The Flash, Vol. 7
Gorilla Grodd is dying from a disease that only the Speed Force can cure. Allied with Black Hole, Multiplex, Negative Flash and Raijin, Master of Lightning, Grodd comes to Central City to drain the energy from all of the speedsters!In the back of Barry's mind, Grodd is gnawing at his memories and scratching at scars, inflicting psychic wounds that may have lasting effects. All the Fastest Man Alive can think about is saving the city and freeing Iris West, who is finally beginning to trust Barry again.When Barry loses his speed, it falls to both Wally Wests and the Flash of China to tackle Grodd and free the city's citizenry. When that proves futile, Barry is willing to cross lines he has never crossed before to regain his speed, and turns to Godspeed for help. This pivotal chapter in the speed saga will leave all of the speedsters fundamentally changed, and relationships will never be the same again. Can they survive the fallout from Grodd's desperate gambit?Writer Joshua Williamson (Justice League vs. Suicide Squad) continues his smash-hit run on The Flash with art by Carmine Di Giandomenico, Carlos D'anda, Dan Panosian and Christian Duce. Collects The Flash #39-45.

The Flash, Vol. 7 Details

TitleThe Flash, Vol. 7
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseOct 2nd, 2018
PublisherDC Comics
ISBN-139781401284527
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Superheroes, Dc Comics

The Flash, Vol. 7 Review

  • Chad
    January 1, 1970
    Williamson's Barry Allen is wearing thin on me. At this point, there is nothing likable about this character at all. He's selfish, self-righteous, and obsessive with a martyr complex. It shows all the more when the OG Wally West shows up who is altruistic and self-sacrificing (along with being better as using his powers!). I've been going back and re-reading Mark Waid and Geoff Johns's runs on Flash and it really shows just how awful these books are in comparison. At this point Barry Allen is a Williamson's Barry Allen is wearing thin on me. At this point, there is nothing likable about this character at all. He's selfish, self-righteous, and obsessive with a martyr complex. It shows all the more when the OG Wally West shows up who is altruistic and self-sacrificing (along with being better as using his powers!). I've been going back and re-reading Mark Waid and Geoff Johns's runs on Flash and it really shows just how awful these books are in comparison. At this point Barry Allen is a pale imitation of Wally West.Grodd's motivations in this are very weak. He's trying to steal the speed force and when he gets it, he doesn't really use it. It was just dumb. At least by the end of this, they finally started referring to new Wally as Wallace.Received a review copy from DC and NetGalley. All thoughts are my own and in no way influenced by the aforementioned.
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  • Chris Lemmerman
    January 1, 1970
    [Read as single issues]A Speed Force Storm ravaged Central City once before, and launched the Flash into an ongoing series of outrageous adventures. Now, a second storm is brewing, and Central City might not survive unscathed this time. The true menace behind Black Hole stands revealed, and his life depends on draining the entirety of the Speed Force into himself – something that Barry and his allies aren’t going to allow to happen. The Flash will need all the help he can get, but when he does t [Read as single issues]A Speed Force Storm ravaged Central City once before, and launched the Flash into an ongoing series of outrageous adventures. Now, a second storm is brewing, and Central City might not survive unscathed this time. The true menace behind Black Hole stands revealed, and his life depends on draining the entirety of the Speed Force into himself – something that Barry and his allies aren’t going to allow to happen. The Flash will need all the help he can get, but when he does the unthinkable and releases a former villain from prison to aid in the fight, will the Flash family shatter under the pressure? This arc really does have it all. It’s a huge clash between the forces of Black Hole, including some familiar faces, and the current incarnation of the Flash Family, through a Central City suspended in time as everyone’s powers are slowly draining away, so there’s plenty of room for action set pieces. However, there’s a lot of time devoted to Barry’s relationships with Wally, Wallace, and Iris, as well as himself – the villain of the piece manages to tear Barry down to his most basic personality traits, and really tear into him as both a hero and a person. Writer Joshua Williamson walks a fine line between these two areas, and manages to succeed for the most part – there’s an issue or so in the middle of the arc that meanders a little, spending a bit too much time in Barry’s head, but it’s a small complaint to make.There’s a sense of ‘everything’s been leading to this’ around this arc. This appears to be the culmination of a lot of plot threads so far, from Black Hole to Godspeed, from Negative Flash to Wally’s hero journey. It’s only when the smoke clears that you realise that this arc, as huge and important as it is, is