Killer T
Our world is about to change in ways we can barely imagine. KILLER T is a novel about growing up in that world. Harry and Charlie are teenagers whose lives are shaped by a society that's shifting around them. He is a lonely Brit in his first term at a Las Vegas high school. She is an unlikely friend, who gets accused of mixing a batch of explosives that blew up a football player.The two of them are drawn together at a time when gene editing technology is starting to explode. With a lab in the garage anyone can beat cancer, enhance their brain to pass exams, or tweak a few genes for that year-round tan and perfect beach body. But in the wrong hands, cheap gene editing is the most deadly weapon in history. Killer T is a synthetic virus with a ninety per-cent mortality rate, and the terrorists who created it want a billion dollars before they'll release a vaccine.Terrifying. Romantic. Huge in scope. A story for our times.

Killer T Details

TitleKiller T
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 6th, 2018
PublisherHot Key Books
Rating
GenreYoung Adult, Science Fiction, Dystopia, Fiction

Killer T Review

  • Jenniely
    January 1, 1970
    It’s 2018. Why are women still being written like this? The character is 13, why are you talking about her sweaty chunky legs and her shirt turning see through so we can see her bra?! Why is she having sex with an ‘ugly’ guy just because? Why is the description of one of the characters that she had brown hair and cleavage?! That’s not how you describe someone! My gosh. Why are we accepting this as okay?! I did a thread to my thoughts about this with images here:https://twitter.com/jenniely/statu It’s 2018. Why are women still being written like this? The character is 13, why are you talking about her sweaty chunky legs and her shirt turning see through so we can see her bra?! Why is she having sex with an ‘ugly’ guy just because? Why is the description of one of the characters that she had brown hair and cleavage?! That’s not how you describe someone! My gosh. Why are we accepting this as okay?! I did a thread to my thoughts about this with images here:https://twitter.com/jenniely/status/1...Here is the text:I REALLY wanted to like Killer T. Sadly it’s definitely not for me. The writing is way off. I find it’s overly sexualising this 13 year old (see below) whilst also just unessecarily commenting on her body type? Same with the other girl. I don’t like this for many reasons.One being - show me, don’t tell me. Every new person we’ve met so far has literally been like - this is blah, he has messy blonde hair and a strong build.But also like... she has cleavage? That’s not a descriptor for a person! Most people can have cleavage?!I’m not often overly negative about a book but this just rubbed me the wrong way 🤷‍♀️ I’ve given up pretty early on - you may like it. This is just my opinionI actually have a proof copy of this and it says that it has a major publicity campaign and reached loads of teenagers, which troubles me because of how it over sexualises all these young women. The men not as much but still.This kid is 14?!Omg gross I skipped ahead and this happens?!I skipped further in the book and it just get worse. Not for me. She has sex with an ‘ugly guy’ but it’s better than being alone, later in the book. Yep. This is gross.The more I think about Killer T and read other reviews the angrier I get. The language is awful as are the overly sexualised children and the ideas portrayed 😡Gosh I haven’t felt this irked about a book since plague land.We don’t need to know about a 13 year old girl’s bra!!
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  • Alexis
    January 1, 1970
    I was drawn into reading this book by the cover, and the description of a dystopian future with crazy gene splicing and a deadly virus. This has taught me that I should read the blurb a bit more carefully in future! The book is actually much more of a teen romance and coming of age story than it is a cool dystopian sci-fi thriller, though I guess it is a little of both.The book centres around Harry and Charlie, and key events in their lives over a number of their formative years. It jumps forwar I was drawn into reading this book by the cover, and the description of a dystopian future with crazy gene splicing and a deadly virus. This has taught me that I should read the blurb a bit more carefully in future! The book is actually much more of a teen romance and coming of age story than it is a cool dystopian sci-fi thriller, though I guess it is a little of both.The book centres around Harry and Charlie, and key events in their lives over a number of their formative years. It jumps forwards in time a few times, missing out a few years here and there to get to the more interesting parts. I liked this aspect of the book, and I would say that each time I was surprised at what had happened while I had been away, as it were. It was a clever way to skip the boring bits and to add a sense of progression.The pace is quite slow, and although I did like the characters I found that the whole thing was quite vanilla. Even when exciting or sad things were happening, I didn't get much emotion from the writing or the characters themselves. At times when my heart should have been racing, when I should have been gripping the book tightly and holding back tears, there was no feeling whatsoever for me. I'm not sure why this is, I think I just expected it to be grittier given the subject matter. It was bordering on comedy at some points because of embarrassing teenaged moments, but it didn't quite get there.All in all, I wanted to like this book, and at first I did. But then I got a bit bored with it. It was all a bit too long and drawn out, and there wasn't enough punch. Even growing up over a few years, from early teenage to early twenties, the characters didn't seem to change or mature that much at all really. Everything just stayed the same. The subject matter and the idea was great, but it was all just a surface idea with a little bit of science thrown in here and there, and nothing was made of it. I wanted more interaction with the gene modifications and the viruses, not just a brief passing comment about them here and there.For me, this book was okay. I wouldn't say I didn't like it, but I wouldn't say I really liked it either. I'd never heard of the author before, but I now know he has written a number of other highly praised books. Honestly, I'm not going to be in a rush to read any of them. On the other hand, maybe he deserves a second chance.
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  • Nic Zimmermann
    January 1, 1970
    Excellent coming of age young adult novel. Killer T is set in a futuristic Las Vegas. Harry and Charlie are smart young teens growing up in a world where gene editing and man made viruses threaten life as we know it. A well realised version of the future forecasting the impact of the modern revolutions of infotech and biotech. I thoroughly enjoyed it. Four stars.
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  • Liz Barnsley
    January 1, 1970
    Review to follow.
  • Trish
    January 1, 1970
    This book was difficult to put down once I got into it. Muchamore poses an interesting question : "What would happen if gene editing technology became common place and could be undertaken anywhere by anyone?" The answer is frightening. Fast paced and well researched, I really enjoyed this book and I will be recommending it to all my students.
