Mister Miracle
From Hugo Award-winning writer Tom King and artist Mitch Gerads, the team behind The Sheriff of Babylon, comes an ambitious new take on one of Jack Kirby's most beloved New Gods in Mister Miracle! One of the best-reviewed series of the year and already a classic in the making, this Mister Miracle is magical, dark, intimate and unlike anything you've read before.Scott Free is the greatest escape artist who ever lived. So great, he escaped Granny Goodness' gruesome orphanage and the dangers of Apokolips to travel across galaxies and set up a new life on Earth with his wife, Big Barda. Using the stage alter ego of Mister Miracle, he has made quite a career for himself showing off his acrobatic escape techniques. He even caught the attention of the Justice League, who has counted him among its ranks.You might say Scott Free has everything--so why isn't it enough? Mister Miracle has mastered every illusion, achieved every stunt, pulled off every trick--except one. He has never escaped death. Is it even possible? Our hero is going to have to kill himself if he wants to find out.Collects Mister Miracle #1-12.

Mister Miracle Details

TitleMister Miracle
Author
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseFeb 19th, 2019
PublisherDC Comics
ISBN-139781401283544
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Superheroes, Dc Comics, Comic Book

Mister Miracle Review

  • Sam Quixote
    January 1, 1970
    Scott Free is Mister Miracle: superhero, escape artist, New God, husband… and soon father-to-be! Together with his wife, Big Barda, they face parenthood alongside all-out war on Apokolips against the greatest enemy in the DC Universe: Darkseid! I think Tom King is one of the best comics writers working today and certainly among the finest DC currently has – his Batman run is jaw-droppingly good! But outside of Batman… ehhhhh. I can take or leave his stuff. Mister Miracle’s not bad but, particula Scott Free is Mister Miracle: superhero, escape artist, New God, husband… and soon father-to-be! Together with his wife, Big Barda, they face parenthood alongside all-out war on Apokolips against the greatest enemy in the DC Universe: Darkseid! I think Tom King is one of the best comics writers working today and certainly among the finest DC currently has – his Batman run is jaw-droppingly good! But outside of Batman… ehhhhh. I can take or leave his stuff. Mister Miracle’s not bad but, particularly given its overwhelming plaudits, it’s a disappointingly unimpressive 12-issue maxi-series. Let’s be honest: this will be most people’s first Mister Miracle book – it certainly is mine – and, though you get a decent idea of his character, King doesn’t do a very good job in explaining his complicated world. Scott and Barda’s extended families are the main focus of this book but I never really understood the various relationships. I got that some nutter called Granny Goodness was a teacher/steward to them when they were little and that Scott’s dad is some kind of Force Ghost dude called Highfather, but beyond that… no clue. Scott’s got some brothers, Darkseid is his – dad as well, maybe granddad? Who is Barda to Scott besides his wife – the daughter of another high-ruling family? What is the difference between Apokolips and New Genesis – or are they the same place, just named differently? Why is there a massive war breaking out now? Why doesn’t Darkseid use the Anti-Life Equation to win the war? What’s the difference between New Gods and Old Gods? Which characters are New Gods and which are Old – does it matter? What do the titles mean – what’s the hierarchy? The story is largely unfocused too. The war is almost an afterthought or background dressing (ditto the escape artist stuff which always seemed incidental and irrelevant). I never had any idea which side was winning or the context of any battle we saw, what its stakes were, and it came off as oddly undramatic and dull. There’s zero tension – Scott and Barda are essentially invincible (we literally see them bathing in lava at one point!) – and the characters that do die are one-dimensional and unknown (to me anyway) so their deaths had no impact. I guess the real story is about parenthood and Scott and Barda’s relationship (and she plays such a huge part in this book the series should’ve really been called Mister Miracle and Big Barda), which is well-written and convincing, buuuut… it wasn’t very interesting. I suppose it was amusing that they were talking about their condo’s layout and other banal domesticities whilst doing something daring and (supposedly) exciting like breaking into a palace to assassinate someone. As well as not explaining Mister Miracle’s world very well, I generally had no idea what was happening. Why do the pictures suddenly go fuzzy like those old TVs where the signal would cause the image to blur? Why is “Darkseid Is” repeated throughout? They’re interesting aspects but a little too avant-garde for my tiny brain to comprehend. It’s hinted early on that Mister Miracle’s greatest escape will be to “escape death” but nothing really happens with that. So what did I like about it? I like Scott and Barda. King writes Scott a lot like Matt Fraction’s Hawkeye, which is to say he’s kind of a ditz who’s always getting banged up but he’s charming and effortlessly likeable – there’s never a point you’re not rooting for him. Scott and Barda’s relationship is likewise believable and you get a strong sense of their deep love, so kudos to King for conveying that so powerfully. The True/False trial was gripping and King inserts a running gag, as is his wont in nearly all of his books now, this time of crudités, so characters munch on carrot sticks at random points – even Darkseid! – which made me smile. Mitch Gerads’ art is interesting. He’s completely mastered the classic 9 panel layout structure used throughout. I like that the weird New Gods/Apokolips costumes mix a weirdly feudal/medieval style with camp futuristic sci-fi. The colours and the look reminded me of the original Tron movie and it’s quite eye-catching (the slave negotiating table!). I like that Oberon looked like Jack Kirby too, Mister Miracle’s creator, which was a cute, respectful nod. I didn’t think it’s the prettiest art but it works fine for the book. The ending is a bit of a bugger’s muddle. Barda conveniently gets an uber-powerful super-weapon, Darkseid suddenly becomes extremely gullible and stupid and… yeah. Not great. Mister Miracle is not a bad comic. I give it a lot of credit that it’s not doing what most superhero comics do which is: good heroes punch bad villains, saves the day, zzz… King and Gerads have produced an original book that takes chances and shoots for art above all else – wonderful, honestly. If only more creators attempted this! Except I still had no real idea about the whole New Gods stuff in the DCU and the story, besides being confusing and unclear, really didn’t grab me – I found it very easy to put down and read anything else instead. Mister Miracle is for readers looking for something a little bit different from their superhero comics though don’t expect the masterpiece the hype would have you believe it is.