only the beginning of something even larger. To have such an enjoyable arc promise to lead into something even bigger while being a complete story in itself is exactly how comics (and stories in general) should work – we’ve gotten answers along with new questions, so we feel like we’re getting somewhere, and it’s great fun at the same time. Incidentially, Perfect Storm Part One is actually issue 700 of the Flash, so this is a nice way to celebrate. I do like that DC aren’t making huge deals out of most of their centennial issues, unlike another company I could name that likes to bring them out all the bloody time and charge through the nose for them. Both Flash and Wonder Woman hit #700 recently, and they were just normal issues of the series, rather than having the ongoing narratives that the creative teams were telling derailed for an oversized issue for no reason. I’m not bitter, honest.On the art front, Carmine Di Giandomenico returns for a few of these issues, including issue 700, while we get some fill-in work from Dan Panosian and Carlos D’Anda. Neither of them are a touch on Di Giandomenico, and their styles are wildly different since there aren’t really any artists like Di Giandomenico, but they get the job done, and are given the middle issues of the story rather than the epic beginning and ending moments that Di Giandomenico gets to sell.Perfect Storm is a Flash story with everything you could ask for – all your favourite characters, a big knockdown battle, high stakes, important character moments, and a sense of progression in terms of the overall story that Williamson is trying to tell. There are a few slight niggles with this arc, so this is really more of a 4.5 than a full 5 stars, but hey, I’m rounding up.
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  • Wing Kee
    January 1, 1970
    I can't stand this janky writing...World: I cannot stand the art and I've not been a fan since Rebirth so there is nothing to say here, the characters are weird looking, their faces are wrong and wooden and the scratchy art does not give me the power of the speed force or a sense of motion, it's just scratchy. The world building is patchy and janky and if you think clearly it's internally inconsistent and logic is all over the place. I know Flash books are suppose to be crazy and time travel and I can't stand this janky writing...World: I cannot stand the art and I've not been a fan since Rebirth so there is nothing to say here, the characters are weird looking, their faces are wrong and wooden and the scratchy art does not give me the power of the speed force or a sense of motion, it's just scratchy. The world building is patchy and janky and if you think clearly it's internally inconsistent and logic is all over the place. I know Flash books are suppose to be crazy and time travel and campy villains but there needs to be rules set by the writer and the world needs to fall into the playground rules that he set, but the rules don't apply, they are always all over the place especially with the powers. The invisible hand of "this needs to happen because of the story so the world is now like this" that it bothers the hell out of me. Story: The writing is bad, the dialog is wooden and the emotions and the banter is so campy it feels like I'm reading an 80s comic (not in a good way). The story makes no sense if you think about, especially the villains that are teaming up with Grodd and also the idea of the speed force healing him. The idea that they can't find Flash and his team for the rod while Flash says he's looked around the whole city already also makes no sense cause you can't have one thing for one character and another set of rules for another. Then there's the horrible characterization of Barry just to give this story some drama. The way he acts here is so contrived and the end turn so unearned that it is infuriating, contrived drama that's so visible mean BAD WRITING. The choices of Barry to free the people that he frees here also makes no sense and the need for Williamson to redeem Negative Flash and the reason he gives is so ridiculous. This is just a really badly written book.Characters: Barry is not Barry I won't get into it, this is just a bad character and his actions are not because of him but because of the author needing to mould characters around to serve the story. None of the characters are organic and deep and even believable...argh. I am not talking about Grodd or any of the character and the completely unearned emotions this book wants readers to feel. Iris and Barry do not work.A really bad book, the writing is so bad I can't believe it, it's nearly up there with Rebirth Justice League (before Snyder), Blue Beetle, and Sideways...Onward to the next book!*read individual issues*
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  • Marco
    January 1, 1970
    This is it, I am definitely dropping this series. Williamson is basically DC's version of Charles Soule, his Flash is a terrible series saved only by the amazing Carmine Di Giandomenico, but storywise it's terrible and every storyarc is worse than the one before. The plot, the dialogue, the way the cast is characterized... Everything sucks. So long, Flash!
