Flight or Fright
Fasten your seatbelts for an anthology of turbulent tales curated by Stephen King and Bev Vincent. This exciting new anthology, perfect for airport or airplane reading, includes an original introduction and story notes for each story by Stephen King, along with brand new stories from Stephen King and Joe Hill.About the Book:Stephen King hates to fly.Now he and co-editor Bev Vincent would like to share this fear of flying with you.Welcome to Flight or Fright, an anthology about all the things that can go horribly wrong when you're suspended six miles in the air, hurtling through space at more than 500 mph and sealed up in a metal tube (like—gulp!—a coffin) with hundreds of strangers. All the ways your trip into the friendly skies can turn into a nightmare, including some we'll bet you've never thought of before... but now you will the next time you walk down the jetway and place your fate in the hands of a total stranger.Featuring brand new stories by Joe Hill and Stephen King, as well as fourteen classic tales and one poem from the likes of Richard Matheson, Ray Bradbury, Roald Dahl, Dan Simmons, and many others, Flight or Fright is, as King says, "ideal airplane reading, especially on stormy descents... Even if you are safe on the ground, you might want to buckle up nice and tight."

Flight or Fright Details

TitleFlight or Fright
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseSep 4th, 2018
PublisherCemetery Dance Publications
ISBN-139781587676796
Rating
GenreHorror, Short Stories, Fiction, Thriller, Anthologies

Flight or Fright Review

  • Sadie Hartmann Mother Horror
    January 1, 1970
    Stephen King is afraid of something that I’m not. He’s afraid of flying. Don’t get me wrong, I have a lot of funky little fears and phobias, it’s just that flying isn’t one of them. So I saw this new anthology, aptly titled, Flight or Fright and I saw it as a personal dare from the King himself! Could he and his co-editor, Bev Vincent, curate a collection of stories that would seep through the cracks and unsettle my nerves enough to make me afraid to fly?There is a definitive answer here but bef Stephen King is afraid of something that I’m not. He’s afraid of flying. Don’t get me wrong, I have a lot of funky little fears and phobias, it’s just that flying isn’t one of them. So I saw this new anthology, aptly titled, Flight or Fright and I saw it as a personal dare from the King himself! Could he and his co-editor, Bev Vincent, curate a collection of stories that would seep through the cracks and unsettle my nerves enough to make me afraid to fly?There is a definitive answer here but before I tell you, let’s unpack my reader’s experience, shall we?The cover of the book reads, “17 Turbulent Tales” then you open the book to read the Table of Contents and a who’s who. Even though several of the stories are by some of my favorite authors, I was disappointed in the “Boys Only” guest list. There are several ladies of horror that I have enjoyed over the last few years that I would have loved to see a new story from, Ania Ahlborn, Kristi DeMeester, Nadia Bulkin or Alma Katsu just to name a few. A missed opportunity, for sure.Moving on, Stephen King’s intro. Having been a Constant Reader since I was thirteen and owning everything he has ever put out, I can say with confidence that King’s intros are some of my favorite. This is no exception, I will never tire of sitting at his feet and hearing his personal anecdotes. It was informative to have his fingerprints on each story as well; introducing each author with a blurb about the tale.Readers who love all kinds of genres, not just horror, will enjoy that there is something for everyone in this themed anthology: Something for sci-fi lovers, history buffs, thriller junkies...maybe you like social commentary, poetry, humor? I was really impressed with the wide range of voices, genres and styles represented here.Of course many people, myself included, will want to buy this for the new, original stories by Stephen King and his son, Joe Hill.A word about those two:I’m a huge fan of both their careers. I read all of their books. I stay updated on everything they do and I watch all the movie adaptations, TV shows and graphic novelizations I can get my hands on. That being said, I don’t mind being critical of their work. I get to be a fangirl and a reviewer at the same time. I was a little disappointed with both of their contributions to this collection. I wanted Stephen King’s offering to be meatier-the story felt like the bones of a good story but there was nothing to sink my teeth into--it was a bony tale with no fleshy bits.Joe Hill’s story, was quite the opposite actually, it seemed that Hill had a lot to say but with this being a short story collection, there wasn’t ample time to say it and I felt like this social commentary/terrorism thriller could have been more impactful with more time spent on building the story and characters.Overall, I loved spending time with several of my favorite authors including Dan Simmons, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Ray Bradbury and Roald Dahl. Some standout stories for me was the first one, Cargo by E. Michael Lewis and Nightmare at 20,000 Feet by Richard Matheson. As I closed the book, I asked myself, Flight or Fright? And the answer was clear: FLIGHT! There’s a whole world out there I want to see and flying is the safest way to get around but you take the challenge and see for yourself.