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  • Lena
    January 1, 1970
    Killer T was majorly underwhelming. I was expecting to go in for an exciting sci-fi thriller, and even though the second half of the book was alright, the first two parts had certain passages that made me more-than-slightly uncomfortable (more on that in a sec). The ending felt random. All in all, it wasn't great. The characters were underdeveloped, from time to time I got an inkling that the author had made research on teenager interactions through low budget teenage dramas, and the sci-fi aspe Killer T was majorly underwhelming. I was expecting to go in for an exciting sci-fi thriller, and even though the second half of the book was alright, the first two parts had certain passages that made me more-than-slightly uncomfortable (more on that in a sec). The ending felt random. All in all, it wasn't great. The characters were underdeveloped, from time to time I got an inkling that the author had made research on teenager interactions through low budget teenage dramas, and the sci-fi aspect was unimaginative. I did enjoy the time skips in the narration.Let's get into the issue I have with the first half of the book. Prepare for some high quality quotes. So, in the first part Charlie is thirteen and Henry is fourteen. Let that sink in. Now proceed:Sobs shook Charlie’s body as Harry breathed her smell and felt a little turned on.I want to kiss her, but that’s the last thing she wants right now.Charlie shuddered as he loomed behind, planting a hairy hand on each shoulder. ‘You’re sweating through that overall,’ mystery man noticed as his stale breath hit her face. ‘It’s not leaving much to my imagination.'‘Nice,’he growled, taking one hand off and edging a slight grin. Then he pushed out his tongue and licked from the base of Charlie’s chin to her earlobe. His breath was like rot and she could hear the spit slosh around his mouth as he spoke his final words. ‘It’s been a pleasure breaking you.’In the second part Charlie is "almost sixteen" aka still fifteen. He looked about eighteen and he’d strode from his room in CK briefs that left little to the imagination.‘So, who’s this blue -eyed honey?’ the Yankees-shirt guy said as he gave Charlie a creepy grin. ‘Bit young, even for you, Brad.’‘Did you have sex with Deion Powell?’ Tracksuit asked as Charlie started a brisk walk. ‘You were only thirteen, you dirty girl!’Charlie sat on Brad’s toilet and felt spaced out as she peed. So, that was sex then . . .‘I have to leave earlier when Mel’s staying at her dad’s,’ Brad explained. The girlfriend’s name made the bed even less comfortable.She’d wondered if the night before had been a one-off, but this was clearly more than an offer of food and she craned slightly, biting the muffin, then gently sucking his fingertips.But the attentions of a guy who could be a model, and prospects of work and money made Charlie feel like she mattered.Look, I'm fine with sex in YA books, I truly am. But this is just... no, thank you.And then there's this thing about "smelling people." Here I graciously offer a couple of examples (plus the two already mentioned above):‘I remember when you were little. You had that warm milky smell and when nobody was looking I’d pick you up and sniff because I loved it so much.’Harry smiled when he set eyes on Charlie. Her smell, her hair all scruffy.But I need to hear Charlie’s voice. See her smile, catch her smell.Well, and of course, the "little left to imagination" thing that was repeated throughout the book.You see where I'm coming from? The second half of the book was just fine and redeeming enough to warrant an extra star. I just can't get over that face licking. And the smell kink or whatever you want to call it. I just... no.
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  • Alyssa Grace
    January 1, 1970
    It took me a long time to figure out what was missing from Killer T. I spent nearly a week reading it, and all the while I had a nagging feeling in the back of my mind telling me something was off. I didn't know what to make of a novel that only got weirder and crazier with every chapter. There were parts at which I was tempted to DNF, and parts at which I thought this might be a solid 4-star read. What was going on here?Then yesterday it hit me. After all that searching, my biggest gripe with K It took me a long time to figure out what was missing from Killer T. I spent nearly a week reading it, and all the while I had a nagging feeling in the back of my mind telling me something was off. I didn't know what to make of a novel that only got weirder and crazier with every chapter. There were parts at which I was tempted to DNF, and parts at which I thought this might be a solid 4-star read. What was going on here?Then yesterday it hit me. After all that searching, my biggest gripe with Killer T is that I don't understand its purpose.Novels, after all, are written for one purpose or another. Whether that's to entertain, convey a political message, or reveal some truth about the human condition, stories say or do something. And I just can't figure out, even after reading the entire book, what Killer T is trying to say. It flirts with entertainment but never gains momentum as a thriller, incorporates elements of dystopia but lacks the social relevance of a true dystopian work, and reads like contemporary realism but with protagonists too remarkable to apply to most teenagers.I went into Killer T expecting, maybe foolishly, something like Robert Muchamore's CHERUB series--teenaged spies, MG level reading. Obviously I was wrong. Killer T is a lot darker and arguably more grounded in the real world, even if it's still not exactly a realistic story. Split into five parts with significant time skips in between, the plot spans a full eight years from the time when Harry is fourteen and Charlie thirteen to their adulthoods. I was expecting a continuous thriller, so the time skips were quite jarring. However, it was interesting to see how the main characters had changed after each jump of two or three years. That I think was quite realistic, and deeply preferable to spending the whole novel with Harry as his insufferable fourteen-year-old self.In fact, Parts 3 to 5 were head and shoulders above Parts 1 and 2. My near-DNF moments came mostly in Parts 1 and 2, which turned the trashy up to eleven. I understand wanting to write a gritty novel, but personally trashy was the word that flashed in my mind again and again while I was reading the first half of Killer T at the expense of all other adjectives. It didn't matter what their socioeconomic status or level of intelligence, all the characters behaved in ways that made me want to drop the book and wash my hands.Call me a prude--I feel uncomfortable when one of the protagonists befriends the other exclusively because she turns him on when he meets her the first time at which point she's thirteen, and turns against her as soon as she sleeps with another guy because, it's implied, she owes HIM a relationship for treating her nice. The other protagonist sleeps with aforementioned guy multiple times despite having met his girlfriend and knowing in no uncertain terms that she's his girlfriend. Neither of them are particularly likeable; I was only able to root for them because the antagonists were so irredeemably awful, you wonder if they're not the secret love children of Hitler and Satan.Yeah, this was a pretty depressing book. There's no light at the end of the tunnel until Part 4 or 5. A bit late if you ask me. The trashiness became a bit more palatable as soon as I realised that this was a coming-of-age story with elements of sci-fi thriller and not the other way round. It was still not my cup of tea, but at least it was meant to be gross and a learning experience, rather than the glorified author-endorsed actions of hero protagonists? Harry and Charlie in fact spent the entire novel getting their shit together, and it wasn't until the final two, maybe three parts that they became characters I supported. Before I just felt sorry for Charlie and annoyed by Harry for the most part. At this point I remember yet another of my misconceptions regarding this book: From the synopsis and cover, I thought there'd be much higher stakes, that the main characters would be at the heart of the Killer T crisis. The truth was, it was only a backdrop for two teenagers learning how to adult. In the end, maybe that's the most faithful description of Killer T. After all, this is not a lighthearted or a fun read. It's an adequate, occasionally insightful coming-of-age drama digging into the grittiest parts of the adolescent experience. Read at your own discretion.*Thanks to Bonnier Zaffre and NetGalley for providing a review copy of this book! All opinions represented remain my own.*My Blog