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  • Liz (Quirky Cat)
    January 1, 1970
    I received a copy of The Flash Vol. 7 through NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review. The Flash is back! Though I suppose I should clarify which one, huh? In this case we have Barry Allen as the main perspective, but there are also cameos from multiple other Flash characters. In short it’s a fun read, especially if you love seeing all the varying characters interacting with one another. Honestly, it’s hard to believe that we’re already up to volume seven in the Flash. I feel like i I received a copy of The Flash Vol. 7 through NetGalley in exchange for a fair and honest review. The Flash is back! Though I suppose I should clarify which one, huh? In this case we have Barry Allen as the main perspective, but there are also cameos from multiple other Flash characters. In short it’s a fun read, especially if you love seeing all the varying characters interacting with one another. Honestly, it’s hard to believe that we’re already up to volume seven in the Flash. I feel like it was just a few months ago that I picked this series up and binged it, but I’m fairly certain that was at least four volumes ago. I’ll resist the urge to make some speed and time goes here. You’re welcome.(view spoiler)[ It shouldn’t come as any surprise that Perfect Storm is a fast paced volume with a lot of action and conflict. I mean, this is the Flash we’re talking about. I personally really enjoyed this volume. Not only did I get to see a lot of other characters that I love, but I always love a plot that forces the main protagonist to take a look at his actions and take measure of him or herself. It’s been a while since I’ve seen Grodd, so in a weird way I was actually kind of happy to see him wreaking havoc here. I know that sounds twisted, but you’ve got to admit that DC has always been capable of creating strong and interesting villains. Still, it’s nice to see them get changed up from time to time, and this was certainly a refreshing change. As I mentioned above, I really love plots and events that force our heroes to really evaluate themselves. In this case we see Barry going above and beyond, as always. He’s doing what he can to protect those he loves…but one has to wonder, just how selfless are his actions here? This is one of those times where you really kind pretend that it’s all for the greater good. And I’m okay with that. Actually, I love that. I love that these characters are human enough to have actual struggles and conflicts. It’s one of the best parts about reading superhero comics, if you ask me. I did really love the cameos too. While I’m sure that not all of the Flash variants arrived, a good number of them did, and it was nice to see. To be honest I had forgotten how many of them had managed to branch out into other series, so it was really nice to see the reminder. It also made it clear that I should probably catch up in those series…alas. Probably the best part about this plot was that they managed to seamlessly set up another plot at the same time. I’m not sure if we’ll be seeing that one come to a head right away or not. I think I’ll be okay with it regardless. And yes, I’m being a bit vague on purpose, but I don’t want to spoil anything good. It’s worth it, trust me. I can’t wait until the next volume of Flash is available! This series has been pretty solid so far, so I’m glad to see it continue, and that it’s getting so many spinoffs and the like. (hide spoiler)]For more reviews, check out Quirky Cat's Fat Stacks
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  • Kristine
    January 1, 1970
    The Flash, Vol. 7: The Perfect Storm (issue #700) by Joshua Williamson et. al. is a free NetGalley e-comicbook that I read in early October.On looks alone, this comic remind me a lot of the theatrical release for Rampage - right down to the nearly shaky-cam, ground level, frenzied combat. In its story, there’s so much intertwining plot lines with Flash, Flash’s girl Iris, Kid Flash, Avery, and the members of Black Hole, particularly Grodd (who has the force but a greater strength than Caesar). I The Flash, Vol. 7: The Perfect Storm (issue #700) by Joshua Williamson et. al. is a free NetGalley e-comicbook that I read in early October.On looks alone, this comic remind me a lot of the theatrical release for Rampage - right down to the nearly shaky-cam, ground level, frenzied combat. In its story, there’s so much intertwining plot lines with Flash, Flash’s girl Iris, Kid Flash, Avery, and the members of Black Hole, particularly Grodd (who has the force but a greater strength than Caesar). It’s his brute strength and mental meddling that’s able to bring Barry to his knees with pain and despair; so much that he has to rely on outside forces (both good and evil) to get on his feet again.
