Color Design Workbook
Designers know that color is an extremely vital part of any design project and not a subject to be taken lightly. For better or for worse, it affects moods and elicits reactions.Color Design Workbook invites readers to explore color through the language of professionals. As part of the Workbook series, this book aims to present readers with the fundamentals of graphic design. It supplies tips regarding how to talk to clients about color and using color in presentations. Background information on color such as certain cultural meanings is also included. Color Design Workbook breaks down color theory into straightforward terms, eliminating unintelligible jargon and showcases the work of top designers and the brilliant and inspiring use of color in their design work.

Color Design Workbook Details

TitleColor Design Workbook
Author
FormatHardcover
LanguageEnglish
ReleaseJan 1st, 2006
PublisherRockport Publishers
ISBN159253192X
ISBN-139781592531929
Number of pages240 pages
Rating
GenreDesign, Art, Nonfiction

Color Design Workbook Review

  • Adam Wiggins
    December 23, 2011
    A reasonably good introduction to using color in graphic design for print media, and to a lesser degree computer displays and architecture.Some notable topics and points:- RGB (additive primary colors) as used on light-emiting devices like TVs and computer monitors, vs CMY (subtractive primary colors) as used on light-absorbing media like magazines and books- Hue (position on the color wheel); saturation (intensity or dullness of the color); and brightness (mix with white to form tints, mix with A reasonably good introduction to using color in graphic design for print media, and to a lesser degree computer displays and architecture.Some notable topics and points:- RGB (additive primary colors) as used on light-emiting devices like TVs and computer monitors, vs CMY (subtractive primary colors) as used on light-absorbing media like magazines and books- Hue (position on the color wheel); saturation (intensity or dullness of the color); and brightness (mix with white to form tints, mix with black to form shades)- Color theory can be used to find harmonious combinations of colors. Combinations that balance each other out add up to gray (neutral) in the brain, which "feels right"- Color relationships: - Complementary: a pair directly opposite on the color wheel - Split complementary: a primary color with two others on the opposite side of the while, spaced evenly from the complement - Double complementary: two pairs of complementary colors - Analagous: a group of colors spaced equally on the color wheel close to each other - Triadic: Any three colors spaced evenly around the wheel - Monochromatic: Tints and shades of a single color- A good color palette is typically two or three colors, and rarely more than four.- Monochromatic color schemes use variations in tints and shades of a single hue -- elegant, but lacks contrast and possibly impact.- "Color is always seen in context." A color looks completely different against a black background vs a white background, for example.- Real/expected hue is called a "local color." Unexpected/abnormal hue is called an "occult color." For example, a picture of a blue apple is would be an occult representation.- "Warm colors are often associated with strong emotion and heat, while cool colors are linked to calmness and the refreshing chill of the sky and sea."- We mentally distinguish "figure" from "ground" in any image, even an abstract one. A small green circle in the middle of a red field would be assumed to be the figure, and the red the ground.- "Closure, or visual grounding, is the tendency humans have to complete or unify incomplete patterns and information by bringing together the elements in their mind. Visual closure occurs when isolated elements are identified and recognized, even though a piece is missing or incomplete." For example, halftone dots in a four-color printing process (e.g. color newspapers).- Color preferences can change with social environments. For example, in the 80s environmental awareness made nonbleached hues like beige and off-white more popular in clothing, packaging, and furniture. In the 90s, designer coffee caused coffee browns to appear in every area of design.- The number of variations within a single color is nearly infinite. For example, blacks (anthracite, carbon, ebony, jet, licorice, obsidian, onyx) or grays (ash, chrome, mist, nickel, pewter, silver, slate, smoke, steel, stone).The final chapter of the book is longish and essentially a bunch of PR for various design firms, but the images are worth flipping through.
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  • Bernadette
    October 10, 2008
    Visually beautiful. Those of us who love color and design now the thrill of getting new pantone chips...this book is that thrill all wrapped up in one beautiful package. Beautiful palettes and plenty of useful design concepts.
  • Anna Richland
    September 20, 2013
    The color wheel as a star design on p. 17 is something my children can replicate -- more interesting the usual circular color wheel. There's also a 12-step color wheel on p. 20 and a complex analysis of color harmony that older students or adults would use, but I think it's too difficult for my 8 & 10 yr old children (at least with the art deficit they're currently laboring under!) This book also has an excellent glossary, which saved me having to flip pages to find definitions of shade, tin The color wheel as a star design on p. 17 is something my children can replicate -- more interesting the usual circular color wheel. There's also a 12-step color wheel on p. 20 and a complex analysis of color harmony that older students or adults would use, but I think it's too difficult for my 8 & 10 yr old children (at least with the art deficit they're currently laboring under!) This book also has an excellent glossary, which saved me having to flip pages to find definitions of shade, tint, hue, etc to put in my curriculum.In general, it's a very interesting review of color in graphic design, rather than in “art” like so many other books on color. Worth flipping through to get children thinking about color in billboards and ads, although most children won't recognize many of the things featured (many from Europe, or brochure covers for reports, etc). The Ten Rules of Color on p 33 look like an excellent discussion tool to use with my children, and I like the flags on p. 35. PLEASE NOTE: f-profanity in a poster on p. 34, if you're going to look at the flags page with kids.
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  • Serge Pierro
    November 4, 2014
    An excellent resource on color theory and its use within graphic design. For beginners, it covers basic theory, and for more advanced practitioners, it presents enough material to inspire and embellish their established knowledge. One of the highlights of the book, would be the back section in which real products have their palettes broken down and analyzed. Recommended!
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  • R.Friend
    June 20, 2008
    Another good addition to the "Workbook" series, and includes decent examples and case studies from Adams Morioka. Gives a bit more exposure to packaging design than I'd prefer, but overall, a book I'm happy to have.
  • Galea Marius
    October 28, 2016
    Learn how colors work,how it's feel and when to apply specific color in projects
  • Rachel Meyer
    January 19, 2017
    I'll admit, I didn't read this book in-depth. I kind of skimmed it. It goes deep into color and using it, more than I know or understand. It wasn't a bad book, it's just not a book for a beginner.
  • Silviu Comarita
    March 5, 2013
    Not bad, but I was expecting more. Quite basic, as much as theory goes. You might find a nugget of wisdom here and there, and the case studies are interesting.
  • Maria
    February 5, 2013
    Very good introduction to color and how to use it. It comes with some studio cases that results very helpful.
  • Jaye
    October 2, 2009
    This book looks lame but is actually awesome. Don't judge a design book by its cover?
  • Nicoleta
    August 2, 2016
    Great guide to colour in graphic design with many real-world examples of how different designers applied colour to enhance their designs.
  • Hellofutureboss
    May 6, 2010
    Good book on color design. A bit pricy for the content, but still a good workbook.
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