Eternity Girl
Caroline Sharp has been a lot of things, including both a superhero and a super-spy. But when Caroline finds herself unfulfilled and depressed, she is given a choice to end her eternal life; she just has to destroy the rest of the world first. Eternity Girl is a brand-new DC's Young Animal miniseries spinning out of the Milk Wars event, written by GLAAD Media Award-nominated writer Magdalene Visaggio (Kim and Kim) and illustrated by Eisner-winning artist Sonny Liew (The Art of Charlie Chan Hock Chye).But now, with those days behind her and her powers proving unreliable, Caroline finds herself stuck in a life weighed down by her depression and an inability to change. You see, Caroline is going to live forever, and there is no escape to be had. The very act of living reminds her that to the rest of existence, she is an anomaly. All of that could change, however, when her old foe, Madame Atom, comes to her with an intriguing offer. Madame Atom can give Caroline the power to end her life; she just has to destroy the rest of the world.From writer Magdalene Visaggio and artist Sonny Liew comes the all-new series Eternity Girl. Collects issues #1-6 of the hit limited series.

Eternity Girl Details

TitleEternity Girl
Author
ReleaseDec 4th, 2018
PublisherDC Comics
ISBN-139781401285203
Rating
GenreSequential Art, Comics, Graphic Novels, Graphic Novels Comics, Superheroes

Eternity Girl Review

  • Artemy
    January 1, 1970
    Much like the rest of DC's Young Animal line of books, Eternity Girl is a cheap knockoff of Grant Morrison's and other prime 90's Vertigo books. While it doesn't directly use any existing characters, this book touches on the same philosophical and existential themes as, say, Morrison's Flex Mentallo, or Milligan's Enigma, or even Gaiman's Sandman. Unfortunately, Eternity Girl is nowhere near as good or smart as those books, and doesn't have anything new or interesting to say about life, choice, Much like the rest of DC's Young Animal line of books, Eternity Girl is a cheap knockoff of Grant Morrison's and other prime 90's Vertigo books. While it doesn't directly use any existing characters, this book touches on the same philosophical and existential themes as, say, Morrison's Flex Mentallo, or Milligan's Enigma, or even Gaiman's Sandman. Unfortunately, Eternity Girl is nowhere near as good or smart as those books, and doesn't have anything new or interesting to say about life, choice, existence, the universe or even just superhero comics. If I were 14 again and have read this book, I would have probably thought that this is the hottest shit ever. Reading it as a 26 year old who went through numerous nervous breakdowns, existential crises, bouts of depression and other mental episodes, Eternity Girl was just a really dull and tiring read with an almost indecipherable story with a message you could just as well get from a random "inspiring" quote or a sitcom episode. That Sonny Liew artwork was stunningly gorgeous, though.
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  • Alex Sarll
    January 1, 1970
    Remember the Element Girl issue of Sandman? Never met anyone who said it was their favourite, but it's quite good. Well, if you wanted the serial numbers filed off and that turned into a miniseries, you're in luck. It also has meta elements familiar from Alan Moore's Supreme and much of Grant Morrison's superhero work, with characters becoming aware in-universe that their continuity is constantly being revised around them, but that loses much of its power when you apply it to a newly created cha Remember the Element Girl issue of Sandman? Never met anyone who said it was their favourite, but it's quite good. Well, if you wanted the serial numbers filed off and that turned into a miniseries, you're in luck. It also has meta elements familiar from Alan Moore's Supreme and much of Grant Morrison's superhero work, with characters becoming aware in-universe that their continuity is constantly being revised around them, but that loses much of its power when you apply it to a newly created character for whom it's not mirrored by their publication history in our world. And yeah, it's always nice to see Sonny Liew art, but I associate his stuff with good times, so giving it this greyed-out palette and applying it to a tale of a superhero who's having a breakdown but can't even kill themselves...well, it's not the project I would have chosen. Especially when she then decides that, since it appears to be the only way she can check out, she's absolutely fine with destroying the entire universe and the potential of any other universe ever happening again. I mean, I find the whole book group vogue for sympathetic protagonists somewhat trying, but there are limits, y'know? Things do perk up halfway through, when issue 4 takes us through iteration after iteration of the protagonist's struggle, each rendered in an excellent pastiche of a particular classic comic - though part of the impact for me might have been seeing WicDiv used as a touchstone comparable to the likes of Peanuts, which, well, let's not get into my whole thing about the concluding moment of DC One Million, but that. And thereafter it at least feels like a more lively Morrison pastiche - the penultimate issue's investigation of what makes a weapon recalled the first issue of Final Crisis - but I had come to expect a little more than that from a Young Animal book. Launching out of the largely underwhelming crossover Milk Wars, a second sad sign that Gerard Way's imprint wasn't bulletproof after all. And indeed, the last new project to come out of the imprint before its indefinite hiatus was announced.
