Green Arrow Vol. 7
The Emerald Archer returns to save the citizens of a war-torn city in this newest installment of Green Arrow from horror novelist Benjamin Percy!Following a hellish year in Seattle, Oliver Queen heads to the war-torn city of Vahkar to use his considerable resources to help its starving citizens. But Oliver soon finds himself in over his head when he discovers that Vakhar is being run by a mysterious new warlord known as NOTHING. At the same time all the town's children have gone missing. Oliver Queen can't save the children of Vakhar...but can Green Arrow?Author Benjamin Percy is joined by acclaimed illustrator Juan Ferreyra in Green Arrow Vol. 7! Collects Green Arrow #43-47 and Annual #2

Green Arrow Vol. 7 Details

TitleGreen Arrow Vol. 7
Author
ReleaseJul 23rd, 2019
PublisherDC Comics
ISBN-139781401285234
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Superheroes, Dc Comics, Graphic Novels

Green Arrow Vol. 7 Review

  • Wing Kee
    January 1, 1970
    Wow, these two stories were very...zzz and bad.World: The art is okay, it’s not Otto Smidt but it does a servicable job. The world building here following the end of Percy’s run is in flux. One these couple of issues are from writers who are not the new team and one is a tie in to No Justice to the world building is small and contained. That being said, I don’t like books when they go to the Middle East or any other now Western country for that matter and the Western hero tries to save it, the w Wow, these two stories were very...zzz and bad.World: The art is okay, it’s not Otto Smidt but it does a servicable job. The world building here following the end of Percy’s run is in flux. One these couple of issues are from writers who are not the new team and one is a tie in to No Justice to the world building is small and contained. That being said, I don’t like books when they go to the Middle East or any other now Western country for that matter and the Western hero tries to save it, the world is choked with cliches and stereotypes and swinging the other way to be overly simplistic. I find it rather a large issue but it’s not only found here, I had the same issue with Waid and his first Champions arc. The world building needs to make sense. The world building needs to be realisitic especially when dealing with other cultures. Problems.Story: The two stories found here by two separate are rather problematic. I know the Green Arrow is a SJW and that’s something I really enjoyed in Percy’s run, but there was a small thin line of dealing with issues domestically before going and talking about problems other cultures has. I know that Ollie is trying to save and help the people in the first two issues because Deathstrokes muck things up but the white savior issue in the first two issues is a problem. Add to that the half baked world building and stereotypes that make the world is an issue. Then there is the cliched discussion of the prison system and it’s a retread once again. I know these are issues that are important but this is not how to write them. The last time I read a good superhero going overseas was G. Willow Wilson with Ms. Marvel in Pakistan, it was balanced, fair and the culture wasn’t tried to made white for readers to understand, sometimes other cultures are just simply different and every aspect of it is different and that’s a great thing. I don’t want to talk anymore about it, I kinda found the first story pretty terrible and I don’t want to talk about it now. Well meaning and should are different things. Characters: Ollie is Ollie and he is consistent to his writing since Rebirth, him arriving in another nation is very him but it’s not the best thing for the story or him as a character. I think that the writer doesn’t understand that other cultures have other ideals and bringing western superhero and ethics into the matter is a delicate balance and Ollie didn’t learn anything or do anything that was well done in this story. Then there are the list of other ho hum characters found in this book tied to the world. The prison story was also rather bland and the characters derivative. This was a terrible story. Onward to the next book!*read individual issues*
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  • Roy
    January 1, 1970
    I read these as single issues. Woah what happened here. The arc/story was very boring and not that exciting. The artist changed as well and that was one of the drawing cards. Very dissapointed here.
  • Kyle Dinges
    January 1, 1970
    This series has been in a gradual decline since it started and it's hard not to view this as a new low. It's an annual and a few two parters, so there's not one cohesive creative team or story throughout. The first two-part story is a very bad "Ollie takes on the Middle East" story that just didn't have the impact that was intended. The second two-parter is more just a generic super hero story, but it's still just filler. If there is a highlight, it's the annual, but only because it's not active This series has been in a gradual decline since it started and it's hard not to view this as a new low. It's an annual and a few two parters, so there's not one cohesive creative team or story throughout. The first two-part story is a very bad "Ollie takes on the Middle East" story that just didn't have the impact that was intended. The second two-parter is more just a generic super hero story, but it's still just filler. If there is a highlight, it's the annual, but only because it's not actively bad. It looks like the creative team from the annual are taking over starting with the next arc, so I guess we can hope for some average stories at least. Even if you've been keeping up with Green Arrow, it's not really necessary to read this since it's not going to have any far reaching developments. Skip it, it's both bad and boring.
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  • Kat
    January 1, 1970
    Basic plot: Two shorts focusing on G.A. facing some serious ethical issues.I love how G.A. is fully aware of his own politics and the contradictions between his beliefs and practices. There are some really wonderful moments where he specifically addresses these issues in these arcs. Both stories were very solid, with art that was solid and interesting, and some very snappy dialogue to boot. A very good volume.
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