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  • Sam Quixote
    January 1, 1970
    So I usually try to summarise a book before launching into the review but part of why Mister Miracle, Volume 1 didn’t fully click with me is because I don’t really know what’s going on?! I can explain bits of it: in addition to being a superhero, Mister Miracle/Scott Free (I know, these names - it’s superhero comics, just go with it) is an escape artist and he’s planning the ultimate escape... from death itself!! There’s a war on Apokolips/New Genesis (are they the same?) where Darkseid has the So I usually try to summarise a book before launching into the review but part of why Mister Miracle, Volume 1 didn’t fully click with me is because I don’t really know what’s going on?! I can explain bits of it: in addition to being a superhero, Mister Miracle/Scott Free (I know, these names - it’s superhero comics, just go with it) is an escape artist and he’s planning the ultimate escape... from death itself!! There’s a war on Apokolips/New Genesis (are they the same?) where Darkseid has the Anti-Life Equation (again) and the Highfather and he are fighting over it or something. Mister Miracle’s gotta get involved because he’s related to a bunch of these guys? And that’s the other main thing: family drama in this large, weird dynastic family of powerful god-like nutters. The “escape from death” thing is only touched upon in the beginning and isn’t referenced again, which is a shame as it’s a cool idea. The Apokolips war sounds epic and dramatic but it’s surprisingly boring. The problem is that whatever obstacles Scott and his girlfriend Barda encounter, they overcome pretty damn easily, usually while talking about domestic banalities like their sitting room layout! On trial? Sentenced to death? Eh, whatevs - we’ll yawn our way out of trouble and oh hey look it worked out what should we have for dinner? War, trials, executions all sound exciting as concepts but reading them here it’s anything but. The deadpan way Scott and Barda breeze through these massive events reminded me of Matt Fraction/David Aja’s Hawkeye run, where you saw the in-between moments of life for Clint Barton when he wasn’t getting mixed up with the Avengers. Scott is also always bandaged like Clint was. It’s an amusing tone to take in a superhero comic, like Tom King’s wryly cocking an eyebrow at this melodramatic, cosmic noise, which I appreciate for its subversiveness, but it also undermines the action. It’s an approach that giveth and taketh away. So then there’s the family drama which was the best part for me because it goes a long way to explaining a character I have zero prior knowledge of. He was born on Earth but he’s related to Darkseid, the Biggest Bad of the DC Universe, he and Barda had shitty childhoods on Apokolips, and they can’t escape their connections to this horrible place where unpleasant relatives are forever fighting one another. The trial scene with his dickhead half-brother Orion stood out to me the most as you got a strong sense of Scott’s bubbling frustration buried deep at his core - it’s a very intense scene, done perfectly by King and artist Mitch Gerads. Gerads’ art is fine. I’m not crazy about it but I don’t dislike it either. The classic nine-panel grid layout of the pages allow for more nuance within the story. I didn’t understand why the art sometimes went fuzzy, like an olden-style TV on the fritz. Then again, I didn’t really understand most of what was happening! I’m not totally sure what the story is, where any of it is going, why “Darkseid Is” is repeated constantly throughout, who most of the extended cast were (though I suspect it doesn’t matter), what was going on or the meaning of anything. And the fuck of it is, I know Tom King can write perfectly coherent stories - his Batman series being the prime example - so he’s being deliberately obtuse here and it’s annoying! I kinda like Scott though. Barda too. They’re a charming couple. Scott’s monologue on Descartes was compelling and offered up a possible explanation of the “Darkseid Is” chant. I like that Jack Kirby, Mister Miracle’s creator, made a cameo as “Oberon”, and a young Stan Lee appeared as Funky Flashman - you can see whose side King/Gerads take on Kirby/Lee’s troubled creative partnership with Funky’s fate. I’d like it more if I felt like I had a better grasp of what King was going for - generic family drama except the family are gods? Alright, but a lot of crap could’ve been pruned away and streamlined for this to work better. As it is I spent most of the time floundering, semi-understanding and quasi-enjoying what I was seeing and remaining puzzled for the rest of it! Mister Miracle, Volume 1 didn’t live up to the hype for me - it was too inconsistent and vague for my taste - but it’s not a bad book either and parts of it were fun. I’ll come back for the second half but with lowered expectations.
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  • Artemy
    January 1, 1970
    Note: this is a review for the book that was supposed to be Mister Miracle Volume 1, which was supposed to collect issues 1–6 of the series that I was reading in singles and wrote the review after finishing issue #6. That collection was cancelled by DC and instead they decided to print the whole series in one volume, which I "reviewed" again here.Come along for the most daring and dangerous adventure of your lifetime with Scott Free, the super escape artist known as MISTER MIRACLE! He can escape Note: this is a review for the book that was supposed to be Mister Miracle Volume 1, which was supposed to collect issues 1–6 of the series that I was reading in singles and wrote the review after finishing issue #6. That collection was cancelled by DC and instead they decided to print the whole series in one volume, which I "reviewed" again here.Come along for the most daring and dangerous adventure of your lifetime with Scott Free, the super escape artist known as MISTER MIRACLE! He can escape anything — but can he escape something that no man has escaped before, can he escape... DEATH? Can he escape HIMSELF? Has he ever seen the face of GOD?..Okay, I'm not going to pretend I understand everything that's going on here. Jack Kirby's Fourth World is extremely difficult for me to wrap my head around (not in the least because, let's face it, those old 70's comics are borderline unreadable today). It also doesn't help that DC isn't doing anything to ease you into that whole world of crazy, not even an intro page to explain what's what. So yeah, even though I understood some things from the context, I'm pretty sure a good chunk of King's Mister Miracle went over my head — everything about the mother boxes and boom tubes, the complicated relationship between Orion and Miracle, the New Gods, Darkseid, Apokolips, New Genesis and everything else — I have no idea what the hell it all is and how it all relates to each other.I loved the comic anyway.I loved it because underneath this veil of cosmic deities, gods, mother boxes and boom tubes there is a very human story about pain, depression, love, hate, fear and hope. Every time I saw a "Darkseid is" panel I felt that crushing sense of dread. I felt Scott's fear and confusion when he was losing his grip on reality, I felt his love for Barda, his hatred of Granny Goodness, his philosophical ponderings about God and life and death, and what it all means. I felt it because I'm going through it all myself, day to day.I loved it because it made me feel things. Complex, uncomfortable and important things.And that's a weird thing to do for a superhero comic by a major publisher. And yet Tom King keeps doing this stuff, year after year — Omega Men, The Vision, Darkseid War: Green Lantern, even Batman. And now Mister Miracle. The themes in his writing are always pretty similar, but with every new comic he approachers it from a different angle, and he almost never fails to win me over (except for Sheriff of Babylon, but now that I think about it, maybe I should give that series a re-read to see if I like it more, too).Mister Miracle is an outstanding series. Even if you're not a Jack Kirby scholar.Darkseid isn't. I hope.