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  • Sue
    January 1, 1970
    This book follows the lives and trials of two teenagers - Harry and Charlie. Harry has just moved to Las Vegas from the UK, is nicknamed Harry Potter and comes from a fairly privileged background, whilst Charlie is a girl living in a dirty trailer with a psychotic older sister and a brain damaged younger brother, and has already been in trouble with the law. Not a very likely basis for friendship but they do have some things in common and are both intelligent, determined and articulate.The story This book follows the lives and trials of two teenagers - Harry and Charlie. Harry has just moved to Las Vegas from the UK, is nicknamed Harry Potter and comes from a fairly privileged background, whilst Charlie is a girl living in a dirty trailer with a psychotic older sister and a brain damaged younger brother, and has already been in trouble with the law. Not a very likely basis for friendship but they do have some things in common and are both intelligent, determined and articulate.The story cleverly develops over a number of years and we see the massive societal problems caused by unlicensed genetic modification as the technology becomes cheaper and easier to use, ranging from simple but unwise changes in wildlife, to humans with gorilla DNA to make them bigger and stronger. Obviously, a major theme of the book is the modified or enhanced diseases regularly being released which kill off a percentage of the population and cause massive societal changes - such as going through a sterilisation procedure before entering shop, waiting in quarantine for 7 days after an international flight, and always wearing a face mask outdoors (complete with Nike or Adidas logo!)This book is aimed at young adults and the sudden time-jumps ("2 years later") are a little disconcerting but understandable, and each time segment highlights the changes that have occurred in Harry and Charlie's lives, the widespread take-up of gene modifying technology well beyond the ability of the authorities to police, and the resulting dramatic societal changes. My only criticisms are that the narrative sometimes drops into exposition, and I felt some characters spoke in a manner well beyond their age - for example would a 5 year old boy really call someone a 'lumbering ape'?I enjoyed Killer T and would recommend it to anyone who enjoys dystopian thrillers.
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  • legenbooksdary
    January 1, 1970
    This book seems like it's been split into parts and each one has its own twists and turns in events. Usually, for previous books that I've read for Dystopian, the disease has already spread for years and the story only began when they're in survival mode. Then, it's up to them to decide how they continue on with their lives. This story started right from the very beginning when they're still in their early teens and they've really gone through a lot, especially Charlie. Slowly, years go by and p This book seems like it's been split into parts and each one has its own twists and turns in events. Usually, for previous books that I've read for Dystopian, the disease has already spread for years and the story only began when they're in survival mode. Then, it's up to them to decide how they continue on with their lives. This story started right from the very beginning when they're still in their early teens and they've really gone through a lot, especially Charlie. Slowly, years go by and people start to modify their bodies and diseases start to spread away. This book really started from nothing, it builds up, it seems as though there seems to be no hope for the world but it slowly progresses until the end. There didn't seem to be a dull moment and when things were boring. There was always something exciting happening in their lives that makes it go up and down. I really wasn't expecting this kind of story when I picked it up. This story was very new, refreshing and an eye opener. It really is like nothing of any book you have read. You'll suffer with all the characters' pain, feel their all sorts of emotions and fight with all your might for their lives.
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  • Lily
    January 1, 1970
    It took me so, so long to get into this. For a start, it started years before the actual plot came together and had, I think, about four or five time skips? I lost count by the end of the book. It makes sense when you look at it as a whole and realise that it's showing the rise of gene editing, but most of the time while I was reading it, I was bored. It would have been better if it had at least been started after Charlie got out of prison, I think. I liked Charlie quite a bit, but I honestly co It took me so, so long to get into this. For a start, it started years before the actual plot came together and had, I think, about four or five time skips? I lost count by the end of the book. It makes sense when you look at it as a whole and realise that it's showing the rise of gene editing, but most of the time while I was reading it, I was bored. It would have been better if it had at least been started after Charlie got out of prison, I think. I liked Charlie quite a bit, but I honestly completely hated Harry. He was fairly okay at the start, but as time went on he just became more and more of a prick. I hate how he treated Charlie so much when he didn't even tell her that he liked her. Charlie deserved so much better than him. The world was really interesting, especially after the epidemic, seeing the world slowly rebuilding itself and putting together more protections for the next epidemic. I have to say, I did like a lot how it ended and how Charlie ended up. I think it was worth reading, but I really, really wish it had been shorter. I think a lot of stuff could have been cut out while still showing a nice overall picture of the rise of gene editing and Charlie and Harry's life.
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  • Laren
    January 1, 1970
    I'm a huge fan of Robert Muchamore's work, and I was super excited to get my hands on a proof copy of Killer T from work! I loved the premise and enjoyed the way the story played out, the multiple time skips were unexpected but I wasn't opposed to them once I got used to the rapid time jumps. Like with a lot of Muchamore's main characters, I liked them without actually 'liking' them, he's really very good at writing flawed, annoying characters you still kind of care about haha :)Rating 3 and a 1 I'm a huge fan of Robert Muchamore's work, and I was super excited to get my hands on a proof copy of Killer T from work! I loved the premise and enjoyed the way the story played out, the multiple time skips were unexpected but I wasn't opposed to them once I got used to the rapid time jumps. Like with a lot of Muchamore's main characters, I liked them without actually 'liking' them, he's really very good at writing flawed, annoying characters you still kind of care about haha :)Rating 3 and a 1/2 stars
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  • julianne
    January 1, 1970
    disappointing, shallow characters, I struggle to find anything positive to say about this. Thanks to NetGalley and the publishers for a copy in exchange for an honest unbiased review.