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  • Larakaa
    January 1, 1970
    4.5 starsVisually and narratively stunning! Can’t say much without getting into spoilery details. But Visaggio and Liew really outdo themselves here! Only one thing missing: The book should have a trigger warning/content note at the beginning "suicide, self harm".
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  • Andrew
    January 1, 1970
    This book is frontloaded with some very Grant Morrison-like commentary on the endless cycle of reboots, retcons, and resurrections in superhero comics and how that, like, totally connects to spiritual concepts of reincarnation and eternity. Once you get past that, it turns into a more interesting (and seemingly personal) story about depression, chronic pain, and unemployment. The script still gets kinda ponderous at times, especially when the Jim Starlin-like "Lords of Chaos and Order" show up t This book is frontloaded with some very Grant Morrison-like commentary on the endless cycle of reboots, retcons, and resurrections in superhero comics and how that, like, totally connects to spiritual concepts of reincarnation and eternity. Once you get past that, it turns into a more interesting (and seemingly personal) story about depression, chronic pain, and unemployment. The script still gets kinda ponderous at times, especially when the Jim Starlin-like "Lords of Chaos and Order" show up to pontificate on the nature of the universe. But Sonny Liew's artwork is consistently impressive and occasionally transporting. Liew does an excellent job of combining big psychedelic spectacle with a more subtle cartooning technique that draws you in to the protagonist's pain and depression.
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  • Simon
    January 1, 1970
    What if Flex Mentallo and Enigma... but bad?
  • Felipe Assis
    January 1, 1970
    Blé... I think that I already ready a lot of stories that looks like the same, kinda generical for me.
  • Yining Ma
    January 1, 1970
    It showed potential in the middle but in the end it's disappointing. Another rushed ending and the story got wrapped up with a fat chunk of words explaining. If I want to read another chunk of philosophical words trying to show the alternate to depression I'd read a book. I read a comic because I want to be shown a story. Plus stop trying to show us depression can be magically killed by some magic word. You give a speech and boom everything's good. It doesn't work like that.The idea of the story It showed potential in the middle but in the end it's disappointing. Another rushed ending and the story got wrapped up with a fat chunk of words explaining. If I want to read another chunk of philosophical words trying to show the alternate to depression I'd read a book. I read a comic because I want to be shown a story. Plus stop trying to show us depression can be magically killed by some magic word. You give a speech and boom everything's good. It doesn't work like that.The idea of the story is very similar to Façade. It developed into something that could be great. But sadly it didn't live up to it.
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  • Geoffrey Payne
    January 1, 1970
    I picked up the first issue of this miniseries when it was a “pick of the week” at my LCS and I thought the cover looked interesting. After I read it I was hooked and added it to my pull list. Now that all the issues have come out it ended up being a pretty great series overall. I really love how Caroline/Eternity Girl was characterized and how the book worked through her dilemma of never being able to die. I did find the story a little hard to follow at times reading it month-to-month but I dou I picked up the first issue of this miniseries when it was a “pick of the week” at my LCS and I thought the cover looked interesting. After I read it I was hooked and added it to my pull list. Now that all the issues have come out it ended up being a pretty great series overall. I really love how Caroline/Eternity Girl was characterized and how the book worked through her dilemma of never being able to die. I did find the story a little hard to follow at times reading it month-to-month but I doubt that would be a problem if I reread the issues together as they are collected in this trade. Even if the writing wasn’t good (it really is great though) the artwork alone is worth the cost of the book. Such vibrant colors and interesting paneling pair perfectly with the fun and interesting character designs.I think what really makes this a fantastic book is how it blends the very fantastical/strange elements with the real world problems of depression and mental illness. I feel that too often comics have characters that have pretty severe mental illness and we don’t really get to see them work through that (especially not in a positive way). This book is quite blatantly about that and I think it really grounds the story in a way that is both realistic but still very interesting.Definitely do yourself a favor and don’t miss out on this one. 4.25 stars!