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  • Chad
    January 1, 1970
    Fourth World Primer: Here's what's necessary to understand the relationships in this book. Apokolips and New Genesis were at war. To end the war, Darkseid and Highfather agreed to exchange sons. Scott went to Apokolips and Orion went to new Genesis as babies. This is why Orion is always such a dick, Darkseid is his true father and has a similar personality. Scott was raised in Granny Goodness's orphanage, eventually meeting Big Barda who was leader of the Female Furies. Scott and Barda escape Ap Fourth World Primer: Here's what's necessary to understand the relationships in this book. Apokolips and New Genesis were at war. To end the war, Darkseid and Highfather agreed to exchange sons. Scott went to Apokolips and Orion went to new Genesis as babies. This is why Orion is always such a dick, Darkseid is his true father and has a similar personality. Scott was raised in Granny Goodness's orphanage, eventually meeting Big Barda who was leader of the Female Furies. Scott and Barda escape Apokolips and head to New Genesis and Earth. At this point Scott and Orion become step-brothers of a sort. On Earth, Scott takes over the Mister Miracle moniker after something happens to the original. Jack Kirby created all the New Gods. That's why Oberon looks like Kirby (as a homage). OK, that's all that's really important, on with the review.King crafts a family drama with a god war as backdrop. Darkseid has gotten a hold of the anti-life equation for the nth time sending Apokolips and New Genesis to war. Scott and Barda get drafted as generals, fighting campaign after campaign (mostly off camera) while in between trying to live a normal life in Los Angeles. King is secretly the best romance writer in comics. Between Batman and Catwoman over in Batman and Scott and Barda's relationship in this book, he quickly has you fully invested in the characters and rooting for their relationship to succeed. This is really where the book excels. The New Gods war is incidental in large portions of this book. All of the weirdness with the "Darkseid is" panels and the glitches on other panels is explained in the last two issues. I do guess it was a bit obtuse because from reading other reviews, not everyone got what really happened with the twist at the end. For those of you who want to know what happened, (view spoiler)[Scott was still battling the anti-life equation in his head, but was choosing not to fight it because he loved the life he and Barda were creating together, raising their family. At any time he could choose to escape, but he didn't want to. This is how DC gets out of killing half the New Gods over the course of this book. (hide spoiler)].Mitch Gerads has mastered the classic 9 panel layout with this book. He really makes it work, often only using slight movements between panels on a page.Received a review copy from DC and Edelweiss. all thoughts are my own and in no way influenced by the aforementioned.
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  • Artemy
    January 1, 1970
    God, how do I even do this? How can I review one of the best comics I've ever read and describe everything it made me go through while I was reading it? I know this is a big statement to make about a book that has barely wrapped up, like, a month ago, but I feel like Mister Miracle will now forever be one of my favourite books of all time.And no, I can't review it. Sorry. I tried several times. I just can't. This book is too personal, it hits too close to home, and I won't be able to do it justi God, how do I even do this? How can I review one of the best comics I've ever read and describe everything it made me go through while I was reading it? I know this is a big statement to make about a book that has barely wrapped up, like, a month ago, but I feel like Mister Miracle will now forever be one of my favourite books of all time.And no, I can't review it. Sorry. I tried several times. I just can't. This book is too personal, it hits too close to home, and I won't be able to do it justice with my lacking second language words.I actually wrote one review for Mister Miracle already, back when it was supposed to come out in two volumes and I basically reviewed the first one after reading the first 6 issues, back then it didn't yet get the chance to wreck me entirely. A lot of what I said in that review still stands, but I'll also add that I caught up on the Fourth World mythology since then, re-read MM afterwards and had a much better comprehension of some of the story moments. If you want to do that as well, I will offer a helpful pro-tip: Tom King actually wrote a several-page introduction explaining all the things necessary for better understanding of the book, but it was only included in Mister Miracle #1 Director's Cut, and will also be included in the trade paperback when that goes on sale. It's not absolutely necessary to know all that stuff to enjoy the book and get what it's trying to say, but it helps a lot.So I'll just ramble a bit here, because that's all I can really do here.First of all, Scott and Barda are perfect. Their relationship is the emotional core of the entire book, and between them and Batman/Catwoman, Tom King is secretly our generation's best romance writer.Among so many other things, Mister Miracle is a bittersweet love letter to Jack Kirby. Two characters here embody the spirit of Kirby, and that's Oberon and Jacob. Unlike Tom King, I never had this big emotional bond with the man even though I do fully recognise his greatness as a person and his importance as a creator. Either way, it was fascinating and touching to see such a tribute. What moved me even more is how the character of Funky Flashman is basically Stan Lee! I loved everything about Funky and Jacob's friendship. We lost Stan just two days before the final issue of MM hit the stands, and in a book so focused on existential dread, loss and overcoming the fear of death it all started to feel a bit too surreal for me. It was the sweetest tribute for both Stan and Jack, free of any cynicism or conflict, just two shining creative lights, making comics together. (click the pic to enlarge)The final issue teased a follow-up series soon to be announced. What could it be? Hmmm...DC must release an absolute hardcover edition of this series. I never buy absolutes because of how ungodly expensive they are, but I will make an exception for Mister Miracle. This series is worth it, and not just because of how perfectly written and structured it is, but also because of Mitch Gerads' mind-blowingly fantastic art, colouring and graphic design. And Nick Derington's covers are icing on the cake, total eye-candy.Okay, I'm done and completely spent. I couldn't end the year without writing at least something about this series, because, like I said, this is without a doubt the best comic of the year. Sorry I couldn't come up with anything more coherent.