  • Melissa
    January 1, 1970
    Slightly disappointing - some of the characters seemed very 2D
  • Lou
    January 1, 1970
    Robert Muchamore always creates intense and extraordinary stories that truly set him apart from the competition, and 'Killer T' is no exception. This is no easy feat in the publishing world, where original ideas now seem to be seriously lacking. Essentially, the story is about genetic manipulation that targets and destroys genes that could potentially cause the person harm in the future. When the criminal underworld gets in on the act all hell breaks loose. Utilising the synthetic virus known as Robert Muchamore always creates intense and extraordinary stories that truly set him apart from the competition, and 'Killer T' is no exception. This is no easy feat in the publishing world, where original ideas now seem to be seriously lacking. Essentially, the story is about genetic manipulation that targets and destroys genes that could potentially cause the person harm in the future. When the criminal underworld gets in on the act all hell breaks loose. Utilising the synthetic virus known as Killer T, creates a terrifying situation whereby the terrorists partake in biological warfare. With a ransom demand issued, an antidote will only be provided if their demands are met. I always enjoy the author's writing style, but I did have an issue with the structure of the novel. The timeline jumps around with no prior warning making it difficult to follow and confusing at times. I also felt that the characters were not as developed as they should be - Muchamore is usually reliable when it comes to interesting and well drawn characters, but I felt a little let down here. What became increasingly clear to me is that this is a novel targeted at young adult readers. that's no bad thing it's just a fact. As I quite enjoy my young adult fiction, this had no impact on me. But I would recommend this particularly those who appreciate YA or dystopian futures. Overall, this is a book that has, as always with Muchamore, exciting, quirky and unique fundamental concepts. Thought-provoking, scarily plausible with some genuinely intriguing scientific discussion. I just didn't find it as compelling as his previous books.Many thanks to Hot Key Books for an ARC. I was not required to post a review, and all thoughts and opinions expressed are my own.
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  • Victoria Robinson
    January 1, 1970
    At the beginning of the novel Harry is 14 and Charlie is 13, they meet because Harry is an aspiring journalist and one of his leads took him to Charlie, from there they formed an unlikely friendship. I will be very honest, I almost stopped reading during the first "part", reading about a grown man making inappropriate comments to a 13 year old girl and licking her face is disgusting and I felt very uncomfortable, and again when the same grown man and an accomplice dragged Harry into a supply roo At the beginning of the novel Harry is 14 and Charlie is 13, they meet because Harry is an aspiring journalist and one of his leads took him to Charlie, from there they formed an unlikely friendship. I will be very honest, I almost stopped reading during the first "part", reading about a grown man making inappropriate comments to a 13 year old girl and licking her face is disgusting and I felt very uncomfortable, and again when the same grown man and an accomplice dragged Harry into a supply room and grabbed his genitalia whilst threatening him and his family.This novel is spread over a fair few yearsThe second part of this takes place 2 years on, Harry and Charlie are still in contact and she has been released from Juvie on good behaviour, but there are conditions.As she has no family she moves into Obama Independent Living accommodation and meets Brad- an 18 year old who lives in a room across the hallway.I have to say I was not keen on a lot of the dialogue between Charlie and Brad- an 18 year old referring to 2 younger girls as "sluts" is just not ok, I also couldn't understand Charlies decision to have sex with him when she knows he has a girlfriend, she only decided it was a bad thing when she realised he was having sex with various women behind his girlfriends back.Honestly there were quite a few occasions where I could have stopped reading this as I wasn't keen on the dialogue, at all, the 3rd part takes place a few years on, Harry had ended contact with Charlie when he realised that she had been sleeping with Brad, but gone was the awkward skinny boy with acne, instead he had taken a course of gene editing injections to alter his outward appearance and strength.Despite having no scientific knowledge I did find the science aspects quite intriguing, and a little worrying- I mean just imagine if you could alter your genetic makeup with a few injections. And this is where the description on goodreads really started to make sense to me because for the first 2 sections (until Charlie meets Mango) I was confused as to what was going to happen. It does baffle me how Charlie managed to avoid being arrested for years after her release considering how that was something she was initially worried about and wanted to live a normal life- trust me her life was anything but normal.Towards the end I assume Charlie is in her mid to late 20s and she sort of has her life on some form of track, although she did go through an awful lot to get to where she is.Harry had run a relatively successful website as a teenager but as he got older, the viruses got worse and the price inflation was ridiculous ($60 for a cupcake and $300 for a proper coffee) so that money didn't go very far in the end.I feel like the ending was very open with a possibility of a sequel as there were still a lot of very dangerous Gene modifications and viruses being spread around and as Charlie said "The Fight goes on, right?"All in all this had a very interesting concept and in the end I didn't dislike it, but I can't help but feel like there are huge sections that could have been left out, like some of the dialogue, as it just seemed to go on and on in some areas, and some of it just seemed a bit inappropriate or far-fetched.
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  • Lucy
    January 1, 1970
    2.5 starsThank you to Hot key Books for providing me with a proof copy at YALC 2018 in exchange for my honest review.Now I want to start this off by saying I LOVE Robert Muchamores CHERUB series but this one didn't quite hit the mark for me.The novel starts with Charlie and Harry being 13 and 14 respectively and meeting for the first time after a school bombing. This was really interesting to see Harry, an amateur wannabe photojournalist and Charlie, a trailer park teen with a hard home life and 2.5 starsThank you to Hot key Books for providing me with a proof copy at YALC 2018 in exchange for my honest review.Now I want to start this off by saying I LOVE Robert Muchamores CHERUB series but this one didn't quite hit the mark for me.The novel starts with Charlie and Harry being 13 and 14 respectively and meeting for the first time after a school bombing. This was really interesting to see Harry, an amateur wannabe photojournalist and Charlie, a trailer park teen with a hard home life and a penchant for all things explosive.They make questionable decisions in the first 200ish pages but it reads like a general contemporary.I was disappointed to find that Killer T didn't show up until the 300 page mark (and - unless I glazed over it) there was no billion dollar demand for the vaccine as per the blurb. This I was very disappointed with as was the main draw to the novel for me.The middle section has some interesting science and I think was my favourite of all the sections (the novel is split into parts that leap forward a few years each time).The final sections felt like a walking dead style world which is having to recover and somehow function after such a catastrophic worldwide event. It was very interesting to see how the value of goods such as coffee inflated so intensely.So, as you can read from this, I didn't hate the book. It just didn't draw me in and get me as excited as I should have been- partly because I would get committed to a storyline then it would leap forward a few years with different circumstances and the whole feel would be different (such as at the end where they feel like reading about people aged 40 not 20 - although yes in that setting you would probably mature quickly) and partly because Harry came across as an ungrateful priveliged rich kid at times who just wanted to get laid.I didn't hate this book and would recommend Robert Muchamore fans to give it a go but otherwise I would definitely recommend his books for younger readers - CHERUB books about child spies. What's not to love?