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  • Nath-poggi
    January 1, 1970
    Dios santo Barry, me alegra que al fin aprendieras algunas lecciones y me gusta cómo están todos los velocistas. El 45 madre de Dios, mi bebé Wally West pelirrojo, mi pequeño, no supero el 45 es simplemente hermoso. Wally se merece esa felicidad
  • Edwin Howard
    January 1, 1970
    THE FLASH VOL 7: PERFECT STORM, by Joshua Williamson, brings Grodd back and along with some help, wants to take over the speed force and defeat Flash once and for all. The Flash wants to handle Grodd alone and not put anyone else in danger, but he realizes that he is infinitely stronger with a team of allies by his side. Williamson uses the Flash's constant struggle of personal risk vs working as team again in this graphic novel. While this torment is not new to the Flash, Williamson keeps it f THE FLASH VOL 7: PERFECT STORM, by Joshua Williamson, brings Grodd back and along with some help, wants to take over the speed force and defeat Flash once and for all. The Flash wants to handle Grodd alone and not put anyone else in danger, but he realizes that he is infinitely stronger with a team of allies by his side. Williamson uses the Flash's constant struggle of personal risk vs working as team again in this graphic novel. While this torment is not new to the Flash, Williamson keeps it fresh by including the unique perspectives of all the other speedsters. Each one has their own reason for being there and wanting to help. The artistry is great and the layout and panel choices really enhance the storytelling, Williamson's THE FLASH VOLUMES is currently the only graphic novel series I read and will keep coming back to because of how well done the volumes are done from top to bottom. Thank you to DC Comics, Joshua Williamson, and Netgalley for a copy of this novel in exchange for an honest review!
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  • Wayne McCoy
    January 1, 1970
    'The Flash, Vol. 7: Perfect Storm' by Joshua Williamson with art by Carmine Di Giandomenico brings us the whole Flash family and Gorilla Grodd.Barry Allen is finally going to clue Iris in on things, when Central City is attacked by an angry and dying Gorilla Grodd. Flash finds old friends siding with Grodd, and Grodd manages to take away Barry's powers. Now he has to rely on Wally West, and...Wally West? Barry becomes singularly focused on getting his powers back, but at what cost?I'm really not 'The Flash, Vol. 7: Perfect Storm' by Joshua Williamson with art by Carmine Di Giandomenico brings us the whole Flash family and Gorilla Grodd.Barry Allen is finally going to clue Iris in on things, when Central City is attacked by an angry and dying Gorilla Grodd. Flash finds old friends siding with Grodd, and Grodd manages to take away Barry's powers. Now he has to rely on Wally West, and...Wally West? Barry becomes singularly focused on getting his powers back, but at what cost?I'm really not a fan of the main artist on this title right now. What I did like is Christian Duce's art in the final issue collected here. It was a nice contrast. The story isn't bad, but really bad things happen to Central City, and then things get cleaned up with no apparent cost or trauma.I received a review copy of this graphic novel from DC Entertainment and NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. Thank you for allowing me to review this graphic novel.
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  • Diane Hernandez
    January 1, 1970
    At the publisher's request, my review will be released on this book's publication date of Oct 2, 2018.
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