was kidnapped by an ancient branch of the Yakuza – the Crimson Kabuki who were considered all powerful – until they kidnapped Robin and earned the wraith of Nightwing, who decimated the Yakuza to retrieve his brother. It is an interesting story told from Damian Wayne's point of view.The final story "The Noble, The Obnoxious, and the Inept" had Dick Grayson wanting to take a night off, when Damian Wayne as Robin calls for some reinforcements with his dealing with the League of Assassins in Gotham City. Furthermore, Roy Harper as Arsenal is also in Gotham City requesting his aid. In the end, the three of them team up to take care of a scheme of the League of Assassins. They have a weapon that could cause a beam to soak up all the oxygen in Gotham City and it is up to these three to stop them.There were four writers in this trade paperback. However, there was not any interruption in the story flow as there is one writer for each story. Sam Humphries wrote the seven-part story "The Untouchables", Jackson Lanzing and Collin Kelley wrote the one-shot "The Crimson Kabuki", and Michael Moreci wrote the one-shot "The Noble, The Obnoxious, and the Inept".For the most part, I rather liked each story, although "The Untouchables" was longer than I would have liked. Despite it being a tad clichéd, I liked the idea of a villain from Dick Grayson's past that he has yet to capture. I liked the idea of telling a story that happened during Dick Grayson's collegiate years, as there are not many stories from this part of Dick Grayson's life – I just wished it spent some more time there. In "The Crimson Kabuki" is a story told by Damian Wayne through a flashback, which was a tad jarring switching from the different storytelling styles.Nightwing: The Untouchable had six pencilers: Bernard Chang penciled four issues (Nightwing #35–36, #38, and #40), Jamal Campbell penciled three issues (Nightwing #37, #39, and #41), with Klaus Janson, Phil Jimenez, Jorge Corona, and Minkyu Jung with one issue each (Nightwing #37, #39, #42–43 respectively).Artistically, it flowed rather well most of the pencilers complement each other rather well – except for Jorge Corona, who's penciling is a tad too indie from the rest of the pencilers. However, since Jorge Corona and Minkyu Jung did the single issues, it was not too bad. Likewise, Klaus Janson and Phil Jimenez did the flashback sequences of Dick Grayson time as Robin and his collegiate years respectively. Bernard Chang and Jamal Campbell did the present day sequences and while their penciling were complemented each other rather well – it is distinctive enough to disturb the artistic flow a tad. All in all, Nightwing: The Untouchable was a well-written and depicted trade paperback and I cannot wait to read what happens next to our favorite bluebird.
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  • Louis Skye
    January 1, 1970
    This may not have been the greatest plot but, honestly, it was a riveting story to read. I felt like I learned a lot about Bludhaven, and Dick’s own insecurities.Plus, a story about a superhero having to deal with the mistakes of his past? That never gets old. Actions have consequences and Nightwing learns that the hard way here.I would have liked more consistent art. This volume has two artists with rather distinct, albeit beautiful, styles. But it took me out a bit when reading the volume in o This may not have been the greatest plot but, honestly, it was a riveting story to read. I felt like I learned a lot about Bludhaven, and Dick’s own insecurities.Plus, a story about a superhero having to deal with the mistakes of his past? That never gets old. Actions have consequences and Nightwing learns that the hard way here.I would have liked more consistent art. This volume has two artists with rather distinct, albeit beautiful, styles. But it took me out a bit when reading the volume in one go. However, both artists do a magnificent job. The art is jaw-droppingly stunning throughout.I would have liked Nightwing to face some of his inner demons here. All the civilians share what their deepest desires are but Nightwing is never affected. I don’t quite buy that. It makes him seem indestructible, which he isn’t. I’m hoping that future series give us more information about the villain. We get some background, and it’s fascinating, but there are still a lot of questions one has after reading this volume.I really hope the stories keep up the art and pace. I loved this one.