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  • Aoife
    January 1, 1970
    Muchamore can write action.There's no doubt about that. And he knows how to choose a compelling plot; the idea of back street gene enhancers holding the world to ransom is very intriguing and throws up a lot of questions around morality and ethics. Unfortunately, the execution leaves something to be desired in this case.The first time skip kind of makes sense; nothing much was going to happen in the interim anyway. The second surprised me. After that they were just jarring. I couldn't connect to Muchamore can write action.There's no doubt about that. And he knows how to choose a compelling plot; the idea of back street gene enhancers holding the world to ransom is very intriguing and throws up a lot of questions around morality and ethics. Unfortunately, the execution leaves something to be desired in this case.The first time skip kind of makes sense; nothing much was going to happen in the interim anyway. The second surprised me. After that they were just jarring. I couldn't connect to the characters, because every time I got to know them we skipped some time and they'd changed in the interim. The events we'd missed were always neatly filled in, the plot didn't suffer, but the emotions did. There was no real connecting story, unless you count Charlie's sister, who barely featured in several of the sections. Instead there was The Prologue - Now SNor Is Around - Now It's Killer T - Psych, It's Something Else - Now Everything's Over Very Abruptly.It's not a bad book by any means; I kept reading to see what happened next, and I'd read more set in this world. But from Muchamore, I expect a lot better.Receiving an ARC did not affect my review in any way.
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  • Katy Noyes
    January 1, 1970
    'What if' speculation: if biological warfare should happen. Frightening look at a world we can almost touch...He's given us 'what if' children could infiltrate as spies, and 'what if' women had fought in World War Two. Now Muchamore has turned his attention to the near future and 'what if' germ warfare should ravage us, 'what if' gene editing should become a common and established practice. In a world in which both of these slowly start to infiltrate into everyday lives, we meet Harry and Charli 'What if' speculation: if biological warfare should happen. Frightening look at a world we can almost touch...He's given us 'what if' children could infiltrate as spies, and 'what if' women had fought in World War Two. Now Muchamore has turned his attention to the near future and 'what if' germ warfare should ravage us, 'what if' gene editing should become a common and established practice. In a world in which both of these slowly start to infiltrate into everyday lives, we meet Harry and Charlie in the aftermath of a school 'incident'. English student Harry is a passionate photograph and wannabee reporter, and meets Charlie in the course of his investigations. Charlie needs a friend, and as she gets inextricably entangled in events she can't control, holds onto Harry as a friend, a constant. We then keep meeting the pair over the next few years, as their high school years pass and the world changes around them. It's a story that sees both adolescents pushed to adulthood quickly, both entering an adult world of responsibilities and a society with issues it must quickly evolve to cope with. For a sum of money, you can have a permanent tan or develop muscle mass, improve your intelligence and immune systems. Yet at the same time, there are now artificially constructed viruses travelling the world that governments are struggling to develop vaccines for quickly enough.So in the midst of one of the most significant social, cultural and scientific revolutions of all time, a plot involving Harry and Charlie's friendship through adversities takes many twists as the years roll by. I enjoyed seeing how each step forward in time meant changes for each, how the changes in society alters the expectation of their teenage years.Muchamore is a master at including small details that build up to a picture of a fully-functioning world: iris scanners that unlock phones, the Barack Obama Independent Living Unit, transgender bathrooms and electric (self-driving) cars the norm. Such touches as the terrible name for a care home, Care4Kids, as well as 'President Timberlake', gives us the impression of a short-attention-span, media-and-consumer-led world. This starts with developing the two main characters for a while before opening up their world to us and showing the huge social change going on. Starting as young teenagers, it would be hard not to empathise with both Charlie and Harry as events too mature for them to grasp envelop them. I thought the world Muchamore creates was a very well-crafted one, so close to the one we have now that it would take very little to move into. The will-they-won't-they relationship of Harry and Charlie adds to the tension created as drugged-up 'zombies' and gorilla DNA-enhanced 'supermen' vie with the personal stories of two young people caught up in plots they keep returning to.While the writing won't win awards for imagery, for poetic allusion, it is entirely appropriate language for teenagers, with a fast-moving story spanning years that brings to life a fascinating, if frightening new landscape.Teenagers as well as adults will find a gripping read. With thanks to Netgalley for providing a sample reading copy.
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  • Jenny (Bookbookowl)
    January 1, 1970
    Actual rating 3.5 starsMany thanks to Allen and Unwin for providing me with this copy of Killer T in exchange for an honest review.Harry wants to be an investigative journalist and he and Charlie meet in chance circumstances when Harry is chasing a story.  Charlie is shipped off to juvenile detention shortly after but they remain good friends.  As their lives progress, so does scientific technology in society and illegal gene modifying becomes more commonplace.  Killer T is the story of Harry an Actual rating 3.5 starsMany thanks to Allen and Unwin for providing me with this copy of Killer T in exchange for an honest review.Harry wants to be an investigative journalist and he and Charlie meet in chance circumstances when Harry is chasing a story.  Charlie is shipped off to juvenile detention shortly after but they remain good friends.  As their lives progress, so does scientific technology in society and illegal gene modifying becomes more commonplace.  Killer T is the story of Harry and Charlie's lives as they navigate through a society where killer modified viruses are ravaging the world and people will do anything to survive.There were parts of Killer T I really enjoyed and parts that kind irked me.  Parts I was not a fan of:  There is a lot of sexist language used in the book - I'm not overly fond of seeing two very young teenage girls referred to as 'sluts' and constant commenting on their appearance, whether being to the boys 'liking' or otherwise.  The way Harry reacted to Charlie for sleeping with another guy when they were in no relationship at all was eye roll worthy.  Harry bought her a few unasked for gifts and visited her in juvenile detention, so, without him even letting her know about his feelings, he thinks she betrayed him?  Why? Because he felt he was owed a relationship?  Hmmm.  A very macho 'toss girls aside when we're done' theme seemed to be fairly prevalent with many characters throughout the first few portions of the book.  Also, the synopsis on the back of the book didn't actually start to happen until at least halfway through the book, if not more.  I honestly thought I was reading a whole different story and was a little confused.  Parts I enjoyed:   The story is told through several 'time jumps', from when Charlie is 13 and Harry 14, skipping forward through the years until they are in adulthood. This made it quite a nice coming of age story and interesting to see the downward spiral the world was taking.  The action and 'what if' theme regarding gene modification was great.  The story, especially the last few time jumps, was dark and gritty and brought up lots of different moral questions.  Although I didn't particularly like many of the characters in the beginning, I'd really come to care about Charlie and Harry by the end.Killer T was a little different to what I expected, because I thought it was going to be a story centralised around gene modifying and killer viruses, but while those subjects were part of it, the story was more focused on the characters' lives and their coming of age.  I did enjoy it as a story though. I found it engaging and liked the pace of the book.MY BLOG ~ INSTAGRAM