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  • James DeSantis
    January 1, 1970
    From my ratings of King's previous work you can probably tell I'm a pretty big fan of this guy. Taking on Mister Miracle I was a little worried. Always am from getting overhyped. When I began reading this title I was a tad bit confused why so many people loved it. I couldn't get into the first 3 issues really much at all, but the rest? Well...Who is Mister Miracle? Well, if you're like me, you have no fucking clue. You might have seen him before but never as a main character. He's the ultimate e From my ratings of King's previous work you can probably tell I'm a pretty big fan of this guy. Taking on Mister Miracle I was a little worried. Always am from getting overhyped. When I began reading this title I was a tad bit confused why so many people loved it. I couldn't get into the first 3 issues really much at all, but the rest? Well...Who is Mister Miracle? Well, if you're like me, you have no fucking clue. You might have seen him before but never as a main character. He's the ultimate escape artist. In this title he is at war with Darkseid and his army. But really, the core focus of this book is about Big Barda and Scott Free as they live their life together. Mid-way through the book, and this isn't a spoiler, they have a child, and it changes the dynamic and the reasoning why they are fighting and their choices for it. It's a big storyline, spanning 12 issues, but telling a story of love, of pride, of honor, and of loss. Good: Loved the hell out of the middle issues. They might be my favorite issues in the series. Strong family dynamic and both funny and heartfelt moments throughout. I think King shined here in both pacing and dialogue. I also enjoyed the ambiguous ending as it left it up to the reader to decide and it was well done. Also, the art is fantastic. I loved how character reacted and the overall design to everything. Bad: Wasn't a huge fan of the start. It's a lot to take in, it's weird as shit at points, and the tone feels all over the place. Overall, this is a fantastic book once it starts going. King has done so many amazing stories so far. I truly mean it, this guy is one of the best storytellers around if you ask me. Mister Miracle is not my favorite work by him but it's very high up there. A 4.5 out of 5.
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  • Bookwraiths
    January 1, 1970
    I know most people love this series and adore this writer. That is actually why I picked it up months ago, came back to finish it today. And I have to admit the first few issues of Mister Miracle lived up to its praises, were damn intriguing. Unfortunately, I can’t say the series as a whole maintained the high level of that beginning, because for me it didn’t. Sure, it was interesting, thought provoking even but just an okay story overall. Hope others enjoy it more.
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  • Malum
    January 1, 1970
    If Tom King keeps it up, his name will be spoken in the same breath as figures such as Grant Morrison and Alan Moore. Almost everything this guy has been putting out for the last few years has been instant-classics. Happily, Mister Miracle is no exception. This is the comic book risen to the level of true art.
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  • Shadowdenizen
    January 1, 1970
    Originally read as single issues.One of todays top writers takes on one of Jack Kirbys most underrated creations, and hits it out of the park! This is, hands down one of my favorite runs of the last few years! It takes a relatively minor character and brings him directly to the forefront of the DCU.Tom King masterfully navigates this complex character, throwing in enough history to please long-time fans while still making it accessible to new/casual fans.Highly recoommended (along with the Visio Originally read as single issues.One of todays top writers takes on one of Jack Kirbys most underrated creations, and hits it out of the park! This is, hands down one of my favorite runs of the last few years! It takes a relatively minor character and brings him directly to the forefront of the DCU.Tom King masterfully navigates this complex character, throwing in enough history to please long-time fans while still making it accessible to new/casual fans.Highly recoommended (along with the Vision mini-series from Marvel.)