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  • Chris
    January 1, 1970
    The art throughout this book is fantastic (especially the gratuitous scenes of Dick posing as a stripper), all of the artists bring their own flair to the characters. It's not at Mikel Janin levels of beauty, but it's pretty great.The story didn't really hold my interest unfortunately. I really want to feel invested in this world of Blüdhaven, but it's not doing it for me. Additionally I don't like Humphries' voice for Dick Grayson. I don't know what it is exactly, it just doesn't sound like the The art throughout this book is fantastic (especially the gratuitous scenes of Dick posing as a stripper), all of the artists bring their own flair to the characters. It's not at Mikel Janin levels of beauty, but it's pretty great.The story didn't really hold my interest unfortunately. I really want to feel invested in this world of Blüdhaven, but it's not doing it for me. Additionally I don't like Humphries' voice for Dick Grayson. I don't know what it is exactly, it just doesn't sound like the character to me.Actually, it's probably his interpretation of young Dick Grayson that doesn't work for me. I will always view "Robin: Year One" as canon, and I don't see that character in these stories.I did enjoy the story at the end by Michael Moreci, featuring Arsenal and Robin. It was worth it just for Aresnal's hope that it'd be a "Bro's night out" and Damian's "I'm more his bro than anyone!"
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  • Juan
    January 1, 1970
    I truly loved this volume and I really hope that if Sam Humphries continues to write this series than I have high hopes for the future. Me personally, I grew tired of Tim Seely writing the series and sometimes kind of figured I would stop following although the issues were only $2.99. His stories were not entirely that bad either. Humphries initial story was long and very interesting, in my opinion. The Judge was a great antagonist with a really interesting back story with a mystical twist. Some I truly loved this volume and I really hope that if Sam Humphries continues to write this series than I have high hopes for the future. Me personally, I grew tired of Tim Seely writing the series and sometimes kind of figured I would stop following although the issues were only $2.99. His stories were not entirely that bad either. Humphries initial story was long and very interesting, in my opinion. The Judge was a great antagonist with a really interesting back story with a mystical twist. Something, or rather someone, that I found myself really giving a damn about in this volume was the events pertaining to Guppy and his father, King Sturgeon. Its a rather sad tale that is told but plays a rather interesting story to the overall plot.
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  • José
    January 1, 1970
    85/100.Qué bien le ha venido Sam Humphries a Nightwing, de verdad. El volumen anterior pensaba que se medía la valía de la historia por su villano. Raptor no estuvo a la altura, pero sí que lo ha estado the Judge. También debo decir que el arte de Bernard Chang me ha enamorado; están casi todos los números escritos por él (5 de 7) y el último en colaboración con Jamal Campbell (que participó en los dos que no escribió Chang).Autoconclusivo y recomendable al cien por cien.
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  • Andrew Huey
    January 1, 1970
    This story was pretty good. There were a few nice touches here and there, including the character Guppy. There were two flashback sequences, one with art by Klaus Janson, and the other with art by Phil Jimenez. I liked both of those. I'm not sure how I feel about the main villain, The Judge. Humphries gets points for creating a new villain, with some quirky traits, at least. I guess I'm not sure I buy into his backstory. But it was a fun story overall.
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  • Rilana
    January 1, 1970
    Good read and paced well. The villain wasn't as great as they tried to make him.Plenty of flashbacks, worthwhile conflict, but character development is kind of at a standstill for this one.It wasn't as good as I was hoping but still enjoyed it. At least there was no unnecessary love interest.Hopefully they go in an even better direction next for Nightwing.
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  • Joseph
    January 1, 1970
    Loved this issue. The Judge was an interesting and creepy villain and the past two stand-alone stories were great. Always a treat seeing Dick and Damian together and adding in Roy Harper was a bonus.Simply loved Chang's art and the colors.
  • Amanda
    January 1, 1970
    I wanted to like this more, especially since it features Dick Grayson going under cover as a Magic Mike dance but...it's very throwback kind of story and was just okay.
  • Yas
    January 1, 1970
    Greatly enjoyed that insight into Dick's self-hatred. And, ont he other side, the forggiveness he has for so many others! God, that truly was a good volume.
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