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  • Alaina
    January 1, 1970
    Actual rating :: 3.75/5 I expected nothing less than 'thrilling' and 'exhilarating' from such an acclaimed author who's books I grew up reading and enjoying and that is exactly what I got. Similar to CHERUB but not quite, similar to Henderson's Boys but not quite, Killer T is its own story in its unique plot and style, which in my opinion was written in a more mature and sophisticated way. Right from the get-go we are thrown into a chaotic scene of an explosion aimed at a student, and the calami Actual rating :: 3.75/5 I expected nothing less than 'thrilling' and 'exhilarating' from such an acclaimed author who's books I grew up reading and enjoying and that is exactly what I got. Similar to CHERUB but not quite, similar to Henderson's Boys but not quite, Killer T is its own story in its unique plot and style, which in my opinion was written in a more mature and sophisticated way. Right from the get-go we are thrown into a chaotic scene of an explosion aimed at a student, and the calamity doesn't stop there. We follow both Harry and Charlie, witnessing key events and changes that happen in the world through their points of view, each change bigger and more worrying than the last. This book was full of twists and turns that I did and didn't see coming. There was one in particular near the end that completely took me by surprise I had to reread it twice to properly comprehend what I was reading. Just when you thought the story couldn't get any darker, it did. There were multiple time jumps throughout the book which were a little jarring at first, but I did end up slowly getting used to them. Although they did sometimes feel unnecessary, we were immediately filled in on what we had missed through website articles which I thought was a nice touch.Unfortunately, due to those time jumps, just as I felt like I was finally completely understanding the character, there would be a time jump and I would once again feel a disconnect to our protagonists. I did also think there were many missed opportunities with this book - so much more could have been explored, such as Charlie's older sister Fawn. Though she plays a significant role in the book, she was rarely present, and when we finally get a proper scene with her at the end it's abruptly cut short. I wish we'd have learnt more about her as it could have been an interesting touch to the story. Honestly, I found this book pretty difficult to review because there were definitely parts that I absolutely loved and couldn't get enough of, but there were also times I found myself quickly skimming the page for useful information, waiting for something more exciting to come up. Overall, this was not perfect, but is an unquestionably exciting read. It is definitely the type of book I'd pick up over the long stretch of the summer holidays.
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  • Theediscerning
    January 1, 1970
    Hmmm… I'd never taken to Muchamore, trying one Cherub from the middle of the franchise's span and hating it, but this is certainly better. It's again a teen read, with a near-future Las Vegas the focus, as mankind develops new viral diseases, genetically modified creatures – and eventually human biological alteration, with technology available that's both cheap and powerful enough for almost anyone to have a go. But that's just context for most of the book, as we see our hero get big in the worl Hmmm… I'd never taken to Muchamore, trying one Cherub from the middle of the franchise's span and hating it, but this is certainly better. It's again a teen read, with a near-future Las Vegas the focus, as mankind develops new viral diseases, genetically modified creatures – and eventually human biological alteration, with technology available that's both cheap and powerful enough for almost anyone to have a go. But that's just context for most of the book, as we see our hero get big in the world of online local news publishing, and the girl he has his heart set on landing in juvenile prison when a bomb goes off at his school. Vegas is under the thumb of an evil Mr Big, and neither will get out from under that pressure quickly or easily.And that's the problem here – this book is just far too long. Pluck any percentage you wish out the air and this could lose that, and not suffer. OK, when I thought in part two I could see too easily where the book was going there were still copious surprises and shifts for me to encounter – before being proven wrong – but boy. Added to the overwriting, and some awful exposition here and there, is the way Muchamore tries too hard to be down with the kids. It's reined in here from the Cherub days, but here and there he tries to narrate in the thought process of his characters – none more so than in the very first chapter. And I wish he wouldn't. It's the literary equivalent of granddad's wedding day dancing. It's a little awkward here, too, where he's clearly writing a teen boy's wish fulfilment story. Exposition, fitting-in-with-the-young, the wet dream aspect – all could be cropped. But with the compelling story, the basic set-up matched with the lengthy drama the two teens face, all being reasonable and then some, it's proven me wrong. The fault isn't with Muchamore, just with his editors. This is a perfect YA romance/sci-fi/dystopia mish-mash, just twice as long as it need be.
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  • TheCosyDragon
    January 1, 1970
    This review has been crossposted from my blog at The Cosy Dragon . Please head there for more in-depth reviews by me, which appear on a timely schedule.Harry and Charlie might as well come from different sides of the world. Harry’s a displaced well-off European in the USA while Charlie’s a rock bottom USA native with a history of blowing things up. Harry has a fascination with the Media his whole life, and in Charlie he sees an opportunity to get a fabulous story…Charlie and Harry form a symbios This review has been crossposted from my blog at The Cosy Dragon . Please head there for more in-depth reviews by me, which appear on a timely schedule.Harry and Charlie might as well come from different sides of the world. Harry’s a displaced well-off European in the USA while Charlie’s a rock bottom USA native with a history of blowing things up. Harry has a fascination with the Media his whole life, and in Charlie he sees an opportunity to get a fabulous story…Charlie and Harry form a symbiosis of true love that has to stand the test of time and misunderstandings. Harry’s persistence and Charlie’s brilliance make the novel gritty rather than touching, and actually make you feel like you are experiencing life with them. What more could I ask from a novel?This is what the future will be! I have little faith in people to do the right things, and the idea of a world where different flu viruses threaten the population every day is exciting. I don’t have a problem with population control, but viruses that pick off the young aren’t really the right way to go about it. This novel was the one I wanted NK3 to be, and takes The Ego Cluster that one step further.I actually enjoyed the jumps forward in time and alternative perspectives. It enabled Machamore to cram more into the novel and leave it as a standalone. Yay, a standalone novel that for once actually still provided a concrete conclusion and didn’t leave me thinking that the author wanted another book deal.My finace was completely put off by the cover of my ARC copy, but I reassured her that the inside was far more exciting! I had difficulty predicting what would come next, and that’s what I need in a novel at the moment. I’m giving this novel 4 stars. I don’t think there is enough depth for me to reread, but I couldn’t put it down.