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  • Wing Kee
    January 1, 1970
    This series is stunningly good. Below is my review broken into two pieces 1-6 and 7-12:1-6:This is without a doubt one of the best books on the market at the moment.World: The art is absolutely fantastic. Gerad's art sets the tone for the world and the story that grounds this little family and character tale like no other. The colors, the frames, the character expressions and personality that pop off the page, the art is perfect. The world building is basic, it's there for the story and it serve This series is stunningly good. Below is my review broken into two pieces 1-6 and 7-12:1-6:This is without a doubt one of the best books on the market at the moment.World: The art is absolutely fantastic. Gerad's art sets the tone for the world and the story that grounds this little family and character tale like no other. The colors, the frames, the character expressions and personality that pop off the page, the art is perfect. The world building is basic, it's there for the story and it serves it well. We have Scott as a performer, and that part of his world. We have Scott the son of Highfather and that part of his world. We have Scott and Barda and their world. It's all simple and grounded, it's amazing.Story: I can't get into this, I don't want to get into spoilers cause it ruins the experience for anyone who is going to read it. It's a character story, it's not a stabby stabby superhero romp (thought there is action in the story), it's a character story. It's beautiful and basic in it's simplicity but the character depth that wells out of the book really shows what's so special about this book. I have always loved Barda and Scott (they were always my favorites in the Forth World) and seeing them in this book and how their story plays out and the emotions, the art, the quiet moments, the big moments the dialog, this book is just sooo good. This is a perfect example of how this art form is different from prose and how art and prose meld together to tell a tale that is awe inspiring. Just read it if you want a good character story, you'll love these to characters I promise you.Characters: Scott and Barda are perfect. They are real, they are deep and they are just beautifully written and realized. I've never felt the depth for these characters before and now I can't go back to the basic caricatures of normal superhero comics for them. What King has been doing at DC since Rebirth as been astounding. I don't see Bat Cat the same as before him, I don't see Swamp Thing they way I see him (I loved Moore's version the best still) and I not don't see Scott and Barda the same way. It's just sublime character work.These first 6 issues is absolutely amazing, I can't recommend this book enough. If you are looking for something deeper, something different with complex and human emotions READ THIS!!!7-12:Where do we go from here?World: The art is phenomenal, it’s so beautiful and sets the tone of the book so wonderfully that this book can’t be what it is without the art. The small quiet moments that are conveyed through the art, the small subtle emotions, the large emotions, the big bombastic and happy moments, the sad torn sad moments, amazing. The world building here is also wonderful, it’s subtle and there is no hand holding at all. There are no info dumps there are no character introductions, this is a book for DC readers and fans of the Forth World, but even if you don’t have any knowledge of this world the context given by this creative team is enough. Honestly the world is not the core of this story, it’s merely a stage for he amazing character story on display here. That being said, it’s still pretty fantastic if you know these characters.Story: This second arc is amazing, with Scott and Barda dealing with being a parent and it’s pretty amazing what they did here. It’s not preachy it’s not “hey look how hard it is and how beautiful being a parent is” it’s not, it just is. The small emotions and the interactions between the characters brings this small intimate tale and the large world together in wonderful ways. With the war and the stakes and the emotions and the negotiations and the how it’s resolved, it’s absolutely stunning where this creative team went, where King went with the dialog and plot and where Gerads went with the art. I won’t say anything about the story, I won’t spoil the ending which was both human, melancholy, hopeful and also pretty amazing in it’s tie to the DCU. Just enjoy this book that deserves to be read by all comic book fans.Characters: Wow the character work is amazing. Scott and Barda were already amazing in book one and this is even better. More depth, more humanity and their reaction to the simple and the backdrop of the war is amazing. Barda is fantastic, giving her more depth since we saw her in the Justice League and a much more human touch to her. The character that show up here and how it’s resolved, the interactions and the depth I won’t go into cause this is the heart of the book and it’s not my place to show you the heart when it should be experienced by readers themselves. This is the best.An amazing achievement and once again showing King as a master storyteller. I have nothing else to say.Onward to the next book!*read individual issues*
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  • Bookwraiths
    January 1, 1970
    Never having been a huge fan of Mister Miracle or the New Gods, I went into this one with no preconceived expectations. I'm glad I did though, because this is quite a different comic story. There are a lot of cool concepts thrown around. (Especially interesting is the creative team's twist on the old mystery of whether any of this is real or not.) The art is distinct and unique. And Scott Free's characterization is intriguing as he is a god pretending to be an ordinary person yet having to deal Never having been a huge fan of Mister Miracle or the New Gods, I went into this one with no preconceived expectations. I'm glad I did though, because this is quite a different comic story. There are a lot of cool concepts thrown around. (Especially interesting is the creative team's twist on the old mystery of whether any of this is real or not.) The art is distinct and unique. And Scott Free's characterization is intriguing as he is a god pretending to be an ordinary person yet having to deal with extraordinary circumstances which complicate his whole life to the point of it not only being jarring for him but for a reader as well. Overall, this was a very good read. There are some highs and some lows in here. Some cool twists, some dumb plots. It's all a nice setup, but not much else. And there better be a damn good payoff, because if not then all this weirdness was for nothing.
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  • Wing Kee
    January 1, 1970
    This is without a doubt one of the best books on the market at the moment.World: The art is absolutely fantastic. Gerad's art sets the tone for the world and the story that grounds this little family and character tale like no other. The colors, the frames, the character expressions and personality that pop off the page, the art is perfect. The world building is basic, it's there for the story and it serves it well. We have Scott as a performer, and that part of his world. We have Scott the son This is without a doubt one of the best books on the market at the moment.World: The art is absolutely fantastic. Gerad's art sets the tone for the world and the story that grounds this little family and character tale like no other. The colors, the frames, the character expressions and personality that pop off the page, the art is perfect. The world building is basic, it's there for the story and it serves it well. We have Scott as a performer, and that part of his world. We have Scott the son of Highfather and that part of his world. We have Scott and Barda and their world. It's all simple and grounded, it's amazing.Story: I can't get into this, I don't want to get into spoilers cause it ruins the experience for anyone who is going to read it. It's a character story, it's not a stabby stabby superhero romp (thought there is action in the story), it's a character story. It's beautiful and basic in it's simplicity but the character depth that wells out of the book really shows what's so special about this book. I have always loved Barda and Scott (they were always my favorites in the Forth World) and seeing them in this book and how their story plays out and the emotions, the art, the quiet moments, the big moments the dialog, this book is just sooo good. This is a perfect example of how this art form is different from prose and how art and prose meld together to tell a tale that is awe inspiring. Just read it if you want a good character story, you'll love these to characters I promise you.Characters: Scott and Barda are perfect. They are real, they are deep and they are just beautifully written and realized. I've never felt the depth for these characters before and now I can't go back to the basic caricatures of normal superhero comics for them. What King has been doing at DC since Rebirth as been astounding. I don't see Bat Cat the same as before him, I don't see Swamp Thing they way I see him (I loved Moore's version the best still) and I not don't see Scott and Barda the same way. It's just sublime character work.These first 6 issues is absolutely amazing, I can't recommend this book enough. If you are looking for something deeper, something different with complex and human emotions READ THIS!!!Onward to the next book!*read individual issues*