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  • Kimberly
    January 1, 1970
    FLIGHT OR FRIGHT, edited by Stephen King and Bev Vincent (who also each contributed a story of their own), is an anthology of plane-horror stories. While I would say that most of these stories were above average, the only thing that disappointed me was that I had already read the majority of them before--some of them several times.Here you'll find classic reprints from Richard Matheson and Ambrose Bierce, to newer tales from Joe Hill and Cody Goodfellow. A solid collection from older flying mach FLIGHT OR FRIGHT, edited by Stephen King and Bev Vincent (who also each contributed a story of their own), is an anthology of plane-horror stories. While I would say that most of these stories were above average, the only thing that disappointed me was that I had already read the majority of them before--some of them several times.Here you'll find classic reprints from Richard Matheson and Ambrose Bierce, to newer tales from Joe Hill and Cody Goodfellow. A solid collection from older flying machines to the newer jets, these 17 short stories will likely have something for every horror fan to enjoy. However, if you're a voracious reader, chances are good that you've read at least some of these contributions before.
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  • Dez Nemec
    January 1, 1970
    I am not a good flier. I flew to FL for spring break a few months after 9/11, and there were armed guardsman all over our tiny airport. Ever since then, I get a sick feeling in the pit of my stomach starting the night before we leave that doesn’t abate until after we land. Yes, I know it’s safer than driving. Yes, I know that there is an infinitesimal chance of something going wrong. No, I don’t care. I’m not unhappy in the least that I haven’t been on a plane in over 3 years.Needless to say, th I am not a good flier. I flew to FL for spring break a few months after 9/11, and there were armed guardsman all over our tiny airport. Ever since then, I get a sick feeling in the pit of my stomach starting the night before we leave that doesn’t abate until after we land. Yes, I know it’s safer than driving. Yes, I know that there is an infinitesimal chance of something going wrong. No, I don’t care. I’m not unhappy in the least that I haven’t been on a plane in over 3 years.Needless to say, these stories appealed to all my flying insecurities. This is absolutely one of the best anthologies I have read in awhile. I was stoked to see Matheson’s “Nightmare at 20,00 Feet” in the table of contents. I don’t think a book about the horrors of flying would be complete without it. While I don’t recall reading anything by E.C. Tubb before, I thought that “Lucifer!” was a great tale about both time travel and the horror of flying. “Zombies on a Plane” by Bev Vincent is a rather cautionary tale about the desperate fight for survival and running away from your problems. And even though “Murder in the Air” was more mystery than horror (although having to solve a mysterious death in the air is a horror in itself), it was quite clever.Coincidentally, my last flight was to see King in Toronto, so perhaps there is some bias, but I really enjoyed his new one. “The Turbulence Expert” has a truly unique premise – imagine if there was someone on the plane to help keep the flight safe that wasn’t an Air Marshal… I finally had the opportunity to go to a Joe Hill reading a few months ago, and I had heard an abridged version of “You Are Released.” A terrifying story of what if, made more terrifying because it occurs to the passengers while en route across the country. It definitely did nothing for my flying insecurities!This is a truly unique collection that touches the many horrors of air travel. A wonderful collection of great authors and remarkable stories. 4 1/2 stars.