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  • Amy Rush Da Silva
    January 1, 1970
    It took me a very long time to get into the story, firstly. The story itself starts years before the actual plot kicks in and this in itself made it a very slow burner and I did find myself getting bored and willing for something exciting to happen. The action doesn't actually kick off until you are over halfway through and by then I was screaming for some excitement. Mind you, once the plot kicked in I was ever so slightly hooked.There are a few time skips throughout Killer T starting from when It took me a very long time to get into the story, firstly. The story itself starts years before the actual plot kicks in and this in itself made it a very slow burner and I did find myself getting bored and willing for something exciting to happen. The action doesn't actually kick off until you are over halfway through and by then I was screaming for some excitement. Mind you, once the plot kicked in I was ever so slightly hooked.There are a few time skips throughout Killer T starting from when our protagonists are young teens up until they are in their early twenties. I can definitely understand why this was necessary as we get to see the rise in gene editing throughout different years. This interesting element was one of the reasons I didn't stop reading and it was great to see how our main characters developed over the years.Harry, as a character was one that I liked for a while and then ended up disliking..a lot. At first I found him to be a sweet, outcast who just wanted to live his dreams..which is okay. However, as his character got older he turned into this unlikeable older teen. He let his wealth rule his personality and he didn't treat any of the females in his life with any respect. I especially didn't agree with how he treated Charlie at times and felt like she could have done better.Charlie, on the other hand I LOVED! She was such a bad ass female character from the beginning. You could tell she wanted to fight for what she believed in and she was such a fierce friend and sister. Yes, she was flawed to a point but I think that's what made her a fully rounded character. I found myself connecting to her on so many levels and yet again it's great to see a kick ass female protagonist in YA.Killer T was a pretty underwhelming read for me. A lot of important features throughout the book weren't explored as much as they should have been, which led to many unanswered questions when the book finally ended. The concept behind it was great but I just think it could have been tackled in a totally different way.
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  • yorkshirebooknerd
    January 1, 1970
    Killer T is a glimpse into a dystopian future where DNA and genetics can be modified and killer diseases can be created by anyone with a bit of cash and some scientific know how.This story was unique and gave a scary view on what the future could be like if gene editing was an everyday occurrence.I do think the synopsis of this book is a little misleading though. Part of it reads “Killer T is a synthetic virus with a ninety per-cent mortality rate, and the terrorists who created it want a billio Killer T is a glimpse into a dystopian future where DNA and genetics can be modified and killer diseases can be created by anyone with a bit of cash and some scientific know how.This story was unique and gave a scary view on what the future could be like if gene editing was an everyday occurrence.I do think the synopsis of this book is a little misleading though. Part of it reads “Killer T is a synthetic virus with a ninety per-cent mortality rate, and the terrorists who created it want a billion dollars before they'll release a vaccine.”Based on this I was expecting a story about a virus killing everyone and the main characters trying to battle these “terrorists” or create a vaccine of their own. That’s not really what you get with this book. Not to say that the book is bad, it just wasn’t what I was expecting to read.What I found most frustrating about this book was the pace, it was too slow in parts and left me feeling detached from the story.I did like the characters however. Charlie and Harry were both likeable but were flawed. Some of their decisions were a little confusing and seemed out of character. The interaction between the two of them was interesting and I was rooting for them both from the beginning. Overall the book’s plot line was unique and the characters likeable enough to maintain my interest throughout the slow parts and the scientific elements were fascinating!I would rate this one 3.5 stars! Killer T is available now.Thank you to NetGalley and the publishers (Hot Key Books) for providing a copy. All opinions are my own and provided willingly.
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  • Sean O’Sullivan
    January 1, 1970
    Killer T is the first novel I’ve read by Robert Muchamore, but after finishing his latest piece I will need to read another before making my mind up about how much I like him as a writer. Set in the not too distant future, the story closely follows Harry and Charlie and their interleaving lives following a bomb explosion in high school. Muchamore uses an interesting narrative structure of breaking up segments of their story across multiple parts; each part separated by years of their time togeth Killer T is the first novel I’ve read by Robert Muchamore, but after finishing his latest piece I will need to read another before making my mind up about how much I like him as a writer. Set in the not too distant future, the story closely follows Harry and Charlie and their interleaving lives following a bomb explosion in high school. Muchamore uses an interesting narrative structure of breaking up segments of their story across multiple parts; each part separated by years of their time together. Whilst this lets us, the readers, see into much more of their lives it did leave me wondering what happened during the gaps in-between. It’s a lot going on, this happened every time I turned the page and was dropped into a new part.The tale starts slowly but picks up speed by the middle of part two. It’s a shame, because not a lot happens at the beginning but we’re juggling different viruses, infections, threats, situations and lots of character deaths throughout the rest of the story. If the pace had been as quick from the start, more time could have been spent in the middle, going into some of the characters backstories and perhaps exploring some of the untold. Too quickly I come across someone, only to find them never spoken of again or they’re killed off.Writing this review, I find myself torn. On the one hand, I did enjoy the novel and the ending was a joy. It’s the pacing of the story and the handling of its supporting characters that let it down for me. If you enjoy distopian novels then you should give Killer T a go but I reckon some might find it a tad frustrating.
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  • Marjorie
    January 1, 1970
    This is a near future Science Fiction novel that I found to have a good dollop of the dystopian about it. It has a little bit everything: plague, zombies, mutants, gangsters and good old societal breakdown. Doesn't sound exactly a laugh a minute does it? However, told by Harry and Charlie there is a wit to the narration that sucks you in to their rapidly dissolving world.From an explosion at a High School, through the world of illegal genetic modifications via gene warfare I could not help but This is a near future Science Fiction novel that I found to have a good dollop of the dystopian about it. It has a little bit everything: plague, zombies, mutants, gangsters and good old societal breakdown. Doesn't sound exactly a laugh a minute does it? However, told by Harry and Charlie there is a wit to the narration that sucks you in to their rapidly dissolving world.From an explosion at a High School, through the world of illegal genetic modifications via gene warfare I could not help but compare the story to The Stand. I think this was mainly because of it's main setting of Las Vegas and I did keep expecting Randall Flagg to make a cameo appearance. In some ways this is a compliment to the author as The Stand is one of my all time favourite books and one that I re-read every couple of years.The characters are well drawn and relatably flawed people who I could not help but empathise with. From the trials of growing pains to trying to hold their lives together as the world falls apart they make bad decisions and good ones but you still want them to come out on top. Maybe this is because they both had childhoods marred by loss but maybe it is because they are inherently interesting people.Spread over several years we get to witness Harry and Charlie grow close, apart and close again against a backdrop of biological warfare which has decimated the world's population. Throw in some mafia-esque dirty dealing and you end up with a fast paced thrilling ride that I did find hard to put down.I RECEIVED A FREE COPY OF THIS BOOK FROM READERS FIRST IN EXCHANGE FOR AN HONEST REVIEW.