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  • Hannah Givens
    January 1, 1970
    Shade the Changing Girl is my favorite of the Young Animal books. Eternity Girl is very similar, the same kind of surrealist thoughts and meditations, but further dislodged from traditional storytelling. I loved the way the scenes were kind of deconstructed, with dialogue from the "real" world blending into dialogue from the past and future and the "behind-the-scenes" world. That kind of thing is usually really confusing, but here it worked, because there's a very limited cast of characters and Shade the Changing Girl is my favorite of the Young Animal books. Eternity Girl is very similar, the same kind of surrealist thoughts and meditations, but further dislodged from traditional storytelling. I loved the way the scenes were kind of deconstructed, with dialogue from the "real" world blending into dialogue from the past and future and the "behind-the-scenes" world. That kind of thing is usually really confusing, but here it worked, because there's a very limited cast of characters and only one theme. The commentary on characters being reused and reimagined until they mean nothing also works well, just pointed enough, although it would've worked better with a preexisting character who really had gone through all those versions. It settled in better over the course of the book, as some of her other versions are shown on the page. CN: The whole book is about suicide and suicidal ideation.
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  • Norman Cook
    January 1, 1970
    This book takes some effort to get into, but it's well worth it. This is an inspirational story of a young woman dealing with depression and attempted suicide. What I ultimately liked about the book was how Visaggio and Liew conveyed shifting realities. It reminded me, in a very good way, of how Philip K. Dick wrote about the nature of reality and how perception influences our thoughts and behaviors. I think this is a book that young adults will find very compelling. Liew's artwork is clean and This book takes some effort to get into, but it's well worth it. This is an inspirational story of a young woman dealing with depression and attempted suicide. What I ultimately liked about the book was how Visaggio and Liew conveyed shifting realities. It reminded me, in a very good way, of how Philip K. Dick wrote about the nature of reality and how perception influences our thoughts and behaviors. I think this is a book that young adults will find very compelling. Liew's artwork is clean and modern. Chris Chuckry's coloring tends towards pastels, and enhances Liew's line work.
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  • Tim
    January 1, 1970
    One of the best miniseries I've read in a long time, Eternity Girl is a thought provoking examination of identity, depression, and suicide told through the lens of a superhero comic. Sonny Liew's art is incredibly detailed and layered with creative layouts and paneling, it truly brings Visaggio's story to life. If you enjoy the works of Grant Morrison and Jack Kirby this is an absolute can't miss.
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  • Timothy
    January 1, 1970
    The beginning of this is fantastic. The first issue was one of my favorites in a long time. And then the subsequent issues just became progressively less interesting as they tread water until the (pretty underwhelming) finale. There are some quality emotional moments that I will think about for some time, but I honestly feel this should have been a lot shorter (when this is already quite short, yikes) and more focused.
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  • Vince
    January 1, 1970
    A trippy story of a woman with great powers and immortality... yet so lonely she feels death is her only choice. Some of it's a little muddy, but it's a really fun read, the idea of living so many lives and being known for so much and yet feeling pointless and exhausted with life is SUPER relatable. Magdalene Visaggio is an incredible writer, I can't get enough of her comics and I hope this isn't the last thing she writes for DC/Young Animal.
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  • Anna Heidick
    January 1, 1970
    I enjoyed the main character premise and the story concept (view spoiler)[of the futility of the repetitive cycle of rebirth and entropy, and the issues that may arise with a super powered near goddess level entity that struggles with depression. (hide spoiler)] All in all the story was decent enough and the art was well done.
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  • Matt
    January 1, 1970
    I don’t think I’ve read a graphic novel published by DC or Marvel that was better than this. This is a creepy, sad, beautiful story, and a deep meditation on identity and the sense of self.Magdalene Visaggio is quickly becoming one of my favorite voices in comics.
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  • Kenny
    January 1, 1970
    Could this be the best book of the year?Visaggio and Liew has pulled of a masterpiece using the background of superheroes to solve the existentialism of the human condition through a hero that cannot die
  • Brian
    January 1, 1970
    At first I was turned off by the art, but I became engrossed in the story, especially for the quantum mechanics angle. After that, I saw how the art complemented the story.
  • Laurie
    January 1, 1970
    Intriguing beginning!
  • John
    January 1, 1970
    Ennui Girl.
  • J.R.
    January 1, 1970
    It meant well. And it had some really good parts, but the ending was rushed and some of the philosophy was a little skewed.
  • Dan
    January 1, 1970
    Sort of slow and boring, honestly...
  • Hanneleele
    January 1, 1970
    Superkangelaste vormi valatud eksistentsiaalsed küsimused.
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