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  • Lou
    January 1, 1970
    From passengers and cargo, to unexpected and unwanted visitors on a plane, to Zombies or a Gremlin, and a plane flying through something comparable to The Stand setting, all the mystery, terror, and the supernatural at 20000 feet to 34000 feet and decreasing.There is splendid reading awaiting, some tales thrilling and have you hooked in with great anticipation of what will happen next.Holidays over for most, all flying one needs to do could be over, good timing for reading these tales before the From passengers and cargo, to unexpected and unwanted visitors on a plane, to Zombies or a Gremlin, and a plane flying through something comparable to The Stand setting, all the mystery, terror, and the supernatural at 20000 feet to 34000 feet and decreasing.There is splendid reading awaiting, some tales thrilling and have you hooked in with great anticipation of what will happen next.Holidays over for most, all flying one needs to do could be over, good timing for reading these tales before the next flight out and months away from any newly founded anxieties left, due to some tales staying with the reader long after shelving this book.This anthology is a great opportunity to read two great classic chilling tales, one may had never read, from Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and Richard Matheson. Within, there are plenty new authors to read of and enjoy, seek out and take further and have under your reading radar and there is new material to submerge oneself in from two well seasoned short story writers, Stephen King and Joe Hill.Some excerpts @ https://more2read.com/review/flight-or-fright-edited-by-stephen-king-and-bev-vincent/
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  • Chris DiLeo
    January 1, 1970
    A wonderful collection of creepy, thrilling, fascinating stories. If like me, you already find flying a precarious challenge, these stories are ready-made for you. They will get your heart racing, and you will be soon flipping pages rapidly, hoping for a smooth landing. The best pieces are "Cargo"; "Nightmare at 20,000 Feet"; "Two Minutes Forty-Five Seconds"; "You Are Released"; "The Turbulence Expert" and "Falling."
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  • Gavin
    January 1, 1970
    Full Review to follow next week.
  • ClubStephenKing
    January 1, 1970
    The stories are very different, but this is a very good anthology !They range from very scary ("Cargo" & "Diablitos" ) to some more realistic (but therefore more scary) stories like the one from Joe Hill (my favorite), and some other occurring in different time and places (eg, the ancient China).Overall, it was a very good anthology, and I like the tone that Bev Vincent has put into his afterword.Furthermore, but not the least interesting, this is definitely a mandatory reading for any Steph The stories are very different, but this is a very good anthology !They range from very scary ("Cargo" & "Diablitos" ) to some more realistic (but therefore more scary) stories like the one from Joe Hill (my favorite), and some other occurring in different time and places (eg, the ancient China).Overall, it was a very good anthology, and I like the tone that Bev Vincent has put into his afterword.Furthermore, but not the least interesting, this is definitely a mandatory reading for any Stephen King fans since he wrote : an introduction in which he tells us his worst experience in a (private) plane, a brand new story "The Turbulence Expert" that will resonate to every passenger, and introducting notes to every single story!I am sort of glad that the publishers released this book AFTER the holidays, but I believe that next time that I will be flying, I will not be able but thinking about what could go wrong....Thanks for ruining my next flight !PS : full (french) article about the book, with a short synopsis of every single stories > https://club-stephenking.fr/sortie-fl...PS 2 : the book is available from Cemetery Dance (USA) & Hodder & Stoughton (UK and other english territories)
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  • Sammy Franco
    January 1, 1970
    Well, I had high hopes (sorry for the pun) for this anthology, but I’m sorry to say I was disappointed. As expected, the only stories worth a read were authored by Stephen King, Joe Hill and Richard Matheson. All three were excellent and beautifully written. The others were simply blah! Especially the poem at the end of the book, WTF?
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  • Onceinabluemoon
    January 1, 1970
    3.5-4 ish. As an iffy flyer it wouldn't take much to horrify me and with no trips on the horizon I was looking for cheap thrills. As an anthology I had heard a couple of the stories, some were dull, loved his sons contribution, enjoyed kings participation. Overall it was good, but I had sky high expectations 🚀
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  • Alex Bear
    January 1, 1970
    The one by Joe Hill was the star of the collection. Cargo by E Michael Lewis at the beginning wasn't a bad hook, but everything else didn't really...take off.
  • Sasha Carpenter
    January 1, 1970
    A couple of the stories in this collection were not the greatest, but most were very enjoyable and gripping. Joe Hill and Stephen King delivered amazing stories, as always.
  • Scott
    January 1, 1970
    Zombies on a Plane! Yes!
  • Becky Spratford
    January 1, 1970
    Review on the blog and in the August issue of Booklist Magazine: http://raforall.blogspot.com/2018/08/...
  • Victoria
    January 1, 1970
    I’m already terrified of flying, so I’m not sure why I read this 😂The story by Joe Hill scared the shit out of me, because it seems like it could happen.
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