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  • Vivienne
    January 1, 1970
    My thanks to the publishers and NetGalley for this advance copy. The cover art is very appealing.I feel this near-future dystopian novel is going to be a big hit with its target YA audience and also have appeal to those older readers that enjoy this genre. The concept of genetic modification and deadly, designer viruses is all too plausible.Given this fascinating premise I am surprised that Muchamore didn’t present this as a trilogy that would have allowed deeper exploration of its social and po My thanks to the publishers and NetGalley for this advance copy. The cover art is very appealing.I feel this near-future dystopian novel is going to be a big hit with its target YA audience and also have appeal to those older readers that enjoy this genre. The concept of genetic modification and deadly, designer viruses is all too plausible.Given this fascinating premise I am surprised that Muchamore didn’t present this as a trilogy that would have allowed deeper exploration of its social and political issues as well and giving his characters more room for development. I did appreciate the slow start to the novel as it allowed time to get a sense of the world as it was and introduced Charlie and Harry. However, I did feel they seemed remarkably articulate and mature for a thirteen and fourteen year old. Yet as the narrative moved through time they seemed more in synch with their physical ages. I found I was more partial to Charlie, given the obstacles she overcame, than Harry, who went from a sweet, nerdy boy to a bit of an entitled brat for a while. I did care for them both and was concerned for their fates in such a volatile world.I had not encountered Muchamore’s work previously and appreciated his ability to create a believable near future (even if the hyper-inflation seemed extreme), characters I cared about, and well-paced action sequences. Also, an interesting take on ‘zombies’. I would love to see this as a television series.
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  • Nikki
    January 1, 1970
    Killer T is definitely not the book I thought it would be, but I really enjoyed it. In many ways, the virus plays background to the story of Harry and Charlie, which is actually a really interesting story of two unusual kids. Very mild spoilers ahead. My heart went out in particular to Charlie, but I loved her tenacity and her brains. Her frustration at her life was palpable and really well written. Also her loyalty to Ed was awesome. I enjoyed reading Harry’s story but I did get frustrated at h Killer T is definitely not the book I thought it would be, but I really enjoyed it. In many ways, the virus plays background to the story of Harry and Charlie, which is actually a really interesting story of two unusual kids. Very mild spoilers ahead. My heart went out in particular to Charlie, but I loved her tenacity and her brains. Her frustration at her life was palpable and really well written. Also her loyalty to Ed was awesome. I enjoyed reading Harry’s story but I did get frustrated at his “grr I can’t have the girl” jealousy - especially as it was never addressed. Though he does get points for never taking out said jealousy on Charlie. He lost a couple for ditching her though ;)Overall, I did expect something maybe more like This Mortal Coil (which I also loved), but I like that Killer T surprised me, and made excellent use of the viruses and gene nodded as plot devices while not making them necessarily right at the forefront of the story (though the modding is pretty close to it!). I’m not sure I’d get modded, to be honest, but the range of ways it was used in the book really expressed how i think it would be if it really existed. Also, the viruses were just terrifying. I can sadly see that being close to reality, and hope it doesn’t ever come to that!
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  • Rebecca
    January 1, 1970
    A student photographer and trailer trash scientist become unlikely friends, while a synthetic virus has wiped out millions and gene enhancement therapy is having its own negative effects. There's a real, jarring logic to the dystopian world in Killer T which makes it hit home. It feels real, tangible, as though we're only a few steps away from a gene-modding disaster; and the book explores those steps too, with large time jumps. This story gave me Charlie Brooker vibes and is ripe for its own Ne A student photographer and trailer trash scientist become unlikely friends, while a synthetic virus has wiped out millions and gene enhancement therapy is having its own negative effects. There's a real, jarring logic to the dystopian world in Killer T which makes it hit home. It feels real, tangible, as though we're only a few steps away from a gene-modding disaster; and the book explores those steps too, with large time jumps. This story gave me Charlie Brooker vibes and is ripe for its own Netflix adaptation, due to its cinematic qualities. The writing style is punchy and engaging, although there's... well, feet. I noticed it once or twice and then, well, the feet kept cropping up, mainly where women are concerned. It did add to the humour, oddly enough. Despite his controversial comments, Muchamore is real. Kids and young adults respect that. I don't agree with everything he's said, but I like that he's honest and doesn't tip-toe around big subjects or cater to pushy parents or snotty teachers or, well, anyone, really. He's not the fluffy, cuddly children's writer (snore) who won't put a foot wrong or - gasp - utter a swearword. Kids have foul mouths, they're rude and often silly and get into trouble and recognise authenticity, which Muchamore has in spades.
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  • Kira Curtis
    January 1, 1970
    I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Not only does it give you a thrilling story line but it leaves you constantly thinking about the possibilities of the world. I remember being in science lessons learning about gene-editing and DNA and why it thought of badly and this book gives a well rounded look at all the possibilities that could happen because of the advancements. It is amazing to think of a world where people can get a permanent tan or extra muscle through a bit of scientific work and it almo I thoroughly enjoyed this book. Not only does it give you a thrilling story line but it leaves you constantly thinking about the possibilities of the world. I remember being in science lessons learning about gene-editing and DNA and why it thought of badly and this book gives a well rounded look at all the possibilities that could happen because of the advancements. It is amazing to think of a world where people can get a permanent tan or extra muscle through a bit of scientific work and it almost seems idyllic. Then you hear about the viruses that can be cause and the billions of people dying and it leaves you wondering which world is better. It's crazy that you could even think of that world being better but somehow the book leaves you wanting to be there. I often struggled to tell what was truth or fake. We are so close to a world where that is all possible and though technological advancements are amazing in some cases, it's good to think and discuss the possible negative side affects. Genuinely in awe over this book. I have found myself talking about it so much and I think I will do forever more. Truly thought provoking.
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