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  • Dr Rashmit Mishra
    January 1, 1970
    This was a hard book to review . To start the review however , you must know about a few things , first I don't like King's stories , I know he is regarded very highly but for one reason or the other I have never really liked his work . Second I am not all that versed in the exploits of Mister Miracle , I mean I do know his origin story and his influence in some of past mega event books by DC . Knowing that , it maybe easier for you to know why this book is so good . As I said before neither Mis This was a hard book to review . To start the review however , you must know about a few things , first I don't like King's stories , I know he is regarded very highly but for one reason or the other I have never really liked his work . Second I am not all that versed in the exploits of Mister Miracle , I mean I do know his origin story and his influence in some of past mega event books by DC . Knowing that , it maybe easier for you to know why this book is so good . As I said before neither Mister Miracle nor King hold any allure for me as a reader and yet reading this book was so much fun . Generally I just want to close King's book and donate it to some reader who really wants to read it , but this one kept making me read more and keep turning the pages . While Mister Miracle for the first time made me feel intrigued about him . He made me want to become obsessed about him and change all my social media profile into a picture of him . That said I think the book does have a narration problem and many readers may get lost and feel clueless at what was happening especially at the beginning , but spare some time on the book and it will make you excited and make you want to read more . And let's face it that's what we want from a good book after all
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  • GrilledCheeseSamurai
    January 1, 1970
    I had to keep reminding myself as I read this that it was a superhero comic from one of the big 2 publishers. It certainly didn't feel like it. If you are looking for a flashy fight book with big huge action scenes...this probably isn't the book for you. However, if you are on the hunt for a deep character study that asks some meaningful questions, this is certainly that book. And more.I absolutely loved it. I loved the 9-panel pages...it brought us in so tight and close to the characters that y I had to keep reminding myself as I read this that it was a superhero comic from one of the big 2 publishers. It certainly didn't feel like it. If you are looking for a flashy fight book with big huge action scenes...this probably isn't the book for you. However, if you are on the hunt for a deep character study that asks some meaningful questions, this is certainly that book. And more.I absolutely loved it. I loved the 9-panel pages...it brought us in so tight and close to the characters that you couldn't help but feel how personal this story was. There were times where I was laughing out loud...and times where I felt really sad. The book took a lot out of me. I saved up all 12 issues (I bought it in singles) and have waited to read the story until now. I'm really glad I did - I think it has more of an emotional impact reading it that way instead of month to month.Easily one of my favorites of the year!
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  • Frédéric
    January 1, 1970
    Well, this was... different.Tom King gets ballsy and delivers a very different book than  average. Does that make it good? If you're like me-and I reckon we're a crowd out there- and started the book knowing zilch about Mr Miracle, Big Barda and the gang of New Gods or whatever, you'll end up with about the same level of knowledge as when you started. So most relationships, stakes, reasons for battles and stuff largely remain a mystery throughout. A bit annoying if you ask me.The plot now... Wel Well, this was... different.Tom King gets ballsy and delivers a very different book than  average. Does that make it good? If you're like me-and I reckon we're a crowd out there- and started the book knowing zilch about Mr Miracle, Big Barda and the gang of New Gods or whatever, you'll end up with about the same level of knowledge as when you started. So most relationships, stakes, reasons for battles and stuff largely remain a mystery throughout. A bit annoying if you ask me.The plot now... Well, is there really one? Mr Miracle, apparently related to some characters from both sides, fights unclear ennemies for unknown reasons. He seems casually out of place, out of sorts, out of himself. And... he's got a baby with Big Barda.And that sums it up. Where does that leave him-and us btw? Hell if I know.What piqued my interest-up to a point-is the narration. Tom King is clever, yessire he is. He uses cool and clever devices throughout, 9 panels grid, running gags, pauses and silences. It's  brainy, it's tongue-in-cheek fun, it's interesting. But.But here Tom King is too clever for his own good. He overstretches the use of his bag of tricks to the limit of boredom. Some are useful and innovative while some remain a mystery to me, such as the half blurred panels dotting the whole book. It sometimes looks like Tom King acts like a show off with delusions of being experimental or something. I was that close to calling it quits at 1/3rd of the book. Artwise Mitch Gerads does his stuff. Quite well I think but his peculiar style being what it is it probably won't suit everybody.That's Mr. Miracle for you. It's original and clever, it starts promisingly but ends confusingly, with lots of overused narrative tricks in between. A well meaning failed attempt at something else. Oh, well, better luck next time. 
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  • Valéria.
    January 1, 1970
    An astonishing series. I was kind of upset it has to end, but the ending was great. I don't know what more to say, there are hundreds of reviews that already tell you how good this is. And they are all true. This was everything I expect from a superhero comic to look like. Plus that wonderful artwork!
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  • Adam M
    January 1, 1970
    This was an incomplete collection. I was warned that before requesting. THAT BEING SAID: this story is so disparate and cerebral that it killed the story not knowing how it ended. Mister Miracle is, arguably, a largely unknown entity in modern comics. Many of the characters in this story are lesser known today in the larger DC canon. I don't know a lot about the New Gods or many of the characters here, so I was genuinely curious as to how Tom King (whose work I read regularly and hold in high re This was an incomplete collection. I was warned that before requesting. THAT BEING SAID: this story is so disparate and cerebral that it killed the story not knowing how it ended. Mister Miracle is, arguably, a largely unknown entity in modern comics. Many of the characters in this story are lesser known today in the larger DC canon. I don't know a lot about the New Gods or many of the characters here, so I was genuinely curious as to how Tom King (whose work I read regularly and hold in high regard) was going to approach this story. The art work by Mitch Gerads was top notch and really held my attention even when this started to meander all over the place. I wanted to like this, really I did. I wanted to have faith that Tom King was going to help me understand who these people were without having to do an entire origin story... Instead I got an incomplete collection from DC that just left me angry about trying so hard to stick with it. I figured I'd have a good enough handle on the people and story it wouldn't be as big of a deal that it was missing the last 2 comics. I was wrong. I didn't care about Darkseid or any of the other antagonists here. I wasn't sure who half the people were and with what seems like a really dense back story and universe, I wasn't sure what the stakes were supposed to be for Scott Free or his wife Big Barda (who was interesting here, but never really fleshed out as an individual). Disappointed is putting it mildly. Tom King is better than this and I'm guessing Mister Miracle is too. I don't even know if I have it in me to try and hunt down the last 2 comics to figure out if any kind of resolution was ever reached. I received an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
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  • Dan
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 Stars For me King is hit and miss. I don’t love everything he touches. But this reimagining of Kirby’s characters is incredible.On paper if you were to tell me King was remaking these characters as dark and gritty I’d be intrigued but worried. But King managed to pull off taking some of the most colorful characters in DCs history and make this more mature tale that both honors the characters roots and does something new and different.I liked this first arc and I’m very interested in the back 4.5 Stars For me King is hit and miss. I don’t love everything he touches. But this reimagining of Kirby’s characters is incredible.On paper if you were to tell me King was remaking these characters as dark and gritty I’d be intrigued but worried. But King managed to pull off taking some of the most colorful characters in DCs history and make this more mature tale that both honors the characters roots and does something new and different.I liked this first arc and I’m very interested in the back half. Definitely recommended reading for fans of Fourth World, Kirby, and King.
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  • Craig
    January 1, 1970
    I might have even gone five stars for this, except that DC's preview issue via NetGalley only collects the first 10 issues of the series, so it isn't complete. It ends at a pretty huge cliffhanger (I won't say more--if you're reading this in single issues, you're probably aware of what I mean) and...that's it. What the what? Why send this out in this form? If you want to whet people's appetite, send out a collection that collects the first half of the story or something. What is here is great. T I might have even gone five stars for this, except that DC's preview issue via NetGalley only collects the first 10 issues of the series, so it isn't complete. It ends at a pretty huge cliffhanger (I won't say more--if you're reading this in single issues, you're probably aware of what I mean) and...that's it. What the what? Why send this out in this form? If you want to whet people's appetite, send out a collection that collects the first half of the story or something. What is here is great. The artwork, the story that combines the mundanity of married life with cosmic battles, the human angle. But it doesn't wrap up, darn it! Now that I think about it, DC pulled something very similar with the Dark Knights Metal volume they offered previously via NetGalley. Even now, I have no idea how that story actually wrapped up.
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  • Roy
    January 1, 1970
    I read this in single issues. I really didnt have much prior knowledge with regards to the character or story. It was a little confusing but after investing the time it became pretty cool with the nuemerous characters, the god concepts, the trippy word play and graphics. Tom King is great at his craft
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  • Todd Glaeser
    January 1, 1970
    Thank you to Netgalley for the free e-copy. Netgalley copy included Issues #1-10I think if you're not reading this, you are missing one of the best, Period.King used the best of Kirby, made sense of the bounty of ideas, even made Funky Flashman relevant. I read Kirby's Mister Miracle as the issues came out at the drug store. (Yeah, I'm old.) I felt this book respected the past and yet was completely modern.
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  • Ian Roditi
    January 1, 1970
    Darkseid Is.But so are we.
  • Sans
    January 1, 1970
    Re-read as single issues. Even more amazing the second time around.
  • Harry Jahnke
    January 1, 1970
    This book, to me, was at the same time a love letter to Jack Kirby and a reflection on how far comic books have come as a medium. I like the contrast between the classic Kirby and Lee style dialogue boxes with the mundanity of what's happening in panel. Also, this book messed me up in a big way. Being a person with anxiety/depression issues, this was hard to get through at times. Which isn't necessarily a bad thing. I appreciate how mental health issues are portrayed so seriously as we watch the This book, to me, was at the same time a love letter to Jack Kirby and a reflection on how far comic books have come as a medium. I like the contrast between the classic Kirby and Lee style dialogue boxes with the mundanity of what's happening in panel. Also, this book messed me up in a big way. Being a person with anxiety/depression issues, this was hard to get through at times. Which isn't necessarily a bad thing. I appreciate how mental health issues are portrayed so seriously as we watch the trials and tribulations of just living with Scott Free.
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  • Javier Muñoz
    January 1, 1970
    4,5 sobre 5Tom King nos vuelve a traer una genial serie limitada que nos fascinará aunque nos deja rascándonos la cabeza, tras la primera lectura no se muy bien qué es real y qué es imaginación, cuál es el mundo en el que vive realmente el protagonista, si al final alcanza la victoria o si lleva toda la historia cumpliendo los designios de su enemigo... Es posible que las futuras lecturas (porque este es un cómic que pide varias lecturas) me desvelen algunos de estos interrogantes, pero en reali 4,5 sobre 5Tom King nos vuelve a traer una genial serie limitada que nos fascinará aunque nos deja rascándonos la cabeza, tras la primera lectura no se muy bien qué es real y qué es imaginación, cuál es el mundo en el que vive realmente el protagonista, si al final alcanza la victoria o si lleva toda la historia cumpliendo los designios de su enemigo... Es posible que las futuras lecturas (porque este es un cómic que pide varias lecturas) me desvelen algunos de estos interrogantes, pero en realidad creo que la intención de Tom King es dejar todas estas cuestiones abiertas, a elección del lector. Esto normalmente no me gusta porque me parece un enfoque poco comprometido y arriesgado por parte del autor, además no me suele gustar los cómics intencionadamente crípticos porque la mayoría de las veces me parece una forma de darle a la obra unas ínfulas de cómic de autor que no siempre se corresponden con la calidad literaria ni con el mensaje. En este caso, sin embargo, creo que todo tiene un propósito y la historia no tendría el mismo sentido (además de perder interés) si se contara de otra forma.Pero bueno, llevo dos párrafos y no he hablado de la historia... esta serie de 12 números nos cuenta como Mister Miracle (Scott Free) y Big Barda compaginan su vida cotidiana en su apartamento de Los Ángeles con la guerra desatada en el cuarto mundo entre Darkseid (lider de apokolips) y Orion (lider de nueva génesis), el heredero de Highfather. La historia está trufada de interesantes reflexiones sobre el significado de la divinidad y la identidad, múltiples referencias a la obra original de Jack Kirby, en especial el cuarto mundo, del que se utilizan multitud de personajes y conceptos, homenajes a este autor y puyitas a Stan Lee personificado en el personaje Funky Flashman (creado por el propio kirby para ridiculizarle)... hay muchas capas y matices que atraerán nuestra atención y que trascienden la historia hasta el punto que a veces (sobre todo al final) nos sentimos confundidos entre distintos mundos, qué es real, qué es guiño del autor y qué está sólo en la mente de scott free...El estilo de dibujo y la estructura de las páginas (siempre la clásica rejilla simétrica de 9 viñetas) forman parte integral del mensaje. La narración gráfica de Mitch Gerards es muy acertada y se adivina una gran conexión entre dibujante y guionista, el arte es excelente y alcanza puntos de genialidad, el problema es que en determinados puntos hace excesivo uso de la duplicación de viñetas y la repetición de fondos y figuras, recurso que aunque tiene valor narrativo y casi siempre está justificado resulta muy repetitivo y en ocasiones (llega a su máxima expresión en el número 4 de la serie) hasta tiene un ligero tufo a truco barato para cumplir con las fechas de entrega.En resumen una serie muy buena que retoma y actualiza el legado de Kirby con un estilo narrativo y artístico muy especial. Se disfruta más si se tiene algo de conocimiento de los conceptos y personajes del cuarto mundo de Kirby.
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  • Ken Moten
    January 1, 1970
    Tom King is the only person at DC Comics that is coming close to Christopher J. Priest. As much as I have been liking his work on Batman, this is the project that takes me back to his work on Vision: The Complete Series (Vision: Director's Cut. I have always known about this character, but it is only now that I really invested in the Fourth World. The trade-mark candor and Tarentino-esque violence of King is in full-effect. The fact that the action is from the point-of-view of someone who is in Tom King is the only person at DC Comics that is coming close to Christopher J. Priest. As much as I have been liking his work on Batman, this is the project that takes me back to his work on Vision: The Complete Series (Vision: Director's Cut. I have always known about this character, but it is only now that I really invested in the Fourth World. The trade-mark candor and Tarentino-esque violence of King is in full-effect. The fact that the action is from the point-of-view of someone who is in a state of what seems to be psychosis (view spoiler)[and who could possibly be dead or dying (hide spoiler)] makes you question every single thing that is happening. There was a whole page devoted to explaining Cartesian philosophy....who does that?!
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  • Ken Moten
    January 1, 1970
    This was an interesting serious that looked at the world of one of Jack Kirby's best creations for DC Comics. He takes a hard look at what the events of Scott Free's life would look like in a realistic sense. That means this graphic novel will not be for everybody (especially those who want pure escapism), but for folks who like looking at (magical) realism in books, this is for you. It gets a little Grant Morrison-like at the end, but I am a fan of Grant Morrison so this is not an issue for me. This was an interesting serious that looked at the world of one of Jack Kirby's best creations for DC Comics. He takes a hard look at what the events of Scott Free's life would look like in a realistic sense. That means this graphic novel will not be for everybody (especially those who want pure escapism), but for folks who like looking at (magical) realism in books, this is for you. It gets a little Grant Morrison-like at the end, but I am a fan of Grant Morrison so this is not an issue for me. Mitch Gerads does an incredible job on the art. If you have read Tom King before, then this is a perfect book for you to read.
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  • Chris Lemmerman
    January 1, 1970
    You've heard it all by now, I'm sure. All the awards, all the hype, all the praise - it's all true. Mister Miracle is a masterpiece that'll leave you thinking about it for days afterwards, and stands up next to the Omega Men and Vision as one of Tom King's best works so far. I'm not saying anything else other than go read it - you won't be disappointed.Oh, and:Darkseid Is.
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  • Ellen
    January 1, 1970
    3.5 starsI read this as a preview to see if the library should purchase it. There is some excellent stuff here, but I couldn't give it higher than 3.5 stars because I was also really confused. I did not know anything about Darkseid and the war that rages on in Apokolips before starting this, and that left me at a loss during parts of this story that jumps around a lot. I had a friend explain some stuff to me, but alas. However, I did love a lot of the conversations between Scott Free and Big Bar 3.5 starsI read this as a preview to see if the library should purchase it. There is some excellent stuff here, but I couldn't give it higher than 3.5 stars because I was also really confused. I did not know anything about Darkseid and the war that rages on in Apokolips before starting this, and that left me at a loss during parts of this story that jumps around a lot. I had a friend explain some stuff to me, but alas. However, I did love a lot of the conversations between Scott Free and Big Barda. Lots of things to think about. I recommend this, but maybe only to those who are familiar with the whole Darkseid/Apokolips stuff.Content warning: Bloody violence, language (strong language is asterisked out), sex, only backside nudity but other parts just barely covered.
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  • Václav
    January 1, 1970
    Scot Free aka Mister Miracle is exceptional "hero" with regular personal issues to deal. King's Mister miracle is fun to read. The story is, especially for superheroes in with capes, bit untraditional and I appreciate the funny twist that big events are taken to the background and small, personal one are amplified and put to the foreground. The art is playful and experimental and the panel style is more like "back to basics", and it is more than interesting. Only shameful thing is that this is o Scot Free aka Mister Miracle is exceptional "hero" with regular personal issues to deal. King's Mister miracle is fun to read. The story is, especially for superheroes in with capes, bit untraditional and I appreciate the funny twist that big events are taken to the background and small, personal one are amplified and put to the foreground. The art is playful and experimental and the panel style is more like "back to basics", and it is more than interesting. Only shameful thing is that this is one of the comics books that reading by issues (with all that waiting) takes half the fun and atmosphere away